THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS Alston Family History

Descendants of John Alston of Newton by Sudbury Suffolk


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897. Lucy MANN [2917] (Sir Horatio (Horace) MANN 2nd Bart.771, Galfridus MANN Of Egerton Kent602, Robert MANN of Linton KEN416, Elizabeth ALSTON229, William of Woodbridge88, William of Siam Hall42, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1).

Lucy married James MANN Esq [2918] in 1786.

General Notes:
James lived at Edgerton Lodge Lenham.

898. Emily MANN [2919] (Sir Horatio (Horace) MANN 2nd Bart.771, Galfridus MANN Of Egerton Kent602, Robert MANN of Linton KEN416, Elizabeth ALSTON229, William of Woodbridge88, William of Siam Hall42, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1).

Emily married Sir Robert HERON Bart. [2920] in 1792.

899. Harriet MANN [2921] (Sir Horatio (Horace) MANN 2nd Bart.771, Galfridus MANN Of Egerton Kent602, Robert MANN of Linton KEN416, Elizabeth ALSTON229, William of Woodbridge88, William of Siam Hall42, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1).

Harriet married Col. ROCHFORD Of Ireland [2922] on 29 Jul 1801.

900. James CORNWALLIS 5th Earl Cornwallis [2928] (Catherine MANN774, Galfridus MANN Of Egerton Kent602, Robert MANN of Linton KEN416, Elizabeth ALSTON229, William of Woodbridge88, William of Siam Hall42, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 20 Sep 1778 and died on 21 May 1852 at age 73.

General Notes:
Upon James death the honours of the Cornwallis family became extinct.

James married Maria Isabella DICKENS [2929], daughter of Francis DICKENS Esq. [2930] and Unknown, in 1804. Maria died in 1823.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1107 M    i. Charles James CORNWALLIS Viscount Brone [2931] died on 27 Dec 1835.

+ 1108 F    ii. Jemima Isabella CORNWALLIS [2932] died on 17 Dec 1836.

James next married Laura HAYES [2934], daughter of William HAYES Esq [2935] and Unknown, in 1829. Laura died in 1846.

General Notes:
Laura died s.p.

James next married Julia BACON [2936], daughter of Thomas BACON Esq Of Redland. [2937] and Unknown, in 1840. Julia died in 1847.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1109 F    i. Julia CORNWALLIS [2938] .

901. Thomas ALSTON [4040] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1779.

General Notes:
Thomas died s.p.

902. Justinian ALSTON [4041] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1780 and died on 11 Jan 1848 in Winterbach Germany at age 68.

General Notes:
ALSTON Justinian, s. Thomas, of Wotton, Beds., arm. Brasenose, matric. 11 Dec 1798, aged 18; B.A. 1802.
Oxoniensis 1715-1886. NZSOG.

1798 Alston Justinian (Beds) Com. b. c. arm., matric 11 Dec 1798 aged 18 BA 16 Jun 1802. Name removed 23 Jan 1807.
(b = entered in buttery book. c = paid caution money)
Brasenose College Register 1509-1909 NZSOG

Justinian swears he is vested in lands in Bedfordshire to enable him to qualify for appointment as a Justice of the Peace.
Bedford RO QSR/23/1817/444

1825 Justinian was an overseer for Pavenham.

In 1827 Justinian offered a reward for information concerning the theft of some eels from a fish trunk in the river below Odell Rectory
Ref Bedfordshire Magazine Vol 2 Pg 145 Bed RO.

Beds. 1848 Jany. 11th aet. 97 Justinian Alston of Odell Castle.

Justinian married Mary KER [4052], daughter of Gen. John-Manners KER [4053] and Isabella ERRINGTON [4054], on 20 Jun 1816. Mary died in 1845.

General Notes:
Gent’s. Mag. 1845, May - At Winterbach Germany Mary wife of Justinian Alston Esq. of Ode11 Castle Beds. and dau. of late Gen. Kerr of Northampton.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1110 M    i. Justinian ALSTON [4055] was born on 21 Jul 1818 and died before 1850.

+ 1111 F    ii. Isabella ALSTON [4081] .

+ 1112 F    iii. Mary ALSTON [4083] .

+ 1113 M    iv. Crewe ALSTON [4058] was born on 28 Jul 1828 in Odell Rectory, was baptised on 4 Aug 1828 in Odell BDF, died on 11 Aug 1901 at age 73, and was buried on 14 Aug 1901 in Odell BDF.


903. Rowland ALSTON of Pishobury HRT [4042] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Jun 1782 in BED and died on 21 Nov 1865 at age 83.

General Notes:
Rowland was an Ensign in the 3rd Regiment of Guards, serving with distinction under Lord Cathcart at Copenhagen 1807. He was M P and Deputy Lieut for Herts., Deputy Grand Master for Essex. A portrait of Rowland was in the possession of his son Sir Francis B Alston 1899.

Officers of the Militia 1805 - Gentlemen & Yeomanry Calvalry
War Office 14 October 1805.
Bedford & Odell.
Cornet Rowland Alston 14 Jul 1803.

County Election Returns.
Hertfordshire: Lord Grimstone, Mr A Smith, and Mr R Alston relected without opposition.
Ipswich Journal 5 Aug., 1835.

There is a brass plaque on the South Wall of the Church of Great St Mary Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire which reads:
In loving memory of Rowland Alston Esq. of Pishiobury Herts. Served as Ensign in H.M. 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards in expedition to Copenhagen 1807. M.P. for this County 1835. Deputy Lieutenant for Herts, Essex, Bedfordshire and Justice of the Peace for Herts. and Essex. Chairman of Quarter Sessions and in Masonry, Provincial Grand Master for Essex. b. 7 June 1782 d. 21 Nov 1865.
Also of Rose, his wife, eldest daughter of Jeremiah Milles of Pishiobury. A loving mother and true friend she lived her life as in God's sight for the happiness and welfare of her family and the people of this place.
b. May 24 1782 d. 19 Feb 1824.
Erected by their two surviving children Francis Beilby Alston K.C.M.G. and Caroline Hesketh Case.
Ref. Anne Alston suggests Rowland and Rose may be buried at Gt St Mary, but has no evidence (2005)

Chelmsford PRO D/DGe/253 Lease by Roland and wife Rose & others of a Messuage, brick house, and lower farm house comprising 123 acres in West Hanningfield.

1833 Rowland Alston and Mrs Milles are recorded as resident at 48 Harley St London.
Ref London Royal Blue Book 1833

Report of Rowland Alston conveying an apology on behalf of a Capt Townshend for an insult to Sir Robert Peel.
Ipswich Journal 23 Sept. 1837

The Times 14th May 1841.
House Commons resumed debate on sugar duties 13 May 1841.
Mr. R. ALSTON said, that approving, as in general he did, of the principles and policy of her Majesty's Government, he had, as was well known, given to them his invariable and zealous support, and he entertained a sanguine hope that in the measure which they meant to propound on the present debate would prove a remedy for existing evils, a remedy which would materially benefit not only the financial and commercial interest of this country, but also the population, by enabling them to purchase the common necessities of life at less exorbitant prices than at present. The agricultural and commercial interests of this country were inseparable, and he knew from experience that when the price of bread was lowest, the people had always suffered the greatest distress, and if any alteration of the existing corn laws was proposed, he should give it his most strenuous opposition. (Cheers from the Opposition benches.) No person could abominate slavery more than he (Mr. Alston) did; but he could not understand how the question of the sugar duties could by any contrivance or ingenuity be brought to bear upon the question of slavery.
The question before the house was a motion for the house resolving itself into a committee on the sugar duties, and on this the noble Lord the member for Liverpool had moved an amendment to the effect, that the proposed scheme of that Government was an encouragement of slavery. Now, in that he could not agree, and he was fortified by a letter he had that day received from the Hitchen Anti Slavery Association, conveying to him the resolutions passed by that body, to the effect, that they did not think it advisable to oppose the Government measure which had been brought forward in a spirit of the liberal and enlightened legislation. This was signed by ten gentlemen, four of them members of the Society of Friends and delegates from the Anti -Slavery Society of London, and had always been the firmest advocates of the abolition of slavery. This justified him in voting as he should in favour of going into committee on the sugar duties, being satisfied that by doing so he would not be giving any encouragement to slavery, but that he was discharging his duty to his country by enabling the people to purchase at a cheaper rate one of the most essential necessaries of life - sugar. He was himself interested in a small property in the island of Jamaica. and he was satisfied by voting for the Government proposition he should do no injustice to himself nor to those who were concerned in the West Indian colonies. The country was indebted to her Majesty's Ministers for the straightforward and bold manner in which they had come forward and, though he should decidedly oppose any alteration of the corn laws, he should give a his hearty support to the proposition now before the House (Hear, hear.)

Norwich. The Church.
On the 12th day of June last, the Rev Henry Thomas Lee was instituted to the vicarage of Helhoughton with Rainham St Martin annexed, in the County of Norfolk, on the presentation of Rowland Alston and John Hillyard, Esq., nominated by Lord Charles Townsend.
Ipswich Journal 8 August 1846

RICHARD STIFF, CHARLES LUCY, theft : simple grand larceny, 28th June, 1820.
The Proceedings of the Old Bailey Ref: t18200628-118
Trial Summary:
Crime(s): theft : simple grand larceny
Verdict: Not Guilty
Name search for: RICHARD STIFF
Crime Location: Harley-street
Original Text:
839. RICHARD STIFF and CHARLES LUCY were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March, 200 lbs. of hay, value 10 s. , the goods of Rowland Alston , Esq.
MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.
ROWLAND ALSTON , ESQ. I reside in Harley-street, and have a coach-house and stable there. Stiff was my coachman. The witness, Foort, had been six or seven weeks in my service - Stiff hired him, and caused him to be discharged. Foort charged Stiff with stealing hay. I said then I was satisfied it was not true, and was ready to give him every assistance to punish the boy for so false a charge. About two days after Stiff took a warrant out against him.
Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. The charge for stealing hay was made by Foort, after Stiff took him before a Magistrate for an assault - A. No: he informed me of it two days before.
DANIEL FOORT . I was stable-boy in Mr. Alston's service. The first week I went into his service, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw a cart drawn up to the loft-door, and hay pushed into it - I did not see Lucy with the cart then, but have seen him three times with it before, at the same place. Stiff put three or four trusses of hay into it, apparently - nobody but him had an opportunity of doing it - the loft communicates with his bedroom. When the cart drove away, some hay was scattered over the ground, and Stiff swept it up to the dunghill.
Cross-examined. Q. Where did you come from before you lived with Mr. Alston - A. I came from Ruslip parish, but had only been in town a short time. I told Mr. Alston I had lately come from the country.
Q. When you heard you was to be discharged, did you not use violent language to Stiff - A. No: I only d - d him, and said I would talk to his master, and then I should be sure to do him. I made no charge against him before, because I thought he had got me the place.
EDWARD FOORT . I am uncle to the last witness, and in the service of Mr. Ricardo, whose stable-door is exactly opposite Mr. Alston's. I have seen a cart there once, or twice, early in the morning - hay was put into it, and it was trod down - the cart was filled. Stiff pushed it out of the loft into the cart, - it was rubbishing, loose hay, not trussed.
WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. On the 25th of May I apprehended the prisoners. Stiff said he had given some hay to Lucy, but it was the sweepings of the loft and he received nothing for it.
ANDREW LANE . In March last I supplied the prosecutor with hay, it was good hay and all fit for use.
NOT GUILTY .
Ref www.oldbaileyonline.org

Hertford Museum:
Archive collection of the Hertford Museum Trust
Catalogue Ref. HETFM
Creator(s):
Hertford Museum
Posters and other ephemera associated with elections in the Hertford area - ref. HETFM/Elections/
FILE - Parliamentary election poster mentioning Rowland Alston - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.114 - date: 1826
FILE - Parliamentary election poster defending Rowland Alston against Currie - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.180 - date: 1831
FILE - Poster announcing Alston retiring - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.193 - date: 1831
FILE - Parliamentary election posters for the 1831 election featuring the Reform Bill and the Candidates, Duncombe, Currie, Alston and Ingestre - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.209-17 - date: 1831
FILE - Parliamentary election poster, Alston denying he is enemy of agricultural interest - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.247 - date: 1832
FILE - Poster signed An Elector of Herts, casting doubts on suitability of Alston as candidate and accusing him of owning slaves - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.256 - date: 1832
FILE - Poster, Alston offering himself as candidate - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.267 - date: 1832
FILE - Poster, Alston defeated - ref. HETFM/Elections/4434.270 - date: 1832
FILE - Poster, Alston offering himself as candidate as County member - ref. HETFM/Elections/4435.216 - date: 1832
Poster and Notices associated with Hertford and its area - ref. HETFM/Posters
FILE - Notice of resignation of Mr Alston as Trustee and Manager of Savings Bank - ref. HETFM/Posters/6244.11 - date: 1849

Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies:
Manorial records, title deeds and family papers of the Abel Smith family of the Woodhall Park Estate, Hertfordshire, 1139 - 1917
Catalogue Ref. DE/AS 1-4898
Creator(s):
Abel Smith family of Woodhall Park Estate, Watton-at-Stone, Hertfordshire
TITLE DEEDS AND MANORIAL RECORDS
WATTON-AT-STONE
Dixon's Wood
FILE - Lease and Release in fee; and assignment of a term of 1,000 years - ref. DE/AS/3415-6 - date: 5 and 6 Sept 1834
[from Scope and Content] Mary Head of Burnham Green and Joseph Frogley of Hoddesdon, gardener (1); John Blindell (2); John and Sarah Blindell and John Blindell (3); John Cass (4); William Hale, John H Waddington and John Proctor (5); Rowland Alston (6);
Clay Hill
FILE - Assignment of terms in trust - ref. DE/AS/3448 - date: 19 March 1839
[from Scope and Content] Rowland Alston and George Proctor junior, esquires, to Samuel George Smith and John Smith.

Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies:
Miscellaneous Family Letters and other papers, 1796 - 1930
Catalogue Ref. DE/Z5
CORRESPONDENCE
Covers only
FILE - ALSTON Rowland to Mrs Fisher, Buxton, Derbys - ref. DE/Z5/C89 - date: 11 Aug 1836
Ref A2A

Essex Record Office
Level: Category Miscellaneous
Level: Fonds DEEDS OF ESTATES OF ROYAL WANSTEAD SCHOOL
Level: Series Deeds of property in Little Hallingbury and Sheening and Sawbridgeworth and Pishobiury, Hertfordshire

Level: Item
Reference Code D/DU 752/134
Dates of Creation 6 November 1832
Scope and Content Adm. of Eliza Thompson [nee Whitehead] by terms of the will of f. W. Whitehead Arable land (3r.) formerly Littletons, in Northfield, Sawbridgeworth, co. Herts, abutting W. upon lands formerly of John Gibson, afterwards of Sarah Jocelyn, and sometime since laid into freehold land (4a.) late of Henry Gladwin, Manor of Pishobury, Sawbridgeworth Recites: (a) Adm., 14 October 1805, of Ann Whitehead nee Gorrod; (b) Appointment, 1 November 1809, vesting property in William Whitehead, in pursuance of Release, 5 June 1806, between Ann Whitehead nee Gorrod, William Whitehead of Sawbridgeworth, farmer, Thomas Mott, Thomas Whitehead; (c) Will of William Whitehead, 12 November 1818

Lord: Ravland* Alston, esq. Steward: William Shergeon Sims.
*May be a spelling error


Essex Record Office
Level: Category Estate and Family records
Level: Fonds RECORDS OF A CHELMSFORD SOLICITOR
Reference Code D/DGe/253
Dates of Creation 1 June 1813.
Scope and Content Lease for 7 years; at annual rent of L200. Rowland Alston of Pishobury (co.Herts.). esq., & wife Rose (formerly Rose Milles), & Harriot & Sophia Milles of Harley Street (co. Midx.), spinsters, to Rich.Finch of West Hanningfield, yeoman. Messuages etc. called the Brick House & the Lower Farm House with 123a. land [no details] in West Hanningfield, with appurts. (except mines, minerals, quarries, timber etc.). (Sporting rights also reserved.) Various husbandry covenants.

Guildhall Library: Records of Sun Fire Office [MS 11936/477]
Records of Sun Fire Office
Catalogue Ref. SUN
Creator(s):
Sun Fire Office, 1710-1891
Exchange House Fire Office, 1708-1710
Sun Insurance Office Ltd, 1891-1959
Sun Alliance Group, 1959-1996
Royal and Sun Alliance, 1996-

[Access Conditions]
Records marked "access restricted" are subject to access conditions. Please enquire to Guildhall Library Manuscripts Section.

[Note]
For guidelines for how best to use the detailed index of policies for some of the London insurers policy registers (old series, MS 11936) on A2A please see The "Place in the Sun" project - using the online index of Sun Fire Office policy registers 1816 - 1824 at: www.history.ac.uk/gh/sun.htm <http://www.history.ac.uk/gh/sun.htm>


FILE - Policy register - ref. MS 11936/477 - date: 1818-1819
item: [no title] - ref. MS 11936/477/948493 - date: 4 January 1819
[from Scope and Content] Insured: Rowland Alston Pishobury Hertfordshire
Ref A2A

Research Notes:
Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Records Office:
FERRERS OF BADDESLEY CLINTON
Catalogue Ref. DR 3
Creator(s):
Ferrers family of Baddesley Clinton, Warwickshire
DOCUMENTS OF TITLE
PLACES OUTSIDE WARWICKSHIRE
FILE - RAINHAM in Norfolk, TAMWORTH, co. Stafford - ref. DR 3/561 - date: 3 July 1818
[from Scope and Content] Assignment from Charles Vere Ferrers Townshend, younger son and devisee of George [2nd.] marquess Townshend, with the consent of the creditors of the said Charles, listed in the attached schedule, to Rowland Alston of Harley Street, co. Middlesex esq., Henry Loftus of Wimpole Street, co. Middlesex a colonel in the King's army, John Robbins of Warwick Street, Golden Square, co. Middlesex auctioneer and Thomas Vandergucht of Craven Street, the Strand, co. Middlesex gent. reciting that whereas the said marquess by his will dated 19 July 1811 left to Lord John Townshend and Robert Blake esq. all his lands etc. in trust to pay his debts, maintain the mansion houses at Rainham in Norfolk and Tamworth, and to provide an annuity of L.4,000 for 21 years for the said Charles his younger son, and whereas the said Charles had incurred certain debts and claimed L.10,000 from the said trustees, and whereas books, plate and pictures due to the said Charles were valued at L.8,000, and whereas there was a debt of L.1,000 due to the said Charles from Daniel Henry Ferrall in Ireland and L.500 due to the said Charles from George Montgomery in France, and whereas the said Charles had received permission from the master in Chancery to take a lease of the said mansion house at Rainham and lands belonging to the same for the annual sum of L.630, the said Charles now assigned to the said Rowland, Henry, John and George the said annuity of L.4,000 and the said sums of L.8,000, L.1,000 and L.500 to hold the same in trust to pay the said Charles an annuity of L.1,500, the said books and pictures to be sold and the residue used to discharge the debts of the said Charles with interest at 5%. The said mansion house and lands to be assigned to the said trustees as surety for these debts and to be leased to the s aid Charles at the annual rent of L.650 to be deducted from the said annuity of L.1,500, the said mansion house and lands to be restored to the said Charles on the payment of the said debts.

FILE - RAINHAM in Norfolk, TAMWORTH, co. Stafford - ref. DR 3/562 - date: 21 August 1822
[from Scope and Content] Assignment by way of mortgage from Rowland Alston of Harley Street, co. Middlesex esq., Henry Loftus of Wimpole Street, co. Middlesex a colonel in the King's Army, John Robins late of Warwick Street, Golden Square, now of Regent Street, co. Middlesex auctioneer and Thomas George Vandergucht of Craven Street, Strand, co. Middlesex gent., at the direction and appointment of the Rt. Hon. Charles Vere Townshend, younger son and devisee of the will of the most Hon. George [2nd.] marquess of Townshend, deceased, to Francis Lawley of Grosvenor Square, co. Middlesex reciting 562., of the annuity of L.4,000 for 21 years left to the said Charles under the will of his father, to secure L.20,000. The said L.20,000 to be repaid in three lots ending on 20 August 1833 during which time the life of the said Charles was to be insured for L.5000 at four Life Insurance Companies, namely the Provident, Globe, Albion and Westminster, provision being made for the payment of these premiums and other expenses incurred.
[from Scope and Content] Signed and sealed by Rowland Alston, [Henry Loftus] John Robins, Thomas George Vandergucht and Charles Vere Townshend.

FILE - NORFOLK - ref. DR 3/567 - date: 15 June 1830
[from Scope and Content] Appointment by the Rt. Hon. Charles Vere Ferrars Townshend, with the consent of Francis Lawley of Grosvenor Square esq., of Rowland Alston of Pishiobury, co. Hertford Esq. as receiver of the rents listed in the schedule attached named as security for certain mortgages outlined in 566. The attached schedule listed tenants and rents to be received under the following places all in Norfolk: East, South and West Rainham, Pattesley, Oxwick, Helhoughton, Toftrees, Tatterford, Shereford, East and West Rudham, Houghton Coxford, South Creake, Horningtoft, Stiffkey, Cockthorpe, Morston, Hempton, Colkirk, Weasenham, Scullthorpe [Sculthorpe] and Holt.
[from Scope and Content] Signed: Chas. V.F. Townshend, Rowland Alston.
Ref A2A

Alston (Rowland). Correspondence with the 3rd Lord Hardwicke 1812-1818.
Alston (Rowland). Letter to Sir H. Hardinge 1837.
Alston (Rowland). Letter. to Sir F. Burdett 1826.
Ref British Library 2007

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 45 Harley St St Marylebone MDX. Rowland is recorded as head of house a widower aged 68 a landed proprietor born ...ton Bedford

Rowland married Rose MILLES [4085], daughter of Jeremiah MILLES of Sawbridgeworth. [4086] and Rose GARDINER [15908], on 26 May 1810. Rose was born on 24 May 1782 and died on 19 Feb 1824 in Pishobury HRT at age 41.

General Notes:
The Times, Monday, Feb 23, 1824; pg. 4; Issue 12117; col B
Deaths: On Thursbury the 19th inst. at Pishobury, in the co Herts the seat of her mother Mrs Milles, after a few hours of most severe suffering, Rose wife of Rowland Alston Esq., and dau of the late Jeremiah Milles, Esq.

Slave Ownership Compensation Claim
Parliamentary Papers p. 50. T71/867: awarded to Charles Scott, St Thomas-in-the-East, attorney to Rose Milles. Awarded to Rose Milles on 01/02/1836, award amended in favour of Rowland Alston and Rowland G. Alston on 29/08/1836.
122 Enslaved L2505 4s. 11d. Colony: Jamaica Parish: St Thomas-in-the-East, Surrey.Claim No: 549. Estate: Georgia.
Collected by Robson, Jas. Uncontested
Ref: http://www.ucl.ac.uk




Children from this marriage were:

+ 1114 M    i. Rowland Gardiner ALSTON [4087] was born on 1 Mar 1812 in Marylebone London MDX and died on 24 Apr 1882 in Pangbourne at age 70.

+ 1115 M    ii. William Vere ALSTON [4088] was born on 3 Jul 1816 in Marylebone London MDX and died on 10 Jan 1892 at age 75.

+ 1116 M    iii. Charles Jeremiah Walter ALSTON [4090] was born on 4 Jun 1817 and died on 20 May 1818.

+ 1117 F    iv. Sister Rose ALSTON C.L.J. [4092] was born on 7 Apr 1818 in Kent England and died on 23 Apr 1887 in The Priory Ascot at age 69.

+ 1118 F    v. Harriet ALSTON [4093] was born on 13 Jun 1819 and died on 8 Jul 1877 at age 58.

+ 1119 M    vi. Sir Francis Beilby ALSTON K.C.M.G. J.P. [4091] was born on 29 Nov 1820 in Marylebone London MDX, was baptised 9 Sep 1821 (Received into the Church) in Sawbridgeworth HRT, died on 24 Aug 1905 at age 84, and was buried in Brompton Cemetery LON.

+ 1120 F    vii. Caroline ALSTON [4094] was born on 14 Feb 1822 in Marylebone MDX, was baptised 26 Jun 1824 (Received into the Church) in Sawbridgeworth HRT, and was buried in Brompton Cemetery LON.


904. Lieut. Thomas ALSTON [4043] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 21 Feb 1784 and died on 3 Feb 1807 in Monte Video Uruguay at age 22.

General Notes:
Thomas served with the 40th Regiment of Foot, and was killed at the seige of Monte Video in Uruguay, in a covert action by the British against the Spanish supporting a local uprising against Spanish rule. He has a fine sculptured monument by Bacon in Odell Church with exquisite detail illustrating the seige.
Ref Rev David Streater Vicar of Odell 2003.

TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS ALSTON
LIEUTENANT OF THE 40TH REGT. OF FOOT.
Who fell in the prime of his Youth
At the head of his gallant Soldiers
Upon the breach at Monte Video
In the Moment of Victory.
His mildness of Disposition and Affability of Manners
Shone conspicuously amidst the energies of a vigorous and active mind;
And his display of early Virtues was embellished by the promise of great professional Talents.
His loss is deeply and sincerely lamented by his friends and afflicted Family
Who with pious gratitude record The merits of a life devoted to and closed
In the Service of his Country.
OH LORD RECEIVE HIS SPIRIT.
Born 21 Feb. 1784 Died 3 Feb. 1807."
(In Odell Church, Bedfordshire on a MMI against the South Wall)

905. Elizabeth Jane ALSTON [4047] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1786, died on 3 Jan 1809 in Odell BDF at age 23, and was buried on 13 Jan 1809 in Odell BDF.

General Notes:
Elizabeth was buried in linen and a fine was paid as a moiety for the poor of L2/10/0



906. Rev Vere John ALSTON [4044] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1788, died on 24 May 1863 in Calais France at age 75, and was buried on 28 May 1863 in Calais Pas De Calais France.

General Notes:
Vere was Rector of Odell 1829 - 1863

Cleric Detail
Surname Alston
Forename Vere
Title clerk
Type Licensing
Date18/10/1814
Office/Status Stipendiary Curate
Clerical Status Location Odell//Beds
Source: LA Curates Reg. 1813-31 (Register of Licences)
Ordinary / Jurisdiction: Pretyman (-Tomline), George/Lincoln 1787-1820
Description: Stipend L50 with surplice fees, eight acres of land and use of a house

Adm. pens. at ST JOHN'S, July 3, 1806. Of Beds. [S. of Thomas, Esq., of Odell, and of Harrold Hall, Beds. B. 1788.] Matric. Michs. 1806; Scholar; B.A. 1810. R. of Cowsby, Yorks., 1830-63. R. of Odell, Beds., 1833-63 (but according to Foster, Index Eccles., he was instituted R. of Cowsby, Sept. 17, 1816, and R. of Odell, Mar. 23, 1829). Married (1) Elizabeth Mary, dau. of the Rev. James Barnard, of Combe Flory, Somerset, Aug. 1813; (2) Maria, dau. of Benjamin Longuet, of Bath, and widow of Richard Orlebar, of Hinwick, Beds., Oct. 2, 1845 (see Burke, L.G., sub Orlebar). [His eldest son, Vere John Alston, died at Odell rectory, Apr. 27, 1851, aged 33.] Died May, 1863. Brother of Rowland (1800).
W. M. Harvey, Willey Hundred, 361; Stemmata Alstoniana, 76, 401; Crockford, 1860.
1814 Appt (Licensing) Alston, Vere Odell Stipendiary Curate
1829 Appt (Institution) Alston, Vere John Odell Rector

ALSTON - Vere John, Rector of Cowsby, diocese of York 1830, Rector of Odell, Bedfordshire, diocese of Ely 1833.
Crockfords Clergy Register of 1860

Rev Vere John ALSTON
Odell Rectory
The rectory was mortgaged for L400 in 1829 [X29/37]. ]. In 1881 the Rector, William Hunt, noted that he had spent L175 of his own money on the Rectory since coming to the parish in 1863 [P115/2/1/2]. He noted that the previous incumbent, Vere John Alston, had been a bankrupt (he had, in fact, fled the country and the story goes that his wife took a carriage to London with all the family silver to keep it out of the hands of creditors). In 1874 the Rectory was again mortgaged, to the Governors of Queen Anne's Bounty so that alterations could be made to it and to farm buildings on the glebe land (Rectory Farm) - this mortgaged was paid off in 1929 [P115/2/4/1] when a new mortgage, for L600 was taken out - this was repaid in 1936 [P115/2/4/4] on the sale of the building.
Ref: http://www.bedfordshire.gov.uk/CommunityAndLiving/ArchivesAndRecordOffice/CommunityArchives/Odell/OdellRectories.aspx

Vere was aged 75 at his death, details Ref: Ancestry UK, Foreign and Overseas Registers of British Subjects, 1627-1965

The Will of the Rev Vere John Alston Clerk formerly of Odell BDF but late of Calais who died 24 May 1863 in Calais was Proved by Hugh Saunders of Harrold grocer on the 30 Jun 1865 at under L1000
National Probate Calendars

Copy of Will with Susan Perrett

Vere married Elizabeth Mary BERNARD [4137], daughter of Rev James BERNARD Of Combe Flory Somerset. [4138] and Unknown, on 14 Aug 1813 in Combe Florey SOM.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1121 F    i. Mary Anne Elizabeth ALSTON [4142] was baptised on 8 Jan 1817 in Odell BDF and died on 7 Dec 1847 in Sidmouth at age 30.

+ 1122 M    ii. Vere John ALSTON [4139] was born in 1817, was baptised on 5 Oct 1817 in Odell BDF, and died on 27 Apr 1851 in Odell Rectory at age 34.

+ 1123 F    iii. Charlotte Helena ALSTON [4143] was baptised on 8 Jan 1817 in Odell BDF.

+ 1124 M    iv. Horace George ALSTON [4140] was baptised on 21 Feb 1819 in Odell BDF.

+ 1125 M    v. Thomas ALSTON [4141] was baptised on 22 Oct 1820 in Odell BDF and died on 31 Jul 1854 at age 33.

Vere next married Maria ORLEBAR (NEE LONGUET) [6211], daughter of Benjamin LONGUET of Bath [8233] and Unknown, on 2 Oct 1845.

General Notes:
Maria was widow of Richard Orlebar 1775 -1833.
Ref Burkes Landed Gentry.
Maria had issue
The "Index to the Children of Manor House No 93" Ref Bed PRO 190 ORL. contains much on Maria's life including:
1845 - her second marriage to Rev Vere Alston.
1847 - Financial difficulties at Odell Rectory. (ref Bed OR/2071/609 & 610 - 613)
1847 - Her dramatic flight flight to London with her silver packed in her coach.
1847 - Anecdote of her husband hiding in Paris
1848 - Allows her husband L100 p.a.
1852 - Her will (ref Bed PRO OR/2071/614)
1863 - Her death in London (ref Bed PRO OR/2244/6)
The index above has no cross reference with records at the Bed. PRO beyond what is on cards under Alston etc. This requires a further search, also refs in Bedford Times & Bedford Magazine indexs

Note Alston references in the above index under Main Index - Expanded Subjects listed alphabetically

LETTER Maria Alston to Richard Orlebar (her son)
4 Nov 1847
Commenting on her and her husbands financial affairs she notes " Were we to live at Odell (L280) would only make us as deep in debt as we are now"
Ref: BDF RO OR/2071/609

The Will of Maria Alston late of River Hse. Duncan Tce St Mary Islington MDX who died 3 Apr 1863 at River Hse. was Proved 6 May 1863 by Richard Longuet Orlebar Esq. of Hinwick Hse BDF her son and sole Executor at under L600
Ref. Civil Probate Calender 1863.

Marias Will dated 5 June 1852 in London - appoints Maria Caroline Layton her daughter as Executor.
Ref: BDF RO OR/2071/614

Ref: BDF RO OR/2071/ 610 - 613 refs to various letters and accounts concerning Vere Alston and family.

907. Henry Frederick ALSTON [4045] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 23 Jan 1790 in Kempston BED, was baptised on 7 Aug 1790 in Kempston BED, and died Oct Qtr 1864 in Hendon MDX at age 74.

General Notes:
Gent's. Mag. 1839 29 Oct.
At Watford Henry Fred Alston Esq. 4th son of late T. Alston Esq. of Odell Castle Beds. to Jane 2nd dau. of Alex. Nicholson Esq. late East Coast Charlton Regis. Gloucestershire formerly Capt. 2nd Life Guards.

The Canterbury Association.
An advertisement by the Association under the name of its president the Archbishop of Canterbury, and a committee of worthies, invites gentlemen to emigrate to New Zealand.
H. F. Alston is shown as secretary.
Ipswich Journal 9 March 1850.

Not found in 1861 census.

Henry is widely recorded in documents pertaining to the Canterbury Association, in the Christchurch Museum, New Zealand and on Archway NZ.
Ref: M.R.Burn 2010 [111]

New Zealand Card Index
Alston, H.F.
In Canterbury papers. nos.9 & 10 . . . . . [1851] 23cm.) GNZ 995.84 C23GNZ 1615

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, St John St Marylebone LON. Henry is recorded as aged 50 of independant means born London

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 1 Wellington Rd St Mary le Bone MDX. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 61 Secretary Canterbury Associate (Association) born Kempston BED.

Henry married Elizabeth BALL [4146], daughter of David BALL Of Satborough Somerset. [4147] and Unknown,.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1126 M    i. Capt Henry Frederick ALSTON [4148] was born on 11 Nov 1812 and was baptised in 1813 in St Pancras London.

+ 1127 M    ii. Edward Hughes ALSTON [4157] was born on 22 Nov 1813 and was baptised in 1813 in St Pancras London.

+ 1128 M    iii. Sydney William ALSTON [4159] was born on 7 Sep 1816 in Blidworth NTH.

+ 1129 F    iv. Georgiana Elizabeth ALSTON [4158] was born on 3 Aug 1819 and died on 9 May 1886 in 119 Islip St Kentish Town MDX at age 66.

Henry next married Louisa Sophia RAYNSFORD [4160], daughter of Nicholas RAYNSFORD [4161] and Unknown,.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1130 M    i. Raynsford George ALSTON [4163] was born on 5 Aug 1828 in Brussels Belgium.

Henry next married Jane NICHOLSON [4164], daughter of Alex NICHOLSON Of Ufford Suffolk [4165] and Unknown, on 29 Oct 1839 in Ufford SFK. Jane was born about 1818 in Marylebone London MDX and died on 18 Oct 1877 in Clacton On Sea aged about 59.

General Notes:
Times Oct. 24 1877.- 18 Oct. at Clacton-on-Sea Essex Jane widow of the late Henry Fred Alston Esq.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, St John St Marylebone LON. Jane is recorded as aged 20 born London.

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 1 Wellington Rd St Mary le Bone MDX. Jane is recorded as a wife aged 33 born Marylebone MDX

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1131 F    i. Catherine Jane ALSTON [4166] was born on 9 Sep 1840 in Paddington London MDX and died on 23 Aug 1889 in 119 Islip St Kentish Town MDX at age 48.

+ 1132 F    ii. Evelyn ALSTON [4167] was born about 1843 in St Marylebone LON.

908. Charlotte Temperance ALSTON [4048] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 16 Nov 1791, was baptised on 29 Dec 1791 in Odell BDF, and died in 1810 in Sidmouth at age 19.

General Notes:
Charlotte was aged 19 at her death.

909. Mary Ann ALSTON [6379] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 11 May 1793 in Northampton NTH and was baptised on 21 May 1793 in Odell BDF.

910. Frances Margaret ALSTON [4049] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 5 Sep 1794, was baptised on 14 Sep 1794 in Odell BDF, and died on 14 Jan 1869 at age 74.

General Notes:
Gloucestershire Record Office:
DYRHAM PARK ARCHIVES; BLATHWAYT FAMILY
Catalogue Ref. D1799
Creator(s):
Blathwayt family of Dyrham Park, Gloucestershire
FAMILY
OTHER FAMILIES
FILE [no title] - ref. D1799/F171 - date: 1845
[from Scope and Content] Draft assignments of securities by Frances M. Alston, Emma M. Alston, and Caroline M. Alston, all of Chard (co. Somerset) spinsters
Ref A2A

The Will of Francis Margaret Alston spinster of Staple Grove SOM late of Wembdon SOM who died 14 Jan 1869 was Proved 11 Feb 1869 by Caroline Matilda Alston her sister at under L100

911. Emma Maria ALSTON [4050] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 27 Apr 1796, was baptised on 5 May 1796 in Odell BDF, and died on 15 Mar 1883 in Wembdon SOM at age 86.

General Notes:
The baptism date may have been May 11 1796 - two entries in the extract.

London Metropolitan Archives: The Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy [A/CSC/2628 - A/CSC/3213]
CORPORATION OF THE SONS OF THE CLERGY
Catalogue Ref. A/CSC
Creator(s):
Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy

[Access Conditions]
These archives of the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy were deposited in the London County Record Office (County Hall, Westminster Bridge, London, S.E.1) on condition that all records for the past 100 years which contain reference to beneficiaries shall be regarded as confidential. Searchers who wish to consult such categories of record should first obtain the consent of the Registrar to the Corporation (Corporation House, 6 Woburn Square, London, W.C.1). Other categories of record and all records more than 100 years old are available for searchers without any special restrictions.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Somerset.
Alston Emma. Wembdon 4a 1r 0p gross estimated rental value. L55/0s/0.

CURRENT ESTATES IN PARTICULAR
Upper Holloway Estate: Individual Properties
JUNCTION ROAD
FILE - No. 187 Junction Road, formerly no. 7 Elizabeth Terrace - ref. A/CSC/2814 - date: 1875 - 1956
item: Assignment of lease - ref. A/CSC/2814/1 - date: 6 Jan. 1875
[from Scope and Content] Emma Maria Alston of Wembdon, co. Som., spinster, to Samuel Harford Wagstaff of 187 Junction Road, gent.

FILE - No. 193 Junction Road, formerly no. 4 Elizabeth Terrace - ref. A/CSC/2815 - date: 1874 - 1923
item: Assignment of lease - ref. A/CSC/2815/1 - date: 26 Mar. 1874
[from Scope and Content] Emma Maria Alston of Wembdon, co. Som., spinster, to James Coleman of 193 Junction Road, builder.
item: Mortgage - ref. A/CSC/2815/2 - date: 27 Mar. 1874
[from Scope and Content] James Coleman to Miss E.M. Alston.
item: Assignment of lease (with plan) - ref. A/CSC/2815/3 - date: 24 Mar. 1876
[from Scope and Content] Miss E.M. Alston to John Henry Hawes of 28 Henry St., Hampstead Road, co. Middx., greengrocer.

FILE - No. 195 Junction Road, formerly no. 3 Elizabeth Terrace - ref. A/CSC/2816 - date: 1875 - 1956
item: Assignment of lease - ref. A/CSC/2816/1 - date: 23 June 1875
[from Scope and Content] Miss E.M. Alston to Ann Baird of 41 Stanmore St., Islington, co. Middx., widow.

FILE - No. 199 Junction Road, formerly no. 1 Elizabeth Terrace - ref. A/CSC/2818 - date: 1875 - 1941
item: Assignment of lease - ref. A/CSC/2818/1 - date: 13 Jan. 1875
[from Scope and Content] Miss E.M. Alston to James Laver of 199 Junction Road, gent.

TUFNELL PARK ROAD
FILE - No. 216 Tufnell Park Road, formerly no. 21, otherwise no. 21 Spalding Terrace - ref. A/CSC/2994 - date: 1880 - 1959
item: Mortgage; G. Stephens and F. Edser to Emma Maria Alston of Wembdon, co.Som., spinster. - ref. A/CSC/2994/5 - date: 26 Feb. 1880
item: Surrender; E. M. Alston to John Jones of 199 Kentish Town Road, co. Middx., gent. - ref. A/CSC/2994/6 - date: 8 Aug. 1882

WARRENDER ROAD
FILE - No. 24 Warrender Road - ref. A/CSC/3059 - date: 1878 - 1951
item: Transfer of Mortgage - ref. A/CSC/3059/6 - date: 26 Feb. 1885
[from Scope and Content] H. Hooper to Francis Beilby Alston of the Foreign Office, Downing St., Westminster, esq.
item: Assignment of lease - ref. A/CSC/3059/7 - date: 14 Nov. 1901
[from Scope and Content] Sir F.B. Alston of 69 Eccleston Square, co. London, to Sarah Gower of 24 Warrender Road, spinster.

FILE - No. 31 Warrender Road - ref. A/CSC/3066 - date: 1879-1951
item: Mortgage - ref. A/CSC/3066/4 - date: 28 Nov. 1879
[from Scope and Content] W. Richards to Emma Maria Alston of Wembdon, co. Somerset, spinster.

FILE - Nos. 25 & 26 Warrender Road - ref. A/CSC/3084 - date: 1885-1890
item: Transfer of Mortgage - ref. A/CSC/3084/1 - date: 26 Feb. 1885
[from Scope and Content] The Revd. Henry Hooper of Ripley Vicarage, co. Surrey, to Francis Beilby Alston of the Foreign Office, Downing St., Westminster, esq.
item: Transfer of Mortgage - ref. A/CSC/3084/2 - date: 13 June 1890
[from Scope and Content] Sir F.B. Alston to Frederick Joseph Mogg Gould of 1 Clements Inn, co. London, gent.

To find out more about the archives described, contact London Metropolitan Archives <http://www.archon.nationalarchives.gov.uk/archon/searches/locresult_details.asp?LR=74>
Ref A2A

The Will of Emma Maria Alston of Wembdon SOM who died 15 Mar 1883 in Wembdon was Proved 1 May 1883 by Edwin Newman of Yeovil gent and
William George Galloway of Spaxton Esq. at L10,239-17-10d.

912. Caroline Matilda ALSTON [4051] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 19 Feb 1799, was baptised on 10 Mar 1799 in Odell BDF, and died on 28 Jul 1871 in Wembdon SOM at age 72.

General Notes:
The Will of Caroline Matilda Alston spinster of Wembdon SOM who died 28 July1871 was Proved 12 Aug 1871 by Edward Newman sole Executor at under L10,000

913. Rev Charles William Horace ALSTON [4046] (Thomas (Capt)784, Thomas 5th Bt. (Sir)610, Rowland 4th Bt. (Sir)441, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Jul 1801, was baptised on 12 Jul 1801 in Odell BDF, and died on 10 Aug 1870 in Wembdon SOM at age 69.

General Notes:
ALSTON (CHARLES WILLIAM HORACE) 5 s. of Thomas, of Odell, Beds,, arm. St. Mary's Hall, matric. 8 Nov 1825, aged 24; B.A. 1831, M.A. 1832, Vicar of Wembdon, Somerset, 1845.
Oxoniensis 1715-1886 NZSOG

The following gentlemen were ordained (Deacons) by the Lord Bishop of Lincoln, in Christs College Chapel (Cambridge) on Sunday last, the 6th inst.
Charles William Horace Alston. St Mary-hall, Oxon.
The Ipswich Journal June 12 1830

Alston Charles William Horace, Wembdon, Bridgwater, Somerset. St Mary Hall, Oxford, BA 1831, MA 1832; Deacon 1830, Priest 1831. Vicar of Wembdon, Diocese of Bath and Wells. 1845. (Patron, the present V; Tithe App. 22L, Imp 200L,V. 575L; Glebe, 7 acres; Vicars Income 573L and Ho; Pop 934) Chap. to the Earl of Bessborough 1853.
Ref: Crockfords 1868

Somerset Archive and Record Service:
DENTON HALL BURGIN AND WARRENS, WILLS ETC OF VARIOUS SOMERSET FAMILIES
Catalogue Ref. ALSTON DD\\BR\\dhb/6
FILE - ALSTON - ref. DD - date: 1870-1898
Probates of the wills of the Rev. Charles William Horace Alston, Caroline Matilda Alston and Emma Maria Alston all of Wembdon; and letter of admon. of Edward Gardiner Alston of Middlesex.
Ref A2A

1830 Ordination: Alston, Charles William Horace / deacon
1830 Appt (Licensing) Alston, Charles William Horace Odell Stipendiary Curate
1831 Ordination: Alston, Charles William Horace / priest
1832 Appt(Licensing) Alston, Charles William Horace East Chinnock Curate
1832 Appt(Licensing) Alston, Charles William Horace East Chinnock Stipendiary Curate
Ref. www.theclergydatabase.org.uk

Wembdon.
There was a church at Wembdon by the late 12th century, when both a rector and a chaplain were mentioned. (fn. 73) In 1284 William Testard, lord of Wembdon manor, was licenced to alienate the advowson to St. John's hospital, Bridgwater. (fn. 74) The hospital appropriated the rectory in 1285 and a portion was set aside for the vicar. (fn. 75) A vicarage ordained between 1293 and 1302 was confirmed in 1304. (fn. 76) The living was a sole vicarage in 1987. (fn. 77)
The hospital appointed vicars until the Dissolution except in 1531 when the presentation was made by John Court. (fn. 78) In 1539 the advowson passed to the Crown, which presented in 1554. (fn. 79) In 1560 the Crown probably sold the advowson with the rectory, (fn. 80) and both descended to Henry Halswell. Henry, having sold the rectory, shortly before his death in 1636 settled the advowson on his brother Hugh. (fn. 81) The advowson descended with Goathurst manor to the Tynte family, (fn. 82) which held it until 1843 when Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte sold it to the Revd. Edward Elton. Elton sold it in the following year to Charles W. H. Alston, who became vicar in 1845. Alston's daughters, Emma and Caroline Alston, presented Arthur Newman to the living in 1870 and sold him the advowson in 1871. (fn. 83) Newman presented his successor in 1885. (fn. 84) W. Brice was recorded as patron in 1889 and 1894, (fn. 85) and J. M. Evans presented himself in 1895 and his successor in 1908. (fn. 86) After 1910 Evans conveyed the patronage to P. S. Douglas-Hamilton, who in 1928 conveyed it to the Church Association Trust, later the Church Society Trust, patron in 1987. (fn. 87)
Charles Alston, vicar 1845-70, was also chaplain to the earl of Bessborough. (fn. 16)
Ref: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18713&strquery=John%20Alston

The Will of the Rev Charles William Horace Alston Rector of Wembdon, SOM, who died the 10 Aug 1870 at Wembdon was Proved 10 Sept 1870 by Emma Maria Alston his sister at under L5000

Charles married someone.

914. Charlotte SHIPTON [3166] (Temperance BEDFORD787, Temperance ALSTON618, Vere John (Rev)446, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) died in 1837.

General Notes:
Charlotte had issue 6 boys and 3 girls Ref pg 18 Alstoniana.
She was aged 64 at her death.
Ref BDF RO 2352/6 Family Tree.

Charlotte married Robert Charles ORLEBAR D.L. Of Husborne Crawley [3167], son of Richard ORLEBAR of Hinwick Hse BDF [6757] and Unknown, in 1807.

General Notes:
Robert was of Husborne Crawley co. Bedford, he was third son by a second marriage of Richard Orelbar of Hinwick, one of the Clerks extraordinary of the Privy Council. Mrs Orlebar died in 1837. She was granddaughter of
Temperance and great granddaughter of the Rev. Vere John Alston.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1133 M    i. Robert Shipton ORLEBAR [6758] was born on 12 May 1808.

+ 1134 M    ii. Arthur Bedford ORLEBAR M.A. [9882] was born on 11 Jun 1810.

+ 1135 M    iii. John Charles ORLEBAR [9889] was born on 18 Mar 1812.

+ 1136 M    iv. Charles Daniel ORLEBAR [9891] was born on 19 Apr 1813 and died in 1874 at age 61.

+ 1137 M    v. William ORLEBAR [9892] was born on 16 Aug 1816.

+ 1138 M    vi. Augustus ORLEBAR [9893] was born on 14 Jun 1824.

+ 1139 F    vii. Charlotte Temperence ORLEBAR [9902] was born about 1815 in Crawley BDF.

+ 1140 F    viii. Mary Constance ORLEBAR [9904] .

+ 1141 F    ix. Emily ORLEBAR [9906] .

915. John KENT [3170] (Anne BEDFORD788, Temperance ALSTON618, Vere John (Rev)446, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1).

916. Rowland Alston KENT [5589] (Anne BEDFORD788, Temperance ALSTON618, Vere John (Rev)446, Rowland 2nd Bart (Sir)282, Thomas Kt & Bt. of Odell (Sir)125, Thomas of Gedding Hall49, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 13 Dec 1775 in Wymington BED.

General Notes:
Buckinghamshire Records and Local Studies Service: County of Buckinghamshire Quarter Sessions [QS/A - Q/DA]
Catalogue Ref. Q
COURT RECORDS
JUSTICES" CASE BOOKS
Interleaved volumes containing notes on cases made by the presiding Justices in Quarter Sessions
FILE - Justices Case Book - ref. QS/JC/12 - date: Easter 1828 - Michaelmas 1829
item: Michaelmas Sessions 1829 [no ref. or date]
R. v Thomas Norman [aged 28], John Leach [aged 30], Milton Keynes, Stealing 6 fowls, property of Rowland Alston Kent, value 6/-, on 9th Aug. Witnesses: Rowland Alston Kent, Thomas Waite, John Abbey, lives 3 miles from R.A. Kent, Edward Draper, Thomas Atterbury. Both Guilty. Norman - has been in custody 3 times, once for horse-stealing for which he was acquitted, convicted of felony at Bedford Spring Assizes, 1 Geo. IV [1820], 7 years transportation, Leach in custody for poaching - 'summary conviction'. Leach - 12 months' imprisonment.
Ref A2A

Rowlands baptism LDS Film 0952422. not searched

Rowland married Mary [5590].

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1142 M    i. Rowland KENT [5596] was baptised on 23 Feb 1800 in Wavendon Birmingham and died on 3 Mar 1800.

917. Sarah ALSTON [17557] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Aug 1759, was baptised on 12 Aug 1759 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS, died in 1798 in Asheldham ESS at age 39, and was buried on 23 May 1798 in Asheldham ESS.

918. Ann ALSTON [17558] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1760, was baptised on 20 Jul 1760 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS, died in Little Thurrock ESS, and was buried on 11 Mar 1761 in Little Thurrock ESS.

919. Hannah ALSTON [17559] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 5 Jul 1761 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS, died in Little Thurrock ESS, and was buried on 13 Mar 1762 in Little Thurrock ESS.

920. William Stevens ALSTON [4703] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 14 Jan 1764, was baptised on 29 Jan 1764 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS, died in Little Thurrock ESS, and was buried on 11 Jul 1768 in Little Thurrock ESS.

921. Hannah ALSTON [17560] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1765 and was baptised on 3 Jun 1765 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS.


922. William ALSTON of Bradwell [4706] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Oct 1768 in Little Thurrock ESS, was baptised on 2 Nov 1768 in St Mary Little Thurrock ESS, and was buried on 20 Oct 1817 in St Pancras Parish Chapel London.

General Notes:
Agreement for Lease
Essex Record Office
Deeds of land in Danbury, Sandon, Woodham Walter etc.
Reference Code:D/DC 22/35
Dates of Creation:10 December 1806
Agreement for Lease for 15 years from 1806, at an annual rent of £820
Sir William Hillary of Danbury Place, bart., to William Alston of Woodham Walter, gent.
The Place Farm, with the barn and land called the Wilderness, The Great Park, The Little Park, Grove Filed, Barn Farm and the barn in it, Upper Chuch Farm, Lower Church Farm, Little Church Farm, Upper Long Farm, Lower Long Farm, Road Farm, "the fore and after crop of 6 acres of the meadow called Press Mead, the after crop from Lammas day to 1 May of the remaining 2 acres of Press Mead ( 133 acres)", Sheepens Farm And Home Farm, Lower Stoney Farm, Upper Stoney Farm, Thistle Farm, Rushey Farm, Rushey Farm, Pond Farm, Cowhouse Farm, Brook Farm, the Chasered Marsh Farm, Loris Five acre Mead, Eight acre Mead, Fiteen acre Mead, Round Mead and Long Mead (136 acres) Tobitts Farm, Barn Farm, Tobitts Herbage Farm, Four acres Farm, Furze Farm, and the Park, Round Croft and Sixteen Acres, Shed Farm, Hither Hern Farm, Further Hern Farm, and Cockrills, Tobitts Mead, Two Acres in East Mead and the Eleven acres, (109 acres), all in Woodham Walter, formerly of John Royce, now of William Alston.
Ref: M Terbrack 2013.

William died aged 40, he had property in Bradwell and 1000 acres in Long Tillingham Marshes, and Asheldham, where there is a family vault.

Will to be searched at ESS PRO 1799 William Alston gent of Asheldham not searched 2006
Ref 301 ER 35

Was this family related to the Alston's of Bradwell Abbey?

Research Notes:
Image courtesy M Terbrack 2013

http://www.essex-family-history.co.uk/tenantsmarshhousefarm.htm Alston 1805-1811

Sporting Trespassers,
Bury Assizes.
THELLUSSON Versus ALSTON AND OTHERS. (Jan 1800)
ON Saturday, the 16th instant, at Bury Assizes, a writ of enquiry of damages was executed before the sheriff, attended by a counsel for the parties, and by a gentleman at the bar as his assessor, for the purpose of assessing the damages in an action of trespass brought by Peter Isaac Thellusson, of Rendlesham, in the county of Suffolk, Esq. against William Alston, of Munden, and Mr. Edmund Hammond, of Lachingdon, both in, the county of Essex, in which they had suffered judgment by default.
The Jury, which was special, and a most respectable one, awarded to the plaintiff damages to the amount of 70 pounds. It appeared by the plaintiff's evidence, that the defendants, who are qualified, had, upon the 30th, of January last, come upon the plaintiff's grounds, and within a short distance of his house, for the purpose of sporting, and that they had persisted in shooting in his covers, notwithstanding they were told by the plaintiff they were upon property in his own occupation, and were repeatedly warned against continuing upon his lands. That not contented with this, they had returned on the following day, accompanied by a Mr. Pulham, an attorney, at Woodbridge, who professed to come for the purpose of seeing his friends righted; had again commenced sporting upon the same spot-were again warned from the premises by the plaintiff and his servants; they behaved with much insolence to the former threatened to shoot him, or anyone who should attempt to molest them-had actually pointed their loaded guns at the servants! and on being turned off the lands, had threatened to return the following season, with as many good shots as they could procure, for the purpose of thinning the plaintiff's pheasants.
No evidence whatever was called on the part of the defendants; and it would seem that their unjustifiable conduct upon this occasion had originated in two notions, which have been most unaccountably entertained: the one; that a verbal notice, not to come upon the land of another, is not sufficient to render a subsequent trespass wilful and malicious, but that such notice must be in writing. The other; that the notice does not attach until the following day; and the defendants had actually contended, that though warned off in the morning, they were entitled to their day's sport over the plaintiff's lands, without being liable to be considered as wilful trespassers.
The absurdity of such notions would not admit of their being entertained a single moment in a Court of Justice; the defendants had abandoned them, by suffering judgment by default; and their own counsel,upon the execution of enquiry, admitted them to be untenable upon the very first statement.
In a subsequent action, brought by one of Mr. Thellusson's tenants against the same defendants and Mr. Pulham, the attorney, for a trespass after verbal notice, a verdict was taken by consent, assessing the damages at 5 pounds. Besides the above damages, tho defendants will have to pay all Mr.Thellusson's costs of suit, as well as their own.
(The foregoing report of these Sporting Trespasses is copied verbatim from the Chelmsford Chronicle, and that this article may be complete, we subjoin the following Letter of the Defendants to the Editors of thatPaper.)

To the Editors ef the Chelmsford Paper .
GENTLEMEN,
HAVING read in your paper of the 15th instant, a partial account of the trespasses committed on the 30th and 31st of January last upon Mr.Thellusson's lands in Rendiesham, you will insert certain facts omitted in that statement;
Mr. Thellusson has omitted to state that he mounted the carpenter's horse, and rode to the spot where Messrs. Alston and Hammond were shooting on the 30th
That he accosted them in a great passion
That he collared one of them
That he sent for his double-barrelled gun
That he ordered his gamekeeper to take away their guns, who actually did seize and take a gun from one of them
That he obliged them to give up their certificates, and go to the porch of his house after they had told him their names and places of abode
That he kept them at the outside of his door as long as he thought proper, and then sent them with his keepers and other servants to the common road, where he ordered the gun to be delivered up.
That the defendants went on the 31st for the purpose of resenting Mr.Thellusson's conduct on the preceding day
That they took Mr.Pulham with them to be a witness what might pass
That they desired Mr. Thellusson to be sent for, who came up again with a host of servants in a bullying manner, and ordered the guns to be taken away
That one of the guns was again forcibly taken away by Jennings, the gamekeeper, whilst an underkeeper held a bludgeon over Mr.Hammond's head, and endeavoured, by sideling up to the butt-end of his gun, to get it away; Jennings, at the same time, threatening Mr. Hammond, by telling him that he would rip out his bowels, and lay them upon the land
That Mr. Pulham told Mr.Thellusson, if he had behaved like a gentleman to his friends, the day before, and asked them to go away, they would have done so, but that he had no right to take the law into his own hands by collaring them, or taking away their guns
That Mr. Thellusson's servants by their gestures and abusive language, behaved extremely ill to the defendants
That Mr.Thellusson encouraged their behaviour, and said he would take all upon himself
That the defendants went out of the field immediately, after the gun was given up, into the road, where Mr. Thellusson came with his servants and some of his volunteers, who bullied as before, and followed them nearly half a mile, until the defendants took shelter at a public house
That Mr. Thellusson intruded himself into the defendants room at the inn, and strutted in an impudent manner several times up and down the room, saying, who dares turn me out
That he then sent his host of servants to watch the defendants wherever they went, who followed at their heels the rest of the day, and watched during the time they were at Mr. Morris's house, and afterwards until they got into their chaises to return home
That the defendants never after went upon Mr.Thellusson's, or any of his tenant's lands.
These are the mighty trespasses of which so much has been made; the public will now be able to estimate the value of a clod of earth, or a spear of grass in the month of January; for, as to abusive language, the defendants have much more reason to complain than the plaintiff.
To the truth of the above statement we pledge ourselves, so far as it concerns us respectively.
Wm. Alston, Edm. Hammond, J As. Pulham.
Ref: Chelmsford Chronicle Jan 1800.
(Peter Isaac Theluson who in 1806 was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Rendlesham. In 1800 he was MP for Castle Rising - M Terbrack)



William married Anne SEWELL [4707], daughter of William SEWELL [19305] and Rosamund BRADFORD of Mundon [19306], on 23 May 1792 in St Matthew Bethnal Green Tower Hamlets LON. Anne was born about 1772 and was buried in St Pancras London.

General Notes:
Anne had a brother Thomas Sewell of Colne Grove, near Halstead ESS.

Was Anne related to the Sewells of Essex & Suffolk.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1143 F    i. Sarah ALSTON [4711] was born on 5 Oct 1793 in Mundon ESS, was baptised on 4 Dec 1794 in Mundon ESS, and was buried on 26 Jun 1815 in St Andrews Grays Inn Rd.

+ 1144 M    ii. Charles ALSTON [4708] was born on 2 Oct 1794 in Mundon ESS, was baptised on 4 Dec 1794 in Mundon ESS, and died in Dec 1818 at sea off Cape of Good Hope. at age 24.

+ 1145 M    iii. William ALSTON [4709] was born on 17 Sep 1795 in Limbourne Park Mansion Munden ESS, was baptised on 9 Oct 1795 in Mundon ESS, died on 11 Aug 1877 at age 81, and was buried in Highgate Cemetery London.

+ 1146 F    iv. Anna Maria ALSTON [4712] was born on 7 Oct 1796 in Mundon ESS, was baptised on 20 Jul 1797 in Mundon ESS, and died in 1872 in St Pancras London at age 76.

+ 1147 F    v. Mary Ann ALSTON [4716] was born on 13 Mar 1805 in Mundon ESS.

+ 1148 F    vi. Elizabeth ALSTON [4713] was born on 1 Sep 1806 in Marsh House Farm Tillingham, was baptised on 5 Jul 1807 in All Saints with St Peter Maldon ESS, and was buried on 7 Aug 1853 in St Pancras Parish Chapel Camden LON.

+ 1149 F    vii. Jane Wright ALSTON [4718] was born on 21 Nov 1808 in Woodham Walter ESS and was baptised on 15 Nov 1810 in Woodham Walter ESS.

+ 1150 F    viii. Louisa Emma ALSTON [4720] was born on 13 Mar 1810 in Woodham Walter ESS, was baptised on 15 Nov 1810 in Woodham Walter ESS, and died in 1865 in Strand LON at age 55.

923. John ALSTON [4705] (William797, Philip635, Philip489, Solomon309, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 12 Dec 1771 and was buried on 30 Aug 1778 in Asheldham ESS.

924. Amelia ALSTON [5310] (Moses804, Moses641, Moses of Lamarsh494, Robert310, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 16 Oct 1762 in Mt Bures ESS.

925. Martha ALSTON [5270] (Moses804, Moses641, Moses of Lamarsh494, Robert310, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 30 Jun 1776 in Mt Bures ESS.

926. William ALSTON [5271] (Moses804, Moses641, Moses of Lamarsh494, Robert310, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 7 Sep 1777 in Mt Bures ESS.

927. Moses ALSTON [5273] (Moses804, Moses641, Moses of Lamarsh494, Robert310, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 6 Sep 1778 in Mt Bures ESS.

General Notes:
Abstract of Administration of Moses Alston of Bures Mount, Essex. Proved in the Court of London.Date June 17 1811 T.N.A. Catalogue reference IR 26/387 Records of the Estate Duty Office Abstracts of administrations and probates of will, contains1 document of many for this catalogue reference Number of image files: 1

928. Amelia ALSTON [5274] (Moses804, Moses641, Moses of Lamarsh494, Robert310, William Of Sible Hedingham ESS130, John of Stisted & Belchamp Otten50, William Siam Hall and Sible Hedingham Ess21, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 5 Mar 1783 in Mt Bures ESS.

Amelia married Henry MURTON [5904] on 22 Oct 1818 in Stanstead SFK.

General Notes:
Married by licence issued, 14 Oct 1818 Henry Murton single man of Long Melford & Amelia Alston of Stanstead single woman. At Stanstead. Surety: John Murton of Boxted.


929. Francis Hare NAYLOR [3541] (Rev Robert (Hare) NAYLOR Of Hurstmonceaux Castle And La Vache807, Margaret (Mary) ALSTON656, Joseph of New House511, Isaac Of Chelsea329, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1753 and died on 16 Apr 1815 at age 62.

Francis married Georgina SHIPLEY [3546], daughter of Rt Rev Jonathan SHIPLEY [3547] and Anne Maria MORDAUNT [3548]. Georgina died on 6 Apr 1806.

General Notes:
There is a memorial to Georgina in Twyford Church nr Winchester.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1151 M    i. Francis George HARE [3550] was born on 6 Jan 1786 and died in 1842 at age 56.

+ 1152 M    ii. Rev Augustas William HARE [3551] was born on 17 Nov 1792 and died in 1834 at age 42.

+ 1153 M    iii. Ven Julius Charles HARE [3554] was born on 13 Sep 1795 and died on 23 Jan 1855 at age 59.

+ 1154 M    iv. Lieut Marcus Theodore HARE R.N. [3557] was born on 9 Nov 1796 and died on 30 Jun 1845 at age 48.

+ 1155 F    v. Anna Maria Clementina HARE [3558] died on 24 Mar 1813.

Francis next married Mrs Anna Maria MEALY [3559].

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1156 M    i. Gustavus Edward Cockburn HARE [3561] was born on 15 Sep 1811, died on 2 Apr 1881 in Albany Western Australia at age 69, and was buried in Old Albany Cemetery WA.

+ 1157 M    ii. Reginald John HARE [3562] was born on 29 Dec 1812.

+ 1158 F    iii. Georgina Francis HARE [3563] .

930. Rev Robert HARE NAYLOR [3542] (Rev Robert (Hare) NAYLOR Of Hurstmonceaux Castle And La Vache807, Margaret (Mary) ALSTON656, Joseph of New House511, Isaac Of Chelsea329, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1756 and died on 24 Feb 1832 at age 76.

Robert married Harriet SPENCE [3598], daughter of Henry Hume SPENCE Esq of Malling [3599] and Unknown,.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1159 F    i. Julia Marrianne HARE [3600] .

+ 1160 F    ii. Amelia HARE [3602] died in 1857.

Robert next married Anne ALLEYNE [3627], daughter of John ALLEYNE Esq Of Barbados [3626] and Unknown,.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1161 M    i. Major Robert HARE [3628] died in 1864.

+ 1162 M    ii. Clarence HARE [3631] died on 18 Oct 1863.

+ 1163 F    iii. Laurentia Anne HARE [3632] was born in 1802 and died in 1803 at age 1.

+ 1164 F    iv. Louisa Anne HARE [3633] was born in 1803 and died in 1803.

+ 1165 F    v. Teresa Anne HARE [3634] was born in 1803 and died in 1803.

Robert next married Mrs Anne LEWIS [3635], daughter of Sir Thomas FRANKLAND [3636] and Unknown,.

931. Anna Maria HARE [3543] (Rev Robert (Hare) NAYLOR Of Hurstmonceaux Castle And La Vache807, Margaret (Mary) ALSTON656, Joseph of New House511, Isaac Of Chelsea329, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) died in Nov 1810 and was buried in Chalfont St Giles.

Anna married Col BULKELEY [3544].

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1166 F    i. Anna Maria BULKELEY [3545] died in 1822 and was buried in Chalfont St Giles.

932. Mary Ann ALSTON [3269] (Evelyn 6th Bart (Sir)814, Evelyn 5th Bart (Sir)667, Joseph 3rd Bart (Sir)515, Joseph 2nd Bart (Sir)331, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 18 Apr 1751 and was buried on 11 Oct 1791 in St Thomas Bradwell on Sea ESS.

General Notes:
Placement of death details completely conjectural



933. Sir William ALSTON 8th Bart of Lingfield [3277] (William 7th Bart (Sir)815, Evelyn 5th Bart (Sir)667, Joseph 3rd Bart (Sir)515, Joseph 2nd Bart (Sir)331, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Nov 1745, died on 6 Mar 1819 in Lingfield SRY at age 73, and was buried on 21 Mar 1819.

General Notes:
Sir William is said to have been affected by deep grief at the death of his only son, in later years he lay aside his title altogether, calling himself William Alston in his will.

He appears to have been as economical and wise as his Grandfather was improvident and reckless, investing what came down to him from the wreck of his family's fortune, in the timber trade. In this he prospered, acquiring considerable land around Lingfield. He was also successful in some lottery speculation. He preferred the older fashion of dress for his time, knee breeches, silk stockings, and shoes with silver buckles, and was exceedingly fond of a rubber of whist.

The registers of St George Hanover Sq LON record a marriage between William Alston widower and Ann Rose single woman on the 29 May 1799.

Beneath are interred the remains of William Alston who died 6th March 1819 aged 73 years.
Altar Tomb Lingfield Churchyard.


Will of William Alston.
27 Jan 1818
This is the last Will and Testament of me William Alston of Lingfield in the County of Surrey timber merchant made this 27th day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen as follows that is to say first I will order and direct that all my just debts funeral expenses and the probate of this my last will and testament be fully paid and discharged by my executors hereinafter named and after full payment and satisfaction I give and devise unto my dear Wife Ann Alston all that my messuage or tenement and garden orchard and premises which I some time since purchased of Thomas Thompsett situated at Domans Land in Lingfield aforesaid to hold the same unto my said dear Wife and her heirs and assigns for and during the term of her natural life Item I give and bequeath unto my said dear Wife one annuity or . . . . . nett yearly sum of one hundred pounds of lawful English money for and during the term of her natural life payable half yearly the first payment thereof to begin and be made at the end of six months next after my decease and I do here by order and direct the said annuity to be paid into the proper hands of my said Wife to and for her own sole and separate use and benefit and not subject or liable to the debts . . . . . disposition or engagements of any future husband with whom she may intermarry and whose receipts alone notwithstanding her future meantime shall be good and sufficient discharges to my said executors for the same and for the more effectual settling the participant of the said annuity or yearly sum of one hundred pounds clear of all deductions whatsoever unto my said dear Wife I do hereby order and direct that my said executors do and shall immediately after my decease out of my estate and effects layout and invest their names or in the names of the survivor of them his heirs or admonitions in the purchase of stock in some one of the public funds as much money as will produce the said annuity or yearly sum of one hundred pounds after deducting all taxes and other charges and encumbrances thereon and from and immediately after the decease of my said dear Wife I do hereby order and direct that the said stock or funds so to be purchased as aforesaid or the money to arise by sale thereof shall sink into and be consonant and taken to be part and parcel of the residue and remainder of my estate and effects and given and disposed of as hereinafter mentioned also
I give and devise unto my said dear Wife the free and interrupted use and enjoyment of all my household goods plate linen and china for and during the term of her natural life and from and immediately after her decease I do hereby order and direct the said shall be taken and considered to be as part and parcel of the residue and remainder of my estate and effects hereinafter mentioned and it is my Will and I do hereby declare that the above devise of the said Messuages and premises and bequest of the said annuity and the use and enjoyment of my household goods plate linen and china therein before devised given and bequeathed unto my said Wife are so given devised and bequeathed and the same to and shall be taken in full satisfaction and discharge of all dower and things which she can or may claim by or out of my estate or effects
Item I give and bequeath unto my three granddaughters Susannah Alston Mary Alston and Elizabeth Alston the capital sum of two thousand pounds three percent consolidated annuities each being part of the stock now standing in my name in the books of the Govenor and Company of the Bank of England to be respectively transferred to them by my executors hereinafter named when and as they my said grandchildren shall attain their respective ages of twenty one years with benefit of survivorship in case of the death of either of my said grandchildren under the age of twenty one years and without issue the interest dividends and proceeds of each child's respective (gain) as aforesaid to be by my said executors or the survivor of them or the executors or administrators of such survivor received as it becomes due the same or so much thereof as they or he shall deem necessary to be in the meantime paid out and applied by them for and towards the bringing up maintaining educating and putting out apprentice such child or children
Item I give and bequeathed unto my daughter in law Elizabeth Alston the widow of my late son William Alston the interest dividends and proceeds of the capital sum of one thousand pounds three percent consolidated annuities of her part of stock standing in my name in the books of the Governor and company of the Bank of England for and during the term of her natural life with interest and proceeds to be received by my executors hereinafter named as the same becomes due and to be by them paid to the said Elizabeth Alston whose receipt alone not withstanding her future meantime shall be a good and sufficient discharge to my executors for the same to the interest and purpose that the said interest dividends and proceeds may be and remain an unalienable provision for her life and from and immediately after the decease of the said Elizabeth Alston I do hereby order and direct my said executors to transfer the said capital sum of one thousnad pounds at three percent consolidated annuities into and actually between my said three grandchildren Susannah Mary and Elizabeth share and share alike with the life benefit of survivorship in case of the death of either of them under the age of twenty one years and without issue as is mentioned with respect to the legacy of two thousand pounds at three percent consolidated annuities hereinbefore given and bequeathed to each of them by this my will.
Item I give devise and bequeath unto my said daughter-in-law Elizabeth Alston widow the Messuages or tenement in which she now lives with the warehouse? shop and house and garden thereunto belonging and adjoining and three acres of land thereto also belonging together with about three quarters of an acre of land lately enclosed and lying in the front thereof being what I purchased of the commissioners acting under the Lingfield Inclosure Act also all those two fields containing about three acres and a half near the same fields which I also lately purchased of the said commissioners all which said premises are situate at Domans Land in Lingfield aforesaid to hold the same unto my said daughter in law Elizabeth Alston widow for and during the term of her natural life but subject to impeachment for waste and from and immediately after the decease of the said Elizabeth Alston widow I give devise and bequeath the said Messuages . . . . . shop land and premises with the appurtenances unto my son in law John Dives of Lingfield aforesaid shopkeeper his heirs and assigns for ever
Item I give devise and bequeath unto my said son in law John Dives all that my Messuages or tenement barn stables lands hereditments and premises called Dorman's situate at or in Dorman's land in Lingfield aforesaid which I lately purchased of Mr Hanson of To. . . am in Kent containing by estimation twenty four acres more or less to hold the same unto the said John Dives and his assigns for and during the term of his natural life but subject to impeachment for waste and from and immediately after the decease of the said John Dives I give devise and bequeath all and singular the said Messuages or tenements Barnes stables outhouses buildings garden orchards fences lands who Hereditments and premises so hereinbefore given and and devised to the said John Dives for life as aforesaid with their and every of their appurtenances unto my son in law John Head of East Grinstead in the County of Sussex Linen Draper his heirs and assigns upon trust that he the said John Head or his heirs do and shall with all convenient speed after the decease of the said John Dives sell and absolutely dispose of the said Messuages or tenements Barnes stables outhouses buildings Gardens orchards fences lands Hereditments and premises with their and every of their appurtenances either together in parcels and either by public auction or private contract as he or they shall think best for such price or prices or sum or sums of money as in his or their opinion can be obtained all reasonably expected for the same and to convey and assure the premises which shall be so sold to the purchaser or several purchases thereof and their heirs or otherwise as he she or they shall direct or appoint and I do hereby declare that the receipt or receipts of the said John Head or his heirs or assigns of and concerning the said premises shall be a good and sufficient discharge or discharges for the purchase money thereof and that no purchaser or purchases his her all their heirs executors or assigns shall after payment of the same to the said John Head or his heirs be in any manner answerable for or liable to see to the application thereof or any part thereof and I do hereby Will and direct that the said John Head his heirs executors and assigns shall direct and be possessed of the monies to arise from such sale sales after paying the costs charges and expenses attending such sale or sales and the investing and making out the titles to the said Messuages or tenements lands Hereditments and premises upon trust to pay apply and equally divide the same and every part thereof unto and equally between and amongst all and every the children of the said John Dives by my late daughter Elisabeth the wife of the said John Dives share and share alike as tenants in common and if they shall be but one such child then to such one or only child and to his her and their executors or assigns and to and for his her and their proper use and benefit the share or shares of him her all there to be respectively vested in him her or their when and as they shall obtain his/her all their respective ages of twenty one years and without issue then the share of him her or their so defined or so much thereof as shall not have been disposed of or applied for his her or their advancement or preferment in the . . . . . in pursuance of the the power hereinafter contained for that purpose shall go . . . . . and be found to the survivor or survivors or other or others of them if more than one and if but one then to and in such only child as such and the same time and times as is here in before expressed and declared relative to his her and their original share or shares and upon further from and after the decease of the said John Dives in case the he shall depart this life during the minority of his said child or children to pay the interest dividends and proceeds of the monies arising by such sale or sales for and towards the maintenance and education of such child or children in such manner as the said John Head or his heirs executors or assigns shall in his or their direction thereof propose provided always and it is moreover my Will and desire that the said John Head his executors or administrators do and shall after the decease of the said John Dives if he or they shall think proper to part apply or advance the whole or any part of the appurtenant or presumptive share or shares of the said children or child or any or either of them unto him her or them or to any other person or persons for his her or their preferment or advancement in the world in such manner as he or they shall deem advisable or expedient although the portion or portions of such child or respective children shall not then have become payable or . . . . and that the receipt or receipts of such child or children or other person or persons shall be a good and effectual discharge to the said John Head his heirs executors or administrators and they nor either of them shall not thereafter be accountable for the same all be in any way bound to see to the proper application therefore any part thereof
Item That I give and devise under the said John Dives all that part or parcel of land containing about two acres called Heyers Head which I lately purchased of John Bennett? to hold the same to the said John Dives his heirs and assigns for ever
Item I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah the wife of John Head of East Grinstead in the County of Sussex Linen Draper subject to the estate for life of my said dear Wife hereinafter given and devised by me to her all that my Messuages or tenement land garden orchards and premises which I some time since purchased of Thomas Thompsett situate in Domans land in Lingfield aforesaid and which I now use and occupy and also all the rest and residue and remains of my Messuages tenements lands Hereditments and real estate whatsoever and wheresoever which I may happened to die seized or possessed of or entitled unto to hold the same and every part and parcel thereof unto my said daughter Sarah the wife of the said John Hand and her assigns for and during the term of her natural life and from and immediately after the decease of my said daughter Sarah the wife of the said John Head I give devise and bequeath all singular the said Messuages or tenements barnes stables Gardens orchards fences lands Hereditments and premises with their and every of the rights premises and appurtenances unto my said son-in-law John Head his heirs and assigns for ever and as to all the rest residue and remains of my personal estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever and of what nature and kind whatsoever which I am happened to be seized and possessed of or entitled unto I give devise and bequeath the same and every part thereof unto my two sons in law the said John Dives and John Head there heirs executors and administrators and assigns for ever to be equally divided between them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint the said John Dives and John Head joint executors and trustees of this my last Will and Testament and guardians of my several legatees during their respective minorities and it is my Will and meaning and I do hereby order and direct that my said Executors and Trustees shall not be answerable or accountable for any more money than they shall severally and respectively actually receive nor for any loss unless the same happens through their wilful negligence or default nor the one for the other of them but each for his own acts receipts and defaults respectively and lastly I do thereby revoke and make void all former and other Will and Wills before at any time or times heretofore made and do declare this and this only to be and contain my last Will and Testament in witness whereof I the said William Alston the Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in five sheets of paper set my Hand and Seale at the top of the first sheet where the same are affixed together and my hand at the bottom thereof and my Hand at the bottom of the three next following sheets and my Hand and Seale to the fifth and last sheet the day and year first above witness
William Alston
Signed sealed published and delivered by the said William Alston the testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have here unto inscribed our names
witnesses WH Barrow James ..... Squire JH Collin's of East Grinstead Sussex.

Proved at London 14 October 1819 before the worshipful Jesse Adams Dr of Laws and Sealed by the oaths of John Dives & John Head the Executors to to whom Administration was granted having been first sworn duly to administer.

William married Mary ROSE [3283] on 18 Dec 1770 in Lingfield Church SRY. Mary was born in 1749, died on 29 Jul 1820 at age 71, and was buried on 4 Aug 1820 in Family Vault Lingfield Churchyard.

Research Notes:
Altar Tomb Lingfield Churchyard. Also of his wife Mary Alston daughter of William Alston died July 29th aged 62.

IN MEMORY OF MARY WIFE OF WILLIAM ALSTON DIED FEB 3 1782 AGED 33 YEARS Also Mary . . . . . daughter . . . . . above . . . . . Ks

Which is which?


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1167 M    i. William ALSTON [3285] was born about 1772 in Lingfield SRY, died in 1802 aged about 30, and was buried on 25 May 1802 in Family Vault Lingfield Churchyard.

+ 1168 F    ii. Sarah ALSTON [3286] was born about 1774 in Lingfield SRY, died on 18 Apr 1858 aged about 84, and was buried on 23 Apr 1858 in Family Vault Lingfield Churchyard.

+ 1169 F    iii. Elizabeth ALSTON [3287] was born about 1773 in Lingfield SRY, died on 10 Oct 1815 aged about 42, and was buried in Lingfield Church SRY.

William next married Ann ROSE [3284] on 29 May 1799 in St George Hanover Sq.

General Notes:
The registers of St George Hanover Sq LON record a marriage between William Alston widower and Ann Rose single woman on the 29 May 1799

This marriage is said not to have been felicitous.

934. Evelyn ALSTON [3278] (William 7th Bart (Sir)815, Evelyn 5th Bart (Sir)667, Joseph 3rd Bart (Sir)515, Joseph 2nd Bart (Sir)331, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Oct 1747, was baptised on 13 Oct 1747 in Oxted SRY, died on 7 Apr 1799 at age 51, and was buried in Bletchingley SRY.

General Notes:
An Evelyn Alston of Bletchingly, was the tenant of Sir Robert Clayton Bart. and paid land tax in 1781 of 8/-. There are several further records of payments.
Ref: Ancestry Surrey, England, Land Tax Records, 1780-1832 <http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=4792> for Evelyn Alston

Evelyn died intestate.

Evelyn Alston. On the 25th day of May 1799, Administration of the goods, chattels, and credits (L2,000), of Evelyn Alston, late of Bletchingley, in the County of Surrey, was granted to Mary Alston, relict of deceased.

On the 23 Jan 1826 limited administration "de bonis non" was granted to his daughter Sarah.

Evelyn married Mary STREETER [3279] in 1769 in Blechingley SRY.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1170 F    i. Sarah ALSTON [3280] was baptised on 12 Nov 1770 in Bletchingley SRY.

935. Sarah ALSTON [3281] (William 7th Bart (Sir)815, Evelyn 5th Bart (Sir)667, Joseph 3rd Bart (Sir)515, Joseph 2nd Bart (Sir)331, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 12 Sep 1749, was baptised on 25 Sep 1749 in Oxted SRY, and died on 7 Nov 1770 at age 21.

General Notes:
Sarah was unmarried



936. George ALSTON [3282] (William 7th Bart (Sir)815, Evelyn 5th Bart (Sir)667, Joseph 3rd Bart (Sir)515, Joseph 2nd Bart (Sir)331, Joseph Knt. Bart of Chelsea & Bradwell (Sir)144, Edward of Edwardstone53, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born from 19 Jan 1753 to 1754, was baptised from 10 Feb 1753 to 1754 in Oxted SRY, died on 13 Mar 1806 in Oxted SRY at age 53, and was buried on 17 Mar 1806 in Oxted SRY.

General Notes:
George is described as a barber in the Surrey, England, Jury-Qualified Freeholders and Copyholders, Records 1805.
Ref: Ancestry.com

A George Alston of Oxted, paid land tax on his own property in 1784 of 13/6. There are several further records of payments.
Ref: Ancestry Surrey, England, Land Tax Records, 1780-1832 <http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=4792> for Geo Alston

George died s.p.

Will of George Alston yeoman of Oxted SRY proved 26 Mar 1806 PROB 11/1439
Available PRO on line - not searched 2006



937. Edward Daniel ALSTON [3741] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 23 Oct 1773 and died on 28 Jun 1843 in Palgrave at age 69.

General Notes:
Edward was a brewer of Diss SFK, he presented a painted altar piece of Jesus to Manningtree ESS Church, now in Feering Church (1965), now in Dedham Church ESS 2003. He died aged 69.

Deaths
On the 28th ult., at Palgrave Suffolk E D Alston Esq of Manningtree Essex in the 70th year of his age.
The Times, Saturday, Jul 01, 1843; pg. 9; Issue 18337; col A

Died
28th ult., at Palgrave, in this county, E D Alston, Esq., of Manningtree, Essex, in the 69th year of his age.
Ipswich Journal 1 July 1843

Letter from R.B. Beckett, author of "John Constable and the Fisher's, 18.2.(19)55, to Rowland Wright Alston [3912].
"I have at last succeeded in tracing down the correspondence about the altarpiece. On the 2nd July, 1821, Constable's brother Abram wrote to say that he had heard from a friend that 'Mr. Edward Allstone (Edward Daniel) of Diss had offered to present the parish with an altarpiece for the chapel, value L200 and recommended his brother to apply for the job"

From "John Constable and the Fishers", Page 92. 1822. Letter from J. Constable.
"I am going into Suffolk about an altarpeice - a gift of compunction I hear from a gentleman who is supposed to have defrauded his family - shall add this motto, from Shakespeare, "may this expiate"

Page 113, 1822. Letter from J. Constable.
"My altarpeice, for the chapel at Manningtree is gone by - the man would not have it. He says I had harmed his future - but my brother tells me the whole concern of these brewers was a low sneak to Archdeacon Jefferson who could licence or not their blackguard publick houses and on his death they were glad to get clear of as much of the expence as they had not actually incurred, as they could. This is a loss to me. The frame is L5, being of mahogany without a joint, and of large dimensions."
Photocopy of this on file E L Fenn 2001

Kellys Directory 1894 Manningtree ESS - "A large oil painting representing our Saviour was the gift of Edward Daniel Alston Esq., in 1823"
The painting by Constable was hanging in Dedham Church in 2003, however the following exerpt indicates its future may not be finally there.

Suffolk Record Office, Ipswich Branch:
RECORDS OF ROUSE FAMILY, STEWARD FAMILY AND OTHERS
Catalogue Ref. HB 54
Unidentified clients
FILE - Memorandum of agreement between John Jessupp of Wik (Ess), carpenter, and Edward Daniel Alston and Daniel Constable Alston, merchants and brewers, - ref. HB 54/E54/33 - date: 9 Dec 1834
Ref A2A

THE CONSTABLE TRUST
2003
Works of art often come on to the market but few are intimatelv associated with a place. In the last few years major items have been sold from churches and schools which should never have come on to the market. The Constable Trust has been established to acquire such items which have a relationship with East Anglia and to display them in appropriate settings. The first item the Trust is trying to purchase is John Constable's greatest religious painting, The Ascension.

The altarpiece was commissioned in 1822 by Edward Alston, a brewer and Constable's cousin by marriage, for St Michael's Church in Manningtree, where it hung until the church was demolished in 1965. It was acquired for All Saints', Feering, where it remained until early 1998 when, to raise funds for central heating in the church, the Vicar and Churchwardens of Feering offered the painting at auction.

The canvas was saved by two private buyers for L60,000. This allowed time for the Constable Trust to be formed, for the Trust to purchase the painting, have it restored by the Hamilton Kerr Institute (University of Cambridge) and display it in a church close to Manningtree. Preparations are in hand for the painting to be hung in St Mary's, Dedham, in the heart of 'Constable Country'.

The Constable Trust is therefore charged with the task of finding L70,000 to purchase the painting, restore it and place it on public view. Will you help?

Recent legislation has made it easier than ever to give in a tax efficient way. By signing the enclosed form you will enable The Constable Trust, as a charitable organisation, to claim from the Inland Revenue an extra 28p for every L1 that you give. . . . . and every penny counts.

The Constable Trust became a charity in April 2000 and in the first six months it has raised L23,000. Please consider adding to this success by giving generously.

Please send your donation to: The Constable Trust
North House, The Walls, Manningtree
Essex CO11 lAS

Edward married Elizabeth FREEBORN [3759], daughter of John FREEBORN of Gt Maplestead [4032] and Elizabeth TOTTMAN [5526], on 17 Jan 1814 in Gt Maplestead ESS. Elizabeth was born in 1788 in Great Maplestead and died on 7 Apr 1824 at age 36.

General Notes:
Marriage ref:
Monday last was married, by the Rev J Spurling, Mr Edward Daniel Alston of Diss in Norfolk, to Eliza Freeborn, only daughter of John Freeborn, Esq. of Lucken-house, Gt Maplested, in the County of Essex.
The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, January 22, 1814; Issue 4192.

Death ref:
Wednesday morning died, deeply lamented by her friends, Mrs Alston, wife of D. Alston Gent. of Diss, leaving four children to lament her loss.
Ipswich Journal Saturday, April 10, 1824 issue 4487
This death is not proved to Elizabeth.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1171 M    i. Rev Edward Constable ALSTON [3752] was born on 30 Mar 1816 in Diss NFK and died on 28 Mar 1871 at age 54.

+ 1172 F    ii. Eliza ALSTON [3753] was born on 31 Aug 1817, died on 6 Aug 1843 in Palgrave at age 25, and was buried in Manningtree ESS.

+ 1173 F    iii. Emma Sarah ALSTON [3754] was born on 27 Jul 1819 and died on 25 Feb 1846 in Santa Cruz Teneriffe at age 26.

+ 1174 F    iv. Caroline ALSTON [3758] was born on 17 Feb 1824, died on 14 Jun 1871 in La Terrasse Dussac France at age 47, and was buried on 16 Jun 1871 in Dussac Churchyard France.


938. Daniel Constable ALSTON [3742] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Sep 1778, was baptised on 17 Sep 1778 in Manningtree, died on 23 Sep 1846 at age 68, and was buried in Manningtree Church Family Vault.

General Notes:
Daniel lived at Manningtree and there is a tablet to him on the wall in Manningtree Church. 2003 This may now be at Mistley Church.

Pigots Directory 1823/4 Manningtree ESS - Daniel Constable Alston , Brewer.
Pigots Directory 1827 & 1835 Manningtree ESS - Daniel Constable Alston , Brewer.
Post Office Directory 1845 Manningtree ESS - Daniel Constable Alston, Brewer, Corn & Coal Merchant, High St.
Whites Directory 1848 Daniel Constable Alston, Merchant, Manningtree.

Essex Record Office D/P 103/28/5
Parish records GREAT BROMLEY, St. George
Dates of Creation 1825
Scope and Content: A plan of Cold Hall Estate situate in the Parish of Great Bromley in the County of Essex. The property of Daniel Constable Alston, Esq. Survey'd in April 1825 by R. Hale, Colchester' 20in. to 1m. 30.5 x 25 213a in S.W. of parish between TM 079255, TM 078243 and TM 087248. Shows buildings, gardens, roads, hedges, ponds and woodlands. Gives names of adjacent owners (in one case altered in pencil). Reference table gives field names and acreages. Well-executed map, delicately coloured, possibly to denote land utilization. Uncoloured cartouche and compass rose

North Essex Conservative Assn.
Tuesday evening the Essex and Colchester True Blue and Conservative Club, embracing the leading nobility, clergy, and gentry of the neighbourhood, celebrated their anniversary at the Three Cups Hotel Colchester. . . . . . The list of stewards comprised . . . . . D C Alston.
Ipswich Journal 26 Nov. 1836.

Essex Record Office Q/SBb 494/94
SESSIONS BUNDLES: LATER SERIES EPIPHANY 1829
Scope and Content Note saying that the Clerk of the Peace produced to the Court a draft of contract between Mr Edward Alston and Mr Daniel Constable Alston and the Clerk of the Peace for a piece of land situated in St. James Parish Colchester for a House of Correction secured and settled by Mr Duval. The court orders that when the Tithe of the land is made out; it shall be conveyed. Upon the conveyance being made, the Treasurer of the County wil pay the sum of L300 to Edward Alston and Daniel constable
(Uncertain which D C Alston, ELF 2004)

Essex Record Office D/DXk/32
DEEDS OF WIX AND MISTLEY
SeriesD/DXk 28-40 Deeds of Westlands Farm, Wix
Dates of Creation 24 December 1829.
Scope and Content Manor of Weeks Hall or Abbey. Memorandum of Absolute Surrender for L63; of Robt.Ham of Wix, farmer, to use of Daniel Constable Alston, of the reversion exectant on the decease of Sarah Cutting (w. of Jos.c), in one moiety of: Acottage (now divided into 2 tenements), with the farm & land belonging containing 15 a., & adjoining the lands of Sir William Rowley bart.; & now in occupation of Jos.Hart, John James & Jos.Cutting. [No details]. [Steward: Robert Winter gent.]


Essex Record Office
Level: Category Estate and Family records
Level: Fonds MISCELLANEOUS ESSEX DOCUMENTS
Level: Series D/DC 18/48-57 Manor of Greenstead: copyhold property called Freemans
Reference Code D/DC/23/757
Dates of Creation 23 March 1843
Scope and Content Grant Sir Joshua Rowley, baronet of Tendring Hall (co. Suff.), and bro. Chas. Rowley, esq., to the minister, churchwardens and overseers of the poor of the parish of Wix and their successors A piece of ground (204 sq. yds.), abutting S. on the highway from Wix Cross to Great Oakley and Harwich, E. on premises belonging to Daniel Alston of Manningtree, esq., in occupation of Jas.Masterman, carpenter, W. on premises belonging to Thomas L. Stone, in occupation of Jas. May, cordwainer, and S. on a field, belonging to said Sir Joshua Rowley, called Lockfield, in occupation of Robert Hardy of Tendring Hall, gent., "for the purposes of the [?]said Act and upon trust to permit the premises and all buildings thereon erected or to be erected to be for ever hereafter appropriated to and for the education of the children of the labouring and other poorer classes in the said parish of Wix. . . . . which said school shall always be conducted upon the principles of the Incorporated National Society for Promoting the Education of the poor in the Principles of the Established Church and shall be under the general management and control of the Committee of four of the subscribers to be annually appointed by the minister of the said parish of Wix for the time being, who shall by virtue of his office be a member of the said Committee and preside over it;" and clauses as to religious instruction. [Endorsement in another hand: "The deed of which this is the draft bearing date June 18. 1844 after having been engrossed. . . . . was enrolled in Her Majestey's High Court of Chancery July 1. 1844 & is in the possession of the Rev. G. Willins the Minister of the parish of Wix."]

Abstract & Transcription of Daniels Will by J E Henderson 2012.
Abstract of Will of Daniel Constable Alston of Manningtree, Maltster, Brewer, Coal and Wine Merchant.
16th September 1846, proved 11th December 1846.
To Eliza Alston his wife L100 to supply her immediate occasions, and his private carriage
To his sons Edward John Alston of Great Bromley, Essex, Daniel Constable Alston of Manningtree and Robert Harrison of Friday Street, Cheapside, City of London the mansion house and garden at Manningtree, together with household goods as trustees on trust to:
-Permit the best parlour to be used and occupied for his business
-Permit his wife to occupy the house and enjoy the use of the contents during her lifetime
-After her death to permit his son Daniel Constable Alston to occupy the house and garden to enable him to devote himself to the business and entertain persons in the trade
-Thereafter on trust to sell the same subject to the options to purchase as set out below for the business
To the same trustees his property at Mistley in the occupation of son in law Charles Samuel Bawtree on trust to:
-The use of his daughter Eliza Ann Bawtree, wife of Charles Samuel Bawtree during her lifetime, subject to the use of the cellars for his wine and spirit business
-After her death to her children, or if none to Daniel Constable Alston
To Robert Harrison L50
To his clerk Thomas Day 19 guineas
To his niece Sarah Chapman L10
Reciting his previous partnership with his brother Edward Daniel Alston in the business of Brewer, maltster etc, the partnership finishing in September 1839, and the passing over of the business to him subject to a mortgage in favour of Edward Daniel Alston of L29,800, on which he was paying interest, repayment due 29th September 1860
To his trustees all the property connected with the businesses on trust to carry on the business whilst his wife lived or the mortgage remained unpaid and to pay from the profits:
-The interest on the mortgage
-An annuity to his wife of L300
-To Edward John Alston L200 annually (or his children)
-To Daniel Constable Alston L300 annually (or his children)
(both these last as compensation for their time and trouble running the business)
-To his daughter Eliza Ann Bawtree L300 (or her children), unless her husband dies or becomes incapable of working in the business when it is reduced to L100
-Charles Samuel Bawtree to be employed in the business whilst it is still in operation.
Any remaining profits to be invested and the interest and capital to be accumulated towards repayment of the mortgage
After the death of his wife and the repayment of the mortgage, then the businesses to be sold, subject to an option for Daniel Constable Alston to purchase the same at fair valuation (as with the house), but if he did not want it then the option for Charles Samuel Bawtree to purchase it. These options do not extend to the farm at Great Bromley in the occupation of Edward John Alston when there is an option for Edward John Alston to purchase it. In the meantime his rent not to exceed the current level.
One horse and gig to be kept for the use of Daniel Constable Alston in the business, and one horse and gig for the joint use of Edward John Alston and the Clerk of the business.
The residue of his estate and the proceeds of sale of the business and house to his trustees on trust to sell the same and invest the proceeds, paying the interest as follows:
-One third to Edward John Alston during his life, and after his death to his wife Mary, then after her death to their children at age 21
-One third to Daniel Constable Alston, his wife and children as for Edward John Alston
-One third to Eliza Ann Bawtree for her life, then after to her children
Executors his wife and sons Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston
Witnessed by James Faiers, Manningtree, Cooper C J Owen, Manningtree, Solicitor

The Will in Full:
This is the last Will and Testament of me Daniel Constable Alston of Manningtree in the County of
[page 2]
Essex Maltster Brewer Coal and Wine and spirit Merchant I give unto my dear Wife Eliza Alston the sum of one hundred pounds to supply her immediate occasions and which I direct shall be paid to her within one month after my decease And I give and bequeath to my said Wife my private carriage for her own use absolutely And I give and bequeath unto my Sons Edward John Alston of Great Bromley in the County of Essex and Daniel Constable Alston of Manningtree aforesaid and Robert Harrison of Friday Street Cheapside in the City of London All that mansion house at Manningtree aforesaid in which I now dwell with the garden adjoining the Malting together with all and singular the household goods and furniture plate linen china glass printed books pictures prints and all other the household effects which shall be in and about my said dwellinghouse at the time of my decease To hold the same unto the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison their heirs executors administrators and assigns upon the trusts hereinafter declared concerning the same that is to say upon Trust to permit and suffer the best parlour of the said mansion house to be used and occupied for the purposes of my said business so long as the same shall be carried on as herein- after treated And upon Trust to permit and suffer my said wife to reside in and occupy the remainder of the said mansion house and premises together with the store closets in the said best parlour and to hold and enjoy the furniture plate linen china and other effects therein during the term of her natural life she paying all rates taxes and charges payable in respect of the same and keeping the said premises in good and tenantable repair and insured against loss or damage by fire during the period of such residence And from and after the decease of my said wife Then upon trust so long as my trade and business hereinafter directed to be carried on shall be contin- ued to permit and suffer my son Daniel Constable Alston to have hold use occupy and enjoy my said mansion with the said garden in order to enable him to devote his entire attention to my said busi- ness and to entertain such persons as are usually entertained by the trade And from and after the decease of my said Wife do and shall stand and be seized and possessed of my said mansion house and the furniture and effects in and about the same subject to the trust hereinbefore declared in favour of my said Son upon the trusts follow- ing that is to say In Trust that they or he my said trustees or trus- tee do and shall consent to the right of preemption hereinafter given to the said Daniel Constable Alston and my Son in Law Charles Samuel Bawtree make sale and absolutely dispose of my said mansion house garden and appurtenances and the furniture and effects in and about the same either together or in parts and by public auction or private contract for such price or prices and subject to such conditions of sale and in such manner as my said trustees or trustee shall think fit with power to enjoy and resell the same and do and shall stand and be possessed of the monies which shall arise from such sale or sales after payment thereout of the costs and expenses of and attendant such sale upon the trusts hereinafter declared of and concerning the monies which shall constitute and be the produce of my residuary personal estate I give and devise all that my freehold messuage or tenement with the appurtenances situate at Mistley and now in the occupation of my said Son in Law Charles Samuel Bawtree but the cellars of which are now used for the purpose of my said wine and spirit Business unto the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison
[page 3]
their heirs and assigns To the use of my Daughter Eliza Ann Bawtree the wife of the said Charles Samuel Bawtree for and during the time of her natural life subject to the cellars being appropriated for the purposes of the said Wine and Spirit Business so long as the same shall be carried on under the trusts of this my Will for her sole and separate use and not subject to the debts control or interference of her present or any future husband And from and after her decease To the use of the child if only one and if more than one all the chil- dren of my Daughter the said Eliza Ann Bawtree by the said Charles Samuel Bawtree and any after taken husband or husbands to be equally shared between the children if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and his her or their heirs and assigns or several and respective heirs and assigns for ever as tenants in fee And in case any one or more of the said children shall be under the age of twenty one years without leaving any issue living at the time of his her or their death or respective deaths Then as to for and concerning the origin- nal share or share of and in the said messuage hereditaments and premises which shall belong to the child or children respectively so dying as aforesaid and also the share and several shares of and in the said hereditaments and premises which the same child or chil- dren respectively shall take under this provision by way of cross limitation To the use of the other or others of the same children to be equally divided between them if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and his her or their heirs and assigns or several and respective heirs and assigns for ever as tenants in fee And in case there shall be no child of my said Daughter by the said Charles Samuel Bawtree or any after taken husband or husbands or in case the child if only one or if more than one all the children of my said Daughter shall depart this life under the age of twenty one years and neither of them shall have any issue living at his or her death Then to the use of the said Daniel Constable Alston his heirs and assigns for ever I give and bequeath unto the said Robert Harrison the sum of fifty pounds I give and bequeath unto my Clerk Thomas Day the sum of nineteen guineas I give and bequeath unto my Niece Sarah Chapman the sum of ten pounds And I direct the two last mentioned legacies to be paid at the expiration of one year after my decease And whereas in and previously to the month of September one thou- sand eight hundred and thirty nine I carried on in partnership with my Brother Edward Daniel Alston the Business of a Brewer Maltster Coal Merchant and Spirit Merchant at Manningtree aforesaid And upon the determination of the said partnership business certain articles of agreement were made and entered into between me and my said Brother bearing date the twenty seventh day of March one thousand eight hundred and forty one whereby in consideration of a large sum of money part of which amounting to the sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds was to be secured by me by mortgage of freehold and copyhold hereditaments to the satisfaction of my said Brother my said Brother sold and converted and assured to me divers freehold and copyhold messuages or tenements Inns Grav- house hereditaments and premises and parts and shares of messu- ages tenements Inns hereditaments and premises mentioned and particularized in the first Schedule to the said Articles of Agreement annexed And also all the part share and interest of him the said Edward Daniel Alston of and in all and singular the messuages tenements Inns hereditaments and premises mentioned and
[page 4]
particularized in the second Schedule to the said Articles of Agreement and which were purchased either before or during the continuance of the said partnership And also of and in all the plant of the Brewery stock in trade wares merchandize goods utensils implements horses carriages ready money book and other debts and sums of money owing to the said partnership bonds bills and other property chattles and effects whatsoever and wheresoever and belonging to the said partnership together with the goodwill of the said businesses and and I have ever since continued the said businesses on my own account And whereas the sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds was duly secured by me to my said Brother with interest after the rate of four pounds ten shillings per cent per annum by an Indenture bearing date on or about the day of whereby the said sum is made payable to my said Brother on the twenty ninth day of September one thou- sand eight hundred and sixty and I am thereby empowered to pay off the said mortgage debt either in one payment or several pay- ments or instalments of not less than five thousand pounds at one time or in payment upon giving such notice as is therein men- tioned And whereas the said sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds is still due and owing to the estate of my said late Brother Now I do hereby give devise and bequeath all my said Brewery Malting Coal and Wine and spirit Businesses now carried on by me and all other businesses connected therewith and all and singular the stock and materials now or to be hereafter employed therein and all money and debts which at the time of my decease shall belong or be due and owing to me for or on account of the said businesses And also all freehold copyhold or customary and lease- hold farms inns public houses messuages lands and hereditaments and parts or shares of messuages Inns hereditaments and premises now or to be hereafter employed in or connected with the carrying on of the said businesses and some of which properties I have had con- veyed and surrendered to the said Edward John Alston and others of them to the said Daniel Constable Alston as Trustees respectively for me and all other my messuages lands tenements hereditaments and premises not hereinbefore by me devised or disposed of whether used in or for the purposes of my said business or not unto and to the use of my said Sons Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston and the said Robert Harrison their heirs executors administrators and assigns according to the nature and quality thereof respectively upon and for the trusts intents and purposes and with under and subject to the powers provisoes and declarations hereinafter expressed and declared of and concerning the same that is to say upon Trust that they the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors administrators and assigns of such survivor do and shall so long as the said mortgage debt or sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds or any part thereof shall remain unpaid or my said wife shall live carry on manage and conduct the said busi- nesses And for that purpose I declare that they and he shall have the fullest power over the said business which I can give them to carry on manage and conduct the same in the same manner to all intents and purposes as I myself could do if I were living and acting therein And I do hereby further declare that during such time as the said businesses shall be carried on in pursuance of this my Will the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison their heirs executors administrators and assigns shall stand seized and possessed of the said businesses hereditaments and
[page 5]
premises and the profits to arise from the same and of and in stock houses and land which in pursuance of this my will shall be pur- chased for the purpose of carrying on the said businesses subject to the payment thereout of the said mortgage debt of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds when and as the same shall become due and payable upon the trusts following that is to say Upon Trust that they my said trustees or trustee do and shall thereout pay the interest which shall from time to time become due in respect of the said mort- gage debt of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds or so much thereof as shall from time to time remain unpaid and in respect of any other debt affecting my said businesses which shall carry inte- rest and do and shall in the next place pay to my said Wife an annuity or yearly sum of three hundred pounds for her own abso- lute use and benefit And in the next place do and shall retain to and for him the said Edward John Alston the yearly sum of two hundred pounds and to and for him the said Daniel Constable Alston the yearly sum of three hundred pounds as a compensation for their trouble and time in attending to and managing the said businesses And in the next place do and shall pay unto my Daughter the said Eliza Ann Bawtree the yearly sum of three hundred pounds for her sole and separate use and benefit And do and shall pay the said annual sums by equal half yearly payments the first half yearly payment of each of the said annual sums to be made at the expi- ration of six calendar months next after my decease And as to the residue of the gains and profits which shall arise from and be pro- duced by the carrying on of my said businesses and the rents issues and profits of the said freehold copyhold and leasehold hereditaments and premises which shall belong thereto after payment thereout of the debts which I shall owe at my decease on account of the said businesses and which shall be contracted by my said trustees or trus- tee in carrying on the same and the losses debts charges damages and expenses which shall arise from carrying on the same or which shall be incident thereto upon Trust that they my said trustees or trustee do and shall lay out and invest the same in their or his names or name in or upon some or one of the Parliamentary Stocks or public funds of Great Britain or upon Government or real securities in England or Wales and do and shall reserve the inte- rest dividends and annual produce of the stocks funds and securities of which the surplus gains rents and profits so to be laid out and invested as aforesaid shall for the time being consist and lay out and invest the same and all the resulting income and produce thereof in their or his names or name in or upon any of the said stocks funds or securities to the intent that the same and all such resultant income and produce may accumulate in the way of compound interest and do and shall from time to time alter and vary the said trust funds and the accumulations thereof for or into other stocks funds or securities of a like nature at their or his discretion And I declare that it shall be lawful for my said trustees or trustee for the time being to apply all or any part of the said accumulations in and towards payment of the said mortgage debt or sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds and interest or any part thereof at such times and such manner as they or he shall think proper And I do hereby declare and direct that when and so soon as the said mortgage debt or sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds shall have been paid and discharged and my said Wife shall depart this life my said trustees or trustee do and shall make sale and abso- lutely dispose of my said Brewery Malting Coal and Wine and Spirit
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Businesses and the goodwill stock in trade and effects belonging thereto respectively and of all and singular my freehold copyhold and leasehold hereditaments and premises hereinbefore by me devised for the purposes of the said businesses and the rents whereof are hereinbefore directed to accumulate as aforesaid including as well those devised by this my Will as those which shall be purchased under the power hereinafter in that behalf contained either together or in parcels and either by public auc- tion or private contract and for such price or prices in money and sub- ject to such conditions of sale and other stipulations with respect to the title or otherwise as they or he shall think proper with full power to reserve a bidding or biddings upon any such sale by auction and also to rescind or abandon or consent to the alteration of the terms of any contract or contracts which may be entered into for the sale of the said trust estate and premises or any part or parts thereof and to resell in any of the aforesaid ways the hereditaments property and effects so bought in or the contract or contracts for which shall be so rescinded and to deal with respect to such sales and contracts and the deposits and damages thereon as they or he shall think proper without being answerable or accountable for any expense loss or diminution of price which may be sustained or occasioned by such postponed sale or sales and to enter into make and execute all such acts deeds con- tracts conveyances assignments and assurances as shall or may be necessary for conveying and assuring the said trust estates heredita- ments and premises or such part or parts thereof as shall be sold to the purchaser or purchasers thereof his her or their heirs executors administrators and assigns or as he she or they shall direct or appoint And I do herein declare that all and every the acts deeds contracts con- veyances and assurances which shall be made entered into and exe- cuted by my said trustees or trustee in carrying any such sale or sales as aforesaid into effect shall be good valid and effectual at Law and in Equity to all intents and purposes whatsoever without the concur- rence therein of any person or persons entitled to the produce of such a sale under the trusts of this my Will And upon further Trust that my said trustees or trustee do and shall call in and collect all the credits and sums of money which at the time of the cessation of my said businesses shall be due and owing on account thereof And I do here- by direct that my said trustees or trustee shall stand and be possessed of the monies which shall arise from the sale or sales to be made of my said businesses and the said freehold copyhold and leasehold here- ditaments and premises after payment thereout of the costs charges and expenses of an attending the carrying such sale or sales into effect and of the monies which shall be collected and received in respect of the credits and sums of money due and owing to my estate on account of my said businesses after payment thereout of the ex- penses of and attending the collection and receipt thereof and also subject to the payment out of the produce of the said sales of the said mortgage debt of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds or so much thereof as shall then remain unpaid and all other debts and sums due on account of my said businesses upon and for the trusts interests and purposes hereinafter expressed and declared con- cerning the same And as for and concerning all the Rest Residue and Remainder of my goods chattels and Personal Estate and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever not hereinbefore by me disposed of I give and bequeath the same to the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison their executors administrators and assigns upon the trusts following that is to say upon Trust that they and he do and shall as soon as conveniently can be after my
[page 7]
decease make sale and absolutely dispose of all such parts of my said residuary estate as shall be in their nature saleable upon such terms and in such manner as to them or him shall seem reasonable and do and shall collect get in and receive such part and parts thereof as shall consist of monies and securities for money and do and shall stand and be possessed of the monyes which shall arise from and constitute and be the produce of my said residuary personal estate upon the trusts in- tents and purposes hereinafter expressed and declared concerning the same And I do hereby declare that my said trustees or trustee shall stand and be possessed of the monies which shall arise from the sale of my said businesses and in the goodwill thereof and of my said freehold copyhold and leasehold premises and of the monies which shall be collected and reserved in respect thereof and of the monies to arise from the sale of my said freehold mansion house and premises at Manningtree aforesaid and the furniture plate linen china and other household effects in and about the same and of the accumula- tions which shall be made of the gains and profits to arise from my said businesses and of the monies which shall constitute and be the produce of my residuary personal estate and the stocks funds and secu- rities in or upon which the same shall be invested upon the trusts following that is to say on Trust that they or he do and shall lay out and invest the same in their or his names or name in or upon some of one of the Parliamentary Stocks or Funds of Great Britain or in or upon Government or coal securities in England or Wales at interest And do and shall from time to time alter vary and trans- pose the same for or into any other stocks funds or securities as shall be thought advisable And as to and concerning one equal third part of the said trust monies stocks and securities do and shall pay the inte- rest dividends and income thereof unto my said son Edward John Alston or empower him to receive the same for the rest of his natu- ral life And from and immediately after his decease do and shall pay the same interest dividends and annual produce unto Mary the Wife of my said son Edward John Alston for and during the term of her natural life And from and after the decease of the survivor of my said Son and his said Wife do and shall stand and be possessed of the said one equal third part and the stocks funds and securities in or upon which the same shall be invested and the interest divi- dends and income thereof in Trust for such child or children of my said Son as being a Son or Sons shall attain the age of twenty one years or being a Daughter or Daughters shall attain that age or marry with the consent of her Guardian or Guardians for the time being equally to be divided between them if more than one And I declare and direct that if at the decease of my said Son and his Wife any of the children of my said Son being a Son or Sons shall not have attained the age of twenty one years or being a Daughter or Daugh- ters shall not have attained that age or been married with such consent as aforesaid it shall be lawful for my said trustees or trustee to apply all or any part of the income of the presumptive or contingent share or respective presumptive or contingent shares of such child or children for his her or their maintenance and education or otherwise for his her or their benefit during such the period of his her or their minority or respective minorities or discoverture or respective discover- as the case may be as to such trustees or trustee may seem proper And if the whole of such income shall not be so applied then I direct that the unapplied income shall be improved at interest and go in augmentation of the share or respective shares from which the same shall have arisen but so nevertheless that my said
[page 8]
trustees or trustee shall not be precluded from applying such invest- ed unapplied income and the proceeds thereof for the benefit of such child or children at any subsequent period of his her or their minori- ty or discoverture or respective minorities or discovertures And I further direct and declare that it shall be lawful for my said trustees and trustee for the time being with the consent of my said Son and his Wife in writing or the survivor of them and after the decease of such survivor at their or his own discretion to apply any part not exceeding one half of the principal of the presump- tive or contingent share or respective presumptive or contingent shares of any one or more of the children of my said Son before the said period of vesting in or towards his her or their advancement or preferment in the world or otherwise for his her or their benefit as my said trustees or trustee may think may think proper And as to one other equal third part of all and singular the said trust in monies stocks funds monies and securities do and shall stand and be possessed thereof upon such and the like trusts interests and purpo- ses powers provisos and declarations in favour or for the benefit of my Son the said Daniel Constable Alston and his Wife and Children as are hereinbefore expressed and declared in favour or for the benefit of my Son Edward John Alston and his Wife and Children And as to and concerning the remaining one third part of all and singular the said trust monies stocks funds monies and securities do and shall pay the interest dividends and income thereof unto my said Daughter Eliza Ann Bawtree for the term of her natural life for her sole and separate use And from and after her decease do and shall stand and be possessed of the said third part upon such and the like trusts intents and purposes powers provisos and declarations in favour of or for the benefit of the children of my said Daughter the said Eliza Ann Bawtree as are hereinbefore expressed and declared in favour or for the benefit of the children of my said Son Edward John Alston provi- ded always and I do hereby declare that when and so soon as my said businesses shall become saleable my said trustees or trustee shall in the first place offer to sell my said businesses and the stock in trade and goodwill thereof my said mansion house freehold copyhold and lease- hold hereditaments and premises except the said farm at Great Bromley in the occupation of my said son Edward John Alston unto my son the said Daniel Constable Alston at a fair valuation to be fixed by two competent persons one to be named by my said Son and x their disagreement by an umpire the other by my said trustees or trustee And in case ofx the refusal to be chosen by them And in of my said Son to purchase my said businesses when so offered to him case of for sale then shall offer the same to my Son in Law the said Charles Samuel Bawtree in like manner And if he shall refuse to purchase the same then my said trustees or trustee shall proceed to sell the same in manner hereinbefore by me directed And I declare and direct that no purchaser of my said businesses from the trustees or trustee of this my Will shall be bound to ascertain that my said businesses shall have been offered to my said Son and Son in Law and that they have refused to purchase the same or to make any enquiries with respect thereto provided always and I do hereby declare that when and so soon as my said businesses shall become saleable my said trustees or trustee shall in the first place offer to sell my said farm at Great Bromley aforesaid in the occupation of the said Edward John Alston with the appurtenances thereto belonging unto my said Son the said Edward John Alston at a fair valuation to be fixed in the same manner as is hereinbefore directed with respect to the value of my said businesses And if he shall refuse to purchase
[page 9]
the same then my said trustees or trustee shall proceed to sell the same in manner hereinbefore directed And I declare and direct that no purchaser of any said farm from the trustees or trustee of this my Will shall be bound to ascertain that my said farm shall have been offered to my said Son and that he has refused to purchase the same or to make any enquiries with respect thereto provided always and I do hereby declare and direct that if the said Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston or either of them shall decline or become incapable to attend to and manage the said busi- nesses the trustees or trustee of this my Will shall pay unto him or them during his or their life or lives the yearly sum of one hundred pounds apiece only for his or their own respective benefit And I do hereby declare and direct that in the event of either of them the said Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston dying before the period for the sale of my said businesses arrives whensoever such death shall happen after my decease then the said yearly sums of one hundred pounds respectively given to the said Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston in the event of their declining or becoming incapable to attend to the said businesses as aforesaid shall be paid and applied by my said trustees or trustee as annual income to and for the benefit of the respective wifes and children of the said Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston in the same manner as is hereinbefore directed with respect to the dividends and income of the shares of my residuary estate And I do hereby direct my said trustees or trustee to employ the said Charles Samuel Bawtree in my said busi- nesses so long as the same shall be carried on under the trusts of this my Will or he shall think fit And in case he shall die or decline or become incapable to be employed in my said businesses then I direct my said trustees or trustee to pay to my said Daughter the yearly sum of one hundred pounds instead of three hundred pounds as here- inbefore directed for the term of her natural life And in case my said Daughter shall die in the lifetime of her said husband and before the period for the sale of my said businesses arrives then I direct my trustees or trustee to pay and apply the said yearly sum of three hundred pounds or one hundred pounds as the case may be to or in favour of the children of my said Daughter in the same manner as is hereinbefore directed with respect to their share of my residuary estate And I declare that the said yearly sum of three hundred pounds and one hundred pounds and income of one third part of residuary estate hereinbefore given to my said Daughter shall be respectively for her sole and separate use and not subject to the debts control or interference of her present or any future husband And the receipt or receipts of my said Daughter whether covert or sole shall be an effect- tual discharge or effectual discharges for the money therein men- tioned and acknowledged to be received And I authorize and empower my said trustees or trustee for the time being to hire and employ such persons with such salaries as they or he shall think proper and to enter into such contracts and agreements and to make such engagements respecting my said businesses and the concerns thereof as they or he shall think reasonable and to increase or abridge the said businesses or concerns and my capital therein and to adjust and settle all amounts and transactions in which I shall be interested and to refer any dispute concerning the same to arbitration and to compromise and compound any debts owing to me and to pay and satisfy any claims and demands made upon or against my estate which my said trustees or trustee shall deem to be fair and just though the same may not be supported in legal evidence and to
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make any sale or sales upon credit and generally to transact all matters or concerns respecting my said businesses and to arrange to be done all acts and deeds relative thereto as if such trustees or trustee were absolutely entitled to or interested in the practises it being my intention to give my trustees or trustee for the time being full discretionary powers and authorities to carry on my said businesses and concerns during the aforesaid period in such manner as to they or him shall seem most advantageous and most for the benefit of the persons interested under the trusts of this my Will And I here- by declare that all losses charges and expenses attending or to be in- curred in the carrying on of my said businesses and the concerns thereof respectively shall be borne paid and defrayed in the first instance out of the gains and profits thereof and if they shall be insufficient then out of the capital thereof And my will is that the trustees and trustee for the time being of this my Will shall from time to time after my decease take annual accounts of the stock and capital employed in my said businesses and shall make out annual accounts of the gains profits losses and expenses of the same businesses and of all transactions relating thereto which accounts shall be audited and settled by my said Wife and my said trustees and after her death by my children or the survivors of them and my said trustees and signed by them And after every such account shall be so audited settled and signed the same shall be considered as finally closed and it shall not be lawful for any person interested under the trusts of this my Will to open dispute or investigate or object to the same but they shall respectively be finally bound and concluded thereby And I direct that one horse and gig shall be kept for the use of the said Daniel Constable Alston in the said businesses and one horse and gig for the joint use of the said Edward John Alston and the Clerk of the said businesses And I do hereby further declare that if either of my said Sons shall raise any difficulty or objection respec- ting the hereditaments so surrendered to them respectively as trus- tees for me as hereinbefore mentioned then and in such case any Son raising such difficulty or objection shall take the property which shall be so vested in him for his own absolute use and benefit and every other bequest or benefit taken by such Son under this my Will shall thenceforth immediately cease and determine as if he had died in my lifetime without issue Provided always and I do here- by declare that it shall be lawful for my said trustees and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors administrators and assigns of such survivor to renew the present or future leases of any of the said leasehold premises now or to be after employed in or connected with the carrying on of my said businesses And I do hereby further declare that my said trustees or trustee shall stand seized or possessed of the premises to be comprised in such renewed cases upon and for the same trusts intents and purposes and with under and subject to the same powers provisos and declar- ations as are in this my Will expressed and declared of and concerning the original leases thereof or as near thereto as the deaths of parties and other circumstances will admit of Provided always and I do hereby further declare that it shall be lawful for my said trustees and the survivors and survivor of them and the heirs executors administrators and assigns of such survivor during such times as my said businesses shall be carried on by them or him in pur- suance of the trust declared by this my Will by any Deed or Deeds Instrument or Instruments in writing to be by them or him sealed and delivered in the presence of and attested by one or more witness
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or witnesses to charge my said freehold copyhold or customary and leasehold messuages hereditaments and premises now or to be here- after employed in or connected with the carrying on of my said businesses or any part thereof with the payment to them or him of any sum or sums of money they or he may think proper not exceeding in the whole the sum of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds and to raise such sum or sums by a mortgage or mortgages of the premises which shall be so charged to any per- son or persons and for such estate or estates and in such manner as they or he my said trustees or the survivors or survivor of them or the heirs executors administrators or assigns of such survivor may think proper And I declare that my said trustees their exec- utors administrators and assigns shall stand possessed of the said sum or sums of money so to be charged as last aforesaid upon Trust that they my said trustees and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors administrators and assigns of such survivor do and shall apply the same sums in paying off the said mortgage debt of twenty nine thousand eight hundred pounds due to my said Brother as aforesaid or so much thereof as shall be then due and unpaid or any part thereof or in carrying on my said busines- ses according to the trusts hereinbefore declared of and concerning the same or any other purpose connected with my said businesses provi- ded also and I do hereby further declare that it shall be lawful to my said trustees or trustee at any time to determine my said businesses and dis- continue the same altogether as to them or him shall seem most prudent and most advantageous to the persons beneficially interes- ted therein And in case of their discontinuing to carry on the same it shall be lawful for them or him my said trustees or trustee to sell and dispose of the said businesses and the goodwill thereof and the estates and property belonging thereto in the same manner in all respects as I have hereinbefore directed in case of the death of my said Wife and the payment of the aforesaid mortgage debt And I do hereby direct that my said Son Edward John Alston shall not be called upon to pay any greater rent for the lands and here- ditaments occupied by him under me than he shall pay for the same at the time of my decease And I do hereby further declare that if any sum or sums of money shall be due and owing to me from my said Sons or my said Son in Law Charles Samuel Bawtree and an entry or entries of the last mentioned monies shall be found in my private books of account under the title of their names respective- ly by the sum or sums so advanced to my said Sons shall be deemed part or parts of the share or shares given to him or them respective- ly and his or their children by this my Will of and in my residu- ary and other estates and shall be deducted therefrom for his or their absolute benefit and if I had given the same sum or sums to him or them respectively and the sum or sums advanced by me to my said Son in Law I give and bequeath to my Daughter absolutely and the same shall be deducted from the share of my said Daughter and her children of and in my residuary and other estates Provided also and I do hereby declare that in the meantime and until my freehold copyhold & leasehold hereditaments and premises shall be sold and disposed of after the discontinuance of my said businesses the rents issues and profits thereof shall be held and applied upon the same trusts as are hereinbefore expressed and declared of any con- cerning the annual income of the monies to arise from the sale thereof Provided always and I do hereby declare that it shall and may be lawful to and for the said Edward John Alston Daniel
[page 12]
Constable Alston and Robert Harrison and the survivors and survi- vor of them and the executors and administrators of such survivor at any time previously to the sale or discontinuance of my said businesses at the discretion of my said trustees or trustee by any Deed or Deeds Instrument or Instruments in writing either referring or not referring to this present power to be sealed and declared by them or him in the presence of and attested by one or more reli- able witness or witnesses to demise or leave or all or any part or parts of the freehold copyhold and leasehold hereditaments and premises by this my Will devises and bequeathed (the proper licences for the devise of such copyhold hereditaments being first obtained) to any person or persons for any term or number of years absolute not exceed- ing twenty one years to take effect in possession and not in rever- sion or by way of future interest so that there be reserved on every such demise or lease payable during the term thereby created then best or most improved rents or rent to be incident to the immedi- ate reversion of the hereditaments to be demised or leased that can be reasonably had for the same without taking any fine premium or foregift or anything in the nature of a fine premium or foregift for the making thereof and so that there be therein respectively contained a clause in the nature of a condition of reentry for non- payment of the rent or rents to be thereby respectively reserved and so that the person or persons names therein lessee or lessees do exe- cute a counterpart of counterparts thereof respectively and do thereby covenant for the due payment of the rent or rents thereby to be respectively reserved and be not by any clause or words therein to be entered made dispunishable for waste or exempted from punish- ment for committing waste Provided also and I do hereby further declare that it shall and may be left to and for the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors or administrators of such survivor at any time or times whilst my said businesses shall be carried on to dispose of surrender convey and assign either by way of absolute sale or in exchange for or in lieu of other messuages inns lands or hereditaments to be situate somewhere in England or Wales all or any part of the freehold copyhold and leasehold here- ditaments and premises hereinbefore devised and bequeathed to any person or persons whomsoever for such price or prices in money or for such equivalent or recompense in lands or hereditaments as to them the said trustees or trustee shall seem reasonable and that for the purpose of effecting such dispositions sales surrenders conveyances and arrangements it shall and may be left to and for my said trus- tees and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors and administrators of such survivor to make and execute all such acts deeds conveyances assignments and assurances which it shall be thought necessary or expedient to execute in order to effectuate such sales dispositions exchanges conveyances and assignments as afore- said and also that upon any such exchange as aforesaid it shall and may be lawful to and for the said trustees or trustee to give or receive any sum or sums of money by way of equality of exchange and also that upon payment of the money to arise by sale of the said hereditaments and premises or any part thereof or so to be received for equality of exchange And it shall and may be lawful to and for my said trustees and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors or administrators of such survivor to give and sign receipts for the monies for which the same shall be sold or so to be received by them or him for equality of exchange as aforesaid [page13]
and that such receipts shall be sufficient discharges to the person or per- sons paying the same respectively for the money for which the same shall be so given or for so much thereof as in such receipts shall be res- pectively acknowledged to be received and that the person or persons paying the same respectively and taking such receipts for the same respectively as aforesaid shall not afterwards be answerable or account- able for the loss misapplication or nonapplication or be in any wise obliged to see to the application thereof or any part thereof respec- tively and further that when all or any part of the hereditaments and premises so to be respectively settled as aforesaid shall be sold for a valuable consideration in money or any money shall be received for equality of exchange under the powers hereinbefore contained they my said trustees and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors or administrators of such survivor shall stand and be pos- sessed thereof upon the same trusts as the said hereditaments and premises so to be sold as aforesaid would have been liable under the trusts of this my Will if such sale or sales had not been made and shall stand possessed of the hereditaments and premises to be received by way of exchange as hereinbefore is mentioned upon such of the same trusts and for such and the same interests and purposes and as with under and subject to such and the same powers provisos and directions as are in and by this my Will declared of any concerning the hereditaments and premises to be given and assigned by the said trus- tees or trustee in exchange Provided also and I do hereby further declare that if the said Edward John Alston Daniel Constable Alston and Robert Harrison or any or either of them or any future trus- tees or trustee to be appointed by virtue of the power for that purpose herein contained or any of the said trustees executors or adminis- trators of any such trustee shall happen to die or be desirous of being discharged from or refuse or decline or become incapable to act in the trusts or powers in this my Will contained before the same shall be fully performed or otherwise satisfied Then and in either of the said cases and so often as the same shall happen it shall and may be lawful to and for my said Wife during her life and after her decease for the surviving or continuing trustees or trustee or if there be none such for the retiring trustee or trustees or if all the said trustees shall have departed this life for the executors or administrators of the last surviving trustee or for some or one of such person or persons if the other or others of them shall be unable or unwilling to exercise this power by any writing under his her or their hand or hands to nominate and appoint any other person or persons to be a trustee or trustees in the place or stead of the trustees or trustee so dying desiring to be discharged or refusing declining or becoming incapable to act as aforesaid And that where any such nomination or appointment of a new trustee or new trustees shall have taken place all and singular the trust estates messuages stocks funds and securities whatsoever which shall be then vested in the trustees or trustee for the time being of this my Will or which shall be subject to the trusts thereof shall with all convenient speed at the costs of my estate be assigned and transferred in such manner as effectually to vest the same in such new trustee or trustees jointly with the surviving or continuing trustees or trustee or if there be no continuing trustee then in such new trustees only upon and for such of the trusts intents and pur- poses and under and subject to such of the powers provisoes and declarations hereinbefore by me declared of and concerning the same trust estates messuages stocks funds and securities as shall be then subsisting or capable of taking effect And I do hereby declare that
[page14]
all and every such new trustees or trustee shall and may in all things act and assist in the carrying on and execution of the trusts to be reposed in them or him as fully and effectually and with all and singular the same powers authorities and discretion to all intents and purposes whatsoever as if they or he had been originally in and by this my Will nominated a trustee or trustees for the purposes aforesaid or as the trustee or trustees in or to whose place such new trustee or trustees shall succeed might or could have done by virtue of this my Will if he or they had been living and continuing to act in the execution of the aforesaid trusts And I do hereby further declare that the said trustees hereby appointed and such new trustees as aforesaid and each of them their and each of their heirs executors and administrators shall be charged and chargeable only with and for so much of the said trust monies as they respectively shall actually receive notwithstanding their respectively joining with any cotrustee or cotrustees in the signature of receipts for the sake of conformity And that any one or more of such trustees shall not be answerable or accountable for any other or others of them or for the acts deeds receipts neglects or defaults of any other or others of them but each of them for his own respect- tive acts deeds receipts neglects and defaults only and that they or any or either of them shall not be answerable or accountable for any loss that my happen by reason of any defect of title in any hereditaments and premises which shall or may be purchased with the said trust monies or any part thereof pursuant to the power in that behalf hereinbefore contained nor shall they or any or either of them be answerable or accountable for any per- son or persons in whose hands any of the said trust monies shall or may be deposited for safe custody or for the insufficiency or defici- ency of any stocks funds or securities wherein or whereupon any of the said trust monies shall be placed or invested or for any other misfortune loss accident or damage which shall or may happen in the execution of any of the trusts or powers herein expressed or otherwise in relation thereto unless the same shall happen through their own wilful defaults respectively And furthermore that it shall be lawful for the said trustees hereinbefore by me appointed and such new trustees as aforesaid and each of them their and each of their heirs executors and administrators by and out of the monies which shall come to their respective hands by virtue of these presents to retain to and reimburse themselves respectively and to allow to their respective cotrustees all such costs charges and expenses as they or any or either of them shall or may sustain or incur in or about the execution of any of the trusts or powers herein expressed or otherwise in relation thereto And I do hereby lastly declare that in all cases whatsoever where any money shall be payable by vir- tue hereof to any trustees or trustee for the time being of this my Will the receipt or receipts in writing of such trustees or trustee shall be an effectual discharge to the person or persons paying the same for so much money as in such receipt or receipts shall be expressed or acknowledged to be received and that such person or persons as aforesaid shall not afterwards be answerable or accountable for the loss misapplication or nonapplication of such money or any part thereof or be obliged or concerned to see to the application there- of or any part thereof And I appoint my said Wife and my said Sons Edward John Alston & Daniel Constable Alston Executrix and Executors of this my Will In witness where I the said Daniel Constable Alston the Testator have to this my last Will
[page 15]
and Testament contained in this and the fifteen preceeding sheets of paper set my hand this sixteenth day of September one thou-sand eight hundred and forty six
Danl C Alston
Signed by the said Daniel Constable Alston the Testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the joint presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other subscribe our names as witnesses James Faiers Manningtree Cooper C J Owen Manningtree Solr Proved at London the 11th Decr 1846 before the Judge by the Oaths of Eliza Alston Widow the Relict and Edward John Alston and Daniel Constable Alston executors to whom Admon was granted having been first sworn by Commission duly to administer
Transcribed by J Henderson 2012.

Daniel married Elizabeth TOTMAN [3760], daughter of John TOTMAN of Gt Bromley [3761] and Unknown, in 1809. Elizabeth was born about 1783, died on 26 Nov 1852 in Manningtree aged about 69, and was buried in Manningtree Church Family Vault.

General Notes:
Married by Licence (Essex).

Died.
26 ult., at Manningtree, aged 69, Elizabeth, relict of D.C. Alston Esq.
Ipswich Journal 4 December 1852

Elizabeth was aged 69 at her death.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, High St Manningtree. Elizabeth is described as head of house a widow aged 67 born Gt Bromley ESS
HO107/1780

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1175 M    i. Edward Thomas ALSTON [3762] was buried in Manningtree ESS.

+ 1176 M    ii. Edward John ALSTON [3763] was born on 21 Oct 1811 in Manningtree, died on 29 Sep 1886 in Gt Bromley Hall ESS at age 74, and was buried in Gt Bromley Church Family Vault.

+ 1177 M    iii. Daniel Constable ALSTON [3765] was born on 25 Aug 1816 in Lt Bromley ESS, died on 15 Mar 1860 in Lt Bromley ESS at age 43, and was buried in Manningtree Church Family Vault.

+ 1178 F    iv. Eliza Anne ALSTON [3766] was born on 12 Aug 1816.

939. Fanny Constable ALSTON [3743] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 14 Aug 1770 and died in 1835 at age 65.

General Notes:
Marriage Ref:
A few days ago was married at Manningtree, Mr Leech wine merchant, to Frances, eldest daughter of Mr Alston both of that place.
The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, July 31, 1813; Issue 4168.

Fanny died without issue.

Fanny married William LEECH Of Manningtree [3744] in Jul 1813 in Manningtree.

Fanny next married Joseph PAGE Of Manningtree [3745].

General Notes:
Joseph died s.p.

940. Anne ALSTON [3746] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born from 7 Jan 1771 to 1772, was baptised from 14 Jan 1771 to 1772, and died in 1855 in East Bergholt, Suffolk. UK at age 84.

General Notes:
Wedding date: IPSWICH
The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, December 7, 1805; Issue 3787
Tuesday was married Mr John Scrivener of Stutton to Miss Anne Alston second daughter of Edward Alston Esq Manningtree

Anne died s.p.

Anne married Thomas SCRIVENER of Stutton Manningtree [3747] on 3 Dec 1805 in Ipswich. Thomas was born on 9 Nov 1767 and died on 2 Oct 1839 in East Bergholt, Suffolk. UK at age 71.

941. Sarah ALSTON [3748] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 1 Mar 1780, was baptised on 5 Mar 1780 in Manningtree, and died on 14 Sep 1864 at age 84.

General Notes:
Sarah died aged 86.

Sarah married Thomas OSMOND [3749].

General Notes:
Thomas was a surgeon of Thorpe-le-Soken.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 1179 M    i. Thomas Edward OSMOND [3750] was born on 16 Jul 1810.

942. Mary Newman ALSTON [3751] (Edward ALSTON822, Sarah ALSTON683, Edward Of Lavenham Hall.533, Edmund of Rogers350, Edmund159, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 2 Feb 1777 in Manningtree and was buried on 22 May 1780 in Manningtree.

General Notes:
Mary died an infant.

943. Susanna BATHO [11631] (Margaret SEWELL828, Thomas SEWELL702, Joseph SEWELL543, Thomas SEWELL355, Mary ALSTON160, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1763 and was baptised on 9 Feb 1763 in St Andrew Holborn.

Susanna married Isaac BATHO [16931], son of John BATHO [16934] and Elizabeth HALL [16935], on 20 Aug 1786 in St Giles Cripplegate City. Isaac was born in 1764 in Holborn London and died on 29 Apr 1821 in Holborn London at age 57.

General Notes:
Isaac was a tailor.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1180 M    i. Henry BATHO [16936] .

+ 1181 M    ii. Thomas BATHO [16937] .

+ 1182 M    iii. Benjamin BATHO [16938] .

+ 1183 M    iv. John BATHO [16939] .

944. John BATHO [11632] (Margaret SEWELL828, Thomas SEWELL702, Joseph SEWELL543, Thomas SEWELL355, Mary ALSTON160, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1767 and was baptised in St Andrew Holborn.


945. David ALSTON [3991] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) died on 15 Sep 1850 in London.

General Notes:
David was an oyster merchant of 31 King William St & Monument Yard, London and Cheyney Rock Sheppy Kent.

Pigots Directory 1839
Alston David - Fish Factor of 4 Arthur St East City.

London P.O. Directory 1843.
Alston David oyster merchant, 4 Arthur St, East, London Bridge.

The Times, Tuesday, Sep 17, 1850; pg. 7; Issue 20596; col D
Deaths:On the 15th inst., David Alston Esq of 6 Monument Yard City and of Cheney Rock Sheerness in the 50th year of his age.

Died 15 Sept. 1850 aged 49 David Alston Esq. of Monument Yard City and of Cheyney Rock Sheerness.
Gentlemans Magazine

Will of David Alston of 31 King Wm. Street London and of Cheyney Rock in the Isle of Sheppey dated 8 Dec. 1847 proved (PCC) by Jane Alston his widow (sole executorix and legatee).14 Oct. 1850. Children in general terms minors.
W. Hinsley Smith and Wm. Alston the 2. witnesses.

Copy of Will on this file

David married Jane [3993]. Jane was born about 1803 in Rottingdean SSX and died on 7 Oct 1858 aged about 55.

General Notes:
The Will of Jane Alston widow of 2 Landsdown Tce Sth Lambeth SRY who died 7 Oct 1858 was proved 16 Dec 1858 by the Rev George Bryant [3994] of Sheerness Kent at under L450

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 6 Monument Yard St Margarets New Fish St LON. Jane is recorded as head of house a widow aged 48 a landed proprieter born Rottingdean SSX Also in the house was a visitor Jane Deadman(?) widow aged 67 born Rottingdean SSX

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1184 F    i. Catherine Sarah ALSTON [3992] .

+ 1185 F    ii. Jane ALSTON [3995] was born about 1839 in City St Magnus LON.

+ 1186 M    iii. William ALSTON [7768] was born about 1831 in St Mary at Hill City.

+ 1187 M    iv. James ALSTON [7769] was born about 1834 in St Mary at Hill City and died on 3 Oct 1867 in Christopher Hotel Eton aged about 33.

+ 1188 F    v. Rosa ALSTON [7770] was born about 1843 in Isle of Sheppy KEN.

946. Mary Ann ALSTON [3998] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 14 Nov 1787 and was baptised on 26 Dec 1787 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN.

Mary married M SMITH of Kent [3999].

947. Elizabeth ALSTON [4002] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1787 in Rochester.

General Notes:
They had further issue.



Elizabeth married William James CHAPLIN M.P. [4003] on 11 Jul 1816 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN. William was born in 1787 and died in 1859 at age 72.

General Notes:
William of Hyde Park Gdns and Ewhurst Park Hants was M P for Salisbury, and Sheriff of London 1845-6.

The year 1847 is a landmark in Salisbury's political history in several ways. It brought to an end the period, beginning in 1818, in which the city had been represented by one Whig and one Tory,and began a period of nearly thirty years during which it was represented by two Liberals; it saw the virtual disappearance of the old family connexions and their replacement by new men, who, though still men with local connexions, were not local men in quite the same sense. For example,William James Chaplin, head of the well-known carriers and coach proprietors, Chaplin & Horne, M.P. from 1847 to 1857, owed his election to his chairmanship of the South-Western Railway, which,it was considered, would give him power to confer benefits upon the city From: 'Salisbury: Politics and parliamentary history since 1612', A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 6 (1962), pp. 117-124. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41796 Date accessed: 18 April 2013.

The Times, Sat July 19 1859
London and South-Western Railway - Notice of next half-yearly general meeting ---- A vacancy has been occasioned in the Board of Directors by the death of William James Chaplin Esq ----


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1189 M    i. Col John Worthy CHAPLIN V.C. C.B. [4004] was born on 23 Jul 1841 and died on 19 Aug 1920 in Market Harborough LEI at age 79.

+ 1190 F    ii. Rosa CHAPLIN [4005] .

+ 1191 M    iii. William Augustus Chaplin CHAPLIN [7009] .

+ 1192 M    iv. Alfred CHAPLIN [7010] .

+ 1193 M    v. Horace CHAPLIN [7011] .

+ 1194 F    vi. Eleanor CHAPLIN [7012] .

+ 1195 F    vii. Caroline CHAPLIN [16558] .


948. Katherine ALSTON [4000] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 2 Jan 1789, was baptised on 25 Jan 1789 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN, died in 1822 at age 33, and was buried on 3 May 1822 in Chatham KEN.


Katherine married Sir Richard DOBSON Kt. MD FRS [4001] on 23 Apr 1811 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN. Richard was born about 1774, died on 1 Sep 1847 aged about 73, and was buried on 9 Sep 1847 in St Mary's Chatham.

General Notes:
Sir Richard Dobson was Surgeon General of the Navy

He proposed that the rank of Physician be abolished in the Navy . . . . .
Ref: http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Ke4BAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA372&lpg=PA372&dq=Sir+Richard+Dodson&source=bl&ots=hKQQnAZxE-&sig=MFnvPxFhBoHcmdSndQWpQbhiN9Y&hl=en&sa=X&ei=0GZvUebZGobCkgW69oAI&sqi=2&ved=0CEIQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=Sir%20Richard%20Dodson&f=false

Richard was aged 73 at his death and was give a big funeral.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1196 M    i. William Francis DOBSON [7013] .

+ 1197 F    ii. Mary Ann DOBSON [11347] was born on 30 Dec 1815 and was baptised on 26 Jan 1816 in Chatham KEN.

+ 1198 F    iii. Sarah DOBSON [11348] was born on 21 Nov 1818 and was baptised on 2 Jan 1819 in Chatham KEN.

949. William Spice ALSTON [10600] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Mar 1790, was baptised on 9 May 1790 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN, and was buried on 2 Jun 1791 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN.

950. Elizabeth ALSTON [10598] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 1 May 1791 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN and was buried on 29 Sep 1791 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN.

951. Sarah ALSTON [10599] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 8 Aug 1792, was baptised on 9 Sep 1792 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN, and was buried on 6 Dec 1805 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN.

952. William Spice ALSTON [3982] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 1 Apr 1797, was baptised on 28 May 1797 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN, and was buried on 11 Oct 1834 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN.

General Notes:
Extracts from a Letter dated 1862.
Wm. Spice Alston died in 1836-7 unmarried his realty went to his brother David Thomas Alston by entail or settlement and his personalty to the same by will . . . . . The sister you mention (Mrs. Chaplin) is also a friend of mine. She is the widow of the late William Chaplin late M.P. for Salisbury of Coaching and Railroad celebrity.
Alstoniana Pg 360

Will dated 27 Oct 1834 PROB 11/1836 copy with Susan Perrett 2007
William is described as a tanner of Chalkwell Kent



953. David Thomas ALSTON [3984] (William of Rochester830, Thomas Surgeon712, Thomas Surgeon552, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 17 Apr 1799 in Rochester, was baptised on 9 Jun 1799 in St Nicholas Rochester KEN, and died on 28 Nov 1855 at age 56.

General Notes:
David was from Cheyney Rock, Isle of Sheppey Kent, and Savage Gardens. He owned oyster fisheries and is said to have been beneficent with the wealth he amassed from these.

Pigots Directory 1839
Alston David Thomas - Oyster Merchant 15 Savage Gardens.

London P. O. Directory 1843
Alston David Thomas merchant 15 Savage Gdns Tower Hill

Green & others v Alston & others.
This was an action brought against the late Mr Alston & others by the night oyster meters of the corporation of London for payment of 265L 12s for work at Billingsgate & Hungerford Markets in 1852/53/54 of meting, landing, & unloading shellfish.
In 1852 Mr Alston had set his face against the claim of the night meters, he had in fact paid the day meters a parallel group working different hours who had established a claim to the payment. Counsel for the defendants described the plaintiffs claim as an usurpation, inspite of the night oyster meters claim of a long and established right and privilage for which they had paid large fees.
The jury retired for half an hour and then returned a general verdict for the defendants.
Extracted from The Times 10 Dec 1857 pg 10 col f

Died 28 Nov. 1855 aged 56 David Thos. Alston Esq. of Savage Gardens and owner of the extensive Cheyney Rock Oyster Fishery Isle of Sheppey. A man of great wealth, he employed it to the benefit of all about him. He married. a niece of Mr. Alderman Harmer.
Gent's Mag.

Kent Archives (U487) have a publication on land holdings and an oyster fishery, owned by the Alston family at Birchington Kent. (IGI Library)

Essex Record Office
Southend Branch transcripts
DEEDS OF FORESHORE AND SEA GROUNDS AT SOUTHEND
Reference Code TS 113/49
Dates of Creation 28 February 1843
Scope and Content Memorandum of Agreement Dan. Robert Scratton of Milton Hall in Prittlewell and David Thomas Alston of Chalkwell near Sittingbourne (co Kent), esqs Scratton to let to Alston two pieces of sea ground belonging to manor of Milton Hall, lying principally between Mill Gut and the Pier Hardway, and marked with beacons, from year to year at an annual rent of L50, for the sole purpose of laying oysters thereon Signatures of both parties Witness: M. Comport [soir], Rochford [For photocopy, see TS 124]

Essex Record Office
Southend Branch transcripts
COPY OF AGREEMENT RELATING TO LETTING OF PIECES OF SEA GROUND IN PRITTLEWELL
Reference Code TS 124/1
Scope and Content Photocopy of Memorandum of agreement between Daniel Robert Scratton of Milton Hall in Prittlewell and David Thomas Alston of Chalkwell near Sittingbourne (co. Kent) both esq., relating to letting of two pieces of sea-ground belonging to the manor of Milton Hall, 28 Feb. 1843 For calendar of series of deeds of which this memorandum forms part, see TS 113

Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office:
Pleadings 1801-1842 C 13/455/22
Alston v Alston. Bill and two answers. [MRFA Two bills].
Plaintiffs: David Thomas Alston. Defendants: David Alston
Date: 1842.
Source: The Catalogue of The National Archives
To search

Law Report
Rolls Court Chancery Lane Friday, July 8
Alston V. Alston
This cause again came on upon motion. The parties were brothers, the plaintiff David Thomas, and the defendant David, Alston. Their father William Alston of Rochester who died in May 1833 by his will of April 21 preceding, devised his freehold lands, grounds, sea-shore, and fishery, called Cheyney Rock, in Minster, in the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, and all his lands, ground, soil, and fisheries, as to one moiety, to the use of his son David Thomas, the plaintiff, for life, with the remainder over; and as to the other moiety, to the use of his son, the defendant for life with remainder over for their respective families. The two brothers continued their father's business of oyster merchants in equal moieties, and entered into articles of partnership, which were dated April 1835. Disputes arose, the bill for a dissolution was filed, and the present motion was by the plaintiff for a reference to the Master to appoint a receiver to get in the debts, to appoint a manager to manage the oyster grounds, and to dredge and carry to market the stock of oysters until the partnership affairs were wound up, to employee the vessels, craft, and implements for that purpose, to pass their accounts, and to pay the balance into court. The case was argued at length by Mr Pemberton and Mr Wilcock for the plaintiff and by Mr Turner and Mr Bacon for the defendant. The Bill was originally filed to have the partnership dissolved, but was afterwards amended to have it declared that by the effect of the notice given by the plaintiff the partnership was dissolved. The articles declared, that if either party should be desirous to determine the partnership, it should be lawful to do so upon giving a notice in writing, and thereupon the same should be immediately dissolved. The plaintiff on the third of February last served the defendant with notice of dissolution. It was stated by the defendant to be necessary for carrying on the business that a stock of oyster spat or brood oysters, should be deposited upon the grounds that they might there grow and fatten, and be rendered in due time marketable; and that the neglecting such deposit at the proper season would be, not only to lose the profit, but to diminish the value of the grounds; and that the season for doing this began in February, and continued until the end of May. When the plaintiff gave his notice this season had begun; and the defendant, to preserve the common property, was desirous that the process should go on, but the plaintiff refused to allow it.
For the plaintiff it was stated, that he had no confidence in the defendant's management, but insisted upon the dissolution according to the terms of the articles; and the employment of the partnership funds in depositing oyster spat upon the grounds was complained of; and it was urged that when the notice of dissolution was given on the third of February 8 time when no inconvenience could arise and before the expense of stocking the ground was incurred, the defendant refused to concur with measures for winding up the concern.
Lord Langdale said, the parties were brothers. The situation of the property was peculiar, and their trade was very extensive. If there was a refusal to act upon the plain directions of the deed of partnership, he must grant the motion. A reference to the Master would amount in fact to a decree; but it would not be very much area will weather the order he made should be dated now or on next Tuesday. What the defendant had probably expended for the joint benefit ought to be repaid. Let the cause be mentioned on Tuesday
Mr Turner requested the liberty for the defendant to propose himself as manager.
Mr Pemberton objected
Lord Langdale said the rule was not to allow it.
The Times: Saturday Jul 9 1842.

Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office:
Pleadings 1801-1842 C 13/455/22
Alston v Alston. Bill and two answers. [MRFA Two bills].
Plaintiffs: David Thomas Alston. Defendants: David Alston
Date: 1842.
Source: The Catalogue of The National Archives

Law Report.
Rolls Court, Westminster, Monday, June 12.
Alston v Alston.
Mr Pemberton Leigh (and Mr Wilcock with him) said that William Alston the late father of the plaintiff, David Thomas Alston, and the defendant, David Alston, devised his oyster grounds on Cheyney Rock, in the Isle of Sheppey and other grounds, to the plaintiff and defendant, absolutely between them, with his boat's craft etc. He died in 1833. In April 1836, the two brothers executed a partnership deed, by which it was provided that the partnership should, upon notice, be immediately dissolved. Differences arose, and notice was given in February, 1842, so it became necessary to have the account is taken and a division made. The deed provided that where an equal division of the oyster beds could not be made a rent should be paid by the party retaining the most valuable portion. A design of division could not be made, because, when the wind was high, the oysters were driven in shoals.
Lord Langdale: Was the chance equal, or did the wind blow oftener one way.
Mr Pemberton Leigh: It blew more one way. Neither party derived a sale. The plaintiff prayed for a declaration that the partnership was dissolved by the notice, that the properly should be divided according to the terms of the deed, to each partner in severality, and for a reference to the Master.
Mr Turner appeared for the defendant.
Lord Langdale made the decree, reserving further directions.
The Times 13 June 1843.

Essex Record Office
Southend Branch transcripts
DEEDS OF FORESHORE AND SEA GROUNDS AT SOUTHEND
Reference Code TS 113/49
Dates of Creation 28 February 1843
Scope and Content Memorandum of Agreement Dan. Robert Scratton of Milton Hall in Prittlewell and David Thomas Alston of Chalkwell near Sittingbourne (co Kent), esqs Scratton to let to Alston two pieces of sea ground belonging to manor of Milton Hall, lying principally between Mill Gut and the Pier Hardway, and marked with beacons, from year to year at an annual rent of L50, for the sole purpose of laying oysters thereon Signatures of both parties Witness: M. Comport [soir], Rochford [For photocopy, see TS 124]

Essex Record Office
Southend Branch transcripts
COPY OF AGREEMENT RELATING TO LETTING OF PIECES OF SEA GROUND IN PRITTLEWELL
Reference Code TS 124/1
Scope and Content Photocopy of Memorandum of agreement between Daniel Robert Scratton of Milton Hall in Prittlewell and David Thomas Alston of Chalkwell near Sittingbourne (co. Kent) both esq., relating to letting of two pieces of sea-ground belonging to the manor of Milton Hall, 28 Feb. 1843 For calendar of series of deeds of which this memorandum forms part, see TS 113

In 1965/6 the Manningtree church was demolished and housing built on the site, in the process the grave yard memorials were lost and the deceased exhumed and reburied in Mistly churchyard.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Kent.
Alston D T. (Exors) Minster 23a 3r 22p gross estimated rental value. L507.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Kent.
Alston David T. Southend 219a 3r 24p gross estimated rental value. L60.
This is an uncertain placement as David died in 1855.

Copy of Will on this file PROB 11/2249 to be transcribed. Dated 27 Mar 1855 it was proved 1 April 1857 by Mary his relict.

Research Notes:
Cheyney Rock House
Sometimes refered to as Cheyney House (126, Marine Parade) & Rock House (124, Marine Parade) but under the same roof was once the headquarters of the Cheyney Rock Oyster Fishery. Built around 1816, by William Alston as a headquarters for his business interests, with a house, it was lived in by his sons David Thomas & David Alston.
Adjoining to south west is a stable block of 2 storeys buff brick with hipped slate roof. 7 sashes, mostly with verticals only. 1 square 4-light bay on the ground floor and hipped slate weatherporch.
It is all now a Grade II listed building.
Ref: CheyneyRock.co.uk

The Gaff Rig Handbook: History, Design, Techniques, Developments by John Leather, 2004
"Cutter rigged smacks sailed from the Medway where Alston's oyster dredgers brought home Channel oysters before they moved to Leigh-on-Sea. Small oyster dredging cutters worked from Whitstable and the Swale, generally resembling the Colne smacks but were fuller bottomed to take the hard foreshore which served their harbour. They set a generous rig but could easily be distinguished from the Essexmen by their square, boxy counters and the large ports cut in the bulwarks to shovel the oyster shell and culch overboard."

Some of the boats registered to D. T. Alston:
NamePort registeredOfficial No.Signal flagsReg. ton.Source
AdderLondon 9725 KJNG 45MNL1867
Alice Rochester 9522 KHQS 49MNL1867
Amity Rochester 9664 KJGF 30MNL1867
Emma Rochester 29433 QFPD 22MNL1867
Ellen Rochester KHQT 46MNL1867
Emerald Rochester 6339 JNKP 28MNL 1867
Henry &
Elizabeth Rochester 28540 PWTM 29MNL1867
James Rochester 9665 KJCH 21MNL1867
Ref: http://www.cheyneyrock.co.uk/local-history/cheyney-rock-oyster-fishery/

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Ingress Abbey Greenhithe Swanscombe KEN. David is described as Thomas a visitor (of James Harmer) married aged 51 oyster merchant born Rochester KEN HO107/1607

David married Elizabeth [3985]. Elizabeth was born about 1810 and died on 17 Jan 1840 aged about 30.

General Notes:
Died 17 Jany. 1840 aged 30 Elizb. wife of D. T. Alston Esq. of Savage Gardens.
Gentlemans Magazine


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1199 F    i. Eliza ALSTON [6815] was born about 1831, was baptised in 1831 in St Olave Hart St London, and died in 1895 aged about 64.

+ 1200 F    ii. Alice ALSTON [3988] was baptised in 1833 in St Olave Hart St London.

+ 1201 F    iii. Ellen ALSTON [6816] was baptised in 1836 in St Olave Hart St London and died Mar Qtr 1925 in Falmouth Cornwall, UK at age 89.

+ 1202 M    iv. Thomas Cooper ALSTON [6823] was baptised in 1836 in St Olave Hart St London and died in 1838 at age 2.

David next married Ellen (Elizabeth) TAYLOR [3986] on 23 Feb 1841 in Swanscombe Kent. Ellen was born about 1811 in Greenwich LON and died on 15 Sep 1860 aged about 49.

General Notes:
The Times, Wednesday, Feb 24, 1841; pg. 7; Issue 17602; col C
Marriages: On the 23 inst. at Swanscombe Kent by the Rev G George Cecil Renouard B.D. D.T. Alston Esq of Chalkwell Nr Sittingbourne to Ellen Taylor neice of James Harmer Esq of Ingress Abbey Greenhithe

Married 23 Feby. 1841 at Swanscombe Kent D. T. Alston Esq. of Chalkwell near Sittingbourne to Ellen Taylor niece of James Harmer Esq. of Ingress Abbey Greenhithe.
Gentlemans Magazine

Ellen was aged 49 at her death, her death date of 15 Sep 1850 in Alstoniana is incorrect, 1860 has been adopted but unproven (2006)

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Ingress Abbey Greenhithe Swanscombe KEN. Ellen is described as a visitor married aged 40 born Rochester Kent HO107/1607

2. Census: England, 18 Apr 1861, 9 Waterloo St Hove. Ellen is described as a lodger a widow aged 50 an annuitant & fundholder born Greenwich

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1203 M    i. Lieut. James Harmer ALSTON [3987] was born on 28 Feb 1847 in City of London, died on 3 Oct 1899 at age 52, and was buried on 6 Oct 1899 in Richmond SRY.

954. Edward Percival ALSTON [19995] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1786 in Denham Park SRY.

955. William Thomas ALSTON [19996] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1788 in Deptford KEN.

956. Sophia ALSTON [19997] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1791 in Deptford KEN.


957. Susannah Elizabeth ALSTON [3717] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in Jun 1784 in Clapham Common LND SRY and died on 2 Apr 1857 in 7 Wharf Rd Paddington LND at age 72. The cause of her death was diseased lungs.

General Notes:
Susannah was of Clapham SRY
Alstoniana Pg 357

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of K Allingham



Susannah married Edward John THURLOW of Gosfield [3718], son of Rev John THURLOW LLB [17704] and Elizabeth ALSTON [3707], on 7 Jul 1812 in Gosfield ESS. Edward was born on 3 Jun 1786 in Gosfield ESS, was baptised on 27 Dec 1786 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died in 1849 in Lambeth LND at age 63.

General Notes:
GOSFIELD REGISTERS.-ENTRIES OBTAINED BY DR. FENN.
13th March, 1898.
Marriage- Edward John Thurlow to Susannah Elizabeth Alston of Clapham Surrey 1812
Alstoniana Pg 357
They were cousins

Research Notes:
Baptism date uncertain very poor image.

Image courtesy of K Allingham


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1204 M    i. Charles Alston THURLOW [17708] was born on 6 Aug 1813 in Orange Hall, Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 14 Sep 1813 in Gosfield ESS, died on 28 Mar 1881 in Sydney Infirmary, New South Wales, Australia at age 67, and was buried on 30 Mar 1881 in St Thomas Cemetery, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.

+ 1205 F    ii. Susannah Elizabeth THURLOW [17759] was born in 1814 in Orange Hall, Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 7 Jul 1815 in Gosfield ESS, and died on 18 Sep 1856 in Consumption/33 Wyndham St, Marylebone, London, England at age 42.

+ 1206 F    iii. Mary Jane THURLOW [17706] was born on 3 Jan 1817 in Orange Hall, Gosfield, Essex, England and was baptised on 25 Feb 1817 in Gosfield ESS.

+ 1207 F    iv. Eleanor Smith THURLOW [17760] was born in 1821 in Rayne, Essex, England, was baptised on 17 Apr 1821 in Gosfield ESS, died on 28 Nov 1892 in Willesden St Andrew, England at age 71, and was buried on 30 Nov 1892.


958. Percival Edward ALSTON [3716] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Mar 1793 in Deptford KEN, was baptised on 14 Apr 1793 in Deptford KEN, and died in Jan 1877 in London at age 83.

Research Notes:
Images Courtesy of Audrey Hall 2014



Percival married Mary JONES [10554] on 26 Nov 1820 in St Mary Whitechapel MDX. Mary was born circa 1800 in Bethnal Green LND.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1208 F    i. Mary Frances ALSTON [19998] was born in 1796 in Deptford KEN and died on 9 Dec 1801 in Deptford KEN at age 5.

+ 1209 M    ii. Percival John ALSTON [10555] was born in 1822 in Newington LON and died in 1903 at age 81.

+ 1210 F    iii. Mary Susanna ALSTON [10559] was born in 1823 in Southwark SRY.

+ 1211 F    iv. Sophia Ester ALSTON [10560] was born in 1825 in Southwark SRY.

+ 1212 M    v. Charles ALSTON [10561] was born in 1826 in Southwark SRY.

+ 1213 F    vi. Emma Adelaide ALSTON [10562] was born in 1830 in London.

+ 1214 F    vii. Susanna ALSTON [10563] was born circa 1831.

+ 1215 F    viii. Louisa ALSTON [10564] was born in 1833 in London.

959. Hannah Catherine Sutton ALSTON [3722] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 17 Apr 1810 in Deptford KEN and died in Oct 1890 in Norwich NFK at age 80.

Hannah married Edmund LEEDER Of Woodton Norfolk [3723] on 2 May 1854 in Swainsthorpe SFK. Edmund was born about 1816 in Woodton NFK.

960. Henry Charles ALSTON [3721] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 8 Sep 1804 in St Paul Deptford KEN.

961. Edward Rowland Toller ALSTON [3720] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1811, was baptised on 10 Dec 1811 in St Paul Deptford LON, and died after 1837.

General Notes:
An Edward Rowland Toller Alston was christened 10 Dec 1811 St Paul Deptford Kent
Ref Susan Perrett 2006 (not checked)

An Edward Rowland Toller Alston was registered born 3 Qtr 1838 St George Southwark ref Vol 4 - Page 110
Ancestry.com

962. Ann Marcia ALSTON [3724] (Edward832, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in Oct 1814 in Deptford KEN.

General Notes:
Marcia was married on the same day as her sister Hannah.

Ann married Thomas MORGAN Of Enfield [3725] on 2 May 1854 in Swainsthorpe SFK. Thomas died before 1861.

Marriage Notes: Married on the same day as her sister Hannah.

General Notes:
Thomas was a Trustee of Sadlers Wells Theatre.

963. Sarah THURLOW [17783] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1780 and died on 30 Mar 1809 in Boxford SFK aged about 29.

Sarah married Nathaniel SALTER [17782] on 30 Sep 1806 in Gosfield, Essex, England. Nathaniel was born about 1770 and died in 1829 in Boxford, Suffolk, England aged about 59.

964. Elizabeth THURLOW [17784] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 13 Sep 1781 in Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 14 Oct 1781 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 17 Nov 1879 in Helperthorpe, Yorkshire East Riding, United Kingdom at age 98.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Church Gate St Bury St Edmunds SFK. Elizabeth is recorded as aged 55 of independant means not born in the County.

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Whilton Rd Ipswich SFK. Elizabeth is recorded as head of house unmarried aged 70 a fund holder born Gosfield ESS

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Flowton Green SFK. Elizabeth is recorded as a sister-in-law unmarried aged 79 a fundholder born Gosfield SFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Helperthorpe, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth is recorded as an Aunt unmarried aged 89 born Gosfield ESS

965. Mary Louisa THURLOW [17785] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 11 Nov 1783 in Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 7 Aug 1785 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 11 Aug 1879 in Chelmondiston, Suffolk, England at age 95.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Church Gate St Bury St Edmunds SFK. Mary is recorded as aged 50 of independant means not born in the County.

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Whilton Rd Ipswich SFK. Mary is recorded as a sister unmarried aged 68 a fund holder born Gosfield ESS

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Flowton Green SFK. Mary L is recorded as a wife married aged 77 born Gosfield SFK

Mary married Rev John ADENEY [17786] on 3 Jun 1856 in Colchester, Essex, England. John was born about 1790 in Westminster, Middlesex, England and died in Jan 1867 in Suffolk, England aged about 77.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Flowton Green SFK. John is recorded as head of house married aged 71 Rector of Flowton born Westminster MDX

966. Esther THURLOW [17787] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 14 Jun 1785 in Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 7 Aug 1785 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 27 Feb 1796 in Gosfield, Essex, England at age 10.


967. John THURLOW [17858] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Jun 1786 in Gosfield, Essex, England and was baptised in 1786 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS.

Research Notes:
Baptism date illegible possibly "5th Jan after"



968. Edward John THURLOW of Gosfield [3718] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Jun 1786 in Gosfield ESS, was baptised on 27 Dec 1786 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died in 1849 in Lambeth LND at age 63.

General Notes:
GOSFIELD REGISTERS.-ENTRIES OBTAINED BY DR. FENN.
13th March, 1898.
Marriage- Edward John Thurlow to Susannah Elizabeth Alston of Clapham Surrey 1812
Alstoniana Pg 357
They were cousins

Research Notes:
Baptism date uncertain very poor image.

Image courtesy of K Allingham



Edward married Susannah Elizabeth ALSTON [3717], daughter of Edward ALSTON [3706] and Susanna BARKER [10553], on 7 Jul 1812 in Gosfield ESS. Susannah was born in Jun 1784 in Clapham Common LND SRY and died on 2 Apr 1857 in 7 Wharf Rd Paddington LND at age 72. The cause of her death was diseased lungs.

General Notes:
Susannah was of Clapham SRY
Alstoniana Pg 357

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of K Allingham

(Duplicate Line. See Person 957)

969. Charles THURLOW [17859] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 18 Feb 1788 in Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 1 Aug 1790 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 6 Jan 1794 in Gosfield, Essex, England at age 5.

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of K Allingham

970. Mary Ann THURLOW [19999] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) died on 31 Jan 1793 in Gosfield ESS.


971. William THURLOW [17839] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 2 Feb 1789 in Orange Hall, Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 1 Aug 1790 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 18 Dec 1864 in South Head Rd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia at age 75.

General Notes:
William was late of Gosfield Hall Essex and Sydney Australia

William came to Sydney on the "William Shand" 1 Jul 1825

Baptisms
St Catherine Gosfield ESS.
William son of the Rev John Thurlow and Elizabeth his wife was born February 2nd 1789 and baptised the 1st day of August 1790 - 24mths?

Marriages
St Catherine Gosfield ESS
William Thurlow son of the Rev John Thurlow and Maria Donovan daughter of James Donovan Esq of the Island of Antigua, both single persons of this Parish, were married in this church by Banns this 6th Day of July 1809, by me - John Thurlow Vicar.

Shipping Intelligence.
Yesterday morning arrived from England and Hobart Town, the ship William Shand, Capt Alexander Kenn, with a cargo of merchandise. She sailed from London 12 March; St Jago 6 April; and Hobart Town the 22nd of. Passengers from Europe Mr Thurlow and 3 sons . . . .
Ref: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Thursday 4 August 1825

£500 REWARD to any person producing ADVERTISEMENT, within 14 days from this date, which appeared in Colonial Papers within the last seven years, calling for the HEIR OR NEXT OF KIN of WILLIAM THURLOW, Deceased, formerly proprietor of the Antigua Estate, West Indies.
WILLIAM THURLOW.
Crown and Anchor Hotel,
Grenfell-street.
Ref: The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 13 March 1874

Deaths
On the 18th instant, Mr. William Thurlow, youngest son of the late Rev. John Thurlow, vicar of Gosfield, Essex, and father of William Thurlow, Esq., solicitor, of this city.
Ref: Trove. The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tues 20 Dec 1864 Pg 1

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of K Allingham.

William married Maria DONOVAN [17844], daughter of James DONOVAN Esq of Antigua West Indies. [17861] and Unknown, on 6 Jul 1809 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS. Maria was born in 1780 in Antigua and Barbuda Caribbean and died before 1864.

Research Notes:
Written by Maria's son Henry James Thurlow, 3 Feb 1874, a search was on for a descendant to inherit.
"In the year 1864, the time of my father's death, I know not who was in possession of the 'Antigua' estate. The original parties who were in possession of the property was named Donovans, my mother's brothers; but I cannot say how long they may have been dead. It would be no harm to search back as far as the year 1860. My father died in Sydney, December 18, 1864."


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1216 M    i. John William THURLOW [17841] was born on 12 Jun 1810 in Gosfield, Essex, England and died on 6 Dec 1873 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia at age 63.

+ 1217 M    ii. Edward Alston THURLOW [17845] was born in 1812 in Gosfield, Essex, England, was baptised on 20 Apr 1812 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS, and died on 24 Dec 1822 in Gosfield, Essex, England at age 10.

+ 1218 M    iii. William Edward THURLOW [17840] was born in 1815 in West Indies and died on 15 Jan 1873 in Cundletown Manning River, NSW at age 58.

+ 1219 F    iv. Louisa Maria THURLOW [17847] was born on 13 Jul 1815 in Gosfield, Essex, England and died before 1871 in England.

+ 1220 M    v. Henry James THURLOW [17846] was born in Apr 1816 in Gosfield, Essex, England and died after 1873 in Australia.


972. Ann THURLOW [17860] (Elizabeth ALSTON833, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Sep 1791 in Gosfield, Essex, England and was baptised on 10 Sep 1791 in St Catherine Gosfield, ESS.

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of K Allingham



973. Thomas Rowland ALSTON [3787] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 22 Jan 1788, was baptised on 13 Apr 1790 in Gt Waldingfield SFK, died on 30 Jul 1844 in Crosby Sq London at age 56, and was buried on 6 Aug 1844 in St Helens Church London.

General Notes:
Thomas of Bishopgate St City of London left a long Will dated 2 Oct 1834 with Codicil dated 14 Nov 1840 it was proved 21 Aug 1844. He left his household goods and L250 to his wife Eliza, then in a 9 page Will his other assets including his co-partnership in a jewellery business passed into trust for the benefit of his wife and family with instructions thereto.
Ref: PROB 11/2003 Q602
Copy on this file

Memorial on the Wall of St Helens Bishopgate reads

Near This Site
Are Deposited The remains Of
THOMAS ROWLAND ALSTON
For Many Years An Inhabitant
Of This Parish
Who Died The 30th July 1844
In The 57th Year Of His Age

Cresswell mentions a note amoungst his papers saying the two sisters of Thomas living in 1852 were Mrs Horrex and Mrs Ward of Bury.
Alstoniana shows his bap date incorrectly in the Gt Waldingfield Register.

Thomas is remembered in 1879 with a memorial window in All Saints Little Bradley Suffolk given by his son Herbert
Ref: Image courtesy of Emily Self.



Thomas married Eliza SAGGERS [3788], daughter of John G SAGGERS [3789] and Unknown, on 7 Jul 1818 in Camberwell Church London. Eliza died on 27 Nov 1864 and was buried in Highgate Cemetery London.

General Notes:
The Times, Saturday, Jul 11, 1818; pg. 3; Issue 10406; col F
Marriages : On Tuesday the 7 inst., at Camberwell Church Mr T R Alston of Bishopsgate St to Eliza eldest daughter of J G Saggers Esq of Crosby Sq.

The Will of Eliza Alston of Crosby Sq. City of London and Carlton Hill East St Johns Wood MDX who died on the 27 Nov 1864 was Proved 28 Feb 1865 by Thomas Rowland Alston of 30 Bishopsgate London Silversmith the son at under L6000

Memorial on the Wall of St Helens Bishopgate reads.

Near This Site
Are Deposited The remains Of
THOMAS ROWLAND ALSTON
For Many Years An Inhabitant
Of This Parish
Who Died The 30th July 1844
In The 57th Year Of His Age
Also Of
Eliza Widow Of The Above
Who Died The 27th November 1864
Aged 66
And Was Buried In Highgate Cemetery.

Eliza is remembered in 1879 with a memorial window in All Saints Little Bradley Suffolk given by her son Herbert

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 22 Carlton Hill E St John St Marylebone MDX. Eliza is recorded as head of house a widow aged 62 fundholder born London City. Also in the house were two servants.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1221 M    i. Thomas Rowland ALSTON [3802] was born on 21 Aug 1819 in MDX, was baptised on 9 Jun 1820 in St Helens Church London, and died on 27 Nov 1886 in Clairville Cres SRY at age 67.

+ 1222 M    ii. Rev Albert ALSTON D.D. [3804] was born on 29 May 1821 in St Helens MDX London, was baptised on 22 Jun 1821 in St Helens Church London, died on 14 Nov 1871 in Northumberland Hse. Green Lanes Stoke Newington. at age 50, and was buried in Highgate Cemetery London.

+ 1223 F    iii. Eliza Ann ALSTON [3811] was born on 28 Apr 1831 in London MDX and was baptised on 1 May 1831.

+ 1224 M    iv. Henry Carter ALSTON [3806] was born on 22 Jun 1835 in Bishopsgate LON, was baptised on 25 Jun 1835, and died on 4 Jun 1893 in 11 The Avenue Beckenham KEN at age 57.

+ 1225 F    v. Eliza Jane ALSTON [3809] was born on 3 Aug 1822 and died on 13 Aug 1822.

+ 1226 F    vi. Eliza ALSTON [3810] was born on 30 Aug 1829 and died on 4 Sep 1829.

+ 1227 F    vii. Emma Jane ALSTON [3856] was born on 1 Aug 1833 in London City and was baptised on 11 Dec 1833.

+ 1228 F    viii. Emily ALSTON [3858] was born on 5 Aug 1836 in London and was baptised on 3 Sep 1836.

+ 1229 M    ix. Rev Herbert ALSTON [3808] was born on 16 Jul 1838 in London MDX, was baptised on 16 Jul 1838, and died on 6 Apr 1918 in Eastbourne SSX at age 79.

974. Elizabeth ALSTON [3794] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Feb 1790 in Gt Waldingfield SFK, was baptised on 13 Apr 1790 in Gt Waldingfield SFK, and died on 18 Jan 1855 at age 64.

General Notes:
Elizabeth was aged 55 at her death.
Note Alstoniana fails to show Elizabeth's birth/baptism details in the Gt Waldingfield Registers.

Elizabeth married Edmund HORREX of Bury [3795] on 8 Sep 1812 in Gt Waldingfield SFK. Edmund was born about 1777 and died on 27 Jul 1843 aged about 66.

General Notes:
Edmund was of Brandon SFK he was aged 66 at his death.

Married by Licence issued, 8 Sept 1812 Edmund Horrex of Brandon single man & Elizabeth Alston of Gt Waldingfield single woman . At same. Surety: Thomas Alston of same schoolmaster.





Children from this marriage were:

+ 1230 M    i. Edmund Alston HORREX [3796] was born in 1813 and died on 31 Jan 1837 at age 24.

+ 1231 M    ii. Thomas Rowland HORREX [3797] was baptised on 6 Jul 1816 in St James Bury St Edmunds SFK.

+ 1232 M    iii. Anthony HORREX [5490] was baptised on 19 May 1819 in Suffolk County Bts.

+ 1233 M    iv. Henry HORREX [5491] was baptised on 3 Jun 1827 in St James Bury St Edmunds SFK.

+ 1234 F    v. Elizabeth Alston HORREX [5492] was baptised on 27 Jan 1821 in St James Bury St Edmunds SFK.

975. Maria ALSTON [3791] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Jun 1792 in Gt Waldingfield SFK and was baptised 28 Jun1792 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

976. Edward ALSTON [3790] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Apr 1794, was baptised on 5 May 1794 in Gt Waldingfield SFK, and was buried on 5 Jul 1794 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

977. Sarah ALSTON [3792] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 24 Sep 1795 in Gt Waldingfield SFK and was baptised on 2 Nov 1795 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

978. Judith ALSTON [5695] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 25 Feb 1798 and was baptised on 4 Mar 1798 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

979. Lucy ALSTON [3793] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Aug 1800 and was baptised on 28 Sep 1800 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

General Notes:
Lucy was a twin with Eliza.

Lucy married Christopher RENTLE [7655]. Christopher was born circa 1793 in Fryerning ESS.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1235 M    i. Philip RENTLE [7656] was born in 1840 in Colchester ESS.

+ 1236 F    ii. Lucy RENTLE [7663] was born in 1824.

+ 1237 M    iii. George RENTLE [7664] was born in 1826.

+ 1238 M    iv. James RENTLE [7665] was born in 1827.

+ 1239 F    v. Caroline RENTLE [7666] was born in 1829.

+ 1240 M    vi. Thomas RENTLE [7667] was born in 1830.

+ 1241 F    vii. Elizabeth RENTLE [7668] was born in 1833.

+ 1242 M    viii. Charles RENTLE [7669] was born in 1834.

+ 1243 F    ix. Emma RENTLE [7670] was born in 1836.

980. Eliza ALSTON [6090] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Aug 1800 in Gt Waldingfield SFK and was baptised on 28 Sep 1800 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

General Notes:
Eliza was a twin with Lucy

981. Esther ALSTON [3801] (Thomas836, Edward714, Nicholas554, Edward B.D. (Rev)371, Edward163, Edmund58, Thomas of Edwardstone22, Edward Lord Of Sayham9, William of Newton SFK3, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 10 Aug 1803, was baptised on 11 Aug 1803 in Gt Waldingfield SFK, and was buried on 31 Aug 1803 in Gt Waldingfield SFK.

982. Joseph ALSTON [6564] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1849 in Mile End ESS.

General Notes:
Ref 1851 ESS Census aged 2 bn Mile End ESS, living 81 High Rd, St Michael Mile End, Colchester, son. 376/MLE

1861 Joseph son 12 brick laborer bn Myland

983. Susannah ALSTON [6565] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1846 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS.

General Notes:
Ref 1851 ESS Census aged 4 bn Mile End ESS, 376/MLE - this entry requires checking.

1861 Susannah aged 15 laundress bn Myland

984. Eliza ALSTON [6556] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1837.

General Notes:
Ref 1851 ESS Census aged 13 bn Myland ESS, grandaughter to Joseph [6554], living 3 Brick Kiln, St Michael Mile End, Colchester, scholar 356/MLE

1841 Census Eliza aged 3

985. Sarah ALSTON [10507] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1853 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS.

General Notes:
1861 Census Sarah aged 8 scholar bn Myland

986. Henry ALSTON [10508] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1855 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS.

General Notes:
1861 Census Henry son aged 6 scholar bn Myland

987. Charles ALSTON [10509] (Joseph842, Joseph722, Richard558, Richard of West Bergholt383, Joseph184, John of Lt Cornard SFK71, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1860 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS.

988. William Henry ALSTON [5685] (Ambrose843, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1860 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
William was a cabinet maker of New St, son of Ambrose Alston was admitted a Freeman of Sudbury 1 Aug 1884. A Freeman must be 21 years of age.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Plough Lane Sudbury. William is described as a son aged 3 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, New St St Gregory Sudbury. William is recorded as a son aged 11 a scholar born Sudbury

William spouse unknown.

His child was:

+ 1244 M    i. George Ambrose ALSTON [6118] .

989. Kate A ALSTON [8918] (Ambrose843, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1864 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Plough Lane Sudbury. Kate is described as a daughter aged 6mths born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, New St St Gregory Sudbury. Kate is recorded as a daughter aged 7 a scholar born Sudbury

990. Thomas ALSTON [8919] (Ambrose843, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1866 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, New St St Gregory Sudbury. Thomas is recorded as a son aged 5 a scholar born Sudbury

991. Edward IVES [16787] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1856 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Borhamgate Street Sudbury SFK. Edward is recorded as a son aged 5 a scholar born Sudbury

992. Henry Arthur IVES [16780] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1857.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Borhamgate Street Sudbury SFK. Henry is recorded as a son aged 4 born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Henry A is recorded as a son unmarried aged 24 a binder & stationers assistant born Sudbury SFK

3. Cernsus: England, 5 Apr 1891, Ventnor Isle of Wight. Henry A is recorded as head of house married aged 34 a bookseller & stationer born Sudbury SFK

993. Phoebe E IVES [16786] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1859 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 4 King St Sudbury SFK. Phoebe is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 17 an assistant born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Borhamgate Street Sudbury SFK. Phoebe is recorded as a daughter aged 7 a scholar born Sudbury

994. Alfred IVES [16782] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1860 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Borhamgate Street Sudbury SFK. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 1 born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 4 King St Sudbury SFK. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 11 a scholar born Sudbury

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Alfred is recorded as a son unmarried aged 21 a stationers assistant born Sudbury SFK

995. Esther Ann IVES [16781] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1862 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 4 King St Sudbury SFK. Esther is recorded as a daughter aged 9 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Esther is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 19 a housekeeper born Sudbury SFK

3. Cernsus: England, 5 Apr 1891, Ventnor Isle of Wight. Esther is recorded as a sister single aged 29 a domestic housekeeper born Sudbury SFK

996. Grace Alice IVES [16784] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1865 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 4 King St Sudbury SFK. Grace is recorded as a daughter aged 6 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Grace is recorded as a daughter aged 16 a scholar born Sudbury SFK

997. Florence Kate IVES [16783] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1867 in Sudbury SFK and died about 1967 aged about 100.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 4 King St Sudbury SFK. Florence is recorded as a daughter aged 4 born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Florence is recorded as a daughter aged 14 a scholar born Sudbury SFK

998. Rose Felicia IVES [16785] (Ellen Selina ALSTON844, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1869 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 4 5 King St Sudbury SFK. Rose is recorded as a daughter aged 12 a scholar born Sudbury SFK

Rose married John FRENCH RSM DCM [16791]. John died in 1919 in Egypt and was buried in Cairo Military Cemetery. The cause of his death was Dysentery.

999. James William Hammond ALSTON J.P. [6027] (William Alfred848, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 19 Jan 1864 in Borhamgate St Sudbury and died on 27 Jan 1930 in Sudbury SFK at age 66.

General Notes:
James was a partmer in the family business "Alston Bros of Sudbury" furnishers and furniture manufacturers.

James was Councillor Mayor 1919 - 20 and 1926 - 27 (during the Gainsborough bi- centenary celebrations) and Alderman of Sudbury, he died at breakfast having choked on a pork pie.

Roy Alston has a copy of a film taken in 1927 of the Gainsborough bi-centenial celebrations showing his Great Uncle as Mayor. 2003

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, King St St Peter Sudbury. James is recorded as a son aged 7 a scholar born Sudbury

James married Amelia Bertha MORLEY [6695].

1000. Percy (Pat) Walter Filbee ALSTON [6029] (William Alfred848, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 24 Dec 1880 and died Apr Qtr 1969 at age 88.

General Notes:
Percy was a partner in the family business "Alston Bros. of Sudbury", and a dealer in furniture. He was councillor for over 41 years, Mayor of Sudbury 1934 -35, 1936 - 37 and Alderman, admitted Honorary Freeman of the Borough of Sudbury in April 1967. Church Warden of St Gregory's Sudbury, Master of Priory Masonic Lodge.


Death Registration April Qtr 1969 aged 88 Bury St Edmonds SFK Ref: 4b 2632

Research Notes:
Suffolk Record Office, Bury St Edmunds Branch:
SUDBURY BOROUGH RECORDS
Catalogue Ref. EE 501
BOROUGH SURVEYOR
New buildings and alterations to buildings
FILE - Plans - ref. EE 501/9/27 - date: 1928-
item: Extensions, 2 Newton Rd, for P. Alston - ref. EE 501/9/27/109 - date: 1933
item: Loading shed, King St, for Alston Bros - ref. EE 501/9/27/285 - date: 1938



Percy married Mary Ann (Poppy) PLAYSTED [6031], daughter of Henry PLAYSTED [6694] and Lydia Smith TAPNER [11771], on 30 Aug 1902. Mary was born about 1878 and died Jul Qtr 1951 in Sudbury SFK aged about 73.

General Notes:
MARY ANN (POPPY) PLAYSTED
Biography by Susan Hendrie.
Mary Ann (Poppy) Playsted was born Jan-Mar Quarter 1878 at Arundel Road, Littlehampton. Her parents were Henry Playsted (born 15 July 1843, Wadhurst) and Lydia (nee Lydia Smith Tapner) from Crowhurst. She was the second eldest of four children, her siblings being Elizabeth (born 1871), Henry Smith (born 1873) and Annie Sarah (born 1875).
Mary Ann's parents married on 6 June 1870 and on the census the following year are found living with Henry's uncle Edgar, formerly a farmer at Wadhurst but now describing himself as a "Nurseryman" at 2 Louis Villas, Tunbridge Wells. The newly married Henry gives his occupation as a "Carpenter Joiner", an occupation his grandson would follow.
Circa 1873-5 Henry and Lydia were living in the village of Lyminster (aka Leominster), a small hamlet to the north of Littlehampton, West Sussex, but had moved to Arundel Road, Littlehampton by the time of the 1881census. It was here that Mary Ann was born and where her father continued working as a carpenter and builder until his untimely death aged only 44 in the Oct-Dec Quarter 1886.
Henry's death clearly caused financial difficulties and the family had to move out of the house. The 1891 census shows poor Lydia working as a live in Cook at 44 Broadwater Down, Frant, now a leafy suburb of Tunbridge Wells. Her daughters, Elizabeth (20), Annie Sarah (16, Dressmaker's Apprentice) and 13 year old Mary Ann were living with their widowed great uncle Thomas Smith, aged 77, (living on his own means), back in Lyminster. Brother Henry (aka Harry), now aged 18, is found living with uncle William Nimrod Playsted (Carpenter Joiner) and wife Emily at Monks Orchard Lodge, Wickham Road, Addington, Surrey. He gave his occupation as Carpenter Joiner too.
In the June quarter of 1895 Mary Ann's sister, Elizabeth, married Charles Hargrave and in the July-Sept Quarter Henry Smith Playsted married Florence Fanny Mitchell in the Bromley Registration District.
By the 1901 census 23 year old Poppy (as Mary Ann was now known) Playsted was earning her living as a Milliner and boarding in the household of widowed Milliner and Dressmaker, Emma Hitchcock, at Nos. 7 & 8 Old Market Place, Sudbury in Suffolk. Next door, at No. 9, lives William Alston, the widowed father of her future husband Percy (Pat). The 26 year old Annie is now a Lady's Maid to the family of Charles & Annetta Wakefield at Belmont House, Hillingdon while Lydia is living with daughter Elizabeth who, with her husband Charles, is the owner of a Fishmonger and Poulterer business in Tarrant Street, Arundel. Lydia is employed by her daughter as a Cashier. Henry (carpenter & joiner), his wife Florence, and their 4 year old son Lionel Henry William, are now living at 92 Rymer Road, Croydon.
No amount of searching on the 1901 census can find Percy , however, he clearly was not far away as Percy Walter Filbee Alston (Furniture Dealer) married Mary Ann Playsted (no occupation given) on 13th August 1902 at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Lower Addiscombe Road, Croydon. The witnesses were Poppy's brother Henry and sister Annie.
The choice of Croydon for the marriage was almost certainly determined by the fact that by the time of the wedding Poppy's mother and unmarried sister, Annie Sarah (now a dressmaker again), had moved to Croydon, the 1911 census showing them at 113 Morland Road. Poppy and Percy's address on the marriage certificate is given as 3 Morland Terrace, Morland Road, Addiscombe, which is a part of Croydon. This would have been a temporary residence for the wedding, not living together!
Poppy and Percy went back to Sudbury after their marriage and the 1911 census finds them living at 8 Old Market Place, the house that Poppy had lived in as a boarder! (Perhaps an Alston family property?) He gives his occupation as "House Furnisher" and they have two sons, Leslie age 6 and Percy 9 months. Living in is Lilly Crick, the Domestic Servant.
Henry and Florence by this time have moved to 6 Amberley Grove, Croydon with their only son, Lionel, now 14 and still at school. Henry works as the Assistant Foreman at a joinery. Sadly, only child Lionel did not live long enough to create a new line of Playsteds. On 20 September 1917 320922 Lance Serjeant Lionel Henry William Playsted 2nd/6th Bn. London Regiment (City of London Rifles), age 21 was killed in action having served in France and Flanders. He is buried at Menin Gate, Ypres.
Henry Smith Playsted, Poppy's brother, died in the December Quarter 1948, in the NE Surrey Registration District, his wife Florence living on until the March Quarter of 1955 and dying in the same registration district.
In 1913 Jan-Mar Quarter Annie Sarah married Frederick Smart in Croydon Registration District. She died in 1958, registered in the Worthing Registration District
Poppy's mother, Lydia Smith Playsted, died Jan-Mar Quarter 1928 in the East Preston Registration District.
Elizabeth Lydia died July-Sept Quarter 1945 in the Worthing Registration District.
Poppy (Mary Ann) died in the July-Sept Quarter 1951 and Percy died in the Apr-June Quarter of 1969. They had two children, Leslie William Llewellyn and Roy. (For the careers of these two brothers see Alstons - Ashbury Furniture).
Ref: suehendrie


Mary was of Arundel SSX.

Death Registration Jul Qtr 1951 aged 72 Sudbury Ref: 4b 747

Research Notes:


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1245 M    i. Leslie William Llewellyn ALSTON C.B.E. [6032] was born on 30 Aug 1904 and died in Mar 1976 at age 71.

+ 1246 M    ii. Percy Roy Playsted ALSTON [6039] was born on 28 Jun 1910.


1001. William Ambrose ALSTON [6119] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1877 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
William of 18 Station Rd (Sudbury), son of Thomas Alston iron moulder, admitted by birth a Freeman of Sudbury 8 July 1913. William was in the Royal Flying Corps in the WW I.

1002. Elizabeth May ALSTON [7148] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born circa 1874 in Sudbury SFK and was buried on 30 Jul 1953 in Walnut Tree Hospital Sudbury.

General Notes:
Elizabeth lived at 18 Station Rd, she was a dressmaker and aged 79 at her death.

1003. Minnie ALSTON [7150] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1).

General Notes:
Notes from Percy R P Alston

1004. Arthur ALSTON [8920] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1872 in Sudbury SFK.

1005. Amy A ALSTON [8921] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1872 in Sudbury SFK.

1006. Agnes M ALSTON [8922] (Thomas849, Sturgeon Drew724, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1879 in Sudbury SFK.

1007. Eliza WILSON [6857] (Isabella ALSTON851, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born c1840 in Sudbury SFK.

1008. Susanna WILSON [6858] (Isabella ALSTON851, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born c1842 in Sudbury SFK.

1009. Albert WILSON [6859] (Isabella ALSTON851, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born c1844 in Sudbury SFK.

1010. Charles WILSON [6860] (Isabella ALSTON851, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born c1847 in Sudbury SFK.

1011. Sarah ALSTON [5673] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1842 in Sudbury SFK and was baptised on 16 Oct 1842 in All Saints Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. Sarah is described as a daughter unmarried aged 18 a silk velvet weaver born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Inkerman Row St Gregory Sudbury. Sarah is recorded as a daughter aged 27 a silk weaver

1012. William ALSTON [5675] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1844 in Sudbury SFK and was baptised on 28 Feb 1844 in All Saints Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
1871 Census 72 Cross St All Saints Sudbury William (difficult to read) head aged 26 silk weaver born Sudbury - his wife and family are based on census entries

William of Gregory St Sudbury son of Sylvanus, weaver, was admitted by birth a Freeman of Sudbury 6 May 1881.



Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. William is described as a son unmarried aged 17 a silk velvet weaver born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Sudbury St Gregory SFK. William was living at 6 Gregory St Sudbury married aged 38 born in Sudbury, also in the house were:
Ellen Alston married aged 32 born Sudbury
Isabella Alston aged 10 born Sudbury
Albert Alston aged 8 born Sudbury
Walter Alston aged 6 Born Sudbury
Beatrice Alston aged 2 born Sudbury
Gertrude Alston aged 8 mths born Sudbury
FHL 1341443 PRO RG11 Pc 1828 Fol 11 Pg 15

William married Ellen [8150]. Ellen was born about 1848 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes: 1871 Census Ellen is a silk warper


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1247 F    i. Isabella A ALSTON [8151] was born about 1870 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1248 M    ii. Albert ALSTON [8912] was born about 1873 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1249 M    iii. Walter ALSTON [8913] was born about 1875 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1250 F    iv. Beatrice ALSTON [8914] was born about 1879 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1251 F    v. Gertrude ALSTON [8915] was born about 1880 in Sudbury SFK.

1013. Thomas ALSTON [5674] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1850 in Braintree ESS and was baptised on 7 Jun 1846 in All Saints Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
Thomas's baptism date conflicts with his 1851 census age at 1 year, however his age stated in 1881 at 30 supports this against the baptism date which has not been searched.

His family is based on the 1881 Census.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. Thomas is described as a son aged 11 a silk winder born Braintree

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Sudbury St Peter SFK. Thomas was living at 81 East St Sudbury married aged 30 born Braintree ESS, also in the house were:
Emma Alston married aged 27 born Coggeshall ESS
Thomas Alston aged 7 born Sudbury
Jane Alston aged 3 born Sudbury
FHL 1341443 PRO RG11 Pc 1828 Fol 88 Pg 30

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Inkerman Row St Gregory Sudbury. Thomas is recorded as a son unmarried aged 21 a silk weaver born Braintree

Thomas married Emma [8923].

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1252 M    i. Thomas ALSTON [8924] was born about 1874 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1253 F    ii. Jane ALSTON [8925] was born about 1878 in Sudbury SFK.

1014. Arthur ALSTON [7809] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1852 in Braintree ESS.

General Notes:

Research Notes:
Is this Arthur Alston [4725]

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. Arthur is described as a son aged 9 a scholar born Braintree

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Inkerman Row St Gregory Sudbury. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 19 unmarried a silk weaver born Braintree

1015. Albert ALSTON [7810] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1858 in Braintree ESS.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. Albert is described as a son aged 3 born Braintree

1016. Ezra ALSTON [7811] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1860 in Braintree ESS.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 16 Garden Row Sudbury SFK. Ezra is described as a son aged 1 born Braintree

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Inkerman Row St Gregory Sudbury. Ezra is recorded as a son aged 11 a scholar born Braintree

1017. Florence ALSTON [8158] (Silvanus852, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1864 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Inkerman Row St Gregory Sudbury. Florence is recorded as a daughter aged 7 scholar born Sudbury

1018. Charles ALSTON [6117] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 13 Sep 1861 in Sudbury SFK and died on 3 Feb 1932 at age 70.

General Notes:
Charles of 41 Friars St (Sudbury), mat weaver, son of Daniel Alston silkweaver, was admitted a Freeman of Sudbury 14 Aug 1906.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Charles is recorded as a son aged 9 a scholar born Sudbury

1019. Susanna ALSTON [6799] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 21 Sep 1852 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: ENGLAND, 8 Apr 1861, School Lane St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Susanna is recorded as a daughter aged 8 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, St Peter Sudbury SFK. Susanna is recorded as a servant aged 18 born Sudbury

1020. Ellen Belissa ALSTON [6802] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 23 Sep 1866 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
Ellen worked as a servant

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Ellen is recorded as a daughter aged 4 born Sudbury

1021. Mary Ann ALSTON [6798] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 16 Oct 1850 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr1861, School Lane St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 10 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 20 an unmarried domestic servant born ? Suffolk

1022. Caroline Alma ALSTON [6800] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1855 in Braintree ESS, was baptised on 22 May 1855 in Braintree ESS, and was buried on 30 Mar 1900 in All Saints Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
Caroline was a spinster of 4 Mill Lane Sudbury, aged 43 at her death.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, School Lane St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Caroline is recorded as a daughter aged 5 scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Caroline is recorded as a daughter aged 15 a scholar born ? Ess

1023. Alfred ALSTON [6801] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1857 in Braintree ESS and was baptised on 13 Jul 1857 in Braintree ESS.

General Notes:
Alfred was a rug weaver

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, School Lane St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 3 scholar born Braintree

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 13 scholar born Braintree

1024. Frederick William ALSTON [6315] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1870 in Sudbury SFK, was baptised on 7 Sep 1870, and died on 17 Apr 1909 at age 39.

General Notes:
Frederick was a mat maker.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Kilroy Ln St Gregory Sudbury SFK. Frederick is recorded as a son aged 6 mths born Sudbury

Frederick married Ellen Kate THEOBALD [6316] on 20 Nov 1896 in Lavenham SFK. Ellen was born on 18 Jan 1875 in Sudbury SFK and died on 8 Jun 1956 at age 81.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1254 F    i. Ethel Edith Kate ALSTON [6317] was born on 29 Dec 1896 in Sudbury SFK and died on 25 Nov 1966 at age 69.

+ 1255 M    ii. Frederick William ALSTON [6804] was born on 4 Jun 1899 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1256 F    iii. Grace Florence Ellen ALSTON [6805] was born on 10 Jan 1903 in Sudbury SFK.

+ 1257 F    iv. Winnie Maud ALSTON [6806] was born on 21 Aug 1907 in Sudbury SFK.

1025. Albert ALSTON [6803] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 23 Nov 1872 in Sudbury SFK.

1026. David ALSTON [6849] (Daniel855, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1859 in Braintree ESS and was baptised on 7 Sep 1859 in Braintree ESS.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, School Lane St Gregory Sudbury SFK. David is recorded as a son aged 1 born Braintree

1027. Spencer Charles ALSTON [6115] (Benjamin Charles857, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born circa 1859 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
Spencer of Stitchell House Torquay, valet, son of Benjamin Charles Alston weaver was admitted by birth to the Freedom of Sudbury 3 Aug 1883.


Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Spencer is recorded as a son aged 2 born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Spencer is recorded as a son aged 12 a scholar born Sudbury

Spencer married Elizabeth [8845]. Elizabeth died on 18 Oct 1923.

General Notes:
Administration of the estate of Elizabeth Jane Alston of 19 Chamber Combe Rd Ilfracombe Devon, who died 18 Oct 1923, wife of Spencer Charles Alston was granted Spencer Charles Alston gent., at Exeter 5 Dec 1923 for L246 3s 9d

1028. Maurice ALSTON [6116] (Benjamin Charles857, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born circa 1861 in Sudbury SFK and was buried on 7 May 1878 in St Gregory Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
Maurice of Parkholm Rd. Dalston London, merchant's clerk, son of Benjamin Charles Alston, was admitted by birth to the Freedom of Sudbury, 3 Aug 1883.

A Maurice Arthur Alston of St Gregory St Sudbury was buried 7 May 1878 at St Gregory Sudbury.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Maurice is recorded as a son aged 11mths born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Maurice is recorded as a son aged 10 a scholar born Sudbury

1029. Ellen A ALSTON [6855] (Benjamin Charles857, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born circa 1864 in Sudbury SFK.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Ellen is recorded as a daughter aged 7 a scholar born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Ellen is recorded as a daughter unmarried pupil teacher aged 17 born Sudbury

1030. Kate Alice ALSTON [6856] (Benjamin Charles857, Peter726, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born circa 1869 in Sudbury SFK.

General Notes:
A Miss Kate A Alston was the infant mistress at the Public Elementary School Mill Lane Sudbury. 1908
Ref Kelly 1908.

Kate was a headmistress in Sudbury, at some time of 18 Gainsborough Rd Sudbury, and a Baptist.
Ref verbal report 2 Oct. 1993.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1971, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Kate is recorded as a a daughter aged 2 born Sudbury

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 2 Inkerman Row Sudbury. Kate is recorded as a daughter a scholar aged 12 born Sudbury

1031. Frank Griffin ALSTON [10010] (Ezekiel Frances862, William729, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1858 and died on 4 May 1865 in Colchester ESS aged about 7.

General Notes:
Deaths.
Alston - 4th inst., suddenly, at 2 St Mary's Terrace, Colchester, Frank Griffin, aged seven years, eldest child of the late Mr E. F. Alston, of Worcester.
Ipswich Journal 13 May 1865

1032. Stephen ALSTON [7848] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1854 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Stephen is recorded as a son aged 7 a student born Bishops Stortford (his christian name is partly illegible)

1033. Alfred ALSTON [7849] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1855 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 6 a scholar born Bishops Stortford

1034. Sydney ALSTON [7850] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1855 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Sydney is recorded as a son aged 6 born Bishops Stortford

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1881, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Sydney is recorded as a son aged 15 apprentice draper and cutter born Bishops Stortford

1035. Ebenezer ALSTON [7851] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1857 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Ebenezer is recorded as a son aged 4 born Bishops Stortford

1036. Ezra ALSTON [7852] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1859 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Ezra is recorded as a son aged 2 born Bishops Stortford

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Ezra is recorded as a son aged 12 scholar born Bishops Stortford

1037. Herbert W ALSTON [7853] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1860 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, New Rd Bishops Stortford HRT. Herbert is recorded as a son aged 4mths born Bishops Stortford

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Herbert is recorded as a son aged 10 born Bishops Stortford

1038. Frank ALSTON [7854] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1863 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Frank is recorded as a son aged 8 scholar born Bishops Stortford

1039. Sydney ALSTON [7855] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1866 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Sydney is recorded as a son aged 5 scholar born Bishops Stortford

1040. Lydia Lavinia ALSTON [7856] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1867 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Lydia is recorded as a daughter aged 4 scholar born Bishops Stortford

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Lydia is recorded as a daughter aged 14 scholar born Bishops Stortford

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Lydia is recorded as a daughter aged 24 a milliner born Bishops Stortford

1041. Alfred T (F) ALSTON [7857] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1869 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bishops Stortford HRT. Alfred T is recorded as a son aged 2 born Bishops Stortfort

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1881, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Alfred F is recorded as a son aged 11 scholar born Bishops Stortford

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 22 a woollen draper born Bishops Stortford

1042. Ebenezer ALSTON [7858] (Stephen870, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born about 1872 in Bishops Stortford HRT.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1881, Bridge St Saffron Walden ESS. Ebenezer is recorded as a son aged 9 born Bishops Stortford

1043. Gertrude PAFFARD [14414] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1858 in Blackburn LAN.

1044. Mary Helena PAFFARD [14415] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1865 in Blackburn LAN.

General Notes:
Mary Helena, was Assistant Head, at the Council School, Wamington, Oxffordshire with her husband.

Mary married James Thomas SHARPLES [14416], son of Noah SHARPLES [14417] and Ann WATSON [14418]. James was born in 1867 in Gt Harwood LAN and died in 1935 in Evington LEI at age 68.

General Notes:
James was the Head Teacher at the Council School, Wamington, Oxffordshire, he later moved to Evington, Leicestershire, as Head teacher and was the Pastor at Evington Chapel 1916 - 1935.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1258 F    i. Ada Gertrude SHARPLES [14422] was born about 1894 in Heaton, NBL and died in 1922 in Evington LEI aged about 28.

+ 1259 F    ii. Dorothy Ruth SHARPLES [14423] was born in 1895 in Heaton, NBL and died in 1944 in Evington LEI at age 49.

+ 1260 M    iii. Frank Paffard SHARPLES [14424] was born in 1896 in Heaton, NBL and died in 1916 in France at age 20.

1045. Henry Alston PAFFARD [14425] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1860 and died in 1894 at age 34.

1046. Emily PAFFARD [14426] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1862.

1047. William PAFFARD [14427] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1864 and died in 1871 at age 7.

1048. PAFFARD [14428] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1867 and died in 1867.

1049. Thomas PAFFARD [14429] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1867 and died in 1867.

1050. Alice PAFFARD [14430] (Amelia Merrick ALSTON871, Stephen733, Peter567, Thomas389, Peter196, Samuel72, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1868.

1051. Charles Barron ALSTON [1010] (Charles880, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 22 Aug 1825 in Colchester ESS and died Dec Qtr 1900 at age 75.

General Notes:
A A Fenn records Charles as living in 1898. Unmarried

BDM Index: Alston Charles Barron, 76. 1900 Dec Qtr Medway 2a 354

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Maidenburg St Colchester. Charles is recorded as an apprentice aged 15 born Essex

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 11 George St St Nicholas Colchester ESS. Charles is recorded as a son unmarried aged 25 shopman born Colchester ESS HO107/1781

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, George St Colchester ESS. Charles is recorded as a son aged 35 unmarried an upholsterer born Colchester

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 15 Newenham Street Chatham, Kent. Charles is recorded as a son unmarried, aged 55, an upholsterers shopman, born Colchester ESS

1052. George Downing ALSTON [1011] (Charles880, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Nov 1828 in Colchester ESS, died on 11 Nov 1893 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust at age 65, and was buried on 18 Nov 1893 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

General Notes:
George produced the magic book in 1847. He was 24 when he sailed on 14th January 1853, from London, aboard the JAMES L BOGART, arriving in Port Philip Bay in April 1853. Also on board was his wife to be, Emma Taylor who was 20 years old.
They were married in St. Paul's Melbourne in June 1853 and settled in Warrnambool, Victoria.

George was a Cabinet Maker and later a Picture Framer, he was aged 65 years at his death, and his religion is given as Episcopalian.
Alston Fenn hosted a Mrs Iris Clarke of 711 Toorak Rd Kooyong Melb at Alston Court in 1959, and gave her her pedigree's.

The magic book is a fantasy story written and illustrated by George, the origional is in the possession of Julia Redman (1999) a copy with Edward Fenn in NZ.

The Magic Book.
In ancient times an Eastern Sage,
Renowned for skills, and learned lore;
Dwelt on Arabia's scorching sands,
There the billows lash the red Sea shore,
He lived alone save a youthful page.
Whom he taught in his mystic skill.
Dark spirits quailed before the Sage,
And obeyed his sovereign will.

In a lofty tower on the red-sea shore
Reared alone in a desert of sand.
The bursting wave and the seagulls scream,
Were the only sounds to be heard I ween,
In that wondrous desolate land.

See sky and sand - and nought beside,
No shrub, or leafy tree;
No sparkling brook - no gay wildflower,
But sky and sand and sea.

T'was a wild home for the Sage to choose
So still and drear the land,
That you feared to break the silence dread,
Of that wild spot - and with noiseless tread
Passed over the desert sand.

One night when the wind howled mournfully,
Around the lonely tower:
And the stormy sea with angry roar,
Hurled its proud billows on the shore.
Exulting in its power,
The Sage glided up the winding stairs,
That led to a loophole high;
And looked forth on the raging sea
And the gloomy murky sky:
The stormy clouds were hurrying past
Driven fiercely along by the winds wild blast.

The page was left in the room below,
Where a lamp from the ceiling hung:
It's faint light gleamed on horrid shapes,
Of uncouth monsters - hideous snakes
Coiled up in eases - forms of dread
Were all around - high overhead
A monstrous crocodile swung.

On a table there, was a wondrous book,
Into which he had often wished to look;
That the Sage had strictly charged him
Not to open the book or to look therein:
But now when the Sage at the loophole high
Was watching the sea and the stormy sky,
He thought he would find out the mystery.

He opened the book with leaves so thin,
T'was written with blood without and within,
And the leaves were made of dead men's skin.
The book contained some fearful spells,
To raise the spirits of the dead:
And demons fierce obeyed the power
Of the Magic book, and swift to the tower
Came with dusky pinions spread.

The Page read on spell after spell,
Not one glance round he took;
Nor heeded the lamp that burned so dim
And he saw not the spirits that glided in
Invoked by the Magic Book.

On, on he read, and in the room,
Arose a misty cloud:
Deep voices smote upon his ear,
In murmurs wild and loud.
Aroused by the voices from reading the book
Up started the Page, and a terrified look
He cast on the demons encircling the room,
Half hid and half seen through the mantle of gloom.

A chief of the horrid goblin band,
And one of mighty power
Demanded why in that stormy night,
They had been called to the tower.

The frightened Page could answer nought:
His lips moved but no sound
Came fourth - and with a fearful look
Sank down upon the ground.
The spirits under no control
Seized on the hapless Page:
And yelling tore him limb from limb,
In their demoniac rage.

The old Sage burned his magic book,
And left the haunted tower:
And never from that fatal time
Sort ought by Magic's power.

Geo Downing Alston
June 1847

Medical Notes: The Magic Book.
In ancient times an Eastern Sage,
Renowned for skills, and learned lore;
Dwelt on Arabia's scorching sands,
There the billows lash the red Sea shore,
He lived alone save a youthful page.
Whom he taught in his mystic skill.
Dark spirits quailed before the Sage,
And obeyed his sovereign will.

In a lofty tower on the red-sea shore
Reared alone in a desert of sand.
The bursting wave and the seagulls scream,
Were the only sounds to be heard I ween,
In that wondrous desolate land.

See sky and sand \endash and nought beside,
No shrub, or leafy tree;
No sparkling brook \endash no gay wildflower,
But sky and sand and sea.

T'was a wild home for the Sage to choose
So still and drear the land,
That you feared to break the silence dread,
Of that wild spot \endash and with noiseless tread
Passed over the desert sand.

One night when the wind howled mournfully,
Around the lonely tower:
And the stormy sea with angry roar,
Hurled its proud billows on the shore.
Exulting in its power,
The Sage glided up the winding stairs,
That led to a loophole high;
And looked forth on the raging sea
And the gloomy murky sky:
The stormy clouds were hurrying past
Driven fiercely along by the winds wild blast.

The page was left in the room below,
Where a lamp from the ceiling hung:
It's faint light gleamed on horrid shapes,
Of uncouth monsters \endash hideous snakes
Coiled up in eases \endash forms of dread
Were all around \endash high overhead
A monstrous crocodile swung.

On a table there, was a wondrous book,
Into which he had often wished to look;
That the Sage had strictly charged him
Not to open the book or to look therein:
But now when the Sage at the loophole high
Was watching the sea and the stormy sky,
He thought he would find out the mystery.

He opened the book with leaves so thin,
T'was written with blood without and within,
And the leaves were made of dead men's skin.
The book contained some fearful spells,
To raise the spirits of the dead:
And demons fierce obeyed the power
Of the Magic book, and swift to the tower
Came with dusky pinions spread.

The Page read on spell after spell,
Not one glance round he took;
Nor heeded the lamp that burned so dim
And he saw not the spirits that glided in
Invoked by the Magic Book.

On, on he read, and in the room,
Arose a misty cloud:
Deep voices smote upon his ear,
In murmurs wild and loud.
Aroused by the voices from reading the book
Up started the Page, and a terrified look
He cast on the demons encircling the room,
Half hid and half seen through the mantle of gloom.

A chief of the horrid goblin band,
And one of mighty power
Demanded why in that stormy night,
They had been called to the tower.

The frightened Page could answer nought:
His lips moved but no sound
Came fourth \endash and with a fearful look
Sank down upon the ground.
The spirits under no control
Seized on the hapless Page:
And yelling tore him limb from limb,
In their demoniac rage.

The old Sage burned his magic book,
And left the haunted tower:
And never from that fatal time
Sort ought by Magic's power.

Geo Downing Alston
June 1849

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Maidenburg St Colchester. George is recorded as aged 12 born Essex

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 22 Brooksby St Islington LND. George is described as a nephew (of Henry Alston) unmarried aged 22 an engraver born Colchester ESS HO107/1499

George married Emma TAYLOR [181] in Jun 1853 in St Paul's, Melbourne, Vic. Emma was born about 1833 in Cambridge CAM., died in Apr 1916 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust aged about 83, and was buried on 1 May 1916 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1261 M    i. Ernest ALSTON [1016] .

+ 1262 F    ii. Edith ALSTON [1018] was born in 1854 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust, died in Jan 1921 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust at age 67, and was buried on 14 Jan 1921 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

+ 1263 F    iii. Alice ALSTON [274] was born in 1856 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust and died in 1935 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust at age 79.

+ 1264 M    iv. Charles ALSTON [1013] was born on 29 Nov 1858 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust and died in 1935 in Fitzroy at age 77.

+ 1265 M    v. George Grey ALSTON [1014] was born on 30 Jan 1861 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

+ 1266 M    vi. Arthur ALSTON [1015] was born on 6 May 1863 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

+ 1267 F    vii. Louisa Emma ALSTON [280] was born in 1865 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

+ 1268 M    viii. Edward Henry ALSTON [1017] was born on 2 Sep 1866 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust and died in 1949 in Oakleigh at age 83.

+ 1269 M    ix. Frank Louis ALSTON [271] was born in 1869 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust and died in 1902 in Orbost, Vic. Aust at age 33.

+ 1270 F    x. Mary Kate ALSTON [275] was born in 1871 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust and died in 1949 in Ballarat Australia. at age 78.

+ 1271 M    xi. Walter Clement ALSTON [276] was born in 1873 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust.

+ 1272 M    xii. Leonard ALSTON [277] was born in 1875 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust, died on 4 Dec 1953 in Cambridge CAM. at age 78, and was cremated on 8 Dec 1953 in Cambridge Crematorium.

+ 1273 F    xiii. Minna Charlotte ALSTON [278] was born in 1877 in Warrnambool, Vic. Aust, died in 1959 at age 82, and was buried on 15 Dec 1959.

1053. Mary Ann ALSTON [1021] (Charles880, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 22 Oct 1822, died on 12 Jun 1839 at age 16, and was buried on 20 Jun 1839 in St Nicholas Colchester ESS.

General Notes:
Mary was unmarried, a sampler embroidered by her at age 7 at Alston Court was mentioned by Alston Fenn in his notes.

Mary was 16 at her death.
Ref: NBI

1054. Henry Charles ALSTON [1024] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 3 Dec 1832, was baptised on 6 Jan 1833 in Pentonville MDX, and died on 2 Feb 1875 in 44 Bryantwood Rd Highbury Hill Islington MDX at age 42.

General Notes:
The Will of Henry Charles Alston warehouseman of 44 Bryantwood Rd Highbury Hill MDX who died 2 Feb 1875 at 44 Bryantwood Rd was Proved 8 Jun 1875 by Eliza Alston his widow and relict at under L600

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2pr 1871, 44 Bryantwood Rd Highbury Hill Islington MDX. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 36 commercial clerk born KN

Henry married Eliza COWELL [9492] Sep Qtr 1855 in Shoreditch LON. Eliza was born about 1838 in Hertfordshire and died about 1884 aged about 46.

General Notes:
1855 Marriage: September quarter, Shoreditch 1c 318 - ALSTON Henry Charles & COWELL Eliza.

Possible death in Lambeth 1884 SQ 1d 344 - ALSTON Eliza, 48.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 44 Bryantwood Rd Highbury Hill Islington MDX. Eliza is recorded as married wife aged 33 born NK

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, St Georges Westminster. Eliza is recorded as a visitor widowed aged 44 born Herts.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1274 F    i. Florence ALSTON [8095] was born about 1860 in St Pancras London.

+ 1275 F    ii. Kate Annie ALSTON [7825] was born about 1856 in Islington MDX London.

+ 1276 M    iii. Henry J ALSTON [8096] was born Mar Qtr 1858 in Islington MDX London.

1055. William James ALSTON [1025] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Aug 1837 in Islington MDX London, was baptised on 10 Sep 1837 in Pentonville MDX, and died Mar Qtr 1887 at age 49.

General Notes:
William had issue

William James Alston warehouseman and batchelor died 11 Jan 1887 at 3 Upper Park St Islington MDX. Administration granted 27 Jan 1887 to Ann Dowling Alston of the above address his sister at L1802 19s 0d

BDM Index: Alston William James 49. 1887 Mar Qtr Islington 1b 200

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Pentonville St James Clerkenwell MDX. William is recorded as aged 3 born MDX

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. William is described as a son unmarried aged 23 a warehouseman born Islington

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. William is recorded as a son unmarried aged 33 warehouseman born Clerkenwell MDX

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. William is recorded as son unmarried aged 43 warehouseman born Clerkenwell MDX

1056. Ann Downing ALSTON [1026] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Jun 1830 in Pentonville MDX, was baptised on 30 Jun 1830 in Pentonville MDX, and died Mar Qtr 1914 at age 83.

General Notes:
BDM Index. Death. Alston Ann D 83. 1914 Mar Qtr Islington 1b 388

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Pentonville St James Clerkenwell MDX. Ann is recorded as aged 11 born MDX

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 22 Brooksby St Islington LND. Ann is described as a daughter unmarried aged 20 a dressmaker born Pentonville MDX HO107/1499

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Ann is described as a daughter unmarried aged 30 a dressmaker born Islington MDX

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Ann is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 40 dress maker born Clerkenwell MDX

5. Census: England, 4 Apr 1881, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Ann is described as a daughter unmarried aged 50 dressmaker born Clerkenwell MDX

6. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Ann is recorded as head of house unmarried aged 40 dressmaker born Islington MDX

7. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Ann is recorded as head of house single aged 70 dressmaker on own account at home born Clerkenwell MDX

1057. Mary Catherine ALSTON [1027] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Jan 1835 in Pentonville MDX.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Pentonville St James Clerkenwell MDX. Mary is recorded as aged 6 born MDX

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 22 Brooksby St Islington LND. Mary is described as a daughter unmarried aged 16 a dressmaker born Pentonville MDX HO107/1499

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Mary is described as a daughter unmarried aged 26 dressmaker born Islington

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Mary is recorded Merriefield as a daughter married aged 36 Dressmaker born Clerkenwell MDX

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Mary is recorded as a daughter widow aged 46 dressmaker born Clerkenwell MDX

6. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Mary is recorded as a sister widow aged 56 dressmaker born Islington MDX

7. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Mary is recorded as a sister widow aged 66 dressmaker own account at home born Clerkenwell MDX

Mary married William Richard MERRIFIELD [1028], son of Thomas MERRIFIELD [13883] and Charlotte HATTON [13884], in 1862 in Islington MDX London. William was born about 1832 in Holborn London and died before Apr 1881.

Marriage Notes:
Marriage Ref: GRO Index

General Notes:
William has not been found with his wife on any census. By 1881 she is recorded as a widow. No death found.

In 1871 there is a male "W R M", a married lunatic at the Royal Hospital, Chelsea. (41, b. Tunbridge Wells, Kent)

In 1881 still there - now Blacklands House Private Lunatic Asylum. (50, b. Tunbridge Wells, Kent)
No trace of "WRM" thereafter and no death of a William R Merrifield.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1277 F    i. Kate A MERRIFIELD [13872] .

+ 1278 F    ii. Annie Francis MERRIFIELD [9490] was born Dec Qtr 1863 in Islington MDX London and died on 15 Nov 1897 in Islington MDX London at age 33.

+ 1279 M    iii. Alfred Alston MERRIFIELD [9491] was born on 1 Apr 1866 in Islington MDX London and died in 1935 in London at age 69.

+ 1280 F    iv. Edith Catherine MERRIFIELD [9489] was born on 22 May 1867 in Islington MDX London.

1058. Frances Emily (Fanny) ALSTON [1029] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Oct 1841 in Pentonville MDX and was baptised on 7 Nov 1841 in Pentonville MDX.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 22 Brooksby St Islington LND. Fanny is described as a daughter aged 9 a scholar born Pentonville MDX HO107/1499

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Francis is described as a daughter unmarried aged 19 an apprentice dressmaker born St Mary Islington MDX

1059. Sarah Sophia ALSTON [1030] (Henry George881, James735, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Oct 1844 in Islington MDX London and died on 4 Oct 1863 at age 19.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 22 Brooksby St Islington LND. Sarah is described as a daughter aged 6 a scholar born Islington LON HO107/1499

2. VCensus: England, 8 Apr 1861, 3 Upper Park St Trinity Islington. Sarah Sophia is described as a daughter unmarried aged 16 apprentice dressmaker born Islington

1060. Mary Kate LIVEING [103] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 9 Jul 1822 in Nayland SFK, was baptised on 14 Aug 1822 in Nayland SFK, died on 12 Dec 1888 in Chertsey SRY at age 66, and was buried in Chobham SRY.

General Notes:
Mary was unmarried, she was a Sponsor at the baptism of E L Fenn [3]. Alternative birth date 5 Jul 1822 - Red Book

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
near Colchester
Camberwell
May 28th
My dear Mamma
I am sorry to hear that Aunt Fenn is ill but I hope she will soon get better. I was not at all surprised that Neddy he would not come to you I do not think he will remember us. We all had a ride on the donkeys on Saturday evening which we enjoyed very much and we are going to have another ride tomorrow and another on Friday which Mr James Beaumont is going to give us. Uncle Charles was very much difsappointed a Papa did not come he stayed at home for him. It was amusing to hear how many places uncle Charles thought of going to. Mifs Rebecca Beaumont is much better and sends her love to you. We are going to drink tea at Mrs Mendham's this evening. We shall be very glad to see the Papa again but we hope he will stay a long time. Uncle and Aunt say they shall mifs us when we go and be very sorry to part with us. I wish I had some more news to tell you that as you only went away last Saturday we have not seen anything since. Uncle and aunt Charles desire to join with me in kind love at the Papa, yourself, Grandmamma, Aunt Fenn, Tom and all the children.
And believe me my dear Mamma your very affectionate daughter
Mary Kate Liveing.

Written on four sides of one sheet with clear postmarks Night MY 28 1833, with an unsigned note "from Mary and Frances was staying at Camberwell with Uncle Charles" folded inserted and sealed. This letter was shared with Frances Liveing
Original in Fenn archive 2007

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Near Colchester
My dear Mamma
We are very sorry to hear aunt Fenn continues so ill, but hope she will soon get better. Uncle Charles and I went to St Paul's on Sunday, but were rather too late for the service so we went to Christ's Hospital and saw the Blue Coat boys. Fanny had the headache once last week and yesterday not badly and she is quite well today Uncle Charles went to Hampstead Heath one day with Mr Beaumont but he did not enjoy his holiday much he so very much wished to have gone some where with Papa. Uncle and Aunt both enjoyed themselves at Bruton Street and wished you had been with them. We shall be very glad to see Papa but hope he will not hurry himself for we are quite happy. Mr Thorogood gave us money to have another ride on the donkeys which we have not had yet. On Monday after we left St Paul's we went to see the wax figures there was a live sea serpent a pair of crocodiles and several more animals then we went to Mr Beaumont's to tea and all rode home in the evening. We will not forget to tell Mifs Sophie Beaumont about the pencils. Aunt wishes to join with me in kind love to put Papa yourself Grandmamma Aunt Fenn Tom, Sarah Anne and the rest, and believe me my dear Mamma your affectionate daughter
M K. Liveing
Written on two of four sides of a large notepaper shared with Frances, folded inserted and sealed with red sealing wax postmarked "JN 5 1833" unsigned note "5 June 1833 from Frances and Mary while staying at Camberwell with Uncle Charles"

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
near Colchester
Camberwell
June 18
My dear Mamma
We were very glad to see Papa and particularly because he was not going to take us home directly. Papa took me to Cheshunt on Friday we got to London by 10 minutes past 10 we met Uncle Charles at Mr Beaumont's and went with him to his office then we went to the coach office to take our places and to hear what time the coach went as the coach did not go till 3 o'clock we went into the Auction Mart and there Papa bought several things and we saw a room full of Pictures. Then we went to Birch's the Pastry Cooks and had a plate of soup and Papa had an ice. After we had done Papa left me there while he went to Mr Beaumont's to get a cloak for me and then we went Cheshunt they were very much surprised to see us they had all got something the matter but were not very ill we did not stay there long for we came away early the next morning. When we got back to London we went to see glafs work we saw the Man make a little ship and a candlestick. Then we went to see a Panorama which was just opened then we to Westminster Hall and saw Lord Brougham. Then we walked about St James's Park and saw some swans then we came home to Camberwell and Uncle Charles and Papa went out to dinner. Fanny is too write now and so I can only send my love to you Grandmamma and all. And believe me dear mamma
your affectionate daughter
M. K. Liveing
Letter written on 3 1/2 sides of a sheet postmarked " night J U 18 1833" folded inserted and sealed. Note "June 18 1833 fr Mary and Francis"


On census night 1851 Mary and her sisters were in Stoke by Nayland with a governess. Where were her brothers and mother?

Living Archive: Images 3611 - 3613
Manuden
4th 1883
My dear Edwd
Mr Knottesford was in no way connected with a story you refer to. Mr Jones invited Mr Harrold (then a young man recently settled in practice in Nayland) to dinner with him to meet an old friend of his who was, I think, Mr Kirby the entomologist. I cannot however feel quite sure it was Mr K., but he and Mr Jones were contemporaries and very intimate friends. During dinner the two elder gentlemen got into a talk on the subject of second- sight and the appearance of
Page
spirits after death; I believe Mr K. introduced it by telling Mr Jones he had lately been in London and while walking down the Strand had met 'Mr ______' a mutual friend of theirs whom they both knew to have been dead some little time. He spoke of having seen him with the utmost seriousness and gravity of manner, and Mr Jones received the information with equal seriousness and faith. Mr Harrold however, could not help letting a smile cross his face, which the elderly gentleman thought betokened unbelief, and then it was that Mr Jones
Page
rebuked him. I do not think Mr Harrold ventured to dispute the subject with his elders. Uncle Henry could probably tell you for certain whether Mr Kirby was the friend dining with Mr Jones, as it was Uncle Harrol d who used to repeat this story himself. I do not know at all when Mr Harrold first went to settle at Nayland, but I have an impression on my mind that Mr Jones died very early in this century, so it must have been before that. I do not know either when Mr Knottesford went to be Curate of Stoke; I fancied Mr Rowley lived there all
Page
the time Mr Knottesford did.
Now with regard to Mr Birch of course, any Clergy List wd tell you at once. All I can recollect myself is that Anna was five years old when Mr Birch married. He must have been Rector of Wiston a year or two before his marriage, as he had to build the house before he could marry.
With kind love to you all
Ever yr affect sister
M K Liveing

Death ref Dec quarter aged 66 Chertsey 2a 38 BDM

See letters by Mary's sister Charlotte [108] at her death.

Deaths.
Liveing, 12th inst, at Chobham Lodge, Surrey, aged 66 years, Mary Kate, eldest daughter of the late Edward Liveing of Nayland.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 21 December 1888.

The Will of Mary Kate Liveing formerly of Cambridge late of Chobham Lodge nr Woking SRY spinster who died 12 Dec 1888 was proved 8 Feb 1889 by George Downing Liveing Prof Chemistry brother and Edward Beaumont of Lincolns Inn barrister Executors at L9583 4s 10d. Resworn 1889 L9680 8s 4d

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Thorington Cottage Stoke by Nayland SFK. Mary is described as a surgeons daughter aged 28 unmarried born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Cottage Manuden ESS. Mary is recorded as head of house unmarried aged 58 income from invested monies born Nayland SFK She lived with two servants.
(Spelt Livings in Ancestry)

1061. Frances "Fanny" LIVEING [104] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 26 Dec 1823, was baptised on 28 Jan 1824 in Nayland SFK, died on 24 Apr 1843 in Stoke By Nayland SFK at age 19, and was buried on 29 Apr 1843 in Nayland Churchyard SFK. She was usually called Fanny.

General Notes:
Frances appears to have had a middle name Downing, she is described thus in the Nayland burial register and in D Reg Sudbury 12 289, and the National Burial Index

Frances was guest/bridesmaid? at Thomas & Maria Fenn's wedding. She was aged 19 at her death and is buried in the family grave under the East Window.

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Near Colchester
Camberwell
May 28th
My dear Mama
I am afraid I cannot write much to you because Mary has wrote almost all the news that idea say you would like to hear that we are all quite well and how we spend our time in the morning we practice and attend to our French then make our dolls things and in the afternoon and take a walk. Mr Beaumont came here yesterday and asked uncle Charles to let us go and see St Paul's next Sunday morning and spent the rest of the day at his house. I enjoyed the ride on the donkey very much and Uncle Charles says if Papa we will keep a donkey for us he will give us one. Aunt desires her kind love and says that she was very sorry to hear that aunt Fenn was so ill and will try to recollect that feather grafs Jane is better, Elizabeth joins with me in sending love to Mamma Papa Grandmamma Aunt Fenn Tom and all the children and believe me dear Mamma your affectionate daughter
Frances Liveing
Written on four sides of one sheet with clear postmarks Night MY 28 1833, with an unsigned note "from Mary and Frances was staying at Camberwell with Uncle Charles" folded inserted and sealed. This letter was shared with Mary Kate Liveing
Original in Fenn archive 2007

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Near Colchester
Camberwell
June 5, 1833
My dear Mamma
I should have written yesterday but I had the head-ach (sic) but it is quite well today. I suppose I was rather tired last Monday but we enjoyed ourselves so very much. We all went to Mr Beaumonts on Sunday and slept there and in the morning Mr Beaumont took us to Guildhall, we saw Gog and Magog, a great many paintings, and some men with large wigs. I think we went all over Guildhall, then we went to the Bank and the people made such a noise, we saw the first Bank note that was ever made, we saw the largest piece of gold money and the smallest piece. Afterwards we went to Leadenhall market and then went to the Tower, we saw a great many soldiers and yeomen, they were dressed in scarlet trimed with black and velvet hats with a wreath of artificial flowers round them. We saw some very large cannons and a great many more things that I can tell you about when we come home next we went to the Custom house, and went into a very large room and saw some men bringing some boxers out of a boat there we saw a large steamboat almost as big as a ship, we called at Uncle Charles office and saw Robert Fenn and then had our dinner afterwards eleven of us went to the top of St Paul's it was a very clear day and we liked it a great deal better than the Coliseum, we were tired going up the stairs but not at all coming down for Uncle Charles carried as part of the way, we were very much pleased with the whispering gallery. My fingers ach (sic) now and so I leave Mary to finish. Give my love to Papa Grandmamma Aunt Fenn Tom and all the children
from your affectionate daughter
Frances Liveing.
Written on two of four sides of a large notepaper shared with Mary, folded inserted and sealed with red sealing wax postmarked "JN 5 1833" unsigned note "5 June 1833 from Frances and Mary while staying at Camberwell with Uncle Charles"

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
near Colchester
My dear Mamma
We are all quite well and we were very glad to hear that Aunt Fen was better. Papa went to the Isle of Wright (sic) but he was obliged to go alone because Uncle Charles could not go with him and he does not expect to be here again till Friday or Saturday so that we cannot see you before Monday or Tuesday but I have not heard when we are to go home. One day last week we went again to the Oxford Street and Soho bazaar. Tomorrow if it is fine we are going to the British Museum, and to drink tea at Mr Beaumonts, the next day we are to go and see the Dulwich Gallery, we are much obliged to you for saying that we may have another ride on the donkeys. Uncle and Aunt Charles and Elizabeth and I send our loves to you and Mr Beaumont desires to be kindly remembered.
and believe me my dear Mamma your affectionate daughter
Frances Liveing
Letter written on 3 1/2 sides of a sheet postmarked " night J U 18 1833" folded inserted and sealed. Note "June 18 1833 fr Mary and Francis"
Original in Fenn archive

Mrs E. Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Wednesday, June 25, 1834
My dear Mamma
As Uncle Henry will have to read prayers tomorrow, it will not be convenient to him to bring us home so you must not expect us till Saturday, then Uncle says he will be at liberty to take us home, Uncle is going to Mistley this afternoon to dine at Mr Norman's and we're going to drink tea at the Arch-Deacon's, we have been there three times before there are some little boys and girls staying there now. I had a little headache yesterday for the first time since I have been here, but it's pretty well today, I forgot to ask Uncle to mend me a pen before he went out, but Mary has mended me some, so my writing is not good we shall have a great many things to tell you when we get home but I cannot write any more now as my paper is filled
Mary joins with me in kind love to you and Papa and all at home and believe me my dear Mamma
your affectionate daughter
F. Liveing
Written on four sides of a small note paper folded and sealed, with an unsigned note reading "25 June 1834 Frances staying with Uncle Henry at Wix?"
Original in Fenn archive


Alveston
August 20, 1841
My dear Mamma
As Mary had only time yesterday to write a line just to tell you we had arrived safely at our journey's end I thought I would write today and give you a longer account of our proceedings. We were very pleased to stay two hours at Leamington Mr and Mrs Burnett desired to be particularly remembered to Papa and to you. The coach that took us from Leamington to Alveston travels more slowly even than our Headley one, we thought we never should arrive here. Have we not been very fortunate in having such a fine weather? Mr Knottisford took us over the grounds the morning after we arrived, they are really very extensive and beautiful, some of the trees I admire particularly, indeed all the country round is beautifully wooded. Maria's time is almost entirely taken up with attending to little Edward who is not very well but I think Mrs Fortescue will return today, and then I suppose Maria will be more at liberty. The Mifs Taylors are exceedingly kind people Mary and I have just been walking with Mifs Taylor to see the Victoria spa it is a very pretty place about a mile from here. Yesterday we had a very great treat, Mr Knottisford took us first to Warwick then on to Kenilworth the ride to Warwick is very pretty indeed we were most delighted with Warwick Castle the scenery round it is certainly exceedingly striking and lovely. I had never seen any place so beautiful before. The paintings also are very fine but it required more time than we could give to see them as I liked Kenilworth Castle is quite a ruin and not nearly so beautifully situated as that of Warwick. We went also to Warwick Church Mr Knottesford was very kind in explaining the different things to us, he pointed out all the places round and gave us much information about them. We enjoyed the day exceedingly: I only wish you could be with us. My tooth has behaved very well which is indeed a great comfort it has not ached badly once since I have been here. I am sorry I must conclude as they are ready to take the letters they always go exactly at 4. Will you write to us soon. With kind love to all ever your very affectionate child
Fanny Liveing
Written on four sides of a small sheet with an unsigned note reading "Aug 20 1841 Frances staying at Alveston visit to Warwick and Kenilworth" Unaddressed so it was presumably enclosed with other mail.
Original in Fenn archive


Alveston
September 6, 1841
My dear Mamma
We have just received a note from Mrs Birch who intends leaving Leamington the beginning of next week but does not name the day. I rather wish she could have returned this week as Mr and Mrs Fortescue are going to her fathers on Wednesday and Maria too, I do not know when they will return home. Do not you think now that Aunt Alston has left you could manage to come and fetch us? It would be so very nice, you need not be away from home more than one week altogether! Mrs Birch says that Bonne has got rid of her cough entirely, also that Mrs Birch will probably meet us in London. I have had a slight cough for a fortnight it has been more troublesome the last few days and dear Aunt Knottesford is rather worried because it will not go away. I don't know how I caught cold, only I know it was not from carelefsnefs for I have been very particular is not going out with nothing on because of my face. It was very kind of you to say I might return to Nayland with Mary if I much wished it I do certainly particularly wish to do so it does seem silly but I should be much more comfortable at Maida Hill if I might come home first. Have you written to aunt Louisa? I must write to Elizabeth soon but it seems uselefs to do so until it is settled whether or not I stay there on my way home. Edward went to Leeds last Wednesday to attend at the consecration of Dr Hook's church, he returned on Saturday. Such an immense afsemblage of clergyman and such a consecration he says has not been known for a great length of time; but we will give a long description of it on our return. Yesterday Mr Knottesford took the morning duty at the chapel in in Stratford; and in the afternoon we went to Billesley. Dear little cousin Mary improves very much, she is quite a pretty baby now, her hair is just like Charlotte's, indeed she reminds me much of what Chatty was when a baby. Give my love to Sally and tell her how pleased I was with her long letter, it was very kind of her to send us so much news. I am sorry she was not able to give Cousin Robert my poor little watch. Oh how careful I will be over it if I can but get it set right again. I suppose Uncle Harold continues much the same, does he talk about living at Colchester still?
Aren't Sears give my dear love to your mother and tell her it is a great pleasure to her that Mrs Birch is going to stay longer at Leamington and if you're cough should get any worse I shall let her know. Now dear Mamma I must conclude accept and distribute our kind love to all, not forgetting aunt Alston & Margaret and believe me always your very affectionate child
Fanny Liveing
PS Not having heard anything about Mifs Stratford I hope she is well. Mifs Smith had her music lessons at our house.
Written on four sides of a note sheet, and over written on two. No envelope.
Original in Fenn archive.


Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Nr Colchester
Rushall Cottage
Monday evening
My dear Mamma
I write a line tonight to be ready for the morning Post that you may hear as early as possible of our safe arrival at Rushall - Uncle and I started by the quarter past 10 train from Paddington, we had a very quick comfortable journey to Chippenham from thence we took a very nice open chaise and reached Rushall before five o'clock, I enjoyed the drive from Chippenham to Devizes extremely - at the latter place it began to rain very hard but we took no harm as the chaise had a hood. All I saw on my journey here pleased me very much, I did not expect to see the country half so wooded.
Maria welcomed us very warmly, she, Aunt Alston and Margaret were all in the drawing-room, Tom was out and I have scarcely spoken a word to him at present but he looks well although thin - As to dear Annie she is indeed a sweet child she looks the very picture of good temper - the baptism* takes place tomorrow Robert is not expected - I believe there will be a dinner party - I hope to write you a full account of it and of every thing else if not tomorrow, the next day without fail, but I do not feel able to write more tonight, so with kindest love to yourself and all that home believe me my dearest Mamma ever your affectionate
Fanny
Aunt Alston and Margaret send their love and desire me to say they leave Rushall on Thursday and hope to reach an Nayland on Friday.
I think of Aunt Fenn every time I look upon pretty Annie feeling sure that she would almost eat her up could she be transported here - my dear God child* I love already - poor little darling I can't bear to see her so thin. Goodbye
Mr Barnes to my surprise is not arrived but I fancy he will be here before midnight.
Written Mon 29 Aug on four sides of a note sheet but undated, envelope shows clear Pewsey post stamp "AU 30 1842" franked one penny stamp, post stamp on back of envelope if "F 31AU31 1842" and two unsigned notes one scratched out the other "August 30, 1842 Frances at Tom Fenn at Rushall" Sealed with black sealing wax and the imprint of a 5 petaled flower.
* The baptism referred to on the 30 Aug is that of Isabella Fenn
Original in Fenn archive


Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
(Nr Colchester)
Rushall Cottage
September 8th
My dear Mamma
I did not intend to have written today but Tom mentioned something to me this morning which I thought you might as well know - He said Uncle Henry had been telling him that Louise thought it very strange indeed, and felt hurt, that she has not been invited to stop at Nayland - She wishes particularly to stay at your house - Uncle Henry himself too is quite put out about it Tom says. I told the latter that Marian now occupies our only spare room and how long she intends to stay I know not - I should much like to know what Louise's is plans are, when uncle Henry heard from her the other day she said she had been very poorly the last fortnight, and had written to ask her father to come and fetch her home but he could not - I suppose she wanted to get away - but perhaps she could share Mary's bed for a little while or Mifs S would kindly give up her's to her, I doubt not if you like that arrangement or Marian will perhaps visit Aunt Alston before Louisa leaves this part of the country - I received Mary's kind letter this morn Uncle H. wished she had sent word how Louise's health was - he is I am glad to say recovering, and I think will soon be strong again, and his appetite has returned - he took a walk with me yesterday, and afterwards went with us to dine at Mr Crooks - we had an agreeable evening of it altogether, Mr C. is a gentle, manly, pleasant person - they talked about the Huseyites a great deal at dinner - there seemed to be very many clergyman followers of Husey hereabouts - one a Mr Mosley declares there is only one step between his faith and that of the Roman Catholic - he does not agree to worshipping the Virgin Mary - I trust he will have his living or whatever it is taken from him ere long - tell Mary with my love I have written to Mrs Burnett - also tell dear Papa - Tom is very soon going to use his horse at present he is fattening it up the creature seems to be thoro'ly enjoying himself in the paddock before the house, I often see him running about there he makes himself quite at home - Now I will conclude with my love to you dear Mamma and to all not forgetting Marion & believe me always your very affectionate
Fanny
Baby looks much better yesterday and today too
P.S. I have written so many letters my aheads & postage envelopes are nearly gone already - I forgot to tell you no one could be procured to take Uncle H's duty either part of ye day last Sunday which seems to trouble him he sends love to all
Written on four sides of a small notepaper envelope stamped clearly "Pewsey SP 9 1842" on the back "0 10SP10 1842", sealed with black sealing wax, with an unsigned note "September 9, 1842 Frances at Rushall" written on inside of flap.
Original in Fenn archive

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
(nr Colchester)
Rushall Cottage
Sepbr 10
My dear Mamma
I received your note this morning and am somewhat puzzled to know how to answer it - Robert intends leaving Rushall Monday week, that he may spend two or three days at Horksley Park with his mother if I come up to London with him, I shall only have spent three weeks here exactly, which is a very short time to stay when one considers the long journey and great distance from Nayland - I made up my mind on coming here to stop a month or at the furthest five weeks - I have mentioned your proposal to Tom and Marie the former says he will undertake to see that I get home safely but how he will manage this I can't say I can see (say) how much I wish Robert could spend another week here - I am really troubled not knowing what to do about leaving in one weeks time, for I seem to be only just arrived - Uncle Henry left us today, Tom drove him to Devizes and he took a coach from thence to Chippenham, he hoped to get to Uxbridge in good time - I think he will soon be quite strong again, his spirits have been very good lately - I hope before you receive this note dear Ellen will be quite herself - I am glad to say Isabella has improved very much this last week - she looks better altogether - thanks to dear Nanny for her letter - I am glad you have arranged for the Louisa's coming to Nayland. Maria desires me to say Tom will see me into . . . . . the train when the time comes for one to go - If he will do this I shall not mind travelling alone to London, as I trust Uncle William will be so kind as to meet me there - I suppose in this case I must give up staying at Camberwell this year, as Uncle's holidays begin so shortly - I am sorry to miss seeing Louisa again - now dear Mamma if after reading this you think it would be a much better plan to come up with Robert write and say so directly & I will be ready to come though I shall leave reluctantly - I must say goodbye for tonight with kind love to yourself and believe me my dear Mamma your very affectionate
Fanny
PS I have written this ready for tomorrow morning's post.
Maria and Robert join me in kind love to all the Nayland and kisses to baby - Tom is gone to bed not being quite well - he pretends to make us think this constitution is gradually breaking up - however Maria is not frightened.
Written on four sides by small notepaper and on the inside of the opening flap of the envelope. The envelope (11.5cm x 7cm) shows a Pewsey postmark plus two others confirming the date at 1842, a one penny franked stamp, it was closed with a black seal. An unsigned note reads "September 10 1842 Frances at Rushall"
Original in Fenn archive.

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
(Near Colchester)
Rushall Cottage
September 14th
My dear Mamma
As Robert has been altering his plans and seems to have decided to stay over Monday, I would not delay writing to you - Robert finds he could only have two days to spend with Aunt Fenn if he were to leave Rushall on Monday, as he must be at his office on the following Friday, and he thinks it would not be worthwhile to visit Horksley for so short a time - he therefore has made up his mind to stay here till Thursday the 22nd, and on that day will precede to London, I think I had much better accompany him, (though I shall not have spent quite a month here) as he will see me safely to my journey's end. I do not doubt you will wish me to leave with him, but I hope you will write by return of post, expressing your wishes decidedly, because then I can give Tom the best of reasons for my leaving so soon, for I know he will say directly "what did your Mamma say do you think she would mind your travelling alone?"
Also dear Mamma I want to hear from you directly that I may know what to do about my visit to Camberwell, perhaps it would be inconvenient to Aunt Charles to have me there the week before she leaves home - will Mary write and tell her of my plan directly and then when I get your answer I will write to her - (I mean to aunt C.)
I should much have liked to stay here another fortnight instead of a week, but there is no likelihood of any of Tom's friends going to London - Robert hopes to get three days holiday at Christmas and then he will come to Feering and see his mother.
I hope dear Ellen is quite recovered - please give my kind love to Aunt Fenn and thank her for writing to me, but as my stay here will be short I hope she will kindly excuse my answering it at Rushall. We had a very great treat yesterday - Tom borrowed Mr Alt's cart and took Robert and Mifs Addelarde and myself, to Wilton House, it is about 3 miles from Salisbury - we started about 10 and reached Wilton at 2, Tom had some difficulty in getting admittance as it was not the right day for showing the house, however at last after much pleading the gates were opened to us. The house is built round a courtyard, we first walked round the cloisters which are beautiful and filled with statues some of them very ancient - we spend a long time looking at them and then proceeded to examine about 13 splendidly furnished rooms - the furniture was all gilt the curtains and cushions all splendid crimson velvet. The apartments reminded me very much of Windsor Palace but the portraits which covered the walls delighted me particularly - there was a splendid family picture of the Pembroke's by Vandyck and a portrait of Charles the first which struck me very much I could have looked at it for an hour - the woman told us they had had 90 visitors staying in the house at one time. There are upwards of a hundred rooms but we were only admitted in one bedroom. Tom was more delighted with the grounds I think than with anything else - we did not walk about them but were permitted to view them from the balcony - I have not seen such superb trees since I left Warwickshire, and certainly I never saw such a lawn in my life it was really magnificent, the extent of it and the beautiful order in which it is kept was really wonderful. We looked with delight at some superlative cedar trees growing on it. From a window in one of the large rooms there is a beautiful view of Salisbury Cathedral, you see it apparently rising out from clumps of trees in the park. We stayed looking about till we were quite tired, and Tom then proceeded to Salisbury, as it was so near he thought we might as well go there but he was alas so dreadfully sick of sightseeing that he did not make an effort to get inside the cathedral - of course I was delighted to see the exterior of it it was quite an unexpected treat. I could scarcely believe the spire is 16 feet higher than St Paul's - we did not stay long in Salisbury as it was getting late - we had a nice moonlight drive home - we passed Stonehenge on our way to Wilton but returning we came a different way - we reached home about 10 o'clock and are none the worse today from our yesterday's exertions - Maria was left at home with the two little ones, but Tom says when Polly comes here he will make another expedition to Wilton and then they will go in a large body
I must think of concluding now and will put on my bonnet and walk to Up Avon & put this in ye post
Thanks Sally for her note I have the write to Uncle Henry as he asked me - Isabella is getting on much better I hope
With kind love believe me my dearest Mamma you're ever affectionate
Fanny
Poor Sarah is in sad trouble, she heard only yesterday of her sister Mary's illnefs and this morning she had a letter saying she is dead - the girl was living in Witham - I am very sorry for poor Sarah
Written on five sides of 1 1/2 note sheets and inside the envelope flap, the sheets are each edged in mourning black which could refer to the note on the envelope flap above, envelope sealed with black sealing wax, two postmarks from and rear "Pewsey SP14 1842" and "D 15SP15 1842" Unidentified note "15 September 1842 Rushall Frances about to return home Tom takes her to Wilton House and Salisbury'
Original in Fenn archive


Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
(Nr Colchester)
Camberwell September 23
My dear Mamma
I know you would like to have a line from me today and to hear I had a comfortable journey yesterday - Tom borrowed Mr Alf's cart which took us baggage and all to Devizes - We started from Rushall about half past 8 and waited at Devizes half an hour before the coach was ready to start for Chippenham - We took that opportunity of examining the crofs also a nice church, with a very fine Norman tower - Tom put me inside the coach and then bid us goodbye. As the day was not rainy we went in the second clafs carriages and arrived at Paddington about four o'clock. We then got into a cab and reached Uncle William before they had finished dinner, we had hardly arrived half an hour before Uncle and Aunt Charles joined us we spent the afternoon and part of the evening there - you may imagine how greatly disappointed I was to find that Betty could not accompany me to Camberwell as Miss E. Deck is staying with her which Aunt C was not aware of when she invited Betty to be with me - I hope however they will all come over here on Tuesday as Uncle C proposes taking the whole party to the Surrey Gardens that evening. I was truly thankful to get to bed last night being nearly knocked up - but today I feel right again - we have had an early dinner as we are expecting Mrs Simpson and Mifs Robertson to spend the evening, I believe Uncle Charles is to bring them in his carriage - Aunt C is poorly with a slight attack of that horrid cholera, Mifs Parson has been troubled but is better I am very pleased to find her here - I hope to have a better account of dear Papa soon and also a baby - Isabella I left tolerably well - now I will conclude, the day is not fixed for Uncle and Aunt to leave London - with kind love to yourself and to all ever believe me my dear Mamma your very affectionate child
Fanny
I hope poor Mifs S's cold is better by this time - Uncle says, how much money does Papa want for the farm? how much for himself? and when does he want it? It would be more convenient to Uncle the second or third of October as he makes up his accounts the end of every month but still Papa can have the money whatever day he likes if he will send word.
Dr Young has been here and desires his kind regards - Robert Fenn took great care of me - What a strange person Louisa Harold is about her plans - We hear she is coming on Monday to us but she has not written to Aunt C so we hardly know what to think I paid Mr Barnes.
Written on four sides of a small note sheet plus an inserted sheet and overwriting on the front page. Envelope shows postmark with date and note paid, also unsigned note "23 September 1842 Frances journey from Rushall to London by coach and rail with R Fenn". Sealed with a black seal.
Original in Fenn archive.


Prospect Place
October 8th
My dearest Mamma
I was very glad to have your kind note and should have written yesterday but there was no time as we walked to St Paul's with uncle Henry. Now as to my returning home Uncle has made up his mind to come down on Monday week but of course cannot be sure that he will not be hindered, he leaves us this afternoon and has promised to write to me word as soon as pofsible if anything short occur to prevent him from going with me, and if the worst comes to the worst I must come alone inside the Wellington - I very much wish to stop this next week and am quite glad that you do not seem to object to it - Uncle Henry wished to have come down by the railroad, but I refused in that case to accompany him because I remembered you had a very strong objection to it. When I arrived here on Monday afternoon I found Louisa Harold, Emma Deck & Emma Freshfield, the latter however returned to school the next day. Louise is in excellent spirits Uncle Henry is coming on Tuesday to fetch her home and intends staying 2 or 3 days at Cheshunt himself.
How fortunate Uncle and Aunt Charles have been with regard to the weather - I suppose you will see something of them tomorrow or the next day, give my kind love to them both Betty's spirits are very good and she is pretty well in health but the last 3 days have been very fatiguing ones - we walked about the Pantheon and Oxford Street on Tuesday with Aunt Louisa and Wednesday Uncle William took us to that tiring British Museum. Thursday morning at breakfast time Uncle Henry arrived and we went with him to the Chinese show (which I think Mary was much pleased with) and then proceeded to Westminster's Abbey and joined in the afternoon service - Today we are at home excepting indeed Uncle H. & Louise who have walked to St Martin's Lane to hear a celebrated organ - I must soon leave off writing as we really ought to call on Mr and Mrs Thorogood hitherto I have had no opportunity - Poor Mrs Steane is too ill to be seen at present, this has been one of her very ill weeks - I saw Captain Steane the day I came, also Charles Mrs Neville (?) spent the evening with as - Betty desires her kindest love and I am to thank you for your invitation which for the present she declines as she has been so much from home, also she has just begun to take lessons of Mr Harris again so it would not do to break them off - this reminds me I have an autumn cold which is a alas just bad enough to prevent my singing, I was extra ordinarily free from cold during my stay at Rushall but I soon got one at Camberwell.
I am particularly glad you are becoming more reconciled to Beatrice I hope dear Ellen is to - I shall certainly be obliged to spend a whole day with Aunt Fenn on my return - shall I not? Is Mifs Stratford free from cold now?.
We all unite in kindest love to yourself and to all believe me my dear Mamma ever your affectionate.
Fanny
PS I forgot whether I told you Dr Young very much enjoyed his visit in Suffolk
Written on four sides of a notepaper one side over written, not addressed and not dated with the year but from the references to Rushall and Camberwell the transcriber (ELF) would guess at 1842. An unsigned note reads "Frances staying with Uncle William in London no year"
Original in Fenn archive.

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
(Nr Colchester)
Saturday morning
My dear Mamma
I thought I would write you a line to say you may expect to see me sometime on Monday. Uncle Henry came up from Cheshunt last night and I believe will take two places on the Wellington for us today, but if the coach which starts at 11 should not go on the rail very likely we shall travel by that because it puts Uncle Henry to inconvenience to get up here Monday morning early enough for Wellington - At all events my dear Mamma I doubt not I shall reach you in some way or other, for tho Uncle Henry has not exactly settled his plan plans I feel perfectly safe under his protection and I know he will manage everything all right for me - indeed I am very glad to have a companion for I do not at all like travelling alone.
I have not paid my respects to them Mifses Taylor but Aunt has most kindly promised to go with me this morning - Last night Betty went to have her singing lefson and we all accepted Mrs Hitchcock's invitation to drink tea with them. I was quite uncomfortable with a very bad cold, but I feel quite another creature today, and hope that my native wit will entirely cure me - So now dear Mamma I will conclude us I hope breakfast is nearly ready - With our united kind love to yourself and to all believe me my dear Mamma ever your affectionate
Fanny
P.S. Poor Emma Deck has been ill with a violent cold on her chest her cough will not leave her entirely.
Written on three sides of a notepaper sealed with black sealing wax, postmarked clearly "B paid 15Oct15 1842" over stamped "Paddington . . . . . " with an unsigned note "15 October 1842 Frances apparently an Uncle William in London coming home with Uncle Henry by coach or rail in two days time"
Original in Fenn archive


Copford
Saturday Afternoon
My dear Mamma
Aunt Ambrose wished me to write and say that she hopes you will not Anna to return with us on Wednesday next, she wishes her to stay here till Mifs Stratford comes back, and I second her wish as the child looks quite improved, having a nice colour in her cheeks & seeming thoroughly happy Aunt will undertake to send her home so that difficulty is gone. She was not at all dull here when alone - I was disappointed not to hear from Uncle last night how poor Sally's head was - I hope you will not over fatigue yourself muddling about with the children - you will be glad to hear Uncle and Aunt Charles are coming down this day fortnight so dear baby's baptism need not be put off long. The William Liveings intend coming here that same day - Betty describes herself as much improved in health. With kind love to you and all ever my dear Mamma your very affectionate
Fanny
PS George is gone to Colchester with uncle - We expect John this afternoon.
Written on three sides of a small note sheet, unaddressed & undated, with an unsigned note "no date Frances Anne and George staying at Copford"
Original in Fenn archive.

Frances Liveing of Stoke by Nayland SFK spinster died 24 Apr 1843 at Stoke by Nayland.
Administration of her estate was granted to Catherine Mary Liveing Widow of 52 Queen Anne St MDX mother of deceased and only next of kin.
Proved 9 Sep 1864 under L300
PCC Calender of Wills.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Bures St Nayland SFK. Frances is described as aged 15 born SFK

1062. Sarah Ann LIVEING [105] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 24 Dec 1825, was baptised on 11 Jan 1826 in Nayland SFK, died on 22 Feb 1844 in Stoke By Nayland SFK at age 18, and was buried on 1 Mar 1844 in Nayland Churchyard SFK.

General Notes:
Sarah was unmarried. She is buried in the family grave under the East Window, Nayland church.

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
near Colchester
August 21st 1835
My dear Mama
George has been rather poorly but he is quite well now. Mifs Rebecca Beaumont has been staying with us but she went away last Tuesday. On Friday a Papa took us to the Zoological Gardens and to the Pantheon, on Saturday he took us to the Panorama to the Swifs Cottage and to the Pantechnicon. On Sunday all the Mifs Beaumont's came to dine with us, in the evening Papa left us because he was going to sleep in London as he started very early in the morning. As George was not quite well we stopped at home on Monday and and Tuesday, on Wednesday Mifs Stratford came to see us but she could not stop all night because her aunt was coming home the next day. On Thursday we went to tea at Mifs Young's but before we had had our key and invitation came from her brothers for her and uncle and aunt and asks to go there to tea and to see the fair from his drawing room window, we enjoyed ourselves very much but I must leave the rest for George to tell you. Mifs Stratford joins with me in love to you and Tom and also to dear little Bob and believe me to be your affectionate daughter
S A Liveing . . . . . letter continued by George

Letter written on three sides of one sheet edged with gold, postmarked August 22, 1835, stamped "T P Camber ll Gve" folder that inserted and sealed.
Note, unsigned," from Sarah Anne and GDL will staying at Camberwell Grove with Uncle Charles their father took them to Zoological Gardens Pantheon Panorama Swiss Cottage Pantechnicon father going trip to Wales and Cornwall" also "Give my Jane Love"
Original in Fenn archive 2007

Mrs Liveing
183 Prospect Place
June 1, 1842
My dear Mama
Of course Papa told you that Mr Barnett could not come up with us when we got to Copford John came out with his bag but there was no place for him although he had sent to take it a few days before the coach was not full then so I suppose all places had been taken before he sent. We got on very well altogether the worst part of the journey was the London part as you may suppose Uncle William and Mrs Card were waiting for us when we got to Piccadilly and there we parted with Mifs Stratford and all the passengers who came up in the basket. We have been this morning to the maze and our party consisted of ourselves Mr and Mrs Thorogood, Mifs Deane, Emily Gelf, Mrs Gelf, Janet and Capt Steane. I enjoyed it very much but found my shawl very hot I must try my cape next time I go out I think it is so much hotter here than it is at Nayland.
We are going to drink tea at Mrs Thorogood is this evening Mrs Steane is a little better today but she is so weak that if she talks for more than a few minutes she faints quite a way Aunt Louisa has asked a Emily Gelf to spend a month here but I am afraid her Mama will not let her if not she goes on Friday. I think I have all my things right excepting my bonnet cap which I am sorry to say I cannot find Betty has given me her white one which I think does pretty well but when I was going out last night and found I had not got one I was quite in a fright. My bonnet got rather bent I cannot make it come quite right, I am sure I shall have to get another soon. I had a note from (sic) this morning she wants to know what I have done about it she has not got one yet herself she says she wrote to Fanny so I will say no more about her now. Mary Anne Bye is here today she is going home next week. What a shocking attempt upon our poor little Queen's life!* Uncle has sent you a paper. It is just past time and dinner is waiting we have been out the whole morning so I must say goodbye and with kind love to Papa and all believe me ever your affectionate child
S A Liveing
I will write again very soon I have been writing this so very fast and with a shocking pen
Written on three sides of a small piece of notepaper, with a note unsigned "1 June 1842 Sarah Anne at uncle Williams in London attempt on life of our poor little Queen" not properly addressed so possibly mailed with other letters.
Original in Fenn archive 2007


Died.
22nd ult., at Stoke by Nayland, in her 19th year, Sarah Anne, third daughter of the late E Liveing Esq.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 2 March 1844

Administration of her estate was granted to Catherine Mary Liveing Widow of 52 Queen Anne St MDX mother of deceased and only next of kin.
Proved 9 Sep 1864 under L200
PCC Calender of Wills.
Death Ref Mar quarter 1844 Sudbury 12 359 BDM


* Re reference to attempted assination of Queen Victoria:
During Victoria's first pregnancy, eighteen-year old Edward Oxford attempted to assassinate the Queen while she was riding in a carriage with Prince Albert in London. Oxford fired twice, but both bullets missed. He was tried for high treason but was acquitted on the grounds of insanity
Two further attempts to assassinate Queen Victoria occurred in May and July 1842:
On 29 May at St. James's Park John Francis fired a pistol at the Queen while she was in a carriage, but was immediately seized by Police Constable William Trounce. Francis was convicted of high treason The death sentence was commuted to transportation for life
On 3 July just days after Francis' sentence was commuted, another boy, John William Bean, attempted to shoot the Queen. Prince Albert felt that the attempts were encouraged by Oxford's acquittal in 1840. Although his gun was loaded only with paper and tobacco, his crime was still punishable by death. Feeling that such a penalty would be too harsh, Prince Albert encouraged Parliament to pass the Treason Act of 1842. Under the new law, an assault with a dangerous weapon in the monarch's presence with the intent of alarming her was made punishable by seven years imprisonment and flogging Bean was thus sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment; however, neither he, nor any person who violated the act in the future, was flogged.
Ref Wikipedia 2007

Research Notes:
Check birth date may be 24 Dec?

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Bures St Nayland SFK. Sarah is described as aged 15 born SFK

1063. Professor George Downing LIVEING [99] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 21 Dec 1827 in Nayland SFK, was baptised on 25 Jan 1828 in Nayland SFK, and died on 26 Dec 1924 in Cambridge CAM. at age 97. The cause of his death was a road accident.

General Notes:
George was Professor of Chemistry St Johns College Cambridge, he was the first to teach science experimentally at Cambridge, he developed new laboratories, and promoted the subject of chemical physics. Fellow Royal Society 1879. Davy Medal 1901 for Spectroscopy. Prof Chemistry Royal Military College Sandhurst. At the age of 96 he was President of St Johns College and a Presiding Magistrate.

He was knocked down by a bicycle aged 97 and died of his injuries.

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
near Colchester
August 21, 1835
My dear Mamma
We saw both the Panoramas, Jeruselem and Thebes. Mr Beaumont has bought me a nice kite, which is almost as tall as Sarah Anne's shoulder. We are both very happy and very comfortable here. Papa was very sorry that he could not get a companion to go with him as he is going into Wales and Cornwall, and several other places. We both wish you to write to Grandmamma and tell her that we are very happy and very comfortable as she particularly whiched (sic) to hear, also send our love to her and Edward and Anna. we are going to sleep one night in London next week weare then going to the top of St Paul's and other places in the city. Uncle talks of taking us to Cheshunt some day next week Auntie joins with me in kind love to you, give my love Tom and Bob I also beg you will excuse the bad writing and mistakes and be- me to be your affectionate Son
G. D. Liveing
Continuation of a letter started by his sister Sarah Anne.
Original in Fenn archive 2007

Cambridge.
Mathematical Examination 1850
Approved For Mathematical Honours.
Liveing - Joh.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 19 Jan 1850.

Cambridge.
The following gentleman have been elected Fellows of St Johns College: George Downing Liveing, 11th Wrangler, 1850.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 19 March 1853.

Cambridge.
Commission is signed by the Lord Lieutenant of the County of Cambridgeshire.
8th R.V.C. - Lieut. G.D. Lieving to be Capt, vice Leapingwell deceased.
Ref: Verbatum from Ipswich Journal 27 February 1864.

Cambridge.
The Charge of Poisoning.
George is reported to have carried out analysis of pudding vomit and viscera, samples from a poisoned husband. George testified that he had found no poison in the first samples, but later testified that he had found arsenic in a further sample of pudding. The report suggests the accused "will doubtless be discharged" due to conflicting evidence by others.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 25 July 1871.

However
Cambridge.
The Charge of Poisoning
The woman Charlotte Day charged with poisoning her husband Henry Day . . . . . was taken before the Magistrates on Monday, on remand from Saturday, when Professor Liveing, who made the analysis of the pudding, went into detail in confirmation of his statement that he had detected arsenic. She was again remanded until Tuesday next. The Magistrates were of the opinion that after the evidence of Professor Liveing, who had distinctly stated that arsenic was discovered, they would not be justified in discharging the prisoner.
Ref: extracted from the Ipswich Journal 5 August 1871.

1876 & 1919 George is registered as a shareholder in the Gt Western Railway

Mary George, Historian and Author of Nayland writes:
I don't know how much you know about all the various properties that the Liveings and the Fenns owned in Nayland apart from the Bear Street and Alston Court houses, but going through some of our own old papers, I realised that one of the houses we used to live in during 1970's and 80's belonged to your family.
I have in front of me a copy of a conveyance dated 21st July 1914, relating to 4 properties in Stoke Road, formerly Birch Street (owned by G D Liveing). They were beside a separate property owned by him called Hillside (now No. 14, a mid 1800's house also a large garden, which was also owned by him at some time).
"Conveyance by Professor G.D. Liveing to Mr. George Towns, Conveyance of 4 Freehold Messuages or Tenements and premises situate at Nayland Suffolk." Three of these were large redbrick houses built in late 1800's on what were formerly single storey Maltings buildings, then converted to 4 bedroom houses, each with about half an acre of garden and outbuildings. The 4th was a larger 18th century redbrick house which had formerly owned the walled gardens, buildings which were at one time used as maltings, and a large orchard behind all which was divided into 4 when the conversion took place between 1876 and 1881" If you can remember the street where the Chapel is, there is a pair of
semi detached houses with no front garden or paved path immediately opposite the Chapel and Chapel Garden. Beside that is a similar, but now much extended, house which is sideways on to the road, the front entrance being at the side. The next house going towards Stoke, the oldest one, has a large front garden and has a barn like wooden building beside it. This house was the home of the Headmaster of Nayland School, who features in my book.

The document mentions the following indentures.
12th March 1881 Mortgage between GDL (the Vendor) and John and William Brown.
16th September 1881 Conveyance between the 2 Browns above and GDL (the Vendor)
7th March 1889 Reconveyance (endorsed on an Indenture of Mortgage dated 19th April 1876) between
Edward Liveing Fenn and GDL (The Vendor)
26th April 1898 Reconveyance made between the said Edward Liveing Fenn of the one part and the
Vendor of the other part.
It is signed sealed and delivered by George Downing Liveing, who signed himself G.D. Liveing.
The 4 properties were sold together for L1085 pounds.

On the first page he is described as "George Downing Liveing a Fellow of St. John's College,
Cambridge, and formerly Professor of Chemistry"

The owner of Hillside tells me that his deeds state in 1888, that the properties next door had been recently converted from a Maltings, but there is no indication of what "recently" means. His deeds mention the other properties because the whole lot was subject to a redemption of Land Tax.
Hope the above is of interest.
Mary George (Nayland)
14 Nov 2003

Liveing Archive: Images 3908 - 3911
The Pightle
12 Apr 1896
My dear Charlotte
I am off tomorrow to Manchester, where I shall stay at the grand Hotel, Aytoun St, until Thursday. On Thursday evening my plan is to go on to Leeds, where I am to stay at the Great Northern Hotel until Monday the 20th. Whether I go on on that day to Liverpool, or on the Tuesday, will be decided by circumstances. At Liverpool I shall probably stay at the Adelphi Hotel in Armelagh Street, and return
Page
home on Friday the 24th. So much for my plans. If they have to be ordered I will let you know. I was interested in Miss Bridges pedigree, because I have long wished to know how the Prowett' s Rylands & Wolseleys were related to us. I used to hear of them from Aunt Knottesford, but I do not remember that she ever explained to me the relationship. The Prowetts knew all about it, and in 1874
Page
Ld Wolseley (then Sir Garnet) was here, Miss Prowett and her brother who was a fellow of Caius, came up and entertained him. Miss P introduced me to him as a cousin, which I knew but not how the relationship came. I never saw her or her brother again. The latter is dead but she may be alive. It is rather curious that Miss Bridges should have the pedigree as her connection with us is through Mrs Bowles
Page
who had no Chambers blood. Her grandfather and our great-grandfather were intimates and very likely he may have had to do with the Chambers. I hope you have a copy of the pedigree, or will procure one. I was casting in mind how to get Charley introduced to Ld Wolseley, perhaps Robert mentioned it to you.
We are having the days which March has repaid April for those lent a little while ago and I don't like them.
My love to you all
Ever your affect brother
G. D. Liveing

Cambridge 14 November 1901
My dear Susie*
My portrait by Sir George Reid is to be presented by the Vice-Chancellor, on behalf of the subscribers, to St John's College, on Saturday, December 7 at 3:30 p.m. I should be very pleased if you and Edward would come and be present when this takes place. Perhaps you could come on Friday the 6th and stay till the Monday following? I am to be the recipient of another honour, as the Council of the Royal Society have awarded me the Davy medal. This is to be presented to me at the anniversary meeting of the Society on St Andrews day. It is a gratifying recognition of my work in the advancement of science by a very good authority.
My love to you both
ever yours affectionately
G. D. Liveing
* Harriet Susan Liveing nee Brown.

The Clerk of the Parish Council
Nayland
The Pightle Cambridge
19 October 1906
Dear Sir
I understand that the water I have supplied to the inhabitants of Nayland has shown no sign of failing in consequence of the recent very dry weather, and hope there will be no failure in future, so I should like to make over to the Parish the spring, settling tank and pipes while I am still alive.
I am told that the Parish Council has power under the Local Government Acts to hold real property for the benefit of the parish, so that if the Council be willing to accept it I would convey to them the property in the wellhead settling tank and pipes and also a right of way over my land at reasonable times and with the least possible injury to growing crops for the purpose of cleaning and repairing wellhead, tank and pipes.
And I should be obliged if you would ascertain whether the Council will accept the trust and if so whom they desire should (be) employed to draft the conveyance.
I am
faithfully yours
G. D. Liveing
Copy of this letter in the Fenn archive 2007
This water also fed a horse trough in the High St Nayland erected by the Parish Council to commemorate the coronation of George V.

Indenture.
George on the 17 Aug 1914 sold No 20 Fen St Nayland to Kathleen Mary Deeves spinster of Nayland for 70pds as "all those two cottages with outbuildings and yard garden and appertenances now or late in occupation of P Hughes and D O'Leary".
Copy on file.

MEMORIES OF CAMBRIDGE: WHEN FELLOWS OF COLLEGES WERE CELIBATES. One of the most interesting personalities at Cambridge is Dr. G. D. Liveing, late Professor of Chemistry, who has spent 75 years' continuous residence in the university. He is 94.
When Dr. Liveing was appointed University Professor of Chemistry in 1861 there was no university laboratory, and he had to conduct his experimental work in a Cottage which he hired and paid for. Before he retired in 1908, his own department of chemistry had been equipped with one of the finest laboratories in the world, largely through his own exertions.
Until 1881, Dr. Liveing told a Daily' mail reporter, fellows of colleges were as a rule, bound to celibacy, and usually resided in their colleges. "There the life," he said , " was that of an intellectual club, good for a student, but not to grow old in. It impoverished the general society of Cambridge, which was small and exclusive. Since fellows had been free to marry, life in college has lost some of its attractions, but society outside has gained."
It has also helped to create the "women's question" at Cambridge, and with regard to this. Dr. Liveing expressed himself unreservedly on the side of the women. Women at Cambridge he said have shown themselves well able to compete with men in the honours examinations.

LONG SPEECH AT 95.
Delegates to the Federation of General Workers' Conference at St. John's College, Cambridge, yesterday were welcomed by Dr. G. D. Liveing, the veteran president of the college and a former professor of chemistry. Though 95 and stated to be the oldest university doctor in the country, he delivered a long address on the founding of the university. He started a laboratory in Cambridge 61 years ago and has kept every term since. 17 August 1923.

The Times 22 December 1923 pg 5 col D.
Veteran Scientist.
Dr G. D. Liveing's 96th Birthday.
Dr G. D. Liveing, of Cambridge, who celebrated his 96th birthday yesterday, may fairly be regarded as the father of chemical studies in the University.
Soon after he had obtained the first place in the first class list of the Natural Sciences Tripos, which was instituted in 1851, he was elected to a Fellowship at St John's, and in the laboratory which his college established he was the first in Cambridge to teach science experimentally. In later years he continued to take a leading part in the development of scientific studies in the University, and in the provision of laboratory accommodation suitable for the purpose, rendering valuable service in connection with, for instance, the plans of the Cavendish Laboratory in the 70s and with those of the new University chemical laboratory which was brought into use in 1888. For 47 years he was Professor of Chemistry, only resignalling the chair in 1908, when he was 81 years of age. Recently he gave up his house, is in the garden of which he took a keen interest, and is now residing at an hotel in Cambridge.

JUNE 6th 1924; At the age of 96 Dr. D. G. Liveing, president of St. John's College, Cambridge, acted as presiding magistrate at Cambridge Police Court yesterday.

DR. GEORGE D. LIVEING: ACCIDENT TO OLDEST CAMBRIDGE PROFESSOR.
Dr. George Downing Liveing, the oldest member of Cambridge University, was knocked down in the street at Cambridge yesterday by a woman cyclist, and was taken home suffering (from an injury to his thigh?) and from shock.
Dr. Liveing who is in his ninety-seventh year, is President of St. John's, and has been a Fellow of that college for seventy-one years. He was the first Professor of Chemistry in the University and started the first laboratory for students in Cambridge.

DON DIES AT 97. CAMBRIDGE G.O.M. WHO WAS KNOCKED DOWN IN STREET.
Dr. George Downing Liveing, president and senior fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, died yesterday at his residence at Maid's-causeway, Cambridge. Dr. Liveing, who was 97 last Sunday, had been president of St. John's College since 1911. He had been confined to the house as the result of a street accident two months ago, when he was knocked down by a bicycle. The funeral will take place next Wednesday.
"The Grand Old Man of Cambridge," as Dr. Liveing was called, took daily walks in the streets until his accident and regularly attended college chapel services and hall. Last June he took his turn as presiding magistrate at the Cambridge Police Court. Before taking his M.A. degree Dr. Liveing was largely responsible for the foundation of Cambridge's great chemical laboratories. He was elected professor of chemistry in 1861 and occupied that chair for 47 years.

The Times 27 December 1924 pg 10 col F.
Death of Dr Liveing.
We regret to announce that Dr George Downing Liveing, President of St John's College, Cambridge, and for 47 years Professor of Chemistry in the University, died at Cambridge yesterday in his 98th year. Dr Liveing who was the oldest member of the University in residence, was knocked down by a bicycle two months since and never recovered from the effects of the accident will stop he became worse a view days ago, and for the last 48 hours was unconscious. The funeral will be on Wednesday next, the first part of the service be in the College Chapel at 2:30. A memoir appears on page 12.

The Times 27 December 1924 pg 12 col B.
G. D. LIVEING: PIONEER, OF SCIENCE AT CAMBRIDGE.
Dr. G. D. Liveing, Sc.D., F.R.S., whose death at. the age of 97 is announced on another page, was the " Father " of scientific and especially chemical studies, at Cambridge. For 47 years he held the chair of chemistry. George Downing Liveing was born on December 21, 1827, the eldest son of Edward Liveing, of Nayland, in Suffolk. He entered St. John's College, Cambridge, in 1847 and, reading mathematics, was eleventh Wrangler in 1850, Besant's year. He then read for the newly instituted Natural Sciences Tripos and was thus thrown into the society of Sedgwick, Henslow, Whewell and Miller of whose stimulating influence he spoke with appreciation in later life. The first examination for the Natural Sciences Tripos was held in 1851. The class list contained six names in order of merit, and of these that of Liveing, distinguished in chemistry and mineralogy, was first. He then went to Germany, and for a short time studied with Rammelsberg in Berlin. In 1853 he was elected Fellow of his college, and a college lectureship in natural sciences was founded for him, to be paid for out of the revenues of the college, an arrangement then without precedent in the University. The St. John's College Laboratory was also built, and Liveing was the first man to teach science experimentally in Cambridge.
In 1860 he was appointed Professor of Chemistry at the Staff College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. In the same year he married Catherine, daughter of the Rev. Rowland Ingram, rector of Little Ellingharn, Norfolk, and, in accordance with the old statutes, vacated his Fellowship. He, however, continued to hold his college lectureship and to direct the college laboratory. Twenty years later he was elected Professorial Fellow of St. John's. After retiring from his professorship in 1908 he was re-elected Fellow, and in 1911 was elected President of the college. On the death in 1861 of James Cumming, who had been Professor of Chemistry for 46 years, Liveing, who had been deputy-professor during Cumming's last illness was elected to succeed him. In spite of the importance which the science of chemistry had at this time attained, and of the intensity with which it was being pursued outside Cambridge all the accommodation at the disposal of the new professor consisted of the lecture room in the building in the Old Botanic Garden which he had to share with the Jacksonian Professor and the Professor of Botany, and two small empty rooms ; facilities for teaching practical chemistry there were none. Yet this was the nucleus from which Liveing by his energy and organizing ability developed a flourishing and productive school. In 1863 the University began that policy of building which resulted in the gradual formation of a great group of science laboratories and museums, and when the first block was opened in 1865 Liveing at last had the satisfaction of being able to announce a course of practical chemistry in the laboratory of the University. He now resigned his lectureship at St. John's, where he had continued to give instruction in chemical manipulations in the college laboratory. At this time a good deal of teaching of physics fell to the share of the Professor of Chemistry, for under the regulations of his chair he was enjoined to treat of the tramformations of substances immaterial as well as material and Liveing was lecturing for one term in the year on Chemistry and one term on Heat. He was relieved of the latter subject by the establishment in 1871 of the Cavendish Professorship of Experimental Physics.
Another event which had a still greater influence upon Liveing's work occurred a few years later. This was the decision of the University that the Jacksonian Professorship, which had become vacant, should be occupied by a chemist. The election of James Dewar in 1875 greatly strengthened the chemical department ; he undertook most of the teaching of physical and organic chemistry, and shortly afterwards Liveing began that admirable series of spectroscopic investigations, for the most part in conjunction with Professor Dewar, on which his scientific reputation mainly rests.
All this time the chemical school had been growing, and the necessity for new building became urgent. Liveing had made himself all expert in laboratory design, and to the plans of the new building he devoted infinite care and labour. When it was finished in 1888, it was one of the finest laboratories in the country, and though it has since been greatly enlarged, it is with this building that the memory of Liveing in the University will be chiefly associated. The growth of the school of chemistry now became very rapid, and he watched it develop under his direction to such an extent that when he resigned his chair in 1908, at the age of 81, the University was compelled to sanction very large extension of the laboratory.
For a long period Professor Liveing was a very powerful influence in the University, partly because of his position and partly because of the many fine qualities of his character. He took a prominent part in the preliminary work within the University which culminated in the new statutes of the early eighties, and has to do with the creation of the Department of Agriculture.
When William Carvendish, seventh Duke Devonshire, became Chancellor of the University, Professor Liveing acted as his local secretary. This put him in position of considerable power and responsibility, as the Duke took a much more active interest in the affairs of the University than did some of his predecessors.
He was elected a Fellow of the Royal society in 1879, and in 1901 the Society awarded him its Davy Medal for his spectroscopic papers, which mainly published during the last quarter of a century in conjunction with Professor Dewar, make up a record of patient, accurate, conscientious labour, and taken together constitute one of the most valuable contributions to the department of chemical physics yet made by British workers.
In 1896 Liveing was appointed by the Treasury to inspect, with Sir Herbert Warren, the University colleges of Great Britain. In addition to his academic and scientific activities, he served many years as a county magistrate. The last years of his life were spent peacefully in collecting and editing the memoirs of his joint scientific work with Sir James Dewar, and in gardening, of which he was very fond.
His venerable figure as he made his way every night to preside at the St John's high table, must have been familiar to recent generations of undergraduates.
His portrait, painted by Sir George Reid, was presented by his friends to the college in 1901

LIVEING, George Downing (1827-1924)
Details: LIVEING, George Downing, JP; MA, ScD; FRS 1879; President of St John's College, Cambridge, since 1911; born Nayland, Suffolk, 21 December 1827; eldest son of Edward Liveing and Catherine, only daughter of George Downing, Lincoln's Inn; married 1860, Catherine (died 1888), 2nd daughter of Rowland Ingram, Rector of Little Ellingham, Norfolk.
Education: St John's College, Cambridge (MA, Hon. ScD 1908); Fellow, 1853-1860, and from 1880; 11th Wrangler 1850; 1st in Natural Sciences Tripos, 1851.
Work: Lecturer on Natural Science, St John's Coll., Camb. 1853; Professor of Chemistry, Staff and Royal Military Colleges, 1860; Professor of Chemistry, Cambridge, 1861-1908; started the first laboratory for students in Cambridge, 1852; active in organizing.
Publications: many papers on Spectroscopy, Crystallisation, etc; On the Transmutation of Matter, Camb. Essays, 1st ser. 1855; Chemical Equilibrium the Result of Dissipation of Energy, 1885; (jtly with Mr Warren) Report on University Colleges, 1897; (jtly with Sir J. Dewar) Collected Papers on Spectroscopy, 1915.
Recreations: field geology, gardening.
Address: St John's College, Cambridge.
Died: 26 December 1924
LIVEING, George Downing
Dates: 1827-1924
Occupation: chemist
Details: BA, St John's College, Cambridge; eleventh wrangler, 1850; senior in new natural sciences tripos, 1851; fellow of St John's, 1853-60 and 1880-1924; professor of chemistry, Staff College and Royal Military College, Sandhurst, 1860; professor of chemistry, Cambridge, 1861-1908; carried out in collaboration with (Sir) James Dewar spectroscopic investigations, 1878-1900; subjects investigated include the reversal of the lines of metallic vapours, the spectrum of carbon, ultraviolet spectra, and sun-spots; seventy-eight joint papers republished in a single volume, 1915; superintended erection of new university chemical laboratory from 1888; FRS, 1879; published Chemical Equilibrium the Result of the Dissipation of Energy (1885)
Ref: Know UK CD - Colin Fenn

DR. GEORGE DOWNING LIVEING Sc.D. F.R.S. of 10 Maids Causeway, Cambridge, President and Senior Fellow of St. John's College who died on December 26 1924 aged 97, left estate of the gross value of L20,910 14s 8d resworn at L19,908 12s 2d, with net personally L20,569. His will was proved 30 Apr 1925 by the Rev Henry George Dowing Liveing Clerk. He left 100pds a year to his maidservant, Ellen Ada Waters; 30/- a week his former servant, Caroline Benstead.

Portrait by Geo Reid at St Johns College. Obituary book 1 E L Fenn 1998 Fenn archive.

Research Notes:
Liveing (George Downing). Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge. Letter to the Duke of Devonshire 1872.
Liveing (George Downing). Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge University. Letter to S. C. Cockerell 1923
Ref British Library 2007

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, St Clement Ipswich SFK. George is described as aged 14 born Suffolk in the house of Richard Mosley aged 39 a clergyman his wife, 2 infants, and 4 other boys including his brother Edward, they were probably being schooled?
(Richard Mosley a graduate of Holy Trinity Cambridge obtained his MA in 1833, married in 1837, became curate of Holy Trinity Ipswich until 1841 when he became vicar of Rotherham in Yorkshire.)

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 12 Hills Rd Cambridge CAM. George is described as head of house married aged 33 M A Lecturer in Chemistry born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Cambridge CAM. George was living at Newnham Walk House Cambridge, head of the household aged 53, born Nayland SFK, occupation Professor of Chemistry Camb.
Also living in the house:
Catherine Liveing wife aged 48 born Leicester.
Ellen Ingram sister in law, married, aged 36, born Tonbridge KEN, Clergyman's wife.
Katie F Ingram niece aged 7 born Tiverton Devon, Clergyman's daughter.
Selina Moore single aged 33 servant.
Mary J Law single aged 22 servant.

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, The Pightle Newnham Cambridge. George was recorded as head of a house of 11 rooms aged 83 a widower a retired Prof of Chemistry, Pres St Johns College born Nayland SFK

George married Catherine INGRAM [980], daughter of Rev Rowland INGRAM M.A. [953] and Maria ALSTON [952], on 14 Aug 1860 in Lt Ellingham NFK. Catherine was born in Nov 1832 in Leicester, died on 8 Nov 1888 in Cambridge CAM. at age 56, and was buried in Cambridge CAM.. They had no children.

General Notes:
Catherine died s.p.

Death entry Dec quarter 1888 aged 55 Cambridge 3b 201 BDM

Administration Granted at Peterborough 10 Dec 1888 to G D Liveing her husband - L80-0-0



Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 12 Hills Rd Cambridge CAM. Catherine is described as a wife aged 28 born St Martins Leicester

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Giggleswick YKS. Catherine is recorded as a daughter aged 18 unmarried born Leicester

1064. Anna Maria LIVEING [106] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Jan 1830 in Nayland SFK, was baptised on 14 Jan 1830 in Nayland SFK, and died on 30 Apr 1919 at age 89.

General Notes:
2 Bedford Place
Nov'ber 12, 1844
My dear Mamma
We were very glad to have your note this afternoon but as Mary and Aunt are gone to tea at Mrs Griffin's they have not seen it yet. Dear little Ellen
has been very good indeed both in the day and night she sleeps very well and seems quite to understand that you are staying with Chatty and will bring her here presently. Beatrice brought her to me in bed this morning and she talked and read me a story and seemed very happy; but she has not liked to come into our bed before.
The wind has been very high in the last few days; on Sunday we could hardly stand against it, but the sea is beautiful and there is not so much wind today - I long for you to be here Give my love to dear Chatty I am afraid she is troubled still with her poor arm itching Harriet is writing her a note I am very glad Mr Mosley continues to improve and also that poor George Alston is a little better - Uncle Charles came down on Saturday and went back on Monday morning he intends to go to Stoke next Saturday for the Sunday Mr J. Beaumont is not here now but there are plenty of people Aunt knows Mr and Mrs Hoole are here and Mr and Mrs Dunnage are going to stay the winter here. Mary of course told you what a comfortable house we have got. Poor James I am afraid Mr Wakefield's dogs must be a great trouble to him; how is Paul Henry? Miss S Beaumont hopes she shall be here when you come. Mrs Griffin is no better I have not heard that she wants a servant. Mary was very glad to hear you had found her ring - we have not been on the chain pier yet as the weather has been very stormy - Dr King lives very near a house we saw his name on the door Mary has written to Aunt Ambrose today - give my love to Uncle Henry and accept the same my dear Mamma.
From your very affectionate child
Anna Maria Liveing
Written on four sides of one sheet and overwritten on two sides with an unsigned note "from Anna staying at Hastings?" Unaddressed so presume posted with other mail, it is interesting to note Anna uses the modern spelling of Miss in this letter in the one below Mifs.
Original in Fenn archive 2007

Stoke
March 19th
My dear Mamma
we were very glad to have your note and Nelly has been writing to you so she hopes you will answer her note next time you write - Mary thinks the 13 yards would just make Harriet and Chatty frocks quite plain and without any tucks - Harriet and chatty would like you to get a dozen Dutch dolls of different sizes from the Mamma to the baby - we are quite delighted to think of dear Betty's coming back with you and I am glad too you think her quite well and not thinner - I quite long to hear how you like Midgham and how you found Mrs Fowke. I am glad you were all able to go and see poor Mrs Johnson she must have been delighted to see you.is Mifs Stratford has not lost her cold but it is not influenza and I hope it will soon get better. Susan and Sarah walked to Higham on Tuesday with Harriet Chatty and Ellen, but they did not hear anything fresh about Beatrice she was much the same when her sister heard from her; they enjoyed their walk very much and did not seem tired. While they were at Higham Mifs Stratford Mary and I went to Stoke to hear a musical performance at the school the same as the school master had before and that Mr Black told us about. It was very good and there were a good many people there. Mary staid (sic) to tea at the Torlefse's of course I came home and so did Mifs Stratford Susan had a letter from Emma this morning she is now at Hamble between Portsmouth and Southampton for they could not get to Falmouth as when they had got about 40 miles from Cowes they were driven back so she thinks they will remain at Hamble about six weeks and then return home. Mary and I went to Colchester yesterday morning we got all the lambs wools for the children's rings so they will not have to wait for them any more - Harriet went with us as Chatty went last time without her. We took our frocks to Mrs Green's and got the quimp for them at Colchester - I hope it is fine at Mitcham and that you will take a few drives with Mrs Fowke - did she come to meet you at Reading - Nelly it is very good and happy her bowels have not been any trouble and she is quite well - Howard I believe is much the same but he is not allowed to eat meat again which I think he did when you went away. Mrs Beardwell is thinking of going to London on Monday in hopes that the change will do her cough good but has not quite decided as yet. Did you remember to ask Betty to get me the piece of chalk. We owe her something for the tooth powder and elastic sandals she she got but as she is coming it does not matter about paying her - I believe there is nothing more to add but that all from me in love to you and pray give mine to Mrs Fowke and Mamma believe me ever my dearest Mamma
your very affectionate daughter
Anna Maria Liveing
letter on four sides of a small sheet overwritten on two sides with the unsigned note "no date and that at Stoke to see M. L. who is staying at Mitcham with Mrs Fowke"
Original in Fenn archive.

1 Dec/65 (pencilled in at a later date)
Dear Cousin Betty
Tommy has broken his head I have been playing in the garden - there is a nice little pony here, and Papa took us for a drive there are kittens and a big dog and a little puppy here
Sketch of children and Papa sitting about reading.
Page 2.
This is a school where Papa went when he was a little boy. Polly is alive and well
your afsect little cousin
Louie

Dear Betty (Elizabeth Ambrose nee Liveing)
Yr note arrived this morning. Harriet had telegraphed yesterday here she told Wm that Cap. Molison wanted him to apply for command
Page 3.
of "Queen of the North" he knows the ship, she is an old one, therefore he is not going in for her. He has written to Cap M & I to Queen Anne St & Mrs Scott think of remaining in Norfolk till Thursday probably if letters come please addrefs
Mr Rings or King's?
hall
E Dereham
Norfolk
It is 2 days post fr Copford here. So any letter coming to Copford later than Monday had better be addressed to us at my Mothers - will you kindly tell
Page 4.
Aunt this.
Wm is going out shooting Rabbits - Yesterday we drove into Dereham. The weather is very mild and pleasant Tomorrow Wm goes for the day to see his old friend & schoolmaster at Reddenhall - & I suppose we shall spend a last day at the Ingram's
Ever dear Betty with love from us all
Yr affec cousin
A M Howard
Gressenhall Dec 1 /65.
Liveing Archive: Letter 20a & b

6 Glenmohr Terrace
Febry 12th 1866
Dearest Betty
I write to tell you that Wm is appointed to the command of a ship just begun loading for Bombay, so he is immediately taken into employment to superintend the loading - it is a gt comfort to me that she is going to India instead of China as it does not involve separation from my child: perhaps it may a month before she is ready for sea, her name is the "Kennington" 700 & odd tons - not a new ship but I believe in good order - I trust we may have better weather by thatPage 2.
time: yesterday was a dreadfully stormy day here - Please give my kind love to Aunt Ambrose and tell her this, as I promised to let her know but I have not time to write to-day - I am expecting Mary who is kindly coming up for a week on purpose to stay with me - just now there is a vacant room in the house wh: I can have, & I hope my Mother may spend a night or two here with her - of Fanny's confinement I dare say you have heard. It took place on Friday Eves (sic); - the baby is a boy - A few days ago Robert & Lucy pd us a visit
Page 3.
It was one of the few fine days we have had; Lucy spent the day here and Robt joined her after office hours - I believe she is gone this week to Upton & after she returns we have promised to spend a night or two at Kensington, they have asked us so many times I wished to make the effort to go - I have not felt very strong lately, but Wm has been better - Louie quite well she does not forget you - My dearest Mother has arrived so I must send you a short letter - she left Fanny going on well - The new nurse-maid fell down & hurt her back just after she arrived which
Page 4.
was very unfortunate - I had hoped that the long-standing " Winlow " accounts were near being settled: but now it seems as far off as ever - I expect we shall have to depute someone to act for us when we sail
Ever dearest Betty with our united love in which my Mother joins
yr affect cousin
A M Howard
Glenmohr Terrace, Greenwich, was a middle class locality
Liveing Archive: Letter 26a & b

In the 1911 census Anna is found living with her brother George in Cambridge with a cook and a house/parlour maid

Research Notes:
Alternative baptism dates, 14 Feb, 5 Jun, 1830.
Red Book.
Family Search Record Search put bap at 14 Feb 1830 Nayland.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Thorington Cottage Stoke by Nayland SFK. Anna is described as a surgeons daughter aged 21 unmarried born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Culmstock Devon. Anna is recorded as a sailors wife aged 41 born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Lower Bourne Farnham Surrey. Anna is recorded as a wife aged 51 born Wayland (Nayland) SFK

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, High St Bramley Surrey. Anna is recorded as a wife aged 61 born Nayland SFK

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Balarny House Bramley SRY. Anna is recorded as a wife aged 71 born Nayland SFK

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, The Pightle Newnham Cambridge. Anna is recorded as a sister aged 81 a widow born Nayland SFK

Anna married William HOWARD [986] on 15 Nov 1860 in Stoke By Nayland SFK. William was born in 1828 and died on 3 Nov 1909 at age 81.

General Notes:
William served in the Merchant Service.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Culmstock Devon. William is recorded as head of house married aged 43 retired master mariner born at sea

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Lower Bourne Farnham Surrey. William is recorded as head of house married aged 53 retired master mariner (struck out) born at Sea

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, High St Bramley Surrey. William is recorded as head of house married aged 63 a retired master mariner born at sea a British Subject

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Balarny House Bramley SRY. William is recorded as head of house married aged 73 retired master mariner born at sea

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1281 F    i. Louisa C HOWARD [4604] was born on 28 Nov 1861 in Calcutta India, was baptised in St Johns Calcutta India, and died on 29 Oct 1917 at age 55.


1065. Dr Edward LIVEING M.D. F.R.C.P. [100] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 8 Feb 1832, was baptised on 8 Mar 1832 in Nayland SFK, died on 2 Apr 1919 at age 87, and was buried in Stoke By Nayland SFK.

General Notes:
Edward was educated at King's College, London, and at Caius College, Cambridge.

The following three letters are in the Liveing Archive in the possession of Tony Liveing - 2011:
Frankfurt . Sunday Even. June 12, 1853. My dear Mother, I think I had better write you some account of our journeyings thus far as you may be wishing to hear of us and I shall not have so good an opportunity of writing again for some time. After a hard days work on Tuesday last we managed to get on board the steamer at St Katharine's Wharf in the evening just in time to secure two berths for ourselves there were a great many passengers so that all the berths were taken and many had to sleep on the floor and on deck we had a very comfortable passage to Ostend, there was only a slight roll and we were neither of us at all sick - Uncle Charles got us a letter of introduction from someone in the N.D.O. to his brother in law at Ostend a M Wallis who was extremely kind and hospitable and made us dine and spend the rest of the day at his house - We slept at one of the hotels and set off early the next morning for Cologne by railway, a very long tedious journey which occupied the whole day - we met many English people on the way who were glad to talk - The natives also were everywhere very communicative and seem to delight in speaking English however little they know, and as far as we have gone at present most of them seem to know a little at the Railway Stations, Hotels etc - At the Railway Station at Verriers we were much amused by a small boy calling out "London News, Punch, Bradshaws guide" and on being told by another Englishman that the Punch was an old one he said "good for all the summer" which speach he had evidently got up by heart but was originally intended only for Bradshaw - At Aix la Chapelle we had to have our passports vise when calling out the names that we might reclaim our passports they read our names as M ?Swaingen & I happened to see the passport was mine and it was quite impossible to help bursting out laughing which highly offended the "Maitre de Bureau" & he would not let us have ours in consequence till all the others were served. We got to Cologne in the evening and took up our abode at the Belle Vue Hotel where we fell in with an Oxford undergraduate who was all alone & also going to Switzerland and seemed heartily glad of our company. He left us however this morning to join a party of Relatives at Baden. On Friday morning we looked about Cologne and of course I was very much delighted with the cathedral which they still continue vigorously building - I wonder whether it will ever be finished! We had not curiosity enough to see the bones of the 3 Maji as they charge a very high price for showing them. We found out St Peter's Church also where Rubens was christened and which contains a large picture by him St Peter crucified with his head downwards - a wonderful subject & wonderfully painted I think in spite of the faults generally found with it - Why in the world they keep the picture turned with its face towards the wall while a wretched copy on the back is generally only seen I cannot imagine. About 1 o'clock we set off by steamer up the Rhine and had my first "Table d'hote" dinner on deck at species of meal which I like very much but which is certainly better calculated to suit one's Taste than Stomach - At dinner we made acquaintance with a clergyman (English) and his sister who were also going to Coblenz.
Page: Liveing Archive Image 3g
The banks of the River are certainly flat and tame until you have passed Bonn and there commences with the Seven Hills the beautiful scenery - "The castled crag of Drachenfels Frowns o'er the wide and winding Rhine, Whose breast of waters broadly swells Between the banks which bare the vine, And hills all rich with blossom'd trees, And fields which promise corn and wine, And scattered cities crowning these, Whose far white walls along them shine" etc. etc. Childe Harrold.
I have just finished reading one of Sir Walter Scott's stories in which he gives a much better description of this than I can: "the broad stream itself hurrying forward, with dizzy rapidity, and rushing around the Islets by which its course is interrupted is one of the most majestic spectacles in nature" (?) "The old castles seen from time to time on the banks of the river itself, or in the ravines and larger brook's which flow into it are picturesque ruins rendered interesting by the stories told about their former inhabitants" & " every stream which here contributes its waters to the Rhine, winds through its own tributary dell, and each valley presents a varying and separate character, some rich with pastures, cornfields & vineyards, some frowning with crags and precipices and others romantic beauties" That it is "one of the most majestic spectacles in nature" however I should think very doubtful and if I do not see something more deserving of such a character in Switzerland I shall certainly be disappointed - We got to Coblenz by the evening and here took up our abode for the night - & got up early the next (yesterday) morning and climbed the stupendous rock of Ebrenbreitstein which is just opposite Coblenz and wonderfully fortified and from the top of which we had the most splendid panoramic view of the Rhine country; I wished I had time to stop & sketch we then went back to the hotel to breakfast and went on by steamer all day to Mayence Fr. thence we arrived here yesterday evening by railroad. Here we have spent the day as we found an English church after some searching and tomorrow morning we set off for Heidelberg - I hope I am already somewhat better for the thorough change though I am far from square yet - Bob is flourishing & I shall be glad to hear if Anna or someone will write to me - Best Love to all fr. your ever affect. son Edward.

Letter on three sides of a large folded sheet addressed to Mrs Liveing Stoke by Neyland Suffolk Angleterre the address sheet is stamped Machmittag with several postmarks including Schaffhausen 15 6, Suisse St Louis 17 Juin, L 18 Jui 8 1853, Colchester Jun 18 1853 A. Mrs Liveing Stoke by Neyland Suffolk Angleterre

GEBRUDER HAUSER Hof Hause (embossed mark) Ragatz. June 18th 1853.
My dear Mother, Since I last wrote from Frankfurt we have had little else but misfortune & disappointment chiefly owing to the wretched wet weather - I have nothing therefore to tell you except what route we have come and where we are going to which cannot interest you as you do not know the country. We left Frankfurt on Monday morning and had a long railway journey by Heidelberg to Kehl we could not stop at Heidelberg as we wanted to get on that night to Offenburg - we stayed at Kehl and walked to Strasb urg and examined the cathedral which of course much delighted us the painted glass windows and the carving of the stonework being very far superior to any thing of ? ye. kind I had seen before - we got to Offenburg late in the evening and went to a Mr Pfachler's hotel, he is a friend of Mr Eddison's, and was stopping in London so that we did not see him but his son speaks English very well and was very kind and obliging and promised us 20 miles range of shooting! Roebuck, hares, pheasant s etc when ever we liked to come - on Tuesday we went by railroad to Freibourg and stayed there an hour which just gave us time to look at the church (Minster) which is very fine and very perfect and has much of the character of Strasbourg Cathedral, so that you would imagine the same architect built them both - we then went on by diligence (a four wheeled stage coach) up the Hollentha l and through a part of the Black Forest & along its outskirts to Schaffhausen - the first part of this journey was through a most beautiful country, but it began to rain when we started and we could see absolutely almost nothing the whole way - we reached Schaffhausen about two o'clock on Wednesday morning and had some trouble in finding out the hotel we wanted to go to as it was quite dark & no one about the streets - we went to see the falls of the Rhine early but there was no sunshine so that we did not see them to advantage - and then went on by diligence to Zurich but it was cloudy and wet so that we could see but little moreover they would not let us ride outside the diligence. We slept at Zurich and started at half past eight on Thursday morning for Ragatz it was tolerably fine though cloudy and we enjoyed the scenery on the lakes of Zurich and Wallenstadt very much and especially the journey from Wallenstadt to Ragatz by diligence but it was too cloudy to see the distant mountains - we slept at Ragatz (where we now are) on Thursday night and procured a guide to go with us the next day over the mountains to Glarus - as Uncle Charles directed us along that route - it poured with rain when we started and it has continued to rain almost incessantly ever since - we walked up the gorge of the Tamina and saw the hot baths and spring of Pfeffers and then continued our route on to Vattis a little village at the entrance of a " Kalfeuser Thal " notwithstanding the wet we (sic) it was impossible not to admire the gorge of the river Tamina certainly one of the most extraordinary spots imaginable - being quite wet through we had about four hours walk in the rain and clouds to the little village of Vattis amongst most magnificent scenery of which in consequence of the wet and cloud we could just see only so much as to let us know that it existed and was very magnificent if we could only see it. It was too late to cross the mountains then and there & so we were obliged to put up at a miserable little Inn in the place and were glad to change our wet clothes. The guide had a long discussion with the natives in the evening & they finally concluded that it was utterly impossible for us to pass up the Kalfeuser Thal and cross over the mountains (at the end of it towards Glarus) for the snow was still so deep that no one had yet been able to pass since the winter and some of the natives who had tried the day before were obliged to give it up & come back this was an extremely annoying piece of news as we had come 4 hours walk in the wet for nothing and it involved our undergoing the same journey back again to Ragatz as we were hemmed in by the mountains & that was the only way out which would suit us at all - in addition to this our plan of route was frustrated (the most annoying part of the whole) and we have lost in this way 2 days at least. I thought the guide did not like the trouble of going and therefore tried to persuade us into the idea that we could not but he stuck to it so resolutely that we should be obliged to turn back again if we attempted it that we thought we had better give it up lest we should lose another 2 days - I cannot tell now for certain that we have not been cheated, and as we know nothing of the L anguage it is very difficult to find out. I made the guide write his French speeches when I could not exactly understand them; the following is a specimen Remarkable for spelling "S'il est possibel de pouvoir passe r acose la naiche (neige?) nous vero n s demain da n s l alpe. Mais s'il y a de n aa ges (?) sur les montains il est impossible de passer, il y a trop de danger" We accordingly walked back again this morning in pouring rain and dense clouds - we have changed our clothes again and had some table D' h ote Dinner and are going by the diligence to Glarus this afternoon and we hope to walk on to Schwytz tomorrow & from there to Arth & up the Rigi (Rhigi) the next day. We have seen so little at present and have been so disappointed that we are quite out of spirits - it is rather better weather this afternoon & I hope it will continue to improve otherwise we might just as well walk in our own valley of the Stour in England in a dense fog - we are both very well considering - but rather afflicted with blisters. Ever your affectionate son Edward. I hope this will be legible written in a great hurry.
Folded and sealed letter bearing post marks from Ragaz, St Louis, Zurich, and 2 illegible marks dated Jun 22 1853.

Inn on the Furka Pass June 26, 1853. My dear mother, We have had little else but a continuance of the same wretched weather since I last wrote to you from Ragatz . As soon as I had finished my epistle the weather having cleared up a little we've found our way back again by diligence and Steamboat to Weseu about 10 miles from Glarus w h ither we had intended to go - there was a fine sunset (almost the first I have seen since we left England) and by the time we arrived at Weseu it was a beautiful clear moonlight even I t was too late for the diligence to Glarus and we accordingly purchased a pole for a trifle and having fastened our luggage to it and hoisting it on to our shoulders we set off for Glarus where we arrived about 12 o'clock having fortunately managed to get a lift on the way I now began to be confirmed in an opinion I had formed some time before viz ; that we were very foolish in bringing so much luggage - We brought each a whole change of clothes besides shirts socks and sundries filling two carpet bags & in addition our plaids and great coats, altogether making a far greater weight than it is ever possible for us to carry; we have therefore been obliged to get a porter to carry our things whenever we have (? walk ed ) a anywhere which is an expensive way of travelling - for notwithstanding that Murray (John Murray's Handbooks for Travellers series started in 1836 and were the British take on Baedeker's idea) says you can get porters for 3 or 4 Franks a day we find we cannot get them for less than double the price. If I had to set out from England on the same expedition I should bring a knapsack (the only thing at all fitted for carrying weight with comfort for a long distance) in this I should have a few shirts socks etc & a change of shoes; I should bring instead of a change of clothes a water-proof loose coat and gaiters which may easily put in ones pockets and lastly either a great coat or a plaid it matters not which. It would have been easy to carry these 20 miles a day, much expense might have been saved, and we should have been also much more independent. For the last two or three stages we have adopted the plan of taking what we absolutely want in one carpet bag and sending the rest round to the next town by a diligence when there is one and we thus get on better. Sunday at Glarus was a beautiful day (the only fine day we have had in Switzerland) - we walked up the Linth Thal (Linthal) as far as the Baths of Stechelberg & back and enjoyed it very much about 27 miles altogether. On Monday morning the Landlord of the Inn procured us a porter to carry our baggage over the Pragel Pass to Schwytz about 33 miles - for which we were obliged to agree to give him 15 franks a vast deal to much - but there was no alternative - our Host said a mule would cost 30 Fr !!! Our porter brought a boy with him in the morning as he thought the luggage was more than he could manage - We set out in good spirits as it was then tolerably fine though cloudy - All along the Klon Thal and passed the lake of Klon it continued pretty fine and we enjoyed the walk for about 8 miles exceedingly by the side of the little lake which is shut in completely all round by mountains certainly one of the most picturesque spots I have seen "une des vallees les plus gracious qu'il y ait dans les Alps" As we began to ascend to the summit of the pass however it began to rain and it continued to do so all the rest of the day - and we walked on in icy cold rain & dense clouds, alternately on snow & wet yellow grass in sight of nothing but ourselves & the path for about 13 miles to the little village of Muotta - where we arrived thoroughly wet through cold and chilly - we could not induce our porter to go on any further and we were accordingly obliged to stop at the little Inn at Muotta W e changed our clothes and endeavoured to make ourselves as comfortable as we could under the circumstances but no one there could speak either a word of French or English so we were very hard up. However in ? the . . . . . evening the Priest came in hearing that we were there and he could ? talk French and of course understood Latin so that between the two we managed to have some conversation - He was excessively kind and seemed extremely concerned and interested about us; he stopped some hours to keep us company and acted as interpreter & mediator between us and our porter who got into a great rage & threw away the money when we offered him 12 Fr for his pay (nearly = to the original sum agreed on though he had come 9 miles short of the distance) we were quite determined however not to give him any more which we got the Priest to tell him and then let him go to bed to think better of it. The next morning after breakfast I sent for the porter and offered him the 12 Fr again which put him again into a towering passion - he declared he would have 15 and snatched up one of our bags and rushed about the room like a madman which amused us exceedingly though I was very angry too. His Reverence expecting there would be a row had already found his way into the house and when he heard the noise walked quietly into the room - his presence at once shut up the guide who put down the bag and seemed ashamed of himself and our kind & excellent friend taking our part lectured the man for some time and we were at last glad to get away in peace by paying 13 francs - The rain kept off long enough to allow us to get to Schwytz - we had intended to have gone on up the Rhigi - but pouring rain and dense clouds compelled us to stop at Schwytz . We sent our luggage on to Lucerne by diligence having had enough of porters - the next morning it being moderately fine we set off from Schwytz and walked to Goldau and from there up the Rhigi - when we got to the top we could see nothing for we were enveloped in clouds and mist - excepting that now & then between the clouds we caught a momentary glimpse sufficient to show us how magnificent at panorama we had around us if we could but only see it - it was also most bitterly cold and plaids and great coats did but little towards keeping us warm the roof of the Righi Kulm Inn being still covered with snow and patches of snow melting all about - After some time towards sunset the clouds in great part cleared off so that for a short time we had a view of the whole panorama though not a very good one much of the beautiful colouring of the picture having vanished as the sun sank - especially that most beautiful greenish blue colour which the lakes have when seen from the top of the mountain. The sun set behind the clouds unfortunately - "sulky and grim he went to bed - sulky and grim went we" this was hardly the case however with us - the other lines were more correct "sulky and grim he rose again - sulky and grim rose we" for when we got up we could scarcely see a yard before us for the dense clouds and wet; it continued to pour all the way down to Weggis & all the time we were crossing the lake to Lucerne but we managed to keep ourselves dry with umbrellas - at Lucerne we were glad to change our clothes and Feed - it cleared up for a few hours in the evening and I walked up to the " Lime Trees" a hill outside the town from which I managed to get a very good view of the lake & mountains around it Mount Pilate being most striking. The next morning Friday was tolerably fine but we could not leave Lucerne till the middle of the day as we were obliged to have our shirts etc washed here. We had a very comfortable passage along the lake in the steamer to Fluellen, the part of the lake called the bay of Uri being certainly stupendously grand by far the finest thing I have yet been able to see. We got on to a diligence at Fluellen going to the Hoof . . . . . village at the foot of the Golthard Pass but the rain & clouds came on again as bad as (before ?) and between that & the darkness we were able to see little or nothing of cv . . . . ? ye. wild and wonderful gorge of the Reuss and of the Devils Bridge crossing it. I wish much now that we had slept at Altorf ( actual spelling Altdorf)and walked on the next morning but having so little time we were obliged to hasten on. Martigny July 5th. I have had no time to continue my account suffice it to say that since I wrote the above we have had much better weather and we arrived here today & intend passing the Tete Noire tomorrow to Chamouny and thence to Geneva & home by Paris. - Bob fell down and hurt his leg so that he had to take to a horse for a time it is quite well again now - I am better than I was I am very happy to say but not by any means square yet. Love to all fr your very affectionate son Edward.

The letter comprises four pages folded, minor damage by the seal, the opening page is half overwritten. It is addressed Mrs Liveing Stoke by Neyland Suffolk Angleterre, there are several postmarks mostly illegible except Nyon 8 Jul 53 and BE JY 8 53.

Liveing Archive Documents - This collection centered on Edward Henry Torlesse Liveing who at his death passed it to Henry Torlesse Liveing both men did considerable work on conserving and adding to the record.
These (rough draft) letters by Edward Liveing at a turbulent time in his student life are written, in the main, to Henry Torlesse his friend and confidant. They may not in all cases have been posted? It is surmised that Henry also coveted Tassie Torlesse and may have left for a new life in NZ to save face.
The miscellaneous documents in the Living Archive are mainly undated and no particular order has been established.
Liveing Archive: Image Misc 6a
Liveing
I must tell you one little anecdote about Taz. & myself. Your F & mother (sic) Uncle as you know stopped some days at the Caledonian Hotel Adelphi & I went to see them there and spent Sunday with them. I went with yr. mother to the Temple Church in the morning and in the afternoon your father & myself went to Westminster Abbey, then to *Miss Burdet Cootes' church in the evening - and after that to hear a sermon in another church. Your most worthy father heard no less than 5 sermons that day!!! Kind o' sort o' professionally - as I suppose. Next morning when I saw them again Taz had written a note to yr. mother - I do not know whether it contained an epistle for you. However yr mother very kindly asked me whether you had had a note fr. Taz. before I left Gravesend and so I said I did not know of it - if you had. Then she said she thought she might show it to me as it concerned me as much as you - Your father came out and put a stop to it - whispering something to yr. mother and so I was not allowed to hear the contents of the epistle & was left in a great state of excitement. You will forgive me, dear fellow, for having written so much about Taz wh interests myself ( with you being perfect cover ?)"
Taken to be a copy of a letter to Henry Torlesse
*Miss (later Baroness in her own right) Angela Burdett-Coutts, was a philanthropist who worked to clean up a squalid and notorious area around Westminster Abbey known as "The Devils Acre" She built a church there, St Stephens Westminster, and schools.
Ref: The Greater London Industrial Archaeology Society walk 'The Devil's Acre'


Liveing Archive: Image Misc 6b (reverse of 6a). Pg 2
We hear of nothing here just now but the Duke of Wellington and his funeral (18th Nov 1852) all the shops are full of pictures of him and not content with these taken of him in every possible position they must needs have pictures of his shadow - sometimes nothing but the shadow of him & his horse against the wall - sometimes this - "the great man & his shadow" There is going to be an awful procession - lots of soldiers English & foreign. St. Paul's has been shut up some time and is hung with Black - lighted with thousands of gas jets & filled with seats - & shop windows are letting at no end of a sum - But enough of this. There was such a curious accident happened the other day. One of the keepers at the Regents Park Z. Gardens came home half seas over and began getting out the serpents and twisting them about him - adders & everything to the great consternation of the other keepers - declaring nothing would bite him - He then got out the cobra and hided ? that beast under his coat - It stood it a little while and then made a dart and bit him on the nose "bit him just one on the maxilla". He was dreadfully bad was taken at once to University College and died in a few hours - !!! Mrs Sadler still suffers very much and the damp weather has made her quite ill again - the rest are all right - I have not heard anything of Ashton.
* short for maxilla or upper jaw Doctor talk?

Liveing Archive: Document Bundle Miscellaneous 6d (follows 6b?) Page 3
Thomas Harold Fenn and now I must tell you a little about Taz which you must forgive me for & considering that she occupies all my thoughts & very wretched & unhappy thoughts they are. Mr Markham has been staying a day or so at my Uncle Charles' on his way fr. Windsor to Hokerley - some week a ago - well last Sunday I went to dine at Camberwell at my Aunt Fenns* & at dinner the conversation turned on things at home - and your sister Susan is staying at T. Fenns just now for a little change & to ride out with him for the sake of air - and Taz was down there & out with them sometimes also - well this they informed me of laying particular stress on everything about Taz. which rather surprised supposing that there at least I kept my own secret and therefore I did not feel at (sic) uncomfortable - but soon they put it point Blanc (sic) at me calling her Taz: no longer but "your friend" and so I was at once struck dumb and asked who in the world had told them she was my dear friend. (But they all the answer I could get them was that they new she was so & - struck out) But they pleased to enjoy my astonishment and would not tell me then. So of course I immediately concluded that T. Fenn had managed at length to find it out - perhaps Susan had let it out to him and that he had as usual propagated it. However in the evening on more serious enquiry I found that when Mr Markham was at Uncle's and they were talking about Stoke, he suddenly mentioned about my being in love with Tasmania and seemed perfectly astonished that they knew nothing about it saying that it was general talk down in Suffolk - and also that Edwd. Liveing was constantly at Stoke - and that no doubt he liked his friend Henry very much but that it was chiefly on account of Miss Fanny - (wh. part at least was a beastly lie as I told them viz. (that I was your friend for Fanny's sake) & that he did not wonder at it for that she was a very nice young lady.
*Aunt Fenn is Harriet Fenn nee Liveing her husband Tom Fenn seems not to have had a reputation for being particularly discrete?
*Edward uses, wh for which & ye for the.

Living Archive: Image Misc 6c (reverse of 6a) Pg 4
I am tired of being in London and shall be very glad to get to Cambridge or anywhere for a change. There is scarcely any one here that I shall regret leaving at all. Those whom I like best care little for me or not at all and so I cant care much for them, for less can I sympathise with them or they with me, & I would that dearest Taz. would care for me that I might have some real friend and some one to care for me now you are gone - But I don't see how she can there is nothing in me to love - I am absolutely beginning to be very anxious as to how I am to best earn my living and wish that I could begin at once to do so and I think now of giving up mathematics at Cambridge and only taking my degree in medicine that I may be sooner able to get into practice & so be able to make T. an offer
_________________________________________

Really, dear fellow, some of the many happy & unhappy times we have spent together. Do you not remember skating by moonlight on the garden pond at Tendring on the night your sister E was married (I think). O what a shining evening it was and I was so concerned then because I wanted you to find out how much I loved Taz but I did not like to tell you lest you should be angry - you can't think how rejoiced I was when I found you were not -
*Tendring Hall, Stoke by Nayland SFK.


Liveing Archive: Image Misc 6e Page 6
Ye Liveing Liveing Liveing Edward Liveing
I went down to Stoke on Saturday afternoon and returned yesterday (Monday). I will just give you an account of my proceedings. On Sunday morning I went up to Church and after church went into yr. house with some of my sisters and I stopped in your dining room talking to your people and waiting for Tas to come in but after waiting a long time as she didn't make her appearance I was obliged to give it up - Believing that she did not choose that I should see her. Your mother asked me to come in in the evening if I liked thinking that I should not like to come all the afternoon; but your sister Susan (whose kindness to me is extreme) would not hear of it & said I must come in directly after church and stop till the evening & then your mother wanted me to do so too & so I was obliged to say yes - though it left me in a dreadful funk. I then started and walked down to Neyland as I had to see Mr. Green - all the way down I was in great sorrow at the thought of Taz cutting me - and I came back again in time for church at Stoke - after church I went in you house with my mother and sister (Anna had been stopping there to the school) - so Mary or my mother asked me if I was coming home with them so your mother cries out No Edwd is going to have tea with us - perhaps Anna will stop too. Bob had told Anna all about Tas. & myself before so I looked at her as much as to say "stop" & so she stopped wh. made it less awkward for me. We waited some time but no Tas. made her appearance but your father & I had a long talk until tea time (it was just at the time that poor Martin & his son were killed which you will here (sic) more about fr home)

Liveing Archive: Image Misc 6g.
Tas. did not shew her face - & I felt very unhappy & disappointed & restless; anxiously watching for her to come in. At last after the others had come down to tea Tas came also and I sat in my old corner & she next to me - partly by her own will I suppose & partly by the management of your sisters - and then I was happy though uncomfortable - she did not speak to me & so I had to begin to talk to her - and so we got on through tea time pretty well - after tea T. Fenn came & your Father & Mother went with him up stairs & I had 6 girls (your coz. Anna M Bridges being there) left alone with me sitting round the fire - I talked as well as I could & to Tas as much as I could - & so passed the evening. When Anna went to put on her things they all went with her and Tas was going too & bolted half across the room - and then she stopped short & came back to me at the fire. I thought it so good & kind of her. Susan called me away and told me she was very glad I came down & also that Tas was really pleased with the songs I sent her - so I went away happy altogether & Tas is gone to the Macnamaras? (sic) Newcross (sic) with yr Father today - & Mrs Mac has written to ask me down there as often as I like - I suppose some of your people must have told her about it - I can't go down before Wednesday.

Julius Archive: Image Misc 6f Pg 8
A Well now the cause of my joy - (I had - deleted) went to the hospital after breakfast leaving C. Mac at home & when I came back in the middle of the day I found to my utter astonishment that Fanny (Mac) & Tas had been here - to bring a message that we were to go & fetch them up from N cross this evening & take them to Mrs Lodges in Waterloo Place where they were to have seats for tomorrow. C. Mac had got them to come in & took them into my Room - and he said they were both in such spirits that they were almost wild & made such a row & then bolted off to Bond Street to amuse themselves!! You may imagine how savage I was to find them gone. Now I & C.M. walked down to N.C. in the evening and then I saw Tas. had tea - and soon we started off to go back to London with them - we had to walk to the Railway station. I offered Tas my arm & C. took his sister and I talked to Tas & she to me all the way and we walked together on the Railway platform half an hour & got on very stunning indeed. Then we sat together in the Railway carriage with only an elbow cushion between & she talked away very kindly to me instead of to F. who was next to her in spite of all the Row. I thought it so intensely kind & good of her. When we got to London Bridge we had a long way to get to Waterloo Place G D Liveing Esq* Regent St. where the girls were to sleep. I took Tas again as a matter of course and by this time I had got quite happy with her & she seemed quite comfortable & in wonderful spirits - & so we went through the crowds of people & very nearly succeeded . . . . .
*Is this a take-off of his older brothers signature. The Will of Edward Liveing died 1843 mentions a lease of premises in Regents St.

B
Well now the cause of my joy - I (deleted) went to the hospital after breakfast leaving C. Mac at home & when I came back in the middle of the day I found to my utter astonishment that Fanny (Mac) & Tas had been here - to bring a message that we were to go & fetch them up from N cross this evening & take them to Mrs Lodges in Waterloo Place where they were to have seats for tomorrow. C. Mac had got them to come in & took them into my Room - and he said they were both in such spirits that they were almost wild & made such a row & then bolted off to Bond Street to amuse themselves!! You may imagine how savage I was to find them gone.
Now I & C.M. walked down to N.C. in the evening and then I saw Tas. had tea = and soon we started off to go back to London with them - we had to walk to the Railway station. I offered Tas my arm & C. took his sister and I talked to Tas & she to me all the way and we walked together on the Railway platform half an hour & got on very stunning indeed. Then we sat together in the Railway carriage with only an elbow cushion between & she talked away very kindly to me instead of to F. who was next to her in spite of all the Row. I thought it so intensely kind & good of her. When we got to London Bridge we had a long way to get to Waterloo Place *GD Liveing Esq Regent St. where the girls were to sleep. I took Tas again as a matter of course and by this time I had got quite happy with her & she seemed quite comfortable & in wonderful spirits - & so we went through the crowds of people & very nearly succeeded . . . . .

Julius Archive: Image Misc 6h
LiveingLiveingLiveingLiveing
. . . . . in getting into the Cathedral to hear the rehearsal wh. was going on - then the crowd up Fleet St. was so thick that one could not get in so we got into an omnibus & the girls seemed mighty pleased with the whole expedition - we went into Mrs Lodges with them & settled that we were to come for them at 7 o'clock to morrow morning & take them to their seats in the Strand - and now I have left them & come home hear(sic) - and so you see the cause of my joy & I must go to Byo now or I shall not be up in time to fetch them to morrow morning - O how I wish that I had Tas here. But I know that she's not many 100 yards off & that is some comfort.
The day after the funeral - Dear Henry, I will continue my narrative where I left off - But I fear you will be too tired for such uninteresting rot to read any more but my mind is so full of it that I cannot help writing it to you for I should tell it you if you were here so you must forgive me - & don't read it if you do not like - about 4 o'clock in the morning I was aroused by someone knocking at my door - so I got up & was horrified to hear them say "Mr Liveing you are wanted" - so I had to get up at once & go to a beastly midwifery case - when I got there I found it would be long past seven before it would be over & after making an exam. & finding I might safely leave her I started off & ran half over London to find some friend to take it for me but all were going to the funeral & so it was no go. & I returned and sat down in despair expecting to loose (sic) Fanny's company & the Duke's funeral also.* However I waited some time & then went to the Hospital & a friend of mine there very kindly offered
* Date of the Duke of Wellington's funeral was 18th Nov 1852, Edward must have been writing to Henry in NZ as Henry left 1 Oct 1852 arriving NZ 2 Feb 1853.

Living Archive: Image Misc 6j (reverse of 6i) Pg 9
Wednesday night - Nov 17th 1852 FJT Dearest Fanny
I think you were but best . . . . . dear Henry, with all your kindness goodness and feeling ( here with me your old friend - struck out ) if you still remember me as such - to increase my present joy by your sympathy for me. (Henry must be enroute to NZ) It is the night before the Duke of Wellington's funeral 12 o'clock midnight and though I am in an extremely quiet part of London yet I can here (sic) the voices of the workmen & their hammers going finishing the platforms and seats in the neighbourhood preparatory for to morrow morning.- The streets fr. Hyde Park to St. Paul's have been a marvellous sight to day - Every shop window emptied & fitted up with wooden raised seats & fittings - & hung with Black - Letting at one guinea and half a guinea each and most of them I believe taken. viz. many thousands. All the church yards are also fitted up with seats & let out - Barriers established at all the principal streets and railings put along the pavements - the streets this evening one continuous crowd of people and what it will be like to morrow & what the end of it all no one can tell or imagine - as an old woman attending a patient of mine told me to day "if God Almighty had come down himself she did not believe they could have done so much for him" The cathedral is fitted up in the most marvellous manner hung with black - organ removed lighted with thousands of jets of gas - None but dean & Chapter & friends & I believe peers and peeresses & "such like" are admitted. Your Rev. Father & Mr. Coyte are going as a friend of your Father's in the Herald's Office whom you may have heard of often gave him 2 admissions


Living Archive: Image Misc 6i (on reverse of 6j) Pg 10
The procession I will describe another day. It is to be something unparalleled - The poor Duke has being lying in state at Chelsea Hospital. The crowd to see it has been tremendous & some people killed. I have not been able to see it - But it is said to be very splendid even surpassing the lying in state of Napoleon wh.(sic) was extremely grand. I will just give you the last canto of Tennyson's (Poet Laureate) ode on His death Peace his triumph etc
But all this leads me back to what interests me much more & fills all my mind (I fear more than it ought) & concerns me individually much more also and which is a cause of unfeigned thankfulness & real joy on my part viz - my brightening prospect (if I am not deceiving myself) with regard to my own dearest Fanny - and it is for this cause that I said I wish you could rejoice with me here now - O Henry without you and what you have done for me what should I have done what would have become of me. But all this leads me back to one thing to me far more interesting and filling my whole heart (I fear more than it ought) viz. the thoughts of my own
d F. (sic) now for the first time I think bringing with your real (unalloyed- struck out) joy & thankfulness into my mind.

Liveing Archive: Image 9a left. Page 1
SynopsisLiveingLiveing
Ice & Skating - our old skating together - the gardens pond & Emily's wedding & Henry's sounding me about Taz. in ignorance - his epistle to me - my rejoicing - & the troubles joys & fears since then - My present . . . . . ? & prospects with regard to Taz. Mr Markham & what he said & the consequences. My visit at Cambridge - Bob & his Rooms & George - My intentions there - How we wished you had been there also & hope you will come now - As to my changing Profession. O that I could hear and learn something about Taz. It is now so long & I have no longer you to tell me ought (sic) about her - I do not know how she is or what doing or where going or what her mind is about me & whether she still hates me or whether she thinks I have forgotten her & that my love was like that very often of other men at first - lasting but a time till some one else fell in the way. O - fain that I could but hear from thine own lips. O Fan & my Family! as to your people going to New Z. & as to his coming back. As to F. N my . . . . . & his love, as to Emily Holland her preparing & N. . . . . urra? & as to James Macnammara. As to Carol - on the invasion of England by
Pr. . . . . c? (Scribble indispersed with random doodling)
That I could just get down to Thorington St . . . . . I wish she would come I should get on so stunning ? then - But I do not know how to unless I tell her my love first. As to Susan I fear I have done something to offend her - or she she (sic) thinks I am not in earnest about Taz or else she she waits for me to speak about it first wh. I am afraid to do. My Mirrorlife? - My 21st Birthday - wish Henry many truly happy returns of his. I always forget what day it is an . . . . . 24 W. Finch going to be married. Uncle Charles going to Build a new Apse at Stoke Church
On the possibility of yr going out to NZ When you write home be sure to tell them (at Stoke) that if such a thing should happen as their going to NZ to be sure & let me know (if I am not previously all square with Dearest Tas )(sic) whether they think it proper for me to make her an offer then before their going, that I may know what Fanny wishes to do, whether she is inclined to wait in England for me or whether she wwould go out to come back again
L'Empereur Napoleon (Rather good sketch of a noble young face)
or . . . . . On whether she wishes me to go out there with her if much against my own inclinations as I fear it will be. For my part and from what she herself told me I strongly suspect that Taz (sic) would rather stop in England if she were married & comfortable here than go to N.Z. I want particularly to know whether they would object to my doing this viz. that I want particularly to make Tas (sic) an offer before they go to N.Z. that she may stop here if she likes - For yr Mother seems to infer fr. her letters (here quote.) that I shall follow Tas out to N.Z. by implying 1 of 2 things either that I shall not have made her an offer or 2 that she will not accept - unless
Living Archive: Image Misc 9b (right side)
Synopsis (continued) of course if she loves me at all and will be my wife wh. I pray she may - why then of course she would consent to stop with me & for me in England if I wished it - since a woman ought to leave her father & mother & cleave to her husband.
Love lorn indecipherable musings by Edward.

Living Archive: Image Misc 9a right side
Feb 24 1853 - London
My dear old fellow - how astonished you will be to see Ashton Sadler in New Zealand - why it seems as if everyone were going out to you - I have been shut up in our wretched Hospital ever since I wrote to you last - so that I have scarcely anything to tell you. How astonished you will be to see Ashton. I did my best to persuade him to go to NZ when I was at home at Christmas & he seemed much inclined to do so, but had no idea that his father and mother would let him - however he managed to persuade them
And he has been up to look out a cabin for himself in some ship wh. is to sail next month. I went to Cambridge a few days ago and spent Sunday and Monday with Bob & George - as I wanted to see about certain university regulations - and as to what I had better do when I get there. George will be an MA this Easter and so he will enter me himself next term at Caius - Hard reading does not suit Bob well & knocks him up & makes him nervous. I had a very jolly day down there and only lamented over you that we two should be there together & you not with us & that all the castles we used to build in the air are all broken down now, and all through condemning yourself to voluntary exile without really I fairly believe half sufficient grounds.
How jolly we 3 might have been there together!!! However it is too late I fear to alter it now & if wishes were horses beggars might ride hope you are as happy as if you you were with us - Cannot you manage to come back now that as I hope & trust you have got up your health & strength again - what's the good of yr. stopping out there now. Can you see any prospect or possibility of your family coming out to you -? I do so hope to have a letter from you and hear what you are doing - & what your prospects are - and what sort of a Land you have got into
We have had several days of jolly hard frost and some capital Ice - I managed to get away one afternoon and went down to Barnes & had some skating on the Ponds there. How I wish I could have been down at Stoke & skated there & have had (sic) also with me. I think almost the last time I had any skating was with you at the bottom of Tendring gardens & do you not remember . . . . .

Living Archive: Image Misc 9b left side
. . . . . that jolly moonlight night when we skated together there and I told you of a certain heavenly damsel who had stolen all my love - and you fished to find out who it was and I was so anxious to tell you and yet afraid lest you should be angry or at least only laugh at me; and when you did find out afterwards who it was and wrote me such a jolly nice epistle about "your lovely and amiable cozin (sic) Tasmania" I was so intensely rejoiced & it seemed then to me the first dawn of life I had ever had that I should ever be able to have Tas. for mine own. O how many changes have taken place among us all since then - within the last 3 years - and how much has my own mind changed since then in every respect I should think excepting that I still love Tas. & more earnestly & faithfully than ever - and I was 21 years old on the 8th so I consider I am no longer a boy & have a sort of right to love her now without being laughed at as if I should love someone else in a day or two. And now I remember dear Henry that your birthday is one day this month either 14th or 24th I think & if the latter to day now Whenever it is I wish you many truly happy returns of it.
These draft letters by a love lorn young man give a peep at courtship in Victorian England.
It is sprinkled with words struck out, scribbles, sketches and abbreviations.

On Edwards engagement, Henry Torlesse [1678] wrote an extraordinary letter to his "friend" admitting his envy, and trying to influence the relationship. He suggests someone write to Tas admonishing her for
". . . . .
the important step she is taking, in throwing herself away upon you. . . . . "

At Edward's wedding as the guests stood around the altar rails a large frog hopped out during the service, then at the reception in a tent in the garden, a swarm of bees settled on the wedding cake!
Marriage ref Sep quarter 1854 Sudbury 4a 546 BDM

He lived in Cambridge as an undergraduate soon after his marriage.

Liveing Archive: Image Letters 2 & 3
Caius College:Wednesday
My own dearest wife, I have got through all right - though I can hardly believe it. What an anxious morning I have had no one can tell. Surely "the race is not to the swift nor the battle to the strong" - I desire that I may never forget the very great and most undeserved goodness of God in thus helping me: I have forgotten him day after day and night after night - but He has not forgotten me. If it had not been that many of y.things (ie. the) which I had read (and they were very few) were set in the papers - often the very things I had accidentally chosen to read the night before, and this not once but several times, I do not think I could have passed.
I cannot think why you have not written to me. No letter again today. Why I have been to bed at two o'clock and up at 6 o'clock in the morning - to work, under
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the most harassing circumstances and the greatest anxiety, and when I have sent this letter I shall have written to you as often as you have to me!!
It is now late in the afternoon, and I have only the rest of the day and tomorrow to write my thesis in, for I was so anxious this morning that I could not collect my thoughts; and now I feel so tired that I do not know how to set to work to grind again.
How I am longing to see you & ye children again - I seem to have been away in an age-and I shall have two stay a week longer (sic) least. Goodbye my dearest wife - May God bless you
Your loving husband
Edward

Letters about 1858-59.
Liveing Archive: Image Letters 5 & 6
Tuesday afternoon
My own beloved wife, I have just been in for the last paper; I have done sufficient I think to pass in all except to day's paper which most unfortunately was the most important and made extremely hard. I could only answer one question in it. It has been a terrible and heavy blow to me. I cannot tell what may be the consequence. I made guesses at 2 or 3 more of the questions - but it must remain very dubious whether I pass or not until the list is out. It is a very heavy blow at the last.
What I have endured the last few days no one can tell. I am quite ill - completely exhausted in body and mind. I have had the most horrible nights lately - no sound rest but hideous
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dreams and waking terrors - so that when I have arisen in the morning I have hardly known how to support myself much less to go to an examination. Should I get through I shall hardly recover and if I am plucked - oh! I cannot tell the consequence. I am all well nigh bewildered now.
If I get through I will tell you more about the examinations if I am well enough. I have been obliged to have soup and stimulants to keep me at all up.
I am going to move into Mr Green's rooms today. He has gone to London - if he comes to you be very kind to him - he has been very kind to me. I am wrought up into the most horrible state of irritability. That pulsation in my stomach has increased think and frightened me a good deal just now.
Page 3.
Good bye my dearest wife. If I did not feel so ill I should be longing to be at home and with you and the dear children again. I think if I knew that I were through the excitement of that might aid in getting me up. If I do get thro (sic) then I shall have to stay up here to write my thesis wh. Dr Bard(?) requires on Friday - and then I should have to keep my aet (or act?) on Tuesday (this day week)
Good bye dearest wife
Your ever loving
Edward

Liveing Archive: Image Letters 9 & 10
British Museum
August 6th 1859.
My own beloved wife, I shall be very glad to see you home again, I hope by Wednesday, when you will have been away a month. I had not time to finish my note yesterday, nor have I much time to day. I am sorry to say I have to go & dine at Hulke's on Wednesday next; you know how I hate dining out, and I have not clothes wh. will bear the light! The trousers were made by Hammond at Nayland 8 years ago, & the coat is nearly as old & tight in ye sleeves instead of loose. I am most deplorably off for clothes. I am obliged to wear out my new things directly I have got - (wh. is a great pity) for all my old things have gone to pieces; even my coat fr Smiths I cannot wear, it has broken out under the arm again & Kate has rent the lining. I caught my umbrella between my legs just now & broke the stick & tore the Kid
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of my boot!
I feel very low, in body and mind; not from being alone, which I rather prefer, excepting, of course, you & ye children.
They say cholera has broken out in some ships in ye Thames, from Hamburg, whence it always comes here.
I think, as it must be doubtful when I can leave, that you had better, after staying with me have few days, go straight to Yorkshire, and I follow you as soon as I can; for I am not likely to stay more than a fortnight there, and (three dots symbol for therefore) you will probably stay after if not before me & so it makes no difference & ye children are best out of London this time of year. But I don't feel quite sure what will be best. You did not tell me how the sickness etc was when you wrote last. I am anxious to know. Shall you want any more quinine before you return. I am vexed to think that I shall not be with ye children at Stoke at all
Page 3.
I suppose you do not go to your Uncle's at all. You have not mentioned them, I think, once.
You never told me anything about the Storrs; did you see them?
The office of Physician to ye St James Dispensary is vacant. I would put in for it, only I am not a member of ye College of Physicians, which seems to be a sine qua now for everything.
Your ever loving husband
Edward
J. H. Bridges in his letter desires to be kindly remembered to you - what a cold message from a first cousin!
There is a little man sitting next me so exactly like Charley Hey, just the same look & manner & get up, but rather larger . If I go to Yorkshire I shall certainly go over to Leeds.

University Intelligence. Cambridge June 18 At a Congregation holden today the undermentioned degrees were conferred: M. B. Edward Liveing, Caius College.
Ref: The Daily News 20th June 1859.

Royal College of Physicians. At the Comitia Majora held yesterday, the following gentleman, having undergone the necessary examination, were admitted members of the college. Edward Liveing M. B., Park Terrace, Highbury.
Ref: The Daily News 23rd December 1859.

Liveing Archive: Image Misc 8
Dear old fellow what would I not give to night to write and ask you what I am to do - I am suddenly become a regular practitioner in medicine - In the Wards at the Hospital all day examining my patients - and attending women in Labour in all the vilest holes in the noted parishes of St. Giles and St. Clement Danes - where the bugs swarm so thick as to make things stink of them - I have given up reading mathematics and am trying to make myself as fit for practice as I can having half lost or forgotten my love of science my love of Tas. and impatience to (get her having somewhat altered my feelings - struck out) have her for my own dear wife - safe fr. the hands of other men, have entirely altered my feelings.
Presumed to be to Henry Torlesse c.1859

Liveing Archive: Images 7a & 7b
Not dated but c1868.

Copy
To the Council of King's College London. My Lords and Gentlemen, It is and now nearly three years since I received from your Secretary the announcement of the expiration of my term of office as Assistant Physician to King's College Hospital, and of my election to an Honorary Fellowship at King's College as a mark of your approval of the manner in which I had discharged my Hospital Duties. The same communication informed me that I was eligible for reappointment whenever a vacancy should occur in the Hospital Staff. [I have anxiously waited for such a vacancy and now hasten to take advantage avail myself of this the first opportunity which has occurred of again presenting myself coming forward as a candidate for the office of Assistant Physician. I am 36 years of age and in the yeh of rey!* In addition to the requisite certificates and some testimonials remaining in your possession, I beg to submit a few more from different sources from other sources for your kind consideration; and with every feeling of respect. I remain My Lords and Gentlemen Your Obedient Edwd Liveing
*An abbreviation for good health?


Liveing Archive: Image Letters 7 & 8
British Museum, Libr
Friday 4.30 July 22, 1859
My own dearest wife - I am getting very much knocked up - having to walk these long distances every day is extremely trying this weather. I have suffered from rheumatic pains in my limbs and a continuous gnawing pain in the pit of my stomach for some time past: I am in fact very far from well. All my time is taken up on the road & I can get no work done - what a thing it is not to have any money to buy a few books with. There will be ( I see by the paper) 9d in the pound income-tax instead of 4d which will just take another L5 note away from us - oh dear! oh dear! I have ordered some clothes or should shortly have been unable to leave the house. I wish I could have spent the money in books.
I shall wish to hear from you, as soon as you know, whether Mary is coming back - I believe now it was all only an excuse for leaving because she did not know what reason to give.
We do not get on very brilliantly at
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home - Kate had visitors to spend the day with her all Monday, without even mentioning it to me, for whom no doubt that meat pie was made. When I came home on Wednesday I heard a child crying in the kitchen - Robert, who had been at home declared it had been there all day and that he had heard it the day before & and that he believed it slept here. Then I heard it myself. Then yesterday George who had been part of the day at home asked me what child we had in the house - so he had heard it!! With regard to the food I have not been able to look after it any more - but she did not eat that fruit pie up the other day I was happy to see - indeed it would have been almost too preposterous. I have this day paid 11s 10d for milk, 8s 1d for a week beginning July 4th and 3s 9d for the next. I cannot tell that this is right it seems to me that you could not have paid up the milk bill as you said you would. Besides I paid 5s for the week - I suppose for washing but I do not know. I do not like having no one to keep house who I can depend on, & no time to see after it myself. George does not come home to dinner till 7 o'clock to night. Dr Todd does not get on with the work & I expect that when he goes he will leave it all in my hands & prevent my holyday.(sic) I do not know when Robert goes. Mr Green has passed the College of surgeons I am happy to say & has got one of Wigrams ships, 1st class, with passengers & emigrants. I am very miserable I don't know how to get back to Highbury now I am so bad. My best love to you dearest & the babes -Eddy has never written his note to me. How do they amuse themselves? Your loving hubby Edward miserable.

His London address in 1869 was 52 Queen Anne St Cavendish Sq MDX

University Intelligence Cambridge May 5. At a Congregation held today at 2 p.m. the following degrees were conferred: M. D. Edward Liveing, Caius. Ref: Pall Mall Gazette 6 May 1870

1876 Edward is registered as a shareholder in the Gt Western Railway

Liveing Edward. 52 Queen Anne Sq Cavendish W.
Business Directory of London 1884

Blea Tarn House Little Langdale Ambleside
Wednesday 11 Aug 1887
My Dear Eddie,
I was very glad to have your note which arrived shortly before we left home when I was very busy finishing up the College business. We left for this part earlier than I had intended, because we found unless we came here at once we could not have these quarters (which we like) at all as they were let later on. Aunt C. & I and Ma "Bloater" came here after a great scrimmage (sic) to get off on Thursday last. Harry and Margaret, who had been staying at Chobham, came on Monday, and Molly has arrived from Qn Anne St today . Some of us have been up the Pike's and also Bo(w)fell (sic) on both of which we found the remains of large Jubilee Bonfires, the iron bands which kept them together & the empty petroleum cans, various rocket cases & sticks. Men were employed here at 5s a day for weeks carrying up fuel etc? After all the result as seen from below, the people tell us here, was like a lantern on the top only. I hear there was a very fine one on Scafell Pike, but we have not got as far. We have had such a long drought & intense heat in the South since May that it seems quite a strange experience to find the air here keen & fresh and everything green instead of burnt up. Notwithstanding all this the year has been remarkable for the perfection of the tree foliage, and very strikingly so in London where the trees in all the squares parks and Gardens were still quite thick & quite green when we left, it appears due to the very late winter we had which made the spring a whole month behind, this late coming out seems always
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favourable to trees. Aunt Mary's illness of which you had not heard, consisted of a very severe attack of sciatica or pain at all events, in her leg & hip, entirely preventing her getting any ease or sleep for many days & nights and confining her to bed as any movement aggravated it. My belief is that it was not true sciatica which is a neuralgia?, but pain owing to inflammatory action in muscles or ligaments or tendons coming on at some time after a fall she had by not seeing well & sitting down on the edge of a chair which let her on to the floor. She still has a nurse with her who can manage her and make her comfortable - her poor stupid maid cant, In consequence partly of her man Coton's ill health and partly of his neglect and a want of any efficient head to look after things - her garden had been left to become a wilderness & her household much demoralised This is a pity as such conditions are far more easily prevented than cured. Harry's long illness which kept Charlotte away five months contributed by preventing her going to look after things there. And we had got to such a muddled state at home with our own stupids that it was absolutely necessary for her to stop at home as soon as she could get there. Margaret has been with her most of late, but she was unfit to go at one time, the care of the house at home having been too much for her. If no new misfortunes come I trust now we may get on better after we return and once more get into working grooves and get some things done & old arrears of all kinds which have accumulated cleared off. The last quarterly meeting of the College I had to conduct alone and
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read or speak for nearly 2 hours as Sir Henry P was taken ill and unable to leave his bed. He has gone to N Wales to recruit where he has taken a large house at Llanfairfechan, & he has made myself and Meg promise to go and spend a week there on our way south, a great trial to me, & involving bringing dress clothes etc north and encumbering us, but it was kindly meant & the dear old man would not be refused. He now tells me she (sic) shall not resign just yet (this time last year he called at Qn A St & told me he should not continue after the opening of the New Hall in April last) not until the lease of his house expires which is not for another year or more. Personally I am glad for I am not master of half the business of the College's precedents for guidance in various cases as they arise, & I know no one else except himself who is, very much of both having grown up under his own management during the last 30 years. For myself it can only be acquired gradually as cases arise and by study of the Annals. To be able to answer all kinds of questions put off hand at a College meeting by any fellow is by no means an easy acquirement for a new hand or head rather. The Wilson Browns have left Assington Vicarage & gone to stay in Ipswich for a change - near Mrs Brown's mother, and sister (who is slowly dying of cancer of the tongue, poor soul!) Sam Brown went with H Mosley and Sarah Mosley a spar tour in Brittany and spent a day or two with us on her way back. She is a nice child I think, and simple, with all her learning and information which is considerable. I took her over the College. John Bridges has let his house for 3 months to a (sic) an old Lunatic (probably dementia) lady & her attendants, & gone abroad with his wife.
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Yes, I was very much interested in the Jubilee celebrations in the Abbey. Sir H. was afraid to go and so I went as representing him, with a Vice president, two Censors and Treasurer. We had good places above the Judges in S. Transept - 8 or 10 feet below the Triforium level. We had an extremely good view of the Old Lady and her immense family who occupied a large crimson dais in the centre under the lantern, with the Chair and Stone of Scone for the Queen & gold chairs for the family including the grandchildren of sufficient age. Round the dais was an extremely handsome ormolu railing brought from one of the palaces they said. Of course we could see nothing of the procession entering or coming up the Abbey. The performance was very unlike a religious one, and the music was execrable for the most part, poor in composition & thin in performance; and tho' we sat there for 2 hours in advance we were not relieved by any music or organ performance. In fact it was a very unworthy concern in that department though a very great success in every other. I never saw and could not have believed that so orderly & well behaved a mass of people could have been brought together. The puzzle to me was how to get there - having to go in scarlet robes & be there at 9 or before. A week before I had ordered a carriage; but Sir H. talking to me about it said his man had asked him L3 or L4 for one and advised me to see what mine was going to charge. Then I found that probably the carriages might never get up to the Abbey and so I countermanded it altogether. I started early & walked with my robes in a bundle to Baker Street about 8 - found the next train with abundance of room & booked for St James Park (our tickets were by Dean's Yard & Cloisters) - Long before we got there every carriage was full & the centre with people standing as many as could force themselves in. I got out and walked along a carriage way kept clear by police without difficult(y) (sic) to find an assembly of people in every sort
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of court costume in Dean's yard. There I struggled on my robes & joined the rest. I thought very often both before and since of Barney Maguires account of the Coronation but a jubilee crowd is not what it was then, and the "cakes & apples in all the chapels" & free ingress & egress to a certain portion of the Abbey for all comers could never be again as it was so then. I heard through Duckworth whose brother was officiating as one of the Canons, that the organist had orders to blow out every stop in the organ over night to make sure that no dynamite had been lodged in any pipes etc. A good many people present in some form belong to the Abbey. I do not know whether I told you the history of my securing a letter of your G G G G Grandfather Dr Richard Torlefse thro' the kindness of Dr Munk. One day he bought a long extract from a M.S. diary kept by a Dr Young of Plymouth at end of 17th & beginning of the 18th century; it contained an account of his examination for the licence as a Physician - very amusing indeed & very Pepys like. He thought it would interest Pitman & myself and he lent it me to copy, when I got it home I found it contained complete details of the exam as conducted by the Presidents House, Sir T Millington by himself and the Censors of whom Dr Torlefse was one, with amusing remarks on their various characters and manners - then "Dr so & so a grim and sour old man" and at the end he wound up with - "but sweeter men than the present & Dr Torlefse I never met". When I returned it to Dr Munk I said how much amused and interested I had been in such a lively picture of the College a century and half ago and then added "but it has been an interest for me quite independently for Dr Torlefse who figures in it was my childrens four times great grandfather in a single line on their mothers side" He then said
Over.
"If that's the case you would like to see a letter I formerly had of Dr Torlesfe's; if I can find it you shall have it." He did find it and gave it me - it is his letter to the President when he fell into ill health & the gout, owing partly to the trouble & poverty which had come on him resigning his office of "Elect". It has his little seal with the stork crest - rather rudely executed. There are of course numerous entries in our annals (which go back to H(enry) VIII) of his share taken in College business; I have noted a few but have not had leisure to look them up. Dr Munk furnished me with another piece of information about him which helped to fill up a blank & reconcile a difficulty. There were of Dr Torlefse's children, besides Christopher & Anthony from the former of whom you are descended, & who took their names from their mother's family, the Browns of Stamford, two other sons at least, one "Richard Torlefse Jnr." who witnesses a will of one of the family and William Torlefse of Barnards Inn Holborn, buried in St Andrews Ch. yard Holborn, who bequeathed his money to his dear friend Mrs Bleunerhafset, and cuts "his brothers Christopher & Anthony" off with a shilling" The wills of old Christopher Brown of Stamford and his son bequeath money on the contrary to Dr Torlesse & Christopher & Anthony only of his children. Now Dr Munk showed me an extract from the registers of the Savoy Chapel containing the marriage of Dr Richard Torlefse with Mary (De Cardonnell). I cant remember the rather peculiar name. This was evidently a former marriage & Richard & William the children of it and only half brothers to Christr & Anty. Having Dr R Torlefs's writing, with the letter of Christopher's I found in the Brit Mussm,- and the family bible of his son John, and at least the will, probably letters also with the Torlefses, of the 2nd John (Mr Torlefses father at Stanmore) we have the series of handwritings from contempy of C.(arles)II downwards, Dr Monk found me the earliest signature of Dr Torlefse on his admission to the College to show me
Over.
its firmnefs as a young man compared with his last letter. I also wrote to the Vicar of Charlton, near Woolwich, where Bridget Torlefse his 2nd wife is buried asking him to search his register about the time Dr T died to see if he had been buried there too. His answer was in the negative & I have now no doubt he was buried in the grave of his first wife wherever that may have been in London, not impossibly in the Savoy Ch or yard. I enclose a Dividend Warrant from the Glasgow Tramways Company for
L1 18s 9d which requires your signature within 3 months. Frances is at Lowestoft with her children I think I told you. We were to have gone to Switzerland walking cheap? this summer and did not intend to have come here again, but Harry's long illness exhausted both my own and Aunt C's funds , tho' we both have a little increase from Uncle Henry's now, so that we could not manage it. I was very sorry to hear of your being kept waiting for instructions to proceed with your shaft when you might as well have been at home. It was very provoking, also your being still kept waiting for your steam pump, I think it very wise of you to have built a little place & office for shelter next the works against the coming winter. But we hope to see you ere then. There are Aunt C., Harry, Miss Rands, Margaret Wolly & myself all sitting writing in a little room 11 feet square, or 11 X 12 625 feet above Ordce. Datm. The heat has been intense and suffocating in London for 3 months & Duckworth writing me from there a few days after having been a short run to Scotland said the air in London felt solid like wool
Over/
Here we have it quite cold & fresh like October early mornings and evenings and emerald green grass & deep shady siccamore (sic) trees, & a good deal of rain of course Best love from us all Ever your affecte father Edwd Liveing
William Munk - <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2434914/pdf/brmedj08696-0054a.pdf>

The Court.
The Prince and Princess of Wales.
Marlborough House, Monday.
The Prince of Wales was admitted at Marlborough House today to the Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians of London, to which he was recently elected in comitia of the College. The following officers of the institution were present: . . . . . Dr Edward Liveing, Registrar.
Ref: extracted from The Daily News 20 July 1897.

The Times for April 1919 pg 15 col E.
Obituary
Dr Edward Liveing. The death of Dr Edward Liveing, Emeritus Registrar of the Royal College of Physicians of London, occurred on Wednesday night. The second son of Edward Liveing MRCS., of Nayland, Suffolk, he was born in February 1832 and was educated at King's College, London, and at Caius College, Cambridge, obtaining honours at the University in mathematics in 1858, and graduating M.B. in 1859 and M. D. in 1870. He was at one time examiner in medicine to the University. His connection with the Royal College of Physicians dated from 1859, when he obtained, by examination, the membership, being elected a fellow in 1874. He was appointed Assistant Registrar in 1886, and on the resignation of the late Sir Henry Pitman in 1889 was elected Registrar, an office he held for 20 years. Dr Liveing was a fellow and formerly a member of Council of King's College London, and Assistant physician to King's College Hospital. He was the author of a book, valuable in its day on "Megrim a Contribution to the Pathology Of Nerve Storms". Dr Liveing's younger brother, Dr Robert Liveing, died last February. His elder brother, Dr George Downing Liveing, FRS., was Professor of Chemistry for 47 years at Cambridge and is still resident there.

LIVEING, Edward (1832-1919)
Details: LIVEING, Edward, MD (Cantab); FRCP; Registrar of the Royal College of Physicians, 1889-1909, Emeritus Registrar, 1909; Consulting Physician, St Marylebone General Dispensary; born Nayland, Suffolk, 8 February 1832; 2nd son of Edward Liveing and Catherine, only daughter of Geo. Downing, Barrister, Lincoln's Inn; married 1st, 1854, Frances (died 1885), only daughter of Lt Henry Torlesse, RN, Police Magistrate at Hobart; three sons two daughters; 2nd, 1898, Harriet Susan, eldest daughter of Rev. J. Wilson Brown, Rector of Stowlangtoft, Suffolk, and Hon. Canon of Ely. Education: King's College, London; Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge; BA Math. Honours, 1858; MB 1859; MD 1870. FRCP 1874. Work: Examiner in Medicine, University of Cambridge, 1870-1871; Fellow and late Member of Council, King's College, London; formerly Assistant Physician to King's College Hospital. Publications: On Megrim, a contribution to the pathology of Nerve Storms. Address: 52 Queen Anne Street, Cavendish Square, London W. Died: 2 April 1919
Ref: Know UK CD - Colin Foot

EDWARD LIVEING, M.D. CANTAB., F.R.C.P.,
Emeritus Registrar, Royal College of Physicians.
By the death of Dr. Edward Liveing, which occurred on April 2nd in his 88th year, the medical profession loses one of its oldest members. He was born at Nayland in Suffolk in 1832 the second son of Mr Edward Liveing, a medical practitioner who had long been settled in that district. After obtaining his preliminary education at King's College, London, he began to study medicine at King's College Hospital, and obtained the diploma of M.R.C.S. in 1854. After this he entered at Caius College, and in 1858 graduated in the mathematical tripos, obtaining the thirtieth place among the senior optimes.
In the following year Dr. Liveing took the degree of M.B., and passed the newly instituted examination for the membership of the Royal College of Physicians of London.
In 1870 he graduated M.D.Cambridge, and in 1874 was elected a Fellow of the College. He was, besides, a Fellow of King's College, for a time assistant physician to King's College Hospital, and examiner in medicine at Cambridge in 1870-71.
In 1886 Dr. Liveing was appointed Assistant Registrar of the College of Physicians, and, on the resignation of Sir Henry Pitman in 1889, Registrar. This important post he held for twenty years, and throughout the whole time he conducted the work of his department with ability and invariable courtesy, which earned him the respect of all with whom he came in contact. On his retirement from the post in 1909 the honorary distinction of Emeritus Registrar was conferred upon him.
Dr Liveing's only publication was On Megrim: a Contribution. to the Study of Nerve Storms, a book which was much esteemed in its day. His younger brother, Dr. Robert Liveing, died a few weeks ago, well over 80, and his eldest brother, Professor G. D. Liveing of Cambridge, still survives, having attained the age of 92, a remarkable record of longevity in a family.
Ref: The British Medical Journal, 12 April 1919.

Edward's grave is marked by a cross - Ref; Partridge 416 J426/85

The Will of Edward Liveing M.D. of 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq MDX who died 2 Apr 1919 was proved London 29 May 1919 to Edward Henry Torlesse Liveing mining engineer, Rev Edward Henry George Dowling Liveing clerk, and William Francis Robert Liveing solicitor at L9449 7s 5d.

Research Notes:
Royal College of Physicians of London:
ESTATE RECORDS
Catalogue Ref. RCP-PREME
[Access Conditions]
Open
Correspondence, accounts, reports etc. re Ashlyns' Farm, High Ongar - ref. RCP-PREME/2005/1-98
[from Scope and Content] Liveing (Edward), 1832 - 1919
FILE - Edward Liveing. ALS to Sir Dyce Duckworth - ref. RCP-PREME/2005/1-98/61 - date: 29 July 1891
Correspondence etc. re the armorial window in the R.C.P. - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107
[from Scope and Content] Liveing (Edward), 1832-1919
FILE - Lionel Smith Beale. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/15 - date: 20 Dec. 1887
FILE - Mary Brinton. 1 ALS to Dr Liveing re coat of arms of William Brinton - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/19 - date: 12 Dec. 1887
FILE - Francis Bisset Hawkins. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing, 13 Dec. 1887 and 1 ALS to Sir Dyce Duckworth, 21 Dec. 1887 - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/54-55 - date: 1887
FILE - L. M. Rate. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing re coat of arms of Dr. James Hope - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/57 - date: 20 Dec. 1887
FILE - Theodore Cracroft Hope. 2 ALS to Edward Liveing - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/58-59 - date: 26 Jan. 1888 and 14 March 1898
FILE - William Jenner. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/63 - date: 15 Dec. 1887
FILE - Sir George Johnson. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/64 - date: 15 Dec. 1887
FILE - Sir George Edward Paget. 1 ALS to Dr. Liveing - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/76 - date: 12 Dec. 1887
FILE - W.E. Nicol. 1 ALS to Edward Liveing re coat of arms of William Prout - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/81 - date: 27 Dec. 1887
FILE - Notes in handwriting of Edward Liveing re coat of arms of Richard Torlesse - ref. RCP-PREME/1094/1-107/98 - date: 14 Jan. 1888

Royal College of Physicians of London:
William Henry Allchin (1846-1912): materials for biography of Sir Andrew Clark
Catalogue Ref. MS-ALLCW
Correspondence, including letters to Dr. Allchin re biography of Sir Andrew Clark - ref. MS-ALLCW/711/122-175
[from Scope and Content] Liveing (Edward), 1832-1919
FILE - Dr. Edward Liveing. ALS to Dr. Allchin, suggesting reply to Canon MacColl and commenting on the fact that if the publishers were restive, the delay had been nothing to do with Dr. Allchin - ref. MS-ALLCW/711/164 - date: 10 Feb. 1903
Correspondence, including letters by and relating to Sir Andrew Clark, and letters to Dr. Allchin re biography of Sir Andrew - ref. MS-ALLCW/713/168-220
[from Scope and Content] Liveing (Edward), 1832-1919
FILE - Edward Liveing. ALS to Dr. Allchin - ref. MS-ALLCW/713/206 - date: 3 March 1898
FILE - Edward Liveing. ALS to Dr. Allchin, with list of the ex-officio appointments and duties of the President of R.C.P - ref. MS-ALLCW/713/208 - date: 11 March 1898
FILE - Edward Liveing. ALS to Dr. Allchin - ref. MS-ALLCW/713/210 - date: 5 April 1898
FILE - William Fleming. ALS to Dr. Allchin re nomination of candidates by R.C.P. for office of Physician at St. Bartholomew's Hospital and stating that Dr. Liveing was of the opinion the privilege of nomination was due to Harvey's bequest - ref. MS-ALLCW/713/212 - date: 24 Feb. 1903
Correspondence re Sir Andrew Clark - ref. MS-ALLCW/714C/1-22
Liveing (Edward), 1832-1919

Royal College of Physicians of London:
William Alexander Greenhill (1814-1894): correspondence and papers, mainly relating to medical biography
Catalogue Ref. MS-GREEW

Correspondence etc - ref. MS-GREEW/264/208-228
Liveing (Edward), 1832-1919
FILE - ALS from Dr. Greenhill to Dr. Liveing, stating that he would be unable to attend the meetings of the Committee, but would be happy to be one of the members - ref. MS-GREEW/264/226 - date: 5 Feb. 1892

Royal College of Physicians of London:
Charles Edouard Brown - Séquard (1817-1894) and family: Papers, including correspondence, lecture notes & case notes
Catalogue Ref. MS-BROWC
Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard; Correspondence etc - ref. MS-BROWC/980
FILE - Edward Berdoe. ALS to Edward Liveing enclosing his circular on Brown-Séquards' experiments "A serious moral question" and a letter on the same subject by Mr. Jesse Herbert - ref. MS-BROWC/980/66 - date: 11 Oct. 1889

To find out more about the archives described below, contact Royal College of Physicians of London
Ref A2A

London Metropolitan Archives:
FARRER AND COMPANY [SOLICITORS]
Catalogue Ref. ACC/1285
[Note]
AW/MP/July 1975
Papers of Montgomrey family; premises in Acton, Brentford and Twickenham
FILE - Assignment of leasehold and conveyance of freehold premises - ref. ACC/1285/025 - date: 1897 Nov 24
[from Scope and Content] 2. Edward Liveing M.D. of Cavendish Square, co. London, and William Coppard Beaumont of 23 Lincoln's Inn Fields, co. London
To find out more about the archives described, contact London Metropolitan Archives
Ref A2A.

Liveing Archive: Images Misc 3a & 3b
Advise to an unknown person, on taking care of her house.
To Mifs W.
As you are tenant at will in a very handsome genteel house and are capable of furnishing it in the politest manner, ruling it by the strictest maxims of economy and decorum, permit a friend to give you a few cursory hints in an affair of so much importance. Your building is composed of some of the finest materials I ever saw and is so much the more liable to discover the least flaw and spot that may accidentally touch it. T'is erected of a proper height, a just size, reared on a regular plan and finished with the most accurate proportions, on the top stands an immanent turret furnished with a room of the Golbelar form, which I observe has two Crystal windows in the front, these are so constructed as to be exceedingly usefull (sic) as they command an extensive prospect; and if all ways kept clean and bright will prove a very great ornament to the house. I advise you not to look through them at every object that pafses by, be sure to shut them soon at night, and you may open them as early as you please in the morning, on each side I discover a small portal to recieve (sic) company take care they don't always stand open for then you will be crowded with visitors and perhaps with many such as you will not like, let them be never shut against the instructive Parent the advising Friend or the supplicating Orphan. I took notice of one gate in the front at which all your company goes out let that generally the barred close, be cautious what Visitors you let out publickly (sic) lest if any of ill carrecter (sic) be seen coming
Over/
from it you draw a scandal upon your house. It will be necefsary therefore to lay a strict injunction of vigilance upon your Poters (sic), who stand centinels (sic) in liverys (sic) of the deepest scarlet, just without the ivory Pallisadores. I have seen some people paint the two pannels (sic) just below the windows but I wou'd (sic) advise you to the contrary for your own natural colours far excell (sic) all the decorations of art. This part of the Edifice is supported by a pillar of Corinthian marble whose base is ornamented with two Alabaster semi-globes over which is generuly (sic) drawn a fine lawn curtain of admirable needlework. Beneath is the great Hall in which you have a small closet of exquisite workmanship this, I suppose is the place of your secret retirement open to none but yourself or some faithfull (sic) intimate Friend I advise you to keep this always clean furnish it well. Make it a little library of the best practical authors, and visited frequently especially when you return home from Church or leave a circle of acquaintance which you have met with at a tea table. Let the outside of the hall not appear like an hearse hung around with escutceons (sic), nor like a coach of state bedaubed with gilt or colourings, but let it be plain, neat and clean to convince the world that it is kept more for use than ornament.
Your (sic) are sensible Mifs, time defaces the beauty and demolishes the strength of the noblest structure, and therefore will not be surprized (sic) to find your little tenemant (sic) subject to the same change, doubtlefs it has wanted repairs often tho' you have lived in it no longer, which are plain estimations that the house will one day fall. You may soon be turned out.
The landlord may give you a warning, or may not, this is uncertain. Be always ready to go when called upon and then you will not be affraid (sic) to leave it at the shortest notice. One thing I wou'd (sic) observe too, is, that when you (leave it - crossed out ) quit the house no other Tenant will inhabit it but t'will lie waste and in ruins, yet the proprieter (sic) will some time or other rebuild it for your reception in a more durable manner, with the same materials but so refined and modified that it will be liable to no accident or decay, and as it is absolutely necessary that your habitation be now reared in some other place, I heartily wish it may be in a finer country, under a milder climate and well sheltered from all storms, then will your situation be happy and honourable and your lease never expire. Yours etc etc
The transcriber E L Fenn, considers this was written by Edward Liveing in his mature years.

Internet March 2012
Migraine pathogenesis were Edward Liveing's theory of nerve storms and Peter . . . . . summarized in Liveing's monograph On Megrim, Sick-Headache and Some . . . . .
brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/. . . . ./brain.aws020.full.pd. . . . . <http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/03/01/brain.aws020.full.pdf&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAEoBDAAOABAwbrf-gRIAVgAYgVlbi1OWg&cd=naO7wyut7ac&usg=AFQjCNHWpGY3MsMJsh9Wyth5b6cGm-xUsQ>

Medical Notes: EDWARD LIVEING, M.D. CANTAB., F.R.C.P.,
Emeritus Registrar, Royal College of Physicians.
By the death of Dr. Edward Liveing, which occurred on April 2nd in his 88th year, the medical profession loses one of its oldest members. He was born at Nayland in Suffolk in 1832 the second son of Mr Edward Liveing, a medical practitioner who had long been settled in that district. After obtaining his preliminary education at King's College, London, he began to study medicine at King's College Hospital, and obtained the diploma of M.R.C.S. in 1854. After this he entered at Caius College,and in 1858 graduated in the mathematical tripos, obtaining the thirtieth place among the senior optimes.
In the following year Dr. Liveing took the degree of M.B., and passed the newly instituted examination for the membership of the Royal College of Physicians of London.
In 1870 he graduated M.D.Cambridge, and in 1874 was elected a Fellow of the College. He was, besides, a Fellow of King's College, for a time assistant physician to King's College Hospital, and examiner in medicine at Cambridge in 1870-71.
In 1886 Dr. Liveing was appointed Assistant Registrar of the College of Physicians, and, on the resignation of Sir Henry Pitman in 1889, Registrar. This important post he held for twenty years, and throughout the whole time he conducted the work of his department with ability and invariable, courtesy, which earned him the respect of all with whom he came in contact. On his retirement from the post in 1909 the honorary distinction of Emeritus Registrar was conferred upon him.
Dr Liveing's only publication was On Megrim: a Contribution. to the Study of Nerve Storms, a book which was much esteemed in its day. His younger brother, Dr. Robert Liveing, died a few weeks ago, well over 80, and his eldest brother, Professor G. D. Liveing of Cambridge, still survives, having attained the age of 92, a remarkable record of longevity in a family.
Ref: The British Medical Journal, 12 April 1919.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, St Clement Ipswich SFK. Edward is described as aged 9 born Suffolk, in the house of Richard Mosley aged 39 a clergyman and his wife, 2 infants, and 4 other boys including his brother George, they were probably being schooled?

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Edward is described as head of house married aged 29 MB Uni Camb MRCP. Practising as a physician born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Edward is described as head of house married aged 39 practicing doctor born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Edwardis described as head of the family married aged 49, MD Camb MRCP Lon Physician, born Nayland SFK.

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Marylebone LON. Edward is described as head of house aged 69 physician surgeon born Nayland SFK

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Edward is recorded as head of a house of 15 rooms married aged 79 a doctor of medicine physician retired born Nayland SFK. There were 3 servants in the house, a cook, a housemaid and a parlour maid.

Edward married Frances Jane (Tassie) TORLESSE [145], daughter of Lieut Henry Boden TORLESSE R N [1622] and Frances HAWTHORNE [1623], on 29 Aug 1854 in Stoke By Nayland SFK. Frances was born in Nov 1831 in Tasmania Aust., died on 3 Aug 1885 in 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX at age 53, and was buried on 7 Aug 1885 in Stoke By Nayland SFK.

General Notes:
Tassie returned to England aged 12 after her parents deaths accompanied by her father's friend Sir John Franklin, then Govenor of Tasmania, who was later lost seeking the Northwest Passage. She travelled with the family from Hobart to Melbourne on the 'Flying Fish' 9 Dec 1843, then on to London on the 'Rajah" in Jan 1844. Tassie shared a governess with Franklin's daughter Eleanor, some seven years her senior. This must have been a very difficult time for a young orphaned woman, Lady Franklin was said to be not an easy person to be around.

A piece of Sir John Franklin's waistcoat given as a piece of "stuffy" to F J Torlesse (Mrs E Liveing) in 1844, on voyage from Tasmania to England on board the barque "Rajah" Capt Ferguson.
Ref: Red Book, picture on file. Refer also letter to C M Torlesse [1633]

Liveing Archive: Image IMG 4126
Letter shows Hobart & India stamps, notated
"Via. Bombay & Marsailles" stamped Colchester May 7 1844, addressed:
Rev C M Torlesse
Stoke by Nayland
Suffolk Colchester.
December 12th 1843
My dear Sir
In my former letters you were made acquainted with every thing which I had done in respect to the passage of Miss Torlesse. My present object is to enclose a Copy of a Bill which I have paid by a draft on my Agent for the amount. I have forwarded a Bill to Mr Hinxman which I have taken the liberty to draw on you (L45.4.0) in order to meet the bill I have drawn on him. It
Page
has been drawn at 60 days in the hope that it will suit more with your convenience.
I remain my dear sir
Very faithfully
Wm Moriarty
12th 1843

Liveing Archive: Image Letter 15 a & b
My dear Edward
We expect Pater home the end of this week but you know his movements are uncertain - we have no visitors and Mrs C is just now away - we have no engagements this week but the school fait (sic) on Friday we have a poney (sic) that will go. If you come you will be very welcome
Page 2.
I would meet you anywhere on Tuesday - at any time you mention - the Fenns know you are at Copford, & told me of it -
Yours affectly
Fanny Torlesse
Stoke. Sunday

Married
23rd ult., at Stoke by Nayland, by the Rev H. T Liveing, Vicar of Bedfont, Middlesex, Edward Liveing Esq of Caius-coll., Cambridge, to Frances Jane, only child of the late Henry Boden Torlesse R.N.
Ref: Ipswich Journal September 9, 1853.

Liveing Archive: Image Letter 29 a & b
7 Clifton Villas
Dec 27th (c1869)
My dearest Elizabeth
I thought you would like a line to hear how your father is I have just come to see him, & am glad to find him decidedly better he is in good spirits & does not feel ill at all his voice is very much affected but that seems all, so I hope in a few days he will be all right again.
Page 2.
I hope dear you are better yourself we had quite a merry party on Christmas Day Robert and Adelaide dined with us and the children had their little tree. Now dear I must say goodbye with my love to John and yourself from your
Ever affectionate cousin
F.J. Liveing
Uncle desires his love to you
Taken to be a letter from Tassie to Elizabeth Ambrose nee Liveing

1881 Census Tassie was living in London with Edward aged 49. She had two servants living in the house on the night of the 3 April 1881 Eliza Rider a domestic cook aged 28 of Lt Chesterford Essex and Ellen Cracknell a domestic housemaid aged 20 of Bishops Stortford Hereford.

In a affectionate memory of Francis Jane, beloved wife of Edward Liveing M. D. of 52, Queen Anne Street, Cavendish Square, and only daughter of the late Lieutenant Henry Boden Torlesse R.N. who departed this life August 3rd, 1885. Aged 53.
Funeral at Stoke Friday, August 7th at 2:30
Ref: Red Book. Memorial card.

Frances died after a long illness
Bygone Days Pg 46

Deaths.
Liveing - 3rd., inst., at 52, Queen Anne Street, Cavendish Square, Francis Jane, the beloved wife of Edward Liveing, M. D., and only daughter of the late Lieutenant Henry Boden Torlesse R. N., aged 53.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 18 August 1885.

Death entry Sep quarter 1885 aged 53 Marylebone 1a 372 BDM
Picture pg 134 Bygone Days.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Francis is recorded as a visitor (of Thomas & Maria Fenn) unmarried aged 19 a fundholder born Tasmania Australia

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Francis is recorded as a wife aged 29 a fundholder born Tasmania

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Francis is described as a wife aged 39 born Colony of Tasmania

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Francis was described as a wife aged 49 born in Tasmania Australia

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1282 M    i. Prof. Edward Henry Torlesse LIVEING ARSM MIME [445] was born on 30 Jun 1855 in Nayland SFK, was baptised on 29 Jul 1855 in Nayland SFK, died on 14 Dec 1950 in Longstanton CAM at age 95, and was buried in Stoke By Nayland SFK.

+ 1283 F    ii. Frances LIVEING [451] was born on 5 Feb 1857 in Cambridge CAM., was baptised on 5 Apr 1857 in St Andrew Cambridge CAM, and died on 3 Feb 1903 at age 45.

+ 1284 F    iii. Margaret "Meg" LIVEING [453] was born on 21 Dec 1858 in Highbury Middlesex.

+ 1285 M    iv. Rev Henry George Downing LIVEING [447] was born on 10 Mar 1861 in Queen Anne St London, was baptised on 5 Jun 1861 in St Mary, St Marylebone Rd London, and died on 17 Apr 1947 in Burgh Heath SRY at age 86.

+ 1286 M    v. William Robert Francis LIVEING [449] was born on 9 Feb 1866 in Queen Anne St London, was baptised on 22 Mar 1866 in St Mary St Marylebone Rd St Marylebone, London., died on 11 Dec 1944 at age 78, and was buried in Radlett HRT.


Edward next married Harriet Susan BROWN [146], daughter of Rev James Wilson Davy BROWN [1593] and Anna Maria BRIDGES [1714], on 15 Aug 1893 in Rectory Church Marylebone London MDX. Harriet was born in 1867 in Hinton Martell DOR and died on 21 May 1950 at age 83.

General Notes:
Marriages.
Liveing - Brown 15th August, at the Rectory Church, St Marylebone, by the father of the bride, Edward Liveing, M. D., of 52 Queen Anne St, London, to Harriet Susan, oldest daughter of the Rev J. Wilson D. Brown, Vicar of Assington, Suffolk.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 19th August 1893.

Harriet was aged 26 at her marriage. Marriage Entry Sept quarter 1893 Marylebone 1a 1153 BDM

Harriet Susan Liveing born 1868, aged 71, sailed in 1939 from Southampton to Lisbon, on the Dempo bound for India. Her address is recorded as 22 Queen Alexanders Mansions WC
Ref: findmypast 2011

Liveing Mrs H S 2 Park Plc gdns W2 Paddington 4697
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1926/27/28

Liveing Mrs H S 22 Qn Alexander mans Judd st WC1 Terminus 6922
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1935/36/37/38/39/41

A Mrs Harriet Liveing aged 71 sailed from Kobe Japan to Southampton ENG arriving 26 Apr 1939 ships name Potsdam. England address 22 Queen Alexander Mansions Tuddstr. LON WC1
Ancestry

Death Notice : Liveing - On May 21 1950, peacefully, Harriet Susan ; widow of Dr Edward Liveing, aged 83. Funeral at Stoke by Nayland tomorrow (Friday) at 2 p.m.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Vicarage Assington Suffolk. Harriet is recorded as a daughter aged 13 a scholar born Hinton Martell DOR

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, The Vicarage Assington Suffolk. Harriet S is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 23 born Hinton Martel DOR

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Harriet is described as a wife aged 33 born Hinton Martell Dorset.

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Harriet is recorded as a wife aged 43 married 17 yrs no children born Hindon Martel DOR

1066. Dr Robert LIVEING M.D. [101] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 30 Mar 1834, was baptised on 1 May 1834 in Nayland SFK, and died on 22 Feb 1919 at age 84.

General Notes:
Robert was a Fellow of Kings College London. M D Christs College Cambridge. Fellow Royal College Physicians, ref pg 204 vol 4 Munks Roll of the R C P.

Julius Archive: Image Letter 33.
Christ College
Cambridge
March 21st
Dear Ned
I am rather in the dumps myself (several things bothering me) so that I am not in a condition either to advise or console just now but I shall see you on Saturday or Sunday when we can have a good talk. Don't worry yourself more than you can help, seeing that it does no good; you can but do your best & leave the rest to fortune.
I want you to bring down a box of long leds (sic) for my pencil. Also a tenon saw and pair of pincers (not pliers) from Buck's as I often want them up here and cannot get any that I can depend upon, (that is if you can). Your affect brother
R Liveing.
PS we can dodge some thing between us
Ned is Edward Liveing born 1832

Liveing Archive: Image Letter 34.
Christ College
June 1st.
Dear Ned
I have not done at all well in the examination, but I do not know where I stand yet, I am afraid that I shall not get a scholarship.
Will you write to me & tell me how you are, and whether you will be able to receive me on Saturday next. And also were you thinking of going
to --
Calverly has got a University prize for Latin verses.
I remain ever your very affect brother
Robert Liv e ing

Cambridge.
At a Congregation to day the following degrees were conferred:
M. D. Robert Liveing, of Christ's College.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 15th October 1864

Robert was a dermatologist.

Marriage Ref Sep quarter 1866 Catherington 2c 223 BDM

The Middlesex Hospital
Medical College.
The Medical Officers and Lecturers request me on of your attendance at the opening of the Classes on Friday, October 1.
The Introductory Address will be delivered by Dr Robert Liveing, at 3 o'clock p.m., after which the prices of war ordered at the end of the last Winter and Summer Sessions will be distributed.
Ref: Red Book.

London Saturday October 2.
Yesterday the introductory lectures at the opening of the session 1869-70 were delivered at several of the medical schools in the metropolis. . . . . . At Middlesex Hospital, Dr Robert Liveing. . . . . .
Ref: extracted from The Daily News 2 October 1869.

New Works.
Notes on the Treatment of Skin Diseases.
By Robert Liveing M. D., Demonstrator on Diseases of the Skin, and Senior Assistant Physician, Middlesex Hospital. Second Edition, with additions. 18mo 2s 6p.
Ref: The Examiner 11 November 1871.

New Work by Dr Robert Liveing.
Now ready, in crown 8vo. cloth, price 4s 6p.,
ELEPHANTIASIS GRAECORUM, or true leprosy; being the Goulstonian Lectures for 1873, revised and enlarged. By Robert Liveing, M. A. and M. D.Cantab., FRCP Lond., Physician to the Middlesex Hospital.
London: Longmans and Co., Paternoster Row.
Ref: Pall Mall Gazette 10 July 1873.

Liveing Robert. 11 Manchester Sq W.
Business Directory of London 1884

1886 Robert is registered as a shareholder in the Gt Western Railway

Royal Botanic Society of London.
The 49th annual general meeting of the society was held yesterday . . . . .
Of eight members of council retiring, six were re-elected the new members being Dr Robert Liveing, and Professor Sir Joseph Lister, Bart., F.R.S.
Ref: extracted from The Daily News 11 August 1888.

THE TIMES
Thursday November 22 1888 pg. 3 col. f
INNOCULATION OF LEPROSY.
To The Editor of The Times.
"Sir - Archdeacon Wright's letter is likely to cause needless harm. That leprosy is inoculable I do not doubt. He says however "leprosy can be conveyed by inoculation - a fact that in itself goes goes far to prove that the malady is contagious" I hope Archdeacon Wright will excuse me for saying that it does not go far to prove anything of the kind. Cowpox and syphilia are highly inoculable diseases, but not in the least contagious. There is at present no evidence to show that leprosy is contagious in the ordinary sense of the word".
I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
Robert Liveing M.D.
November 19th.

The Doctors and Sir Morell McKenzie.
Hubbub in the "British Medical"
Robert is reported as a signatory, along with a long list of Knight's and worthies, of a memorial to the President and Council of the British Medical Association.
They were voicing an objection to the publication in the British Medical Journal of confidential treatment information concerning the Emperor Frederick, a patient of Sir Morell McKenzie.
Ref: extracted from the Pall Mall Gazette 24 November 1888.

LIVEING, Robert (1834-1919)
Details: LIVEING, Robert, AM and MD Cantab; Consulting Physician to the Skin Department, Middlesex Hospital; born Nayland, Suffolk, 30 March 1834; son of Edward Liveing, MRCS; married Adelaide (died 1906), daughter of Adm. Edward Hawker; one son one daughter.
Education: Christ's Coll., Cambridge (Scholar). Math. Hons 1856.
Work: Fellow of King's Coll. London; formerly Lecturer on Anatomy and Physician to Middlesex Hospital; Gulstonian Lecturer, 1873; Vice-President Alpine Club, 1869 and 1870.
Publications: Handbook on Diseases of the Skin; Notes on the Treatment of Skin Diseases; Lectures on Leprosy.
Recreations: travelling, gardening.
Address: 11 Manchester Square, London W.
Clubs: Alpine.
Died: 22 February 1919
Ref: Know UK CD - Colin Fenn

The Will of Robert Liveing of 11 Manchester Sq MDX M.D. who died 22 Feb 1919 was proved to Charles Hawker Liveing Lt Col RA, Katherine Edith Napier (wife of Archibald Scott Napier) and Mabel Weston Liveing
(wife of Charles Hawker Liveing) at
L54,669 14s 10d

Alumni Cantabrigiensis puts his death at 21 Feb 1919.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Bures St Nayland SFK. Robert is described as aged 7 born SFK

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 14 The Green Camberwell Dulwich SRY. Robert is recorded as a nephew (Head of house Harriet Fenn) aged 17 unmarried no occupation born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Thorington St Stoke by Nayland SFK. Robert is described as a son unmarried aged 27 M A Cantab born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 11 Manchester Sq, St Marylebone LND. Robert was described as married aged 38 head of house Physician MD born Nayland SFK also in the house were servants:
Elizabeth Furber aged 49
Kate Dean aged 21
Elizabeth Dyer aged 18

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 11 Manchester Sq, St Marylebone LND. Robert was described as head of the family aged 47 Physician born Nayland SFK
Also living in the house:
A.M.D. Liveing wife aged 49, born Paris (B Sub.) France.
H.A. Liveing daughter aged 11 born London MDX, scholar.
Charles H Liveing son aged 9 born London MDX, scholar.
Sarah Mitchell married aged 65 cook.
Elizabeth Howe single aged 28 parlor maid.
Marie L Giovinni single aged 26 born Switzerland parlor maid.
Sarah Mapp single aged 23 housemaid.

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Marylebone LON. Robert was described as head of house aged 67 born Nayland SFK

Robert married Adelaide Mary HAWKER [1554], daughter of Admiral Edward HAWKER R N [1555] and Johanna Naomi POORE [14738], on 15 Aug 1866 in Blendworth Horndean HAM. Adelaide was born on 3 Jan 1832 in Paris BS France. and died on 17 Jan 1906 in St Marylebone LON at age 74.

General Notes:
Marriages.
Liveing - Hawker -on the 15th inst., at Blendworth Church, Horndean,Hants, by the Rev William Henry Hawker, brother of the bride, Robert Liveing Esq., M. D., to Adelaide Mary Dorothea, youngest daughter of the late Admiral Hawker, of Ashford Lodge, Petersfield, Hants.
Ref: Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle. 22 August 1866.

BDM Death 1906 Jan qtr, Adelaide M D Liveing aged 74 Marylebone 1a 355

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 11 Manchester Sq, St Marylebone LND. Adelaide was described as a wife aged 39 born in Paris (B Sub)

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 11 Manchester Sq, St Marylebone LND. Adelaide is resident at 11 Manchester Sq and described as a wife born abt 1832 in Paris (B Sub) France.

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Marylebone LON. Adelaide is described as a wife aged 69 born France, she is wrongly named Dorothea A L Liveing

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1287 F    i. Katherine Edith LIVEING [1558] was born on 22 Sep 1867 in Marylebone London MDX and was baptised on 25 Oct 1867 in St Mary Branston SQ Westminster MDX.

+ 1288 F    ii. Helen Adelaide LIVEING [1560] was born on 7 Mar 1870 in London., was baptised on 13 Apr 1870 in St Thomas, St Marylebone, and died on 19 May 1893 in Marylebone London MDX at age 23.

+ 1289 M    iii. Lieut Col R.A. Charles Hawker LIVEING C.M.G. D.S.O. [1556] was born on 1 Apr 1872, was baptised on 13 Jun 1872 in St Paul Cambridge, and died on 20 Mar 1934 at age 61.

+ 1290 M    iv. Robert Arthur Harrold LIVEING [1557] was born on 4 Jan 1876 in Marylebone London MDX and died on 3 Jun 1879 in Marylebone London MDX at age 3.


1067. Harriet LIVEING [107] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 9 Jun 1836, was baptised on 16 Jul 1836 in Nayland SFK, and died on 14 Jul 1903 at age 67.

General Notes:
Liveing Archive: Image Letter 12 a & b
Denmark Hill
May 19th (c1852)
My dear Edward
I was so sorry that there was no one here when you came last Sunday: Aunt wished me to write to you & ask you if you could not come next Sunday, as I do not think of going home till next week. She said she should be very glad to see you on Saturday night to sleep, if you could do so, but I suppose that would be impossible - I left New Cross on Friday last. The Macnamara's were very kind in taking
Page 2.
me about. Aunt found Mrs Torlesse's and Fanny's card here, when she returned from Copford & Aunt Fenn told us that they had been in London.
Believe me ever you're very affectionte sister
Harriet Liveing

Liveing Archive: Images 3624 - 3627
Lomer Tce
Torquay
Feb 14th
My dear Uncle
I gave your message to Mrs Majendie the first opportunity I had, and I received the enclosed from her last night. You will see by her note that the seals has, will you please return them to me as well as Dr Middleton's mottoe. The autograph is for you to keep. Mrs Majendie has done the best she could for you. She said she did not know whether she could get a colored (sic ) drawing of the Bishop's Arms. I suppose she does not know where to get his Crest. Mr Ward is Mrs Majendie's brother. They both seem to have a very pleasant remembrance
Page
of Tansor.
Dr Fripp's Organ built by Mr Walker is a beauty I do not now understand how it is softened, though Dr Fripp tried to explain it to me - It is not entirely enclosed in the Swell. The Pedal types are so very pleasant not too much for the room though very effective. The 2d row of keys act on the Swell which seems
Page
curious. The Dulciana is so pretty I have never heard any Organ playing I think so nice has Dr Fripp's. He has a Grand Pianoforte which his Daughters play with the Organ. I heard them all play the Overture to "Athalie" & it was very nice not at all disagreeably loud, though the Organ is quite a large Organ for a house. I was sorry to hear that Mr Cannington had been behaving so badly. I hope he will not continue to do so. We have cold East wind today Nelly's cough has been troublesome this week, but this is the first day she has not been out.
With best love from us all to you and Mary
I remain your very affectionate niece dear Uncle
Harriet Liveing
Note on letter "Aunt Harriett to Uncle Henry prob 1864"

MacDonald - Liveing : 5th inst., at Loughill Church co Limerick, Ireland by the Rev R J Gabbett M.A. Vicar of Shanagolden, the Rev William Archibald MacDonald, B.A., ex-Scholar Trinity College Dublin, to Harriet, daughter of the late Edward Liveing Esq., Surgeon, Nayland, Suffolk.
Ref: Freemans Journal 9 September 1875
Ref: Ipswich Journal 11 September 1875.

Research Notes:
Birth date variations 5 Jun, 10 Jul, 1836
Red Book

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Bures St Nayland SFK. Harriet is described as aged 15 born SFK

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Thorington Cottage Stoke by Nayland SFK. Harriet is described as aged 14 a scholar at home born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Thorington St Stoke by Nayland SFK. Harriet is described as a daughter unmarried aged 24 born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Sussex Villas Cambridge CAM. Harriet was described as a daughter unmarried aged 34 born Nayland SFK

Harriet married William Archibald MACDONALD M.A. [988], son of Archibald MACDONALD [14802] and Anne KENNAN [14803], on 5 Sep 1875 in Loughill Church Co Limerick Ireland. William was born in 1841 in Enniskerry co Wicklow IRL and died on 6 Oct 1911 in Chalfont St Peter BKM at age 70.

General Notes:
Of Trinity College Dublin. Sometime in Holy Orders and Chaplain to Lord Monteagle afterwards M.P. (Old Irish Party) for Queens County.

Research Notes:
William's antecedents were found on a Kennan Tree - Ancestry 2012 they are completely unproven.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1291 F    i. Lucy MACDONALD [7058] was born in 1876 and died in 1879 at age 3.

+ 1292 M    ii. Major Arthur Kennan MACDONALD MA Cantab. [7059] was born on 7 Feb 1878.


1068. Charlotte LIVEING [108] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 4 Nov 1838, was baptised on 5 Dec 1838 in Nayland SFK, died on 16 Nov 1896 in Pightle Newnham CAM at age 58, and was buried in Cambridge CAM.

General Notes:
Liveing Archive: Images 3649 - 3651
E Liveing Esq M.D.
52 Queen Anne Street
Cavendish Square
London
Chobham Lodge
Dec 12 /88
My dear Edw'
I did not write yesterday as there seemed nothing to say, but increasing weakness, & that is just what it is - we have had another very quiet night, but she no longer attempts to speak, only opens her eyes & holds our hands when we change attendance on her, & still knows what we say I think - Dr Hope calls every day, but as he says, does not desire to disturb her in any way, yesterday he just went up into the room & looked at her.
Your loving sister
C Liveing
On the approaching death of Mary K Liveing

Liveing Archive: Images 3670 - 3672
E Liveing Esq M.D.
52 Queen Anne Street
Cavendish Square
London
Chobham Lodge
Dec 12 /88
My dear Edw'
Soon after I had posted to you this morning Dr Hope came and went upstairs & told me he did not think his patient had 24 hours to live, but before 4pm the end came, so very quietly I had only just time to ring for the maids, in fact she only ceased to live & it was a most peaceable end to life here - so now I am writing notes to all - she never directed me nor anyone else that I am aware of, as to where she
Page
wished to rest, so I always concluded here, but if you think otherwise, you will perhaps wire me to that effect - I shall send for the evening letters now every day - no new graves are allowed around the church, the additional burying ground is not far from the Vicarage I think - you & George will doubtless arrange what day would suit you best for the funeral. I am asking him in my note to communicate direct with you - I have just looked in the dear old Bible for her birth, in case you might want the date for a notice in the Times - it was 9th of July 1822. Her will is in William Beaumont's safe keeping.
Your ever very affectionate sister
C Liveing.
Note on the letter: For the Times - Death on the 12th inst at Chobham, Surrey, Mary Kate eldest daughter of the late Edward Liveing, of Nayland, Suffolk, aged 66.
Inserted in Times December 14, 1888 but Chobham misprinted Cobham & therefore reinserted in Times of 15th correctly.

Death Ref Dec Qtr 1896 aged 58 Cambridge 3b 304a BDM

The Will of Charlotte Liveing of 52 Queen Anne St Cavendish Sq MDX spinster who died 16 Nov 1896 at Pightle Newnham CAM was proved London to Rev Henry George Downing Liveing Clerk and William Francis Robert Liveing Solicitor at L7169 6s 11d. Resworn March 1897 at L7963 1s 9d

Charlotte did not marry.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Bures St Nayland SFK. Charlotte is described as aged 2 born SFK

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Thorington Cottage Stoke by Nayland SFK. Charlotte is described as a daughter aged 12 a scholar at home born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 12 Hills Rd Cambridge CAM. Charlotte is described as a sister ( in her brother George's home)unmarried aged 22 born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 1 Sussex Villas Cambridge CAM. Charlotte was described as a daughter unmarried aged 32 born Nayland SFK

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 52 Queen Ann St Cavendish Sq Marylebone MDX. Charlotte was described as a sister unmarried aged 42 no occupation born Nayland SFK

1069. Thomas LIVEING [102] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Mar 1841, was baptised on 8 Mar 1841 in Nayland SFK, and was buried on 1 Apr 1841 in Nayland Churchyard SFK.

General Notes:
Thomas died aged 3 weeks and is buried in the family grave under the East Window of Nayland Church.
Death entry Jun Quarter 1841 Sudbury 12 311 or 317 ?



1070. Ellen LIVEING [109] (Catherine Mary DOWNING883, Mary ALSTON736, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Jun 1842, was baptised on 28 Jul 1842 in Nayland SFK, and died on 30 Jan 1864 in Torquay at age 21. The cause of her death was of consumption.

General Notes:
Birth entry Ellen Liveing Sep quarter 1842? Sudbury 12 409 BDM.

Liveing Archive: Image Letter 32 a & b
52 Queen Anne St.
June 1st 1863.
(Note added here - from Ellen Liveing to Eliz Ambrose) - (nee Liveing)
Dear Lisbeth I have determined to begin a letter to you at any rate this evening for I have been meaning to write some time. I wish you were in London now I am sure you would enjoy it so - it is so full this season I think it is quite exciting to walk even in the quiet streets about here, and many streets in the afternoon are thronged with carriages - Chatty is at Tansor and will be there for about 10 days longer I think.
Page 2
Fanny and the two youngest children are at Cambridge Edie & Francie at Mrs Bridge s 's. Edward Mary & Harriet went to Exeter Hall last Friday evening to hear Haydn's Creation they had had (sic) some tickets given them for it, they enjoyed it much. There seems to be a fine set of singers for the Opera at her (sic) "Her Majesty's" this season. I can't help longing a little to go though I know I cant, however I hope Mary & Chatty will be able to go one evening before the season is over.
Page 3
Thursday - I have left this letter all these days hoping I should be able to go over to Clifton Villas in my chair (that I go in the park in) or that some of us would be able to walk over but it has been so hot, & they have somehow had a good deal to do, so it could not be accomplished; however Aunt & Harriet happened to meet at Kensington yesterday, & walked part of the way home together, & H thought Aunt seemed pretty well, she had been to Mrs Hitchcock's - The last time I saw her, about ten days ago, I thought she looked well but seemed very nervous.
Page 4
Chat & I hope to send you our photos, soon, but we have had rather a trouble about them, at least I have about mine; we went to the same place as Mary, but they have not proved as successful as hers - have you a book or not ?. I do not mean to have one, but to get a nice little scrap-book that will do for other photos; from pictures etc, as well as cartes, I am so tired of those albums. - How is Terpin this hot weather? We have had a few lines from Bob once from Paris, he sent us his address which is in the Rue L'Universite - I do not remember any thing more to tell you so
Goodbye from your affect
E Liveing

Deaths.
Liveing. 30th ult., at Torquay, of consumption in her 22nd year, Ellen, youngest daughter of the late Edward Liveing, Esq., surgeon of Nayland.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 6 February 1864

Ellen Liveing of Stoke by Nayland SFK spinster died 30 Jan 1864 in Torquay DEV Administration of her estate was granted to Catherine Mary Liveing Widow of 52 Queen Anne St MDX mother of deceased and only next of kin. Proved 9 Sep 1864 under L600
PCC Calender of Wills.

Research Notes:
Alternative date of birth 18 Jun 1842
Red Book

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Thorington Cottage Stoke by Nayland SFK. Ellen is described as a daughter aged 8 a scholar at home born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Thorington St Stoke by Nayland SFK. Ellen is described as a daughter aged 18 born Nayland SFK

1071. Commander Alfred Henry ALSTON R N [71] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 7 Oct 1829 in Hadleigh, SFK, was baptised on 8 Oct 1829 in Hadleigh, SFK, and died on 22 Jan 1874 in Sandgate Cheriton Folkstone KEN at age 44. The cause of his death was softening of the brain over one month.

General Notes:
Alfred had a distinguished career in the Navy retiring to take an active role in the Penal system and rehabilitation of offenders.

Her Majesty's ship North Star, Beechey Island.
7 September 1852.
This article is a report to the Admiralty, by Captain Pullen of the North Star concerning the search for Captain Sir John Franklin lost in an ill-fated north-west passage expedition in 1845.
Alfred is recorded as the mate on North Star.
Ipswich Journal 27 November 1852.
Initially a depot ship at Beechey island, in the Canadian Arctic, North Star took the crews off the other vessels home when they all became trapped in the ice

This document is refered to by the Rev George Alston in his correspondance with his Solicitor Frederick Hand [2041] in his dispute with the Trustees his half brother Samuel Alston and the Fenn brothers.
Power of Attorney to Receive a Share of Stock and to Sign Release to Trustees.
Dated 1 May 1857
To all to whom these presents shall come Alfred Henry Alston a Lieutenant of her Majesty's Ship Sybille now in China Sends Greeting. Whereas by an indenture bearing date the 26th day of April 1850 made between Anne Alston of Nayland in the County of Suffolk widow of the one part and Samuel Alston of Nayland aforesaid Attorney Thomas Harrold Fenn also of Nayland surgeon and Robert Liveing Fenn of the National Debt Office in London of the other part. After reciting that the said Anne Alston being desirous of providing for her son-in-law the Rev George Alston Clerk and his four children namely Alfred Edward Waldon and William after his decease had transferred into the joint names of the said Samuel Alston Thomas Harrold Fenn and Robert Liveing Fenn the sum of 3801 pounds 13 shillings and 6 pence stock three pounds per cent per annum Consolidated annuities upon the trusts thereinafter declared. It is witnefsed that in pursuance thereof it was hereby declared that the said Samuel Alston Thomas Harrold Fenn and Robert Liveing Fenn and the survivors and survivor of them and his executors and administrators should stand pofsefsed of the said stock. In trust for the said Anne Alston during her life and after her decease upon trust to pay the dividends thereof to the said George Alston during his life and after his decease upon trust to pay one fourth part of the said stock on trust monies to each of the four sons of the said George Alston when and as they should respectfully attain the age of 24 years with benefit of survivorship and whereas the said Waldon one of the said four sons of the said George Alston departed this life in the year 1853 in the lifetime of the said Anne Alston an infant under the age of 21 years and whereas the said Anne Alston departed this life in the month of February 1856 and whereas the said Alfred Henry Alston Edward Graham Alston and William Evelyn Alston in the said indenture called Alfred Edward and William Alston respectively have all attained their respective ages of 21 years and whereas the said trustees have in pursuance of the Act of Parliament passed in the 16th and 17th years of her present Majesty entitled "An Act for granting to her Majesty Duties on Succession to property and for altering certain provisions of the Acts charging duties on Legacies and Shares of personal Estate paid to the Commissioners the Succession Duty payable upon the said sum of 3801 pounds 13 shillings and sixpence three pounds percent Consolidated bank annuity and on the dividends accrued thereon since the decease of the said Anne Alston amounting to the sum of 364 pounds and for that purpose have sold out a portion of such stock amounting to the sum of 336 pounds nine shillings and four pence whereby the said sum of 3801 pounds 13 shillings and sixpence stock have been reduced to the sum of 3465 pounds four shillings and two pence which is the sum now standing in the names of the said trustees and whereas the said George Alston Alfred Henry Alston Edward Graham Alston and William Evelyn Alston have agreed among themselves at once to divide the capital sum of 3465 pounds four shillings and 10 pence so standing in the names of the said trustees as aforesaid in the manner of following namely one moiety thereof to be paid or transferred to the said George Alston and the remaining moiety thereof to be divided into three equal parts and one of such three equal parts to be paid or transferred to each of the of the said Alfred Henry Alston Edward Graham Alston and William Evelyn Alston as he the said Alfred Henry Alston doth hereby admit and acknowledge and they have accordingly requested the said trustees to make such division as aforesaid and the said trustees have agreed so to do upon having a Release executed by each of them respectively Now Know Ye that as well for settling and adjusting all accounts now depending between the said parties relative to the execution of the trusts of the said Indenture as for receiving to the use of the said Alfred Henry Alston the balance which upon the final settlement shall appear to be due to the said Alfred Henry Alston as his agreed Share of the said sum of 3465 pounds four shillings and two pence three pounds percent Consolidated stock and also for releasing and discharging the said trustees He the said Alfred Henry Alston had made ordained constituted and appointed and by these presents Doth make ordain constitute and appoint and in his place and stead put the Rev George Alston of Studland in the county of Dorset Clerk his true and lawful Attorney for him and in his name and to his use to settle and adjust with the said Trustees all and every Accounts and account of all monies by them paid and disbursed in manner aforsaid and in and about the execution of the trusts of the said Indenture And also for him and in his name to ask demand recover and receive of and from the said Trustees all such balance as upon such settlement of the said Accounts shall appear to be justly due and owing or belonging to the said Alfred Henry Alston as his agreed share of the said stock or trust money and according to the proportions hereinbefore mentioned or for him and in his name and to his use to accept a transfer of such balance or capital sum in the proper book or books kept for that purpose at the Bank of England and on receipt of such balance or acceptance of such transfer for him the said Alfred Henry Alston or in his the said George Alston's own name as Attorney for the said Alfred Henry Alston receipts or other proper and good discharges releases and acquittancess in the law to the said Trustees to make seal and execute and give when tended to him for that purpose so as that the said Trustees may be as effectively and finally released and discharged of from and against all future claims or demands by or through the said Alfred Henry Alston or any person or persons claiming or to claim by from under or on account of all his said equal one third part or share and interest of and in the said capital sum of 3801 pounds 13 shillings and sixpence so transferred by the said Anne Alston in trust as aforesaid to which he would have become entitled under the hereinbefore recited Indenture upon the decease of the said George Alston as if the said Alfred Henry Alston were at the same time present and executed the same And Generally for him and in his name to do or cause to be done all other lawful acts deeds matters and things which shall or may be requisite to be down in and about the premises and hereby ratifying allowing and confirming whatsoever his Attorney shall lawfully do all cause to be down in and about the premises by virtue of these presents.
In witness whereof the said Alfred Henry Alston hath hereunto set his hand and seal this First day of May 1857
A H Alston
Sealed signed and delivered by the above named Alfred Henry Alston in the presence of:
E. H. Stewart Lieutenant of H.M.S. "Pique" serving in Macau Fort Canton River
A. V. Mouton(?) 1st Lieut Royal Marines

THE LONDON CANAILLE
To the Editor of The Times.
Sir: In The Times of yesterday I read that the successful raid of the London "roughs" in the train of the City Militia, has been followed by a series of brutal assaults on men and women. You tell us also that attacks on the person becoming more and more common, and that there is but one way of dealing with the perpetrators of such outrages - to flog them always. Most cordially do I concur in this, and heartily do I trust that the remedy may be invariably and vigorously applied, as there can be no question as to its efficiency with the man we have to deal with in their condition of the rampant, savage brutedom.
But, when we have applied our deterrent and have diminished the frequency of these outrages, what becomes of the ruffian himself? Do we change his nature in any way? Do we make a useful creature of him? Not probably. We do drive the wild animal to seek " fresh fields and pastures new" where he tries his hand at other feats of brutality or lawlessness, and in due time crops up again, a candidate for penal servitude or hanging; having in the meantime, no doubt, according to the course of nature, begotten children to recruit the Devil's ranks, and duly swell that calendars of crime.
A step beyond flogging is therefore necessary, if we would shun the awful responsibility of leaving to the next generation and unmanageable legacy of hopeless, but now preventable, crime. We must catch up the young, we must save the homeless and destitute children who will throng to you if you will but hold up your finger in any focus of London traffic. In behalf of them the State will not interfere until they are rigidly qualified by crime for a reformatory; and on private philanthropy, now as ever, falls the burden as well as the privilege of seeking and saving the lost.; and perhaps it is best for us all that it is so. A paternal Government waits till the child has become a criminal, and then sits to work to reform, whip, or hang him. But Government perhaps, has as much as it can well do on its hands already, and so gladly leave leaves to the Christianity, humanity, and surplus energy of Englishmen the great work of saving from utter ruin 10,000 English lads in London alone.
These children are very much what we choose to make them. Save them, train them, and they will become a source of strength and a blessing to the country. Leave them alone, and they must become a curse to it. In proof of this societies training ship Chichester at Greenhithe, is the most striking demonstration. She has only been six months in operation and has now on board 100 of as active, well behaved, and docile lads as could anywhere be seen together, and who, but a few months ago, were turning
"Catharine wheels" cadging for a livelihood, graduating for a life of crime and misery.
Straightened for want of funds, 100 can only be received on board, while the 9900 on the streets are being silently absorbed into the "canaille of London, the nonhuman or half human class" recently described by Carlyle as being more " extensive and miscellaneous, more dismal and disgusting, then even we seem to think of"
Fearing to trespass further on your space,
I am, Sir, yours faithfully,
A H Alston - June 25.
The Times 27 Jun 1867 pg 10 col D

THE CHICHESTER
To The Editor of The Times.
Sir: Permit me to correct a mistake in the letter of "JM" appealing in The Times of today for help to purchase a small craft, of 20 tonnes or so, as a sailing tender to this ship. For "Chichester moored at Erith" read " Greenhithe"
a proof of how much more valuable and thoroughly trained our lads would be if we could but give them some knocking about under sail before sending them away to sea, is supplied by a letter which I have just received from two boys who sailed a fortnight ago in a 1000 ton ship, an extract from which may interest our numerous supporters among your readers. It says: "I think the ship's husband will give you a good account of us, for I heard our second mate tell him we were the best young fellows on board, and I can assure you we intend to remain such"
Ten months ago the boys who write that letter were "Arabs" on the London streets, without home or parents; and, in corroboration of your correspondence appeal, though they now only get 1L a month as ship's boys, they would, had they been able to take the helm, have received 2L a month with the rating of "ordinary seaman" in the ship they now are sailing in; a still further step than that which they have already achieved in the upward march of an honourable career.
I am, Sir, yours faithfully,
A H Alston Commander R.N.
Training ship Chichester, Greenhithe, September 10.
The Times 11 Sep 1867 pg 4 col D

DRUNKENESS AND CRIME
To The Editor of The Times
Sir, I beg to afford for publication if you think fit a noteworthy communication from Mr A. H. Alston, Governor of the County Prison in Usk Monmouthshire.
Yours faithfully
Thos Hughes. Esq M.P.
The Time's 19 Jul 1873 pg 6 col F

County Prison, Usk, Monmouthshire.
July 11, 1873
Sir, My occupation leads me to look into the causes of crime and I find:-
1 That with the exception of the merest fraction of it, crime is the product and monopoly of the working classes.
2 That, while the drink is the direct cause of upwards of one half of it, a still greater proportion (running into the drink half) is due to the contaminating influence of beer shop companions acting and reacting upon one another. Men of course, must and will have some social enjoyment after work hours; but in this populous country, thronged with iron and coal workers, I can hear are of no place where a workingmen can enjoy himself like a Christian.
I went to Newport last week and saw the foreman of a large work with reference to getting up a workmen's club. He said the men would never take to it. For that opinion I was prepared; but I have a faint surmise that workingmen's clubs have been established somewhere on the principle of gentlemen's clubs, and, I should hope, with bowling alleys and some facilities for outdoor amusements in addition; but I know not where it to learn about them.
I propose drawing up some facts and statistics, if I can get them, to circulate among the Newport workmen, and to endeavour to get them to meet me and discuss the proposal of starting one. Thinking that Mr Kingsley might be able to tell if and where such clubs were in existence, I wrote to ask him, but he replies that he knows little, but tells me to write to you, and say that he wished me to do so: and this is my apology for troubling you by asking if you can oblige me by putting me in the way of obtaining the experience of others in the formation, and working of workingmen's clubs.
Pray do not be at the trouble of responding otherwise than briefly and allow me to remain.
Sir, your very own obedient servant
A H Alston Governor.

N MEMORIAM
The Late Captain Alfred Henry Alston R.N.
The late Commander Alfred Henry Alston R.N. was during his life well known in the Navy as an earnest Christian man, and, at the same time, as one of the bravest of the brave. And this from his earliest entry into the service that he loved so well, when he dared the sneers of his companions by kneeling at his chest morning and evening at private devotion, and again he showed the spirit that ruled him by holding Bible classes in his cabin for the lads on board, when he became a Lieutenant.
Indeed, all the time that he was in the Navy, he was known as one who in all, and through all, trusted in God, and his sense of duty was almost his chief characteristic, as to serve his God and his Queen truly and well, and at all cost, was his chief ambition.
Many years ago, one of his messmates, now a distinguished officer, said, - "We were always ready to follow Alston anywhere," such was their esteem for him and their confidence in him.
In 1852 the late Commander Alston RN volunteered and was accepted for the Arctic Expedition in search of Sir John Franklin.
He saw much service in China and performed there an act of as great bravery and readiness for self-sacrifice as could be well performed, was instrumental in the capture of the celebrated Commissioner Yeh.
It was in 1852 at the taking of Canton. The Naval Brigade had fought its way to the Chinese General's house, which was surrounded by high walls with massive gates. Men were despatched for ladders, and beams to use as battering rams.
Every moment was valuable for Yeh was known to be inside the building and delay might allow him to escape.
Captain Alston, then a midshipman, saw that if he could squeeze himself through the opening under the great gate he might open the gate to the attacking force. The fort was commanded by Tartan troops. He felt that he might be killed even before he could rise from the ground; but he did not hesitate. He crawled with difficulty, under the gate,and opened it, the troops had fled the moment before.
He rushed after the flying Chinese and overtook two Mandarins. One tapping himself on the chest, said "Me Yeh! Me Yeh!" Captain Alston seized him, making a snatch at the other, but only succeeding in securing the feather from his cap, but he was immediately captured by the Captain of the Brigade, who rushed in first through the open gate.
The feather thus taken from Yeh's cap was some years after presented to the Queen by Captain Alston's widow, and accepted by Her Majesty; and surely few relics among the Royal treasures can bear witness of a more calmly heroic deed than that here related.
From 1852 until 1864 he was almost constantly in active service, and from his well-known character was selected as Naval Instructor to Prince Alfred when His Royal Highness was aboard the "St.George". Always anxious to live out his life in the best way he could for the benefit of his fellow creatures, his attention was drawn to the question of the training and reformation of outcast lads, and with the permission of the Admiralty, he took command of the training ships "Chichester" and "Cumberland" respectively. He devoted himself with a most ernest spirit to this work and was much blessed in its results.
As an instance of his readiness for self-devotion. One winter's day a heavy gale was blowing, and a swift tide was running down the Thames. A boy fell overboard. The Captain plunged at once from the poop, and swam his hardest after the boy, who was being swept away by the fierce tide. He reached him, grasped at him, but at that moment the boy sank and was lost, and the Captain himself sinking each moment lower in the water from the weight of his winter clothing was only saved at the last moment. When it was suggested that application should be made to the Humane Society for a medal in token of his gallant action, he answered, "certainly not! If a boy falls over board every day, I shall go after him; I shall not receive a medal for simply doing my duty."
Captain Alston then he became interested in the question of the reclamation of criminals, and how far the time of a criminal's imprisonment might be made a time of reformation of character.
He obtained the Governorship of the Monmouthshire County Prison at Usk, and there devoted himself all too earnestly to his hopeful but most trying work. He made it a principle to seek that no prisoner who came under his charge should leave without being the better for his personal influence. At this work he laboured incessantly and beyond his strength, and was within about a year, seized with paralysis of the brain, from which he shortly died, leaving a widow and five children, a sixth being born three months after his death.
Captain Alston was the author of a very valuable manual of instruction in practical seamanship for young officers,and he also wrote a book entitled "Ready, O, Ready," giving much of his life's experience, and written with the aim especially of encouraging young men in a manly Christian life. One extract from the book will give much of the spirit and tone in which it was written: - "You, young fellows who have vowed on your knees to serve God as his leal and loyal knights, who seek to be admitted into the glorious chivalry who in heaven follow Him upon white horses, clothed in fine linen, white and clean; and who have received the Holy Ghost; may you feel more and more of the awfulness of that! For the love of Christ may you keep you honour stainless, and be utterly, everlastingly faithful and true to Him. Remember too that the righteous are bold as a lion for this is not a common characteristic nowadays."
Ref: This unsourced obituary is reproduced in Alstoniana Pg.292 It origionally took the form of a two page leaflet.

Unsourced note in the Fenn family photo album; "Alfred H Alston was Mate 1852 - 54 of H.M.S. North Star (Commanded by Lieut Pullen) he was awarded the Artic Medal (which he wears in his portrait, the second medal of the two) Five ships under Sir Edward Belcher sailed in the last government Franklin Search Expedition. North Star the depot ship stayed at Beechey Island. The other four were abandoned in the ice, the crews returned to the North Star


Research Notes:
Alston (Alfred Henry). Mate R.N. Letter to J. Barrow 1852. Add. 35307 <DESC0010.ASP?CollectionID=27&NStart=35307&CollectionName=Add&strHead=Add. 35307 > f. 164
Ref British Library 2007

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, St Peters Tce Stepney Tower Hamlets LON. Alfred is recorded as a son single aged 21 a Midshipman R N born Hadleigh SFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Navy census list. Alfred is recorded as a Lieut RN unmarried aged 21 on board HMS St George

3. Death Certificate: 22 Jan 1874, Sandgate Cheriton Folkstone KEN. Alfred is recorded as a Commander R.N. retired, aged 44 - certificate on file

Alfred married Jessie Rosalie GILMORE [1515], daughter of Capt John GILMORE R N [1517] and Unknown, on 23 Feb 1865 in Ramsgate KEN. Jessie was born about 1837 in Middlesex and died on 17 Dec 1923 in Eastbourne SSX aged about 86.

Research Notes:
Death Ref: ALSTON Jessie R 89 Eastbourne 2b 105

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 30 Auckland Hill Norwood LND. Jessie is recorded as head of house a widow of a Captain R.N. aged 45 born Camberwell SRY

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Southbrook Rd Lee LON. Jessie is recorded as a head of house a widow aged 54 living on means born Middlesex.

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 5 Limes Rd Folkestone KEN. Jessie is recorded as head of house a widow aged 65 living on own means and Naval Pension born Camberwell SRY

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Arklow House Eastbourne SSX. Jessie is recorded as head of a 9 roomed house a widow aged 75 she had 6 children 5 still alive living on private means born Camberwell LON

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1293 M    i. Hugh-Durrant ALSTON [1518] was born on 2 Dec 1865 in Porthpean Cornwall., was baptised on 10 Feb 1866 in St. Austell, Cornwell, and died on 21 Aug 1931 in San Francisco California USA at age 65.

+ 1294 M    ii. Ashton ALSTON [1519] was born on 8 Mar 1867 in Greenhithe, KEN, was baptised on 20 May 1867 in Holy Trinity Ramsgate, and died on 21 May 1962 in Fort William Ontario CAN at age 95.

+ 1295 M    iii. Commander Alfred Gilmore ALSTON R N [1520] was born on 10 Oct 1868 in Greenhithe, KEN, was baptised on 9 Feb 1869 in St Mary Stone KEN, and died 4th Qtr 1954 in Eastbourne SSX at age 85.

+ 1296 M    iv. George Hamilton Galbraith ALSTON [1521] was born on 22 Apr 1871 in Rowin, Dumbarton, SCT and died in Jul 1887 at age 16.

+ 1297 M    v. John Oxenden ALSTON [1522] was born on 16 Apr 1874 in Charlton KEN and died 4th Qtr 1964 in Walsham District NFK at age 90.

+ 1298 F    vi. Adelaide ALSTON [1523] was born in 1873 in Usk Monmouthshire WLS, was baptised on 5 Jun 1873 in Usk Monmouthshire WLS, and died Dec Qtr 1967 in Eastbourne SSX at age 94.


1072. George Fortescue ALSTON [4613] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 1 Jan 1831 in Layham, SFK and died before 26 Apr 1850.

General Notes:
George is mentioned by Lionel Cresswell as being "born at Hadleigh,(Suffolk) died in infancy" but I can find no other reference to him.
The IGI has him Christened in Layham, Suffolk - possibly he is buried in either Hadleigh or Layham - Susan Perrett searched the registers of Hadleigh and Layham confirming his baptism date, however he was baptised George Fortescue, not Arteswell which has crept into the record for some reason. She found no burial for George, in Clontarf Ireland, he is not mentioned in the 1841/51/61/71 Census. A search at The National Archives has been carried out.





1073. Hon Edward Graham ALSTON [72] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 6 Sep 1832 in Cambridge CAM., was baptised on 27 Oct 1832 in St Botolph Cambridge CAM, and died on 12 Nov 1872 in Sierra Leone, West Africa at age 40. The cause of his death was blackwater fever.

General Notes:
Edward graduated M. A. Trinity Cambridge, practised as a barrister, settled in British Columbia, Attorney General 1871, then Queens Advocate Sierra Leone.

The following is taken from the Cambridge University Alumni 1261-1900
Alston, Edward Graham.
College: Trinity
Entered: Michs. 1851.
Born: Sept 6 1832.
Died: Nov. 12 1872.
Adm. pens. (age 19) at Trinity, June 21 1851. 2nd s. of George, Clerk. B. Sept. 6 1832.
Adm at Lincoln's Inn, Jan 27 1854.
Called to the Bar, 1857.
Went to Vancouver.
Registrar-General of Vancouver Island, 1861.
Attorney-General of British Columbia, 1871-2.
Queen's Advocate, Sierra Leone, 1871-2
A member of the Legislative Council and of the Executive Council keenly interested in development of the Settlement. While Attorney-General, he was one of a party of explorers into the centre of Vancouver Island.
Mount Alston was named after him.
Twice married and had issue.
Died Nov. 12 1872, of African fever.
M.I. at Studland, Dorset.
(St. Pauls Sch. Reg.; Stemmata Alstoniana).

Lincolns Inn Admissions 1800-1892 Vol 2
1854 27 Jan Folio 31
Edward Graham Alston of Trinity College Camb., (21), 2 s Rev George Alston, Rector Studland Dorset.

Edward Graham Alston
Hornden
July 12 (c1853)
My dear Grandmother,
Not having heard from me for some time I thought perhaps you would like to know something of our doings as we are such an erratic people. We have got now into a small cottage a short way from the village but in a most beautiful situation in the Langdon Hills. I am at home now for the long vocation having just passed the examination at Trinity and though I only obtained a second class yet you will see that I have not been idle as there are eight classes altogether. Willie will be here soon for his mid-summer holidays having just been removed into the top class at St Paul's. I have no particular news about Waldon as he has not written for some time. Have you heard from him lately? I suppose Nayland has not been disturbed much by the elections (4 Nov 1852). Lord J Manners I see is returned for Colchester although there was a strong party against him owing to his alleged religious views. Liveing and his brother were talking of going to Berlin this summer, when I left Cambridge. Have they gone? Robert has entered at Christ's, and will shine there I should think. We have had most lovely weather lately and almost all the hay is got in.
Hoping you are all quite well and with our United love.
Believe me
My dear Grandmother
Yrs affectionately
Edward G Alston

Application to practice in Vancouver Island 1867
Mr. Alston; power of Mr. Needham's court,
December 7, 1867.
Ref: earch.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/sn-48C7FDD/view/TextualRecords/find%2BAlston%2B%2B%2B%2B/8

Handbook to Vancouver Island and British Columbia: with map 18491 Alston, E. Graham (Edward Graham), 1832-1872
http://www.archive.org/stream/cihm_18491#page/n9/mode/2up

Edward Graham Alston
1832 - 1872
Colonial politician, barrister, civil servant, and school administrator.
Edward Graham Alston was born on 6 September 1832 at Cambridge, England, second son of the Reverend George Alston and Anne Charlotte Oxenden. He was educated at St. Paul's School, London, and at Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A., 1855). He trained as a barrister and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1857.
Alston was admitted to the bar of Vancouver Island on 15 June 1859, just a month after he arrived in the colony via the Isthmus of Panama. He was a member of the Legislative Council of Vancouver Island in 1861 and 1862 and held various executive posts, including Registrar of Deeds for Vancouver Island (1861-1866).
Following the union of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, Alston served as Commissioner of Savings Banks, Registrar of Joint Stock Companies, and Registrar General for the Colony of British Columbia. He was British Columbia's Attorney-General from May to August 1871, at a time when the colony was preparing to enter Confederation with Canada.
He served in the local militia during the time of the Fenian scare in 1866, and in 1868 joined an exploring party which crossed Vancouver Island from Nootka Sound to the east coast. Mt. Alston, at the head of the Nimpkish River on Vancouver Island, commemorates his journey.
A member of the Church of England, Alston was active in parish affairs in Victoria and New Westminster. He helped to establish a freemason's lodge in Victoria and served on the executive of the Mechanic's Literary Institute in that city. His own literary work was descriptive and included a detailed article entitled "Historical and political summary for ten years - 1858-1868," published in Report of the Columbia Mission, 1868 (London 1869). Alston's essay was reprinted as A hand-book to British Columbia and Vancouver Island (London: 1870).
Alston was a member of the General Board of Education (. . . . . /. . . . . /Schools/Public/vibed.htm) of Vancouver Island from 1865 to 1869. On 6 May 1870 he was appointed Inspector-General of Schools for the Colony of British Columbia, a position created by the Common Schools Ordnance Amendment (. . . . . /Statutes/1870amnd.htm) of April 1870. Alston's duties were to inspect and report on the "management, character, efficiency and general condition" of the public or common schools in the Colony. He was also responsible for approving the qualifications of teachers and for ensuring that they conducted their classes in accordance with the Rules and Regulations for the Management and Government of Common Schools. First published in the Government Gazette on 28 May 1870, the Rules and Regulations <. . . . . /Statutes/rules70.htm> set down hours of instruction, vacation periods, teachers' duties and prescribed text-books.
The Rules and Regulations of 1870 reaffirmed the non-sectarian character of colonial schools [as established in the Common School Act, 1865 (. . . . . /Statutes/csa65.htm)] by stating that "no person shall require any pupil to read or study in, or from, any religious book, or to join in any exercise of devotion or religion objected to by his parents or guardians." The instructions laid down by Alston continued to form the basis of the Rules and Regulations of the Public Schools of British Columbia long after Confederation. Although Alston was an efficient school administrator, and while he favoured a relatively democratic educational system, he had little sympathy with populists such as Amor de Cosmos (Amord.htm) who championed responsible government and Confederation with Canada. Alston opposed both initiatives. In August 1871, shortly after British Columbia concluded terms of union with Canada, he quit Victoria to become Queen's Advocate in the colony of Sierra Leone, in West Africa. There he served as a member of the Legislative and Executive Councils and for several months was acting governor. But his career was cut short. Alston died in Freetown, Sierra Leone of "African fever" on 12 November 1872. He was forty-one years of age.
Alston was predeceased by his wife Elizabeth Caroline Abbott (http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/cgi-bin/text2html/.visual/img_txt/dir_144/g_08001.txt?G-08001). The two had known each other in England and she had travelled to Victoria to wed Alston on 2 September 1861. She died in Victoria in 1865, after giving birth to their second child. Alston married a second time in 1868 to Anna Maria Tuzo (http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/cgi-bin/text2html/.visual/img_txt/dir_153/i_46685.txt?I-46685), the sister of a medical doctor in Victoria and by whom he had three children.
Alston was a friend of many prominent citizens in Victoria, including Peter O'Reilly. Point Ellice House, O'Reilly's home on the Gorge waterway, was the centre of the city's socially polite, but politically conservative, faction. Alston was a frequent visitor. His name is commemorated by Alston Street, situated near the western approach to the Point Ellice Bridge, across the water from historic Point Ellice House (http://www.tbc.gov.bc.ca/culture/schoolnet/victoriana/) in Victoria.
Images British Columbia Archives HP-00474 HP-004746 (http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/cgi-bin/text2html/.visual/img_txt/dir_144/g_08002.txt?G-08002)
References: Dorothy Blakey Smith, "Edward Graham Alston," Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. 10; British Columbia Archives, "Vertical Files."

Last night's Gazette contains the appointment of . . . . . Mr E. G. Alston to the office of Queens Advocate in Sierra Leone. . . . John Bull 7 October 1871.

57, Bedford Gardens,
Campden Hill, W.,
March 10th 1898.
Dear Sir,
. . . . . . . . It might also interest you to know that my father Ed. Graham Alston while Attorney General of Vancouver Island British Columbia was one of a party of explorers of the centre of the Island and one of the mountainsm still bears his name " Mount Alston."
Yours faithfully,
(Miss) CHARLOTTE M. ALSTON.
Alstoniana Pg 375.

African Fever.
The mail that has just arrived from Sierra Leone brings the intelligence of the death of Mr E. G. Alston, the Queens Advocate, after a week's illness. The preceding mail announced the death of M. Rene Buhot, the French Consul, after an equally short attack of fever. Mr Alston was called to the bar in Lincoln Inn in 1857. He served as Attorney General in British Columbia, and he was appointed to Sierra Leone in 1871 at a salary of L1000 a year - since increased to L1200. The acting governor in chief has temporarily appointed a black barrister, Mr Lewis to the vacant office. . . . .
The Times 7 December 1872.

The following "IN MEMORIAM" appeared in "THE NEGRO", Freetown, Sierra Leone, November 20th 1872.
"It becomes our painful duty to announce the death of EDWARD GRAHAM ALSTON, Esq., Queen's Advocate of this Colony. He died at the residence of Acting Chief Justice Huggins on the morning of the 12th inst. at four o'clock. The intelligence of his death spread rapidly through the community, and was received by all classes with the deepest sensibility. EDWARD GRAHAM ALSTON was born in the month of August 1832. He was educated at St. Paul's School and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took the degree of B.A. in 1855. He then went to London, and was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1857. He was appointed Registrar-General of Vancouver's Island in 1861; Registrar-General of British Columbia in 1870; and Attorney-General in 1871. He arrived at Sierra Leone as Queen's Advocate in November 1871 and was a member of both the Legislative and Executive Councils. He administered the Government of Sierra Leone for three months, during the absence of the Administrator-in-Chief. During the twelve months he lived in Sierra Leone his abilities and high character gave him a foremost place in the staff of officials. His kindly heart and generous disposition endeared him in no ordinary degree to those who knew him well. He gave to every object which he considered worthy, but without ostentation and preferred that his contributions should be known only to their recipients. He was ever ready with his time, and purse in assisting especially Bishop Cheetham and the Clergy of his own Church, by whom his loss will be severely felt. He took a deep interest in the improvement of the people of these Settlements; and he had in view many plans for the material advancement of the Colony, for the opening of roads and fostering of commerce among the aborigines which he recognised as important missionaries in the work of civilization. It is generally understood that he was an active supporter of the present Govenor's measures for the repeal of the Road Tax, House and Land Tax and Market Dues. To us the death of Mr. Alston is a personal affliction".
From the first he took a great interest in the "NEGRO" newspaper, and in the various questions which have, from time to time, been discussed in these columns, and was doing all in his power to make it an influential organ of public opinion, as well as a remunerative enterprise to its promotors, whose patriotism and public spirit in starting the paper he eulogised in the highest terms. A few days before his illness we had made arrangements for a tour of observation on the Bullom shore, but the Great Architect of human affairs had higher and nobler work for him to do. The private and personal character of the deceased were stainless. He was a regular attendant and communicant at the Cathedral. In both public and private life he was a bright example to all classes. He died of African fever after an illness of eight days. He was attended by Drs. Smith, Waters and McKellar, who exhausted every means within their reach to avert a fatal result. The whole of the last night he was watched by Governor Hennessy, Judge Huggins and Dr. McKellar, in whose presence he breathed his last, calmly and peacefully. The Rev. J.H.Lamb officiated at the funeral. His Excellency the Governor was the Chief Mourner. "--------cui Pudor, et Justitiae soro, Incorrupta Fides, nudaque Veritas Quando ullum inveniet parem?" (Hor.Car.I.24)
Alstoniana Pg 293

Cost of a Colony
To the Editor of the Times
Sir, I have just read with melancholy interest the Leading Article in The Times on Saturday on the late mortality at Sierra Leone.
My brother, the late Queen's Advocate, after holding a somewhat similar appointment for some years at Vancouver's Island, entered upon the duties of his new office a little more than a year ago. It is not for me to write his eulogy; his pure spirit and noble character won for him the esteem of all who knew him.
A widow and five children are left to mourn his early death. For the eldest of these I am endeavouring to obtain a nomination to the Blue Coat or some similar school.
Will any kindhearted Governor help me?
I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant,
W. E. Alston.
Shorncliffe December 15.
18 December 1872. Pg 6. Col F
An article following the above, cites a mortality rate of 20% amongst the European population in Sierra Leone, at this time, and considers the issues around appointing coloured officials.

Memorial in Studland church inscribed "In the beloved memory of Edward Graham Alston B.A. of Trinity College Cambridge and of Lincolns Inn. Barrister-at-Law, Queens Advocate for the colony of Sierre Leone, where after little more than 12 months assidious attention to the duties of his office, he died from the fatal effects of the climate on the 12th day of Nov 1872 in the 41st year of his age. His sorrowing father the Rector of this Parish has placed this tablet".

The Will of Edward Graham Alston Esq. Barrister late of Victoria Vancover Is. Canada was proved 4 April 1873 by Anna Maria Alston widow and relict of Norwich City at under L300.

Research Notes:
Images: http://search.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/sn-225101F/query/VisualRecords/find%2BAlston%2B%2B%2B%2B



Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, St Peters Tce Stepney Tower Hamlets LON. Edward is recorded as a son single aged 18 a scholar born Cambridge CAM

Edward married Elizabeth Caroline ABBOTT [1524], daughter of Edward ABBOTT OF WRETHAM NORFOLK. [1525] and Unknown, about 1860. Elizabeth died in 1865.

General Notes:
The Edward Graham Alston home, Broome Cottage, Victoria was on the site of what became Pentrelew on Fort Street in 1875.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1299 M    i. Rev Alfred Edward ALSTON [1526] was born on 25 Jun 1862 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, was baptised on 27 Jul 1862 in Christ Church Cathedral Victoria BC, died in 1927 in Framingham Earl NFK at age 65, and was buried in Framingham Earl NFK.

+ 1300 F    ii. Constance Jane (Connie) ALSTON [1527] was born on 18 Jan 1865 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada and was baptised on 9 Apr 1865 in Christ Church Cathedral Victoria BC.

Edward next married Anna Maria TUZO [1528], daughter of Henry TUZO [1529] and Anna M [9701], about 1868. Anna was born in 1837 in Quebec CAN and died on 25 Jul 1919 in Barnes SRY at age 82.

General Notes:
The Royal British Columbia Museum have an image of Anna.
Ref: British Columbia Archives
Visual Records Catalogue Email: access@www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca
Call No: I-46685. Catalogue Number: HP024297. Subject: Family Groups
Mr. Alson with the second Mrs. Edward Graham Alston, nee Anna Maria Trizo.
Date: 1870. Accession Number: 193501-001

The Will of Anna Maria Alston of Cnr House, Lowther Rd, Barnes, SRY Widow who died 27 Jul 1919, was proved 23 Apr 1920 by Alfred Edward Alston Clerk and Charlotte Maria Alston Spinster for
L874 6s 1d

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 6 Adelina Tce Tottenham MDX. Anna is recorded as Head of house a widow aged 46 born Canada

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, St Paul Deptford LON. Anna is recorded as Head of house widow aged 56 own means born Quebec Canada

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Stephen Sq. Paddington. Anna is recorded as Head of house widowed aged 66 living on own means born Quebec Canada

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1301 F    i. Charlotte Maria (Lottie) ALSTON [1532] was born on 6 Jan 1868 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, was baptised on 9 Feb 1868 in Christ Church Cathedral Victoria BC, and died Mar Qtr 1940 in Barnes at age 72.

+ 1302 M    ii. Fr Henry George "Father Cyprian" ALSTON [1530] was born in 1869 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

+ 1303 M    iii. Canon William Tuzo ALSTON [1531] was born on 31 Jul 1871 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, was baptised on 19 Aug 1871 in Christ Church Cathedral Victoria BC, and died 1st Qtr 1953 in Hackney LON at age 81.


1074. Walden ALSTON [4622] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 18 Feb 1834 in Saffron Walden ESS, was baptised on 15 Apr 1834 in Saffron Walden ESS, died on 14 Dec 1853 in Studland DOR at age 19, and was buried on 19 Dec 1853 in Studland Graveyard, DOR.

General Notes:
Waldin appears to have been named after the village his family were resident in when he was born and baptised? The entry in the Saffron Walden register appears clearly as Waldin Alston, the i with a clear dot, the parish with an e. Accordingly this researcher will use the i although it had reverted to an e at his death.
Waldin died a minor aged 19, and is buried in an altar tomb beside his fathers grave on the uphill side (west) of the church under an ancient yew . The stone lid is inscribed:
"To the memory of Walden Alston third surviving son of the Rev George Alston B.A. Rector of this Parish. Who departed this life on the 14th Dec 1853 in the 19th year of his age".
Cresswell in Alstoniana implys by dates that Waldin may have been a twin to William but this is unsubstantiated.

On inquiry to the Anglican Church in Clontarf, Dublin, there is no record of Waldin being baptised there, although his brother William was. The records were searched for the years 1834-35.
No. 322 page 41 Burials. Dorset Record Office. Studland Parish.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Ever Green Cottage Lepton Kirk Heaton Yorkshire. Walden is recorded as aged 7 not born in Yorkshire

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bletchingley SRY. Walden is recorded as the articled pupil of Edward Boulger Surgeon and Physician, he is unmarried aged 17 a student of medicine and surgery born Saffron Walden ESS HO107/1600

1075. Surgeon Major William Evelyn ALSTON [75] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 29 Oct 1835 in Clontarf, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland, was baptised on 21 Apr 1836 in Clontarf, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland, died on 19 Oct 1896 in East Cliff House, Sandgate, Kent at age 60, and was buried in Oct 1896 in New Cemetery Sandgate.

General Notes:
Births.
29th ult., at Clontarf, near Dublin, the lady of George Alston, Esq., of a son.
Ipswich Journal 7 Nov. 1835

William was educated at St. Paul's School, situated near St. Paul's Cathedral, then studied medicine at Edinburgh University.

After taking his degree he was appointed Demonstrator in Anatomy at King's College, London. On 11th October 1859, he joined the old "Army Medical Department" which preceded the Royal Army Medical Corps, as a Staff Assistant Surgeon. On 23rd November 1860, he transferred to the 70th (Surrey) Regiment of Foot and was appointed Staff Surgeon on 9th January 1863.
On 29th November 1864, he transferred to the Royal Artillery and was subsequently appointed Surgeon Major on 12th February 1875. His services abroad were:- June 1860 - March 1861 - East India March 1861 - March 1868 - New Zealand, 70th Foot; March 1868 - October 1868 - Sydney, Australia. In New Zealand he served under Lt.Gen. Sir Duncan Cameron K.C.B. and Sir Trevor Chute during the Maori wars which continued intermittently during the period 1861-1871.
During these arduous campaigns Surgeon Major Alston won the esteem of the men and officers with whom he came in contact, by his close attention to the sick and wounded, and by his kindness to them in the hospital marquees. In 1867 he was married to Elizabeth Rouse Fitzgerald, the service being conducted by the Rev. E. Hayden.
On 19th October 1868, by which time their eldest son had been born, they sailed from Sydney on the "Rifleman", a sailing man-o-war of 600tons, and at Gibraltar they changed ships and embarked with the troops on the merchant ship "London" arriving in England on 25th January 1869. Captain E.T.W.Purcell RA was in command of the troops and Surgeon Major Alston RA was in medical charge.
He was then stationed at Shorncliffe Camp, as the Principal Medical Officer, and purchased East Cliffe House, Sandgate, which remained his permanent home until his death. His next appointment was at Wigston Barracks, near Leicester, where he remained until retiring on half pay on 23rd October 1879. When retired he interested himself in local affairs in Sandgate, where he promoted the Gough Soldiers' Home.
In 1887 he was elected a Town Councilor at Folkstone, and was appointed Magistrate for the County of Kent. He died on St. Luke's Day, 18th October 1896.
The above article was given to Mrs Perrett by Peter Culverwell.

As William married Elizabeth in 1867 he must have met her while on a 'leave' to Australia from New Zealand, and one presumes she went back to NZ with him, at least until February 1868 when William Evelyn (junior) was born in Sydney.

Mary Burn tells a story of William and Elizabeth on a voyage to Britain when a mutiny broke out amongst the crew, Elizabeth was the only woman aboard.

Medical Officer 355.345 092 page 426 is an entry number 5908 which says - William Evelyn Alston. A.S. Staff, 11 Oct 1859: 70 F. 23 Nov. 1860: Staff, 9 Jan 1863: R.A. 29 Nov. 1864. A.M.D., S., 11 Oct 1859. S.M. 12 Feb,. 1875. ret. on h.p. 23 Oct 1879. b: at Clontarf Ireland, 29 Oct 1835. M.D. d: at Sandgate, Folkestone, 19 Oct 1896.
The Genealogist Commissioned Officers. SOGNZ

PRO Ref. WO 25/394 2 - William got his Degree of M.D. at University of Edinburgh on August 1st 1858 and he got his Diploma for Surgery from the Royal College of Surgeons of London on May 3rd 1858.

It also states his Place of Residence as Studland Rectory, Wareham, Dorset. He was the Resident Physician Accoucheur for three months at the Kings College Hospital.

PRO Ref: WO 76/62 - Quarterly Pay List for the 70th Regiment of Foot, "Colonel" Lt. General G.W. Paty

PRO Ref; WO 12/7830 - Quarterly Pay list for the 70th Regiment of Foot, "Colonel" Lt. General Paty, for the period 22 February to 14 May 1861, "on passage from India to New Zealand", mentions him as an Assistant Surgeon, starting with the Regiment on 6th March 1861 to 14th May for 70 days at the rate of 10/- shillings a day he received L35 and paid 2/1 shillings Income Duty. He Embarked at Calcutta on 4th March and disembarked at Auckland, New Zealand on 14th May (72 days) and "he was sent from the Regiment" on the 5th August 1861.
The 70th Foot were based at Bairds Farm & Camp Otahuhu Auckland.

Cost of a Colony
To the Editor of the Times
18 December 1872. Pg 6. col F
Sir, I have just read with melancholy interest the Leading Article in The Times on Saturday on the late mortality at Sierra Leone.
My brother, the late Queen's Advocate, after holding a somewhat similar appointment for some years at Vancouver's Island, entered upon the duties of his new office a little more than a year ago. It is not for me to write his eulogy; his pure spirit and noble character won for him the esteem of all who knew him.
A widow and five children are left to mourn his early death. For the eldest of these I am endeavouring to obtain a nomination to the Blue Coat or some similar school.
Will any kindhearted Governor help me?
I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant,
W. E. Alston.
Shorncliffe December 15.

The Soldier's Homes.
To the Editor of the Times
Sir, Will Col Walker kindly inform me within what limits of private judgement one may be permitted to retain the title to be considered a loyal Church-man?
He charges the " old homes" with being "permeated with the private religious views of the founders" and says, "the influence they exercise is not such as can be accepted by loyal Churchmen".
This is not true of the oldest of these homes, the one founded by the late Miss Papillon 30 years ago, the committee and trustees of which communicants of the Church of England. I have a right, Sir, I think, in face of these charges, to ask our self constituted ecclesiastical Court what in its, or his, opinion were the views of our founder, a lady who spent large sums of money in rebuilding the church of this place, which are deemed unacceptable, and in what respect the teaching that is given at the home is such as cannot be accepted by loyal Churchmen.
I have the honour to be yours obediently,
W. E. Alston M. D., Surgeon Major.
Hon. Treasurer Miss Papillon Soldiers Home,
Chapel Street, Sandgate.
The Times 4 April 1890 pg10 col E.

Death Notice : Surg. Maj. W E Alston M.D., died at his residence, East Cliff House Sandgate, on Monday, in his 61st year. The eldest surviving son of the Rev G Alston of Nayland Suffolk, he was born in 1835, entered the Army Medical Service in 1859, and retired in 1879 with the Rank of Surgeon-Major.

An obituary notice in the local paper said: "Dr Alston was much attached to Sandgate. . . . . to within a few days of his death, he devoted himself to good works. Chief among these may be noted his solicitude for the highest moral and spiritual welfare of the soldier. . . . . He worked earnestly and faithfully in widening the influence of the late Miss Lucy Papillon's Soldiers' Institute ( a cousin of his; the first Soldiers' Institute of its kind in the country). Less than a month ago, although undoubtedly conscious of declining health, Dr. Alston gave an earnest address to the young soldiers who gather here on Sunday evenings. He was most attentive to the poor. It was his delight to assist them. He would supplement acts of charity with kindly advice, and also give those who desired it, the benefit of his medical skill and knowledge. He was a ripe scholar and it is said his Greek and Latin were without suspicion. A man of independent thought and holding strong views, he often crossed swords with those who held extreme views in the Church of England. The late doctor did not take things for granted, however great the human authority, but would always search for the why, the wherefore, and the inner meaning of things.

There is a poem written by J.R.A. - who was an aunt of Arthur Fawssett Alston and who is thought to be, Jessie Rosalie Alston, wife of Alfred Henry Alston (1829-1874), who was a brother of William Evelyn, which goes like this:-
Soldier and Physician, man of Christian might, Strongest most in weakness, firm advocate of right, Preacher of righteousness in thy life and word, Gentle, loving, true, imbued with Gospel light, Thy labour's done - rest thou in the Lord Thy death to us is loss, to thee tis gain. O kindly soul, man of the healing art Battling with ardour man's moral ills and pain, Blending there withal the medicine of Heaven, Using to the full the talent God had given, Prayer often on thy lips, love ever in thy heart, Endeared to high and low, but chiefly to the poor, Rest, thy work is done - thy warfare o'er. Oh! fit moment for thy toil to cease, The day when Luke, the blest evangelist, The much loved physician, entered into peace. Childlike of heart! for thee we cannot weep, For thou art now with Christ, and blessed is thy sleep.

W.E.Alston - 1835-1896.
THIS IS THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT of me WILLIAM EVELYN ALSTON of East Cliffs House Sandgate in the County of Kent Esquire Doctor of Medicine Surgeon Major (Retired) and a Justice of the Peace for the County of Kent I bequeath the following specific legacies namely my gold watch and silver match box to my son William Evelyn Alston my silver watch and Buffalo horn goblet to my son Arthur Fawssett Alston my gun and captain Blake's pin to my son Robert Graham Fitzgerald Alston my silver inkstand to my daughter Lila Elizabeth Alston my coral shirt studs and buttons and pin to my son Ernest Alfred Brooke Alston my horse shoe links to my daughter Dora Glades Oxenden Alston a silver spoon and fork to my old servant Sarah Joy I also bequeath the sum of Three hundred pounds to the said Sarah Jov in recognition of her long and faithful services to myself and my family I direct that all legacy duty payable in respect of the specific and pecuniary legacies hereinbefore bequeathed shall be paid out of my residuary personal estate And that the pecuniary legacy shall be paid within one calendar moth from my decease And subject to the hereinbefore mentioned bequests I devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate and effects unto my dear wife ELIZABETH ROUSE ALSTON for her own absolute use and benefit And I APPOINT HER SOLE EXECUTRIX of this my Will
IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto set my hand to this my Will this Fifth day of February One Thousand Eight hundred and Ninety six
Signed by the said William Evelyn Alston as and for his last Will and testament in the presence of us present and at the same time who at his request William Evelyn Alston and his sight and presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as attesting witnesses Alfred H.Gardner - Solicitor - Folkstone Arthur Cox - his clerk.
On the 18th day of January 1897 Probate of this Will was granted at Canterbury to Elizabeth Rouse Alston Widow the sole Executrix

The Will of William Evelyn Alston MD Esq of East Cliff Hse Sandgate Kent Surgeon Major retired who died 19 Oct 1896 was Proved 18 January 1897 by Elizabeth Rouse Alston for L965/10/11.

Research Notes:
William's Company the 70th (The Surrey) Regiment of Foot were involved in the following actions in NZ.
Reference - Tom Gibson's history "The Maori Wars", Reed Wellington NZ.
In June (1861) the 70th arrived (in NZ). Pg 93.
A Company under Major Ryan was despatched to the Otago disturbances among the European goldminers. Pg 94
Three Companies of 70th left in the winter of 1862 to complete the Queens Redoubt at Pokeno (Sth Auckland). Pg 97
Engaged in support in the taking of Tataraimaka Pa (Sth of New Plymouth) 4 June 1863. Pg 99
Engaged against superior numbers in the defense of a redoubt at Poutoko (Sth of New Plymouth). Pg 100
In action against Waikato Maori at Kiheroa on the Waikato river near Meremere17 July 1863. Pg 105
Involved in construction of blockhouses between Thames and Waikato Rivers. Mid Nov 1863. Pg 108
In action in Waikato 21 Feb 1864, dug in at Rangirowhia (South of Cambridge) and supported by two guns the 70th dashed forward and carried the position with only 3 wounded, the action was praised in despatches. Pgs 113-115
In action 1 April 1864 at siege of Orakau Pa (Sth of Cambridge) a hard fought and heroic action on both sides which was decisive in breaking Waikato Maori resistance Pg 113-115
In action at Gate Pa (Tauranga) 29 April 1864 where a large force (1700 troops) were repulsed in a ignominious disaster of poor tactics matched by brave defence by the Maori led by Rawini. The British took heavy casualties (about 100 men). Pg 121
Moved in May 1864 to Taranaki NZ fighting the Hau Hau. Pg 139
Assembled in Auckland in December 1865, the 70th sailed for Dover after 17 years in India and NZ. Pg 182

In many of the actions above the 70th was part of a larger force. Gate Pa is of particular significance in the history of the NZ Maori Wars, led by the 43rd British Regiment with considerable artillery support, the Pa was stormed after prolonged shelling. However the Maori using trench's and tunnels against the barrage resisted the British attacks with great success and few losses. The Maori finally withdrew from the Pa at night. British forces first came up against trench warfare in fighting Maori who were particularly skilled military tacticians. (A Pa is a fortified village).

Portrait of George Alston's boys dated 1843 is in the hands of Michael Murray-Alston 2009.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Ever Green Cottage Lepton Kirk Heaton Yorkshire. William is recorded as aged 5 born in Ireland

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, St Peters Tce Stepney Tower Hamlets LON. William is recorded as a son aged 15 a scholar born Ireland

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Waterton Lodge Milton Rd Woolston Ham. William is recorded as head of house married aged 35 assistant surgeon RAMD born Ireland

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Oadby Leicester. William is recorded as resident at Broxhills House Oadby, aged 45, head of house, married, a Surgeon Major Army Medical Depot, born in Ireland.
Also in the house were Elizabeth his wife, three daughters, two sons, and four servants

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, East End House, Sandgate, Kent. William is recorded as head of house married aged 55 retired Surgeon Major Army Medical Staff born in Ireland. Also in the house were four servants.

William married Elizabeth Rouse FITZGERALD [76], daughter of Hon Robert FITZGERALD of Sydney M.L.C. [1533] and Elizabeth Henrietta ROUSE [4833], on 5 Jan 1867 in St John's, Darlinghurst, N.S.W. Elizabeth was born on 5 Oct 1844 in Windsor, N.S.W., was baptised on 1 Sep 1846 in St Matthew Windsor NSW, died on 6 Apr 1918 in East Cliff House, Sandgate, Kent at age 73, and was buried in Apr 1918 in Folkstone, KEN. The cause of her death was valvular disease of the heart & cerebral thrombosis.

Noted events in their marriage were:

1. Marriage Certificate: copy on hand, 1867.

General Notes:

On 19th October 1868 she and her husband plus the baby sailed back to England aboard the "Rifleman" taking 96 days via the Cape of Good Hope. Robert Graham was born in 1870 and the following year, 1871 Lila Elizabeth was born. She was followed by Arthur Fawssett in 1872, Ernest Alfred in 1877, and Dora in 1882. She lived in Co. Kent for a number of years and died in Folkestone, Co. Kent, England on 6th April 1918. Elizabeth had been left "Mamre" and in her Will below she left it to her daughter Lila and after her death to her other daughter Doris.
In 1947 "Mamre" was bought by Evan Colin Briarclffe MacLaurin and Emily Ethel MacLaurin (nee Evans). The property was in a bad state of repair and Emily spent over L12,000 on its restoration. During the 1970's the State Government of N.S.W. placed a "notice of resumption" on the property, forbidding the MacLaurin family to spend any more money on the place and if they sold it, the Government were the only people who could buy it. Eventually the family were forced to sell the property to the State Planning Authority. After a number of years the property was restored.

Will of Elizabeth Rouse Fitzgerald
13 Apr 1914
THIS IS THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT of me ELIZABETH ROUSE ALSTON ( nee Fitzgerald)
of East Cliffe House Sandgate in the County of Kent Widow of Surgeon Major William Evelyn Alston M.D.
I BEQUEATH to my son William Evelyn Alston my carved oak cabinet, my electro silver casket epergne and glass complete one sixth of my silver spoons and forks with the Alston crest engraved and the crayon portrait of his father
I BEQUEATH to my son Robert Graham Fitzgerald Alston my dining room oak table one sixth of my silver spoons and forks with Alston crest engraved six silver tea spoons in case which were a Silver Wedding present, one silver cream jug one silver pepper grinder an oxydised silver goblet and the family group of his father and uncles as boys
I BEQUEATH to my daughter Lila Elizabeth Alston my octagon oak table and my oak writing table my silver card case my Silver Wedding present complete (tea service, from husband and children) in case with Norwegian spoons one sixth of my silver spoons and forks with Alston crest and gold watch and long gold chain six silver tea spoons George 1st period my jewellery not hereby otherwise disposed of my wedding and engagement rings my diamond gypsy ring and coral ring my gold necklace and locket my landscape by Paul Bril from Broome Park and other pictures and china in drawing rooms
I ALSO BEQUEATH to the said Lila Elizabeth Alston absolutely my leasehold property known as East Cliffe House Sandgate free from legacy duty for all the residue which shall be unexpired at my decease of the term for which the same premises are held subject to the rent reserved by and the covenants and conditions contained in the lease under which the said premises are held together with all my furniture fixtures and household effects in about or belonging to the same not hereby or by any Codicil hereto otherwise disposed of
I BEQUEATH to my son Arthur Fawssett Alston my old oak clock Crudens Concordance and all Theological books Bible and writing desk which belonged to his late father one sixth of my silver spoons and forks with Alston crest also one soup ladle one gravy spoon and one sauce ladle (Alston crest) my gold watch with short gold chain and one silver pepper grinder mustard pot and spoon (Silver wedding present)
I BEQUEATH to my son Ernest Alfred Brooke Alston my two pictures by Gerhard Don the picture "Mandarin" the water colour "Soldiers" by Orlando Norie "Ship in Storm" (sepia) "Blowing Bubbles" (reputed Teniers) large Pier glass Testament Telescope silver salver and two silver butter shells in case two silver table napkin rings Norwegian silver trowel Captain Cooks Voyages one sixth of my silver spoons and forks with Alston crest also gravy spoon sauce ladle with Alston crest large silver tea pot (old) sugar basin and cream jug also 6 more table spoons and old sauce ladle one silver tea caddy Military decorations, two old oak chairs one ring diamonds and sapphire also all my shares (free from legacy duty) in the London County and Westminster Bank
I BEQUEATH to my daughter Dora Gladys Oxenden Fawssett, nee Alston my silver candlesticks tea service complete in box as a Wedding present to her one silver claret jug in case being a Silver Wedding present (to myself) one sixth of my silver spoons and forks (Alston crest) onyx chain and cross my wedding brooch 1867 necklace diamond and blue enamel diamond and white coral ring gypsy ruby ring two fancy cabinets rosewood picture "Henley on Thames" New Zealand box (long) large silver mustard pot I direct that all the before mentioned specific bequests shall be free of duty
I GIVE to my son the said Ernest Alfred Brooke Alston the sum of 1000 pounds free of legacy duty
I GIVE to my General Trustees (hereinafter named) the sum of 1000 pounds free of death duties upon trust that they shall invest the same with power from time to time to vary the investments thereof and shall stand possessed of the said legacy of 1000 pounds and the investments thereof upon trust to pay the income thereof to my daughter Doris Gladys Oxenden Fawssett during her life and after her death in trust for all or any the children or child of the said Dora Gladys Oxenden Fawssett who being male attain the age of 21 years or being female attain that age or marry under that age and if more than one in equal shares
I DEVISE all my share estate and interest in the Station property known as DABEE RYLSTONE in the State of New South Wales to the use of my sister EMILY EVANS during her life and from and after her decease to the use of her son ROBERT FITZGERALD EVANS absolutely I DEVISE my farms houses hereditaments and lands called "Mamre" and "Pawsons" near the Township of Saint Mary's South Creek in the State of New South Wales and all my estate and interest therein unto my General Trustees hereinafter named their executors administrators and assigns according to the nature and tenure thereof respectively as to one equal undivided moiety or half part hereof to the use of or in trust for my eldest daughter Lila Elizabeth Alston and her assigns during her life and from and after her death to the use of or in trust for such of her children of issue and in such shares and proportions and with such powers and provisions as she shall by deed or Will appoint and in default of any and subject to every such appointment to the use of or in trust for such of her children as being sons shall attain the age of twenty one years of being daughters shall attain that age of marry and if more than one as tenants in common in equal shares AND if there shall be no such child then to the uses and upon the trusts hereinafter declared concerning the second moiety of the said farms houses hereditaments lands and property AND as to such second moiety to the use of or in trust for my daughter Doris Gladys Oxenden Fawssett and her assigns during her life and from and after her death to the use of or in trust for such of her children of issue and in such shares and proportions and with such powers and provisions as she shall by deed or Will appoint AND in default of any and subject to every such appointment to the use of or in trust for such of her children as being sons shall attain the age of twenty one years of being daughters shall attain that age or marry and if more than one as tenants in common in equal shares AND if there shall be no such child then upon such trusts as shall correspond with the uses and trusts hereinafter declared concerning the first mentioned moiety of the said farms houses hereditaments lands and property
I DEVISE AND BEQUEATH all the real and personal property whatsoever and wheresoever of or to which I shall be seized possess or entitled at my decease or over which I shall then have a general power of appointment or disposition by Will except the real and personal estate and property in the States of New South Wales Victoria Queensland and any other part of the Commonwealth of Australia and in the Dominion of New Zealand hereinafter devised and bequeathed to my Colonial Trustees and except what I otherwise dispose of by this my Will or and Codicil hereto unto and to use of my sons William Evelyn Alston and Arthur Fawssett Alston my sister Lucy Douglas Hamilton (hereinafter called my General Trustees) their heirs executors or administrators respectively upon the trusts and with and subject to the powers and provisions hereinafter declared of and concerning the same that is to say UPON TRUST that my General Trustees shall sell call in collect and convert into money the said real and personal estate and premises at such time or times and in such manner as they shall think fit but as to reversionary property not until it falls into possession unless it shall appear to my General Trustees that an earlier sale would and so that they shall have the fullest power and discretion to postpone the calling in or conversion of the whole or any part or parts of the said premises during such period as they shall think proper and to retain the same or any part thereof in its present form of investment without being responsible for loss and so that the income of such of the same premises as for the time being shall remain unsold shall as well during the first year after my death as afterwards, be applied as if the same were income arising from investments hereinafter directed to be made of the proceeds of sale thereof and that no reversionary or other property not actually producing income shall be treated as producing income AND as to the moneys to arise from the sale conversion and getting in of the residuary estate I DIRECT my General Trustees thereout in the first place to pay or retain all the expenses incident to the execution of the trusts of this my Will and my debts and funeral and Testamentary expenses other than the debts owing by me in the said States of New South Wales Victoria Queensland and any other part of the Commonwealth of Australia and in the Dominion of New Zealand the payment whereof is hereinafter provided for and in the next place to pay every pecuniary legacy bequeathed by this my Will or any Codicil hereto and the legacy duties thereon and on the said specified bequests and then to hold the residue of the said moneys hereinafter called "the residuary trust funds" IN TRUST for my six children William Evelyn Alston Robert Graham Fitzgerald Alston Lila Elizabeth Alston Arthur Fawssett Alfred Brooke Alston and Dora Gladys Oxenden Fawssett nee Alston in equal shares as tenants in common PROVIDED ALWAYS and I declare that the share of the trust premises which is hereinbefore expressed to be given to each child of mine shall not vest absolutely in such child but shall be retained by my General Trustees and held by them upon the trusts hereinafter declared concerning the same respectively that is to say upon trust with the consent in writing if such child if living and of full age and at any other time at the discretion of my General Trustees in invest such shares in the names of my General Trustees in or upon any of the Public stocks or funds or Government Securities of the United Kingdom or India or any British Colony or dependency or any securities the interest on which is or shall be guaranteed by Parliament or upon freehold or copyhold leasehold or chattel real securities in Great Britain but not in Ireland such leasehold or chattels real having not less that 60 years to run at the time of such investment being made or in stock of the Bank of England or Metropolitan Stock or London County Stock or in or upon the debentures debenture stock or guaranteed or preference or ordinary stock or shares of any railway or other Company a fixed or minimum rate of interest or dividend on which is guaranteed (whether absolutely or otherwise) by the Government of India or in or upon the debentures or debenture or rent charge stock of any railway canal dock harbour gas water or other Company or body incorporated by special Act of the Imperial Parliament or of the legislature of any British Colony or Dependency or by Royal Charter or in or upon the guaranteed or preference stock or shares of any such Company as aforesaid which shall have paid dividends upon its ordinary capital at the rate of at least three per cent per annum for at least five years prior to the time of investment of which fact a letter purporting to be signed by the Secretary of the Company or by a Banker or member of a firm of bankers or by the Secretary or Manager of a Joint Stock Bank or of any Branch thereof shall be sufficient evidence or in or upon the stock bonds debenture or securities of any municipality Corporation or district council public body or local authority in the United Kingdom or in or upon any other stocks funds or securities for the time being authorised by law for the investment of trust funds but not in any Stocks funds bonds shares or securities to bearer of transferable by mere delivery or delivery and endorsement though coming within the general description of investments hereinbefore authorised and may with such consent or at such discretion as aforesaid transpose such investments into others of any nature hereby authorised and shall during the like of such child pay the income of his or her share to separate use without power of anticipation and after the death of each such child shall hold such share and the future income thereof upon trust for a all or such shall hold such share and the future income thereof upon trust for all or such one or more exclusively of the others or other of the children or remoter issue of such child such remoter issue to be born and take vested interests within 21 years after the death of such child at such age of time or respective ages or times if more than one in such shares and with such future or other trusts for their benefit and such provisions for their respective advancement either in the lifetime or after the death of such child and maintenance and education at the discretion of my General Trustees or any other person or persons and in such manner an all respects as such child shall by any Deed or Deeds revocable or irrevocable or by Will or Codicil appoint AND in default of and subject to any such appointment in trust for all or any the children or child of such child who being male attain the age of 21 years or being female attain that age or marry if more than one in equal shares but so that each grandchild of mine taking under this trust shall bring into account the share or shares appointed to him or her or to his or her issue
I DECLARE that my General Trustees may at discretion apply all or any part of the income of the share to which any minor shall be entitled in expectancy and would if of full age be entitled in possession under the trusts hereinbefore contained for his or her maintenance education or benefit in such manner as they may think fit and shall invest the surplus income (in any) thereof in the investments hereby authorised in augmentation of the capital of such share
I AUTHORISE my General Trustees after the death of any child of mine or previously thereto with his or her consent in writing to raise any part or parts no exceeding in the whole a moiety of the then expectant presumptive or vested share of any grandchild of mine in the trust premises under the trusts hereinbefore contained and to pay or apply the same for the advancement or benefit of such grandchild in such manner as my General Trustees shall think fit I authorise my General Trustees to manage and cultivate any real and leasehold hereditaments of the time being vested in them on the trusts of this my Will with all the powers in that behalf of absolute owners including power to cut timber and underwood for sale repairs and otherwise and to repair and insure houses and buildings and to make allowances to and arrangements with tenants and others and to accept surrenders of leases and tenancies and may out of the capital or income if the premises make any outlay for the purpose aforesaid I authorise my General Trustees to concur with the other persons or persons entitled to or having power in that behalf in relation to any property whether real or personal held in undivided shares in making a partition of such property and that notwithstanding that any of my Trustees or a sole Trustee may be entitled to or interested in any of the other shares of the same and may give or receive money for equality of partition and make such partition upon such terms and conditions as they shall think proper and for the purposes aforesaid may execute and do all such assurances and things as they shall think fit and the property which shall on any such partition be taken by my Trustees in severalty and the income thereof shall be held upon and subject to the like trusts powers and provisions so far as applicable as the undivided share or shares for which the same shall be substituted and the income thereof and any sum agreed to be paid for equality of partition may be paid out of my residuary personal estate and any moneys received for equality of partition shall be applied as if the same had arisen from a sale of the said undivided share or shares
I DEVISE AND BEQUEATH unto the perpetual Trustee Company Limited of Sydney in the State of New South Wales and my nephew Robert Fitzgerald Evans of Sydney aforesaid (hereinafter called my Colonial Trustees) all my real and personal estate and effects situate and being at the time of my death in the States of New South Wales Victoria Queensland or any other part of the Commonwealth of Australia or the Dominion of New Zealand (not hereby otherwise disposed of) expressly including all debts and other closes in action which shall then be recoverable by action or other legal proceedings in such Sates Commonwealth and Dominion upon the like trusts and subject to the like powers and provisions with respect to the sale conversion and getting in of the same and management and leasing until sale herein contained to the Trustees or Trustee hereof shall be deemed to apply to the General Trustees or Trustee and not to the Colonial Trustees.
I APPOINT the said Perpetual Trustee Company Ltd and Robert Fitzgerald Evans executors of this my Will as to the property and premises hereinbefore bequeathed to them and I hereby bequeath a legacy of 100 pounds free of legacy duty to the said Robert Fitzgerald Evans for his trouble if he shall prove my Will
AND I APPOINT the said William Evelyn Alston and Arthur Fawssett Alston and Lucy Douglas Hamilton General Executors of this my Will
I AUTHORISE my acting general executors or executor and my Trustees for the time being as to my general estate and my acting special executors or executor and my Colonial Trustees for the time being as to my estate in the said States Commonwealth and Dominion to pay any of my debts or any claims upon my estate upon any evidence which they or he shall think sufficient and to accept any composition or any security real or personal for any debt due to me or my estate and to allow any time for the payment of such debt as they or he shall think fit and also to compromise compound or submit to arbitration all debts accounts claims or things whatsoever belonging or relating to my estate and for any of the purposes aforesaid to enter into give execute and do such agreements instruments of composition releases and things as they or he shall think expedient without being responsible for loss I AUTHORISE my General Trustees except as to any property which for the time being be legally vested in my Colonial Trustees and my Colonial Trustees as to such last mentioned property to determine what articles pass under any specific bequest contained in this my Will or any Codicil hereto and whether any monies are to be considered as capital or income and how valuations are to be made or value determined for the purpose of any case of hotchpot or satisfaction or allotment or appropriation or partition or otherwise and to apportion blended trust funds and to determine all questions and matter of doubt arising in the execution of the trusts of this my Will or any Codicil hereto
AND I DECLARE that every such determination whether made upon a question actually raised or implied in the acts or proceedings of my General Trustees or Colonial Trustees respectively shall be conclusive and binding on all persons interested under this my Will or any Codicil hereto I DEVISE to my Colonial Trustees all freehold hereditaments in the said States Commonwealth and Dominion vested in me at my death as a Trustee or Mortgagee subject to the trusts or equities affecting the same respectively
IN WITNESS whereof I the said Elizabeth Rouse Alston have to this my Will contained in this and E.R.Alston the preceding 8 sheets of paper set my hand this thirtieth day of April one thousand nine hundred and fourteen.
Elizabeth Rouse Alston.
Signed by the above named Testatrix as her last Will in the presence of us present at the same time who in her presence and at her request and in the presence of each other have hereto subscribed our names as witnesses.
Archibald Gardener, Solicitor, Folkestone. William W Nevison, Clerk with Messrs Wightwick & Gardner, Solicitors, Folkestone.


Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Waterton Lodge Milton Rd Woolston Ham. Elizabeth is recorded as a wife aged 26 born New South Wales. Also visiting was Elizabeth's sister Lucy Fitzgerald aged 20 unmarried born NSW

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Oadby Leicester. Elizabeth is recorded as resident at Broxhills House, aged 35, married (wife), born in NSW Australia.

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, East End House, Sandgate, Kent. Elizabeth is recorded as a wife aged 45 born Australia

4. Death Certificate: 1918. Copy on file 2006

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1304 M    i. Dr William Evelyn ALSTON B A M B. [1534] was born on 15 Feb 1868 in Sydney NSW Australia, was baptised on 14 Mar 1868 in Holy Trinity Sydney, died on 13 Apr 1958 in Crowborough, SSX at age 90, and was buried in Apr 1958 in Charing, London.

+ 1305 M    ii. Robert Graham Fitzgerald ALSTON [78] was born on 7 Jan 1870 and died on 23 May 1940 in Dursley GLS at age 70.

+ 1306 F    iii. Lila Elizabeth ALSTON [81] was born in 1871 in Woolston Hampshire and died on 31 Dec 1934 in Folkstone, KEN at age 63.

+ 1307 M    iv. Rt Rev Arthur Fawssett ALSTON M A [79] was born on 30 Dec 1872 in Sandgate, KEN and died on 20 Feb 1954 in St Helena Hospital Hastings at age 81.

+ 1308 M    v. Col Ernest Alfred Brooke ALSTON [80] was born on 29 Oct 1878 in Sandgate Cheriton Folkstone KEN, died on 11 Aug 1917 at age 38, and was buried in Ramskappelle Road Military Cemetery, Nieuwpoort, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

+ 1309 F    vi. Dora Gladys Oxenden ALSTON [82] was born on 30 Nov 1879 in Sandgate, KEN, died on 17 Nov 1940 in Overdene, Riding Mill, Northumberland at age 60, and was buried in St Andrews, Bywell, Northumberland.


1076. Capt Hubert George ALSTON R.N. C.B. [1540] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 15 Jul 1866 in Studland DOR, was baptised on 16 Sep 1866 in Studland DOR, and died on 5 Jul 1939 at age 72.

General Notes:
Hubert was a seafaring man, he joined the P & O Navigation Co. but changed over to the Royal Navy, was a Lieutenant on H.M.S. Agincourt in Chatham. He saw service throughout the First World War and commanded one of the Q Mystery Ships, camouflaged as a trawler. He was nearly sunk on one occasion. In the Second World War he was Commander in Chief of the Hebrides and was promoted to Captain R.N. and was decorated C.B. for his services.

Hubert was in command of the Faulkland (sic) Is during the 1914-18 war?. A keen salmon fisherman he tied his own flies - memories from Mary Burn 1999.

St Edwards School Roll. 1863-1939.
Easter Term 1877.
Alston Hubert George, s Rev Geo. Alston; b 1866; left m 1880; Choir. m 1894; Royal Navy, retired 1910; Capt. training ship Empress, 1914; Snr Naval Officer Shetland Is., Regional Dir., Ministry of Pensions, 1919-26; Mentioned in dispatches. C.B. address, Capt., H G Alston, CB RN Broome Cottage, West Town, Somerset.
NZSOG.

Royal Navy List 1908.
Alston Hubert G. Lieut, HMS Grafton, 7500 tons, HP 10,000.
http://www.worldnavalships.com/navy_list_1908_ship_d_to_g.htm

The Crisis of the Naval War
By ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET Viscount Jellicoe of Scapa.
The following have been appointed or lent for temporary service during the War: . . . . . TRADE DIVISION. . . . . . Hubert G. Alston, C.B. . . . . .
http://www.archive.org/stream/crisisofnavalwar00jelluoft/crisisofnavalwar00jelluoft_djvu.txt

ALSTON, Hubert George b.Studland, Dorset (Devon sic vol.43) 1866 016073 London 1893 vol.43 Extra folio no.6 1893-1895; vol.58 no voyages listed
Ref: http://www.crewlist.org.uk/findingonindexes.html#online

Medals earned: 1914-15 Star, Victory & British War Medals. His C.B. was gazetted 3 June 1918. Kings Birthday Honours List. Page 6527.

ALSTON, Captain Hubert George (1866-1939) [Who Was Who May 2003]
Categories: Biography
Summary: Details: ALSTON, Captain Hubert George, CB 1918; RN; born 15 July 1866; son of Rev. George Alston, Studland, Dorset; married 1894, Mabel, eldest daughter of William Crabbe, Hove; one daughter. Education: St Edwards, Oxford; HMS Worcester. Work: Lieutenant Royal Navy, 1895; served European War (despatches, CB); Captain, 1919 (retired). Recreations: gardening. Address: Broome Cottage, West Town, Somerset. Telegraphic Address: West Town, Somerset. Died: 5 July 1939
Ref: Know UK CD Colin Fenn

Probate granted 14 Aug 1939 Bristol to M M Crabb. Effects L1246.0s.4d

Research Notes:

Studland Parish Baptism Record no. 5 pg 1.

Description
Name Alston, Hubert George Date of Birth: 15 July 1866 Rank: Lieutenant Date31 October 1895
Catalogue reference ADM 196/137
Dept Records of the Admiralty, Naval Forces, Royal Marines, Coastguard, and related bodies
Series Admiralty: Officers' Service Records (Series III)
Piece Book 1
Image contains 1 document of many for this catalogue reference Number of image files: 1
Image Reference Format and Version Part Number Size (KB) Number of Pages Price 75 / 242 PDF 1.2 1 829 3 L.3.50
Not searched 2009

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Studland Dorset. Hubert is described as a son aged 4 scholar born Studland

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Jesmond Northumberland. Hubert is recorded as head of house married aged 44 Retired Commander R.N. working as an Assistant Manager Sir William Armstrong Co. Ship Builders. born Studland Dorset

Hubert married Mabel Mary CRABB [2441], daughter of William Joseph CRABB Of Hove. [4853] and Mary Jane GROVER [9703], in 1894. Mabel was born Apr Qtr 1863 in Brighton SSX, was baptised on 24 Jun 1863 in Chapel Royal Brighton, and died in 1947 in Western Supermare SOM at age 84.

General Notes:
1863, Brighton - Mabel Mary Crabb/e birth registered as CRABB
Parents William Joseph CRABB & Mary Jane GROVER married 1860 (GRO index)

Research Notes:

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 40 Selborne Rd Hove Sussex. Mabel is recorded as a daughter aged 17 a scholar born Brighton

2. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Hemingford Grey HUN. Mabel is recorded as Head of house Married aged 35 wife of a an Officer in the Royal Navy born Brighton SSX

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Jesmond Northumberland. Mabel is recorded as a wife aged 47 16 yrs married with one living child born Brighton Sussex

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1310 F    i. Katharine Lawrence ALSTON [2442] was born Mar Qtr 1897 in Brighton SSX and died Oct Qtr 1979 in Avon Bristol Glos at age 82.

1077. Edith Isabel ALSTON [1541] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 21 Jul 1859, was baptised on 24 Sep 1859, and died on 11 Apr 1958 at age 98.

General Notes:
Ediths baptism Ref: Studland Parish Record no. 696 page 87

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Vicarage Studland Dorset. Edith is described as a daughter aged 19 mths born Studland

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Studland Dorset. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 11 scholar born Studland

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Oadby Leicester. Edith is recorded as resident at Broxhills House with her brother William E Alston, aged 21, unmarried, born Studland Dorset.

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Croxton Kerrial Leicestershire. Edith is recorded as a wife aged 41 born Studland Dorset

Edith married Rev Francis Edward NUGEE [1542], son of Andrew NUGEE [1548] and Elizabeth Wroughton RICHARDS [265], on 13 Oct 1887. Francis was born on 9 Jun 1856 in Wymering HAM and died on 19 May 1930 at age 73.

General Notes:
Francis was Rector of Sheldon Newark, and Shangton Leicester, then Canon of Leicester Cathedral.

Probate granted 10 July 1930 to Edith Isabell Nugee widow for effects L16831 9s 5d

Research Notes:
Part of this family is sourced from Tree c1950 drawn by Dorothy E.D. Cotes.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Croxton Kerrial Leicestershire. Francis is recorded as Head of house married aged 46 Clergyman Church of England born Wymering HAM

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1311 F    i. Elizabeth Catherine NUGEE [1543] was born on 25 Nov 1888 in Sneinton NTT and died in Jul 1991 in Wallingford at age 102.

+ 1312 F    ii. Laura Christine NUGEE [1544] was born on 23 Dec 1889 in Sneinton NTT.

+ 1313 M    iii. Brigadier George Travers NUGEE C.B.E D.S.O M.C. [1546] was born on 7 Jul 1893 in Sneinton NTT and died in 1977 at age 84.

+ 1314 M    iv. Francis John NUGEE Q.V. M.C. T.D. [2438] was born on 31 May 1891 and died Mar Qtr 1977 in Cheltenham GLS at age 85.

+ 1315 M    v. Andrew Charles NUGEE [9704] was born on 28 Oct 1895 in Shelton NTT and died Dec Qtr 1977 in Cheltenham GLS at age 82.

1078. Maude Mary ALSTON [1549] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1861, was baptised on 22 Dec 1861 in Studland DOR, and died on 5 Jan 1936 at age 75.

General Notes:
Maud's baptism Ref no. 736 page 92 Studland Church.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Studland Dorset. Maude is described as Maude M a daughter aged 9 a scholar born Studland

Maude married Charles Smith MORRIS [1550].

General Notes:
Their wedding date may have been 7 Feb 1888.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 1316 F    i. Mabel Travers MORRIS [2432] was born about 1891 in Bridgend Glamorgan Wales.

+ 1317 F    ii. Daisy MORRIS [2433] was born about 1894 in Bridgend Glamorgan Wales.

+ 1318 M    iii. Charles Alan MORRIS [2436] died in 1917 in Killed In Action.

+ 1319 F    iv. Lucy Maude MORRIS [2437] was born on 15 Jan 1901 and died Dec Qtr 1977 in Cheltenham GLS at age 76.

1079. Ethel Travers ALSTON [1551] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was baptised on 15 Feb 1863 in Studland DOR. Another name for Ethel was Edith J.

General Notes:
Ethels baptism Ref: Studland Parish Record no. 757 page 95

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Studland Dorset. Ethel is recorded as Ethel F (or T) a daughter aged 8 a scholar born Studland

2. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Mary Paddington LON. Ethel is recorded as a wife aged 38 born Studland Dorset Also in the house as a boarder was a Gertrude S S Crabb

Ethel married Ernest Henry Downing LLOYD [1552]. Ernest was born in 1860 in Caramon Bangor.

General Notes:
Ernest was an artist, the family emigrated to Vancouver in 1911 then to San Francisco in 1914. They were living there in 1920.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Mary Paddington LON. Ernest is recorded as head of house married aged 41 an artist & sculptor working at home on his own account born Caramon Bangor

The child from this marriage was:

+ 1320 F    i. Mildred Travers LLOYD [2439] was baptised on 12 Oct 1900 in St Saviour London and died on 8 Jun 1989 in California USA at age 88.

1080. Mildred Georgina ALSTON [1553] (George Downing (Rev)884, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born in 1864, was baptised on 27 Mar 1864 in Studland DOR, and died on 19 Aug 1867 in Infancy. at age 3.

General Notes:
Mildred died aged 3, birth date calculated from this. Inscription on shared tombstone is "(same coffin) In memory of dear little Mildred died 19 Aug 1867 aged 3"

Studland Parish Records: no.769 pg 97, no420 pg 53. who died 9th August 1867 age 3 years, (no.420 page 53) buried in St. Nicholas Graveyard Studland.

1864 - Birth June Qtr Wareham 5a 301 Alston Mildred Georgina



1081. Annie Vanderzee FENN [4] (Maria ALSTON891, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 25 Mar 1841 in Rushall WIL, was baptised on 6 May 1841 in Rushall WIL, died on 27 Feb 1922 in Norwich at age 80, and was buried in Nayland Burial Ground.

General Notes:
Sponsors at Annie's baptism, were Robert L Fenn, Margaret Alston, Elizabeth T Liveing.
Annie is buried in the Nayland Burial Ground Bear St Nayland. Her headstone reads "In ever loving memory of Annie Vanderzee Hand entered unto rest the 27th Feb 1922 aged 80 yrs".
Pastel by Sydney Buck at age 10 1851 in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

Research Notes:
Pewsey Vol VIII - 391 1841 E-G March.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Rushall WIL. Annie is described as aged 2 mths born Wilshire

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Annie is recorded as a daughter aged 10 a scholar born Rushall WIL

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 43 Bear St Nayland SFK. Annie is described as a daughter unmarried aged 20 born Rushall WIL

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bear St Nayland SFK. Annie is recorded as a sister aged 30 married born Rushall WIL

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Market Sq Midhurst SSX. Annie is described as a lodger aged 40 married wife of a Commander Royal Navy born Rushall WIL

6. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, The Castle Dedham ESS. Annie is recorded as a wife aged 50 born Rushall WIL

7. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Hammersmith LON. Annie is recorded as a wife aged 60 born Rushell WIL

Annie married Rear Admiral George Weightman HAND R.N. C.B. [5], son of Frederick James HAND [2041] and Ann VANDERZEE [361], on 14 Nov 1866 in St James Nayland. George was born on 2 Jul 1841 in St Pancras London, was baptised on 28 Oct 1841 in St Pancras London, and died on 25 Jan 1914 in Virginia Water SRY at age 72.

General Notes:
Dr E L Fenn in a letter to E V Fenn 10 Mar 1893 says "Uncle Geo Hand has been appointed captain of the Shannon lying in Bantry Bay, he is not at all pleased as he wanted another ship which is stationed at Harwich near his house in Dedham.

George was Capt of the Aurora in 1894.
Ref Anthony Turreff

George Hand also lived at "Castle House" Dedham, now the Sir Alfred Munnings Art Museum.

George was aged 73 at his death.

Probate Calendar: Hand George Weightman of 33 Burlington Gdns.,Chiswick MDX, died 25 Jan 1914 at Virginia Water SRY. Probate London 5 March to George Edward Basil Hand Lieut RN and the Rev Alfred Edward Alston clerk. Effects L8625 18s 1d

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Navy census list. George is recorded as single an acting Mate aged 19yrs 9mths on board Imperience born MDX

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Navy census list. George was on a Naval vessel the Royal Alfred in Grassy Bay Bermuda aged 29 a Lieut RN born Marylebone MDX

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Navy census list. George is recorded as married aged 39 Commander R N of the Beacon born ESS

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, The Castle Dedham ESS. George is recorded as head of house married aged 49 Captain RN born MDX

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 16A Brook Green Hammersmith LND. George is recorded as head of house married aged 59 Rear Admiral RN retired born London

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1321 M    i. Cmdr. George Edward Basil HAND R N [441] was born on 10 Mar 1870 in Nayland SFK and died on 22 May 1931 in Weybread SFK at age 61.

+ 1322 M    ii. Frederick Harrold HAND [442] was born on 14 Mar 1874 in Limerick Ireland and died on 2 Mar 1906 in West Norfolk & Lynn Hospital New Lynn at age 31.

+ 1323 M    iii. Rt Rev George Sumner HAND [443] was born about 1880 in Midhurst SSX, was baptised on 24 Sep 1880 in St Denis Midhurst SSX, and died on 26 Jul 1945 in St Kitts BWI aged about 65.

+ 1324 F    iv. Margaret Rosa Katherine HAND [19] was born in 1883 in Dedham ESS, was baptised on 25 Sep 1883 in St Mary Dedham ESS, died on 22 Jul 1959 in Hyekem Hall LIN at age 76, and was cremated on 25 Jul 1959 in Grimsby.

+ 1325 M    v. Henry George (Harry) HAND [444] was born about 1885 in Dedham ESS and was baptised on 6 Dec 1885 in St Mary Dedham ESS.


1082. Isabella Frances Louisa FENN [6] (Maria ALSTON891, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 23 Jul 1842 in Rushall WIL, was baptised on 30 Aug 1842 in Rushall WIL, died on 6 Sep 1927 at age 85, and was buried in Lanteglos by Fowey CON.

General Notes:
Sponsors at Isabella's baptism were Rev H T Liveing, Frances Liveing, Louisa Harrold.

Cotes - Fenn : 27th ult., at St Matthias Church Richmond Surrey, by the Rev A Smythies, assisted by the Rev C T Proctor, Vicar of the Parish, and the Rev J Tidcombe, the Rev Rev Digby Henry Cotes, Chaplain Bombay Presidency, to Isabella Frances Louisa, second daughter of the late Thomas Harrold Fenn, Esq., of Nayland, Suffolk.

A Memorial plaque in St James Church Nayland, under one to her sister reads "Also of Isabella Frances Louisa widow of Digby Henry Cotes, government chaplain in India, and second daughter of Thomas Harrold Fenn of this Parish who died at Southbourne Hants 1927. This tablet is erected by her loving daughter. I thank my God for every remembrance of you".
Pastel at age 9 1851 by Sydney Buck in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

ISABELLA'S CONFESSIONS June 1891
MY FAVOURITE VIRTUE: Moral courage
MY IDEA OF HAPPINESS: The old home life
MY IDEA OF MISERY: Having night-mare
MY FAVOURITE OCCUPATION: Listening to good music, walking & reading
MY FAVOURITE COLOUR: Black & White
MY FAVOURITE FLOWER: Lily of the Valley
MY FAVOURITE POETS: Longfellow Keble Tennyson
MY FAVOURITE PROSE AUTHORS: Scott Dickens ? Crockett Mrs Humphry Ward Edna Lyall
MY FAVOURITE PAINTER: Fildes Long Cook Leaden Cooper
MY FAVOURITE FOOD: Bread & fruit
MY FAVOURITE NAMES: Dorothy Constance Lionel
MY PET AVERSION: Early rising
MY FAVOURITE MOTTO: Every cloud has a silver lining

THE FOLLOWING POEM IS SIGNED BY I.F.L.C. : 1892
A is for Arthur whose surname is Fenn,
B is for Basil Lieutenant R.N.,
C is for Charlie a student at Kings,
D is for Dolly who learns lots of things,
E is for Edith a Frenchified girl,
F is for Frankie whose red hair won't curl,
G is for Georgie third son of his mother,
H for Harry & Hal who belong to each other,
I Aunt Isabella who is Dolly's Mamma,
J Julius or Edgar sometimes called Baa,
K is for Katherine who grows like a weed,
L is for Lewis a fat dumpling indeed,
M's for Margery R C a very long name,
N for Nathaniel or Edward of bicycle fame,
O is for Olive of Simla the belle,
P Playford Dick who at school does so well,
Q stands for Miss Quirk a friend of the boys,
and R for Rees H who dearly loves toys,
S is for Sumner called Georgie above,
T is for Thomas who mischief doth love,
V is for Vandy a prim little lad,
For W X Y & Z no names can be had,
From Hopkins or Giles or even from Hand,
Or Cotes of Rich-mond or Fenn of Nay-land.

1 Mt Ararat Road
Richmond
Surrey
My dear Harry
I am going to try and think of some Richmond news to tell you \endash I wonder if you have heard that the unfortunate Winnie Bateman has broken her arm again \endash just the same place where it was broken before \endash they were having a picnic in the Park on Saturday \endash Cyril and Tilly were there and she was running along and tumbled down so Auntie Annie drove her home in the pony cart as quickly as she could and Dr Williamson set the arm and father gave her chloroform. We had a dreadful thunder storm here last week \endash nurse and Baa were out but took shelter at Miss Quirk's and several houses were struck - and I think the Bruins at Strawberry Hill must have had a good fright for the lightning came down the nursery chimney danced about the room where 2 children and nurse were then went through the floor into the drawing room below, carrying the drawing room ceiling down with it most merciful no one was injured. Father was at Lady Augustine's at the time and poor little Robert outside with the horse which jumped and danced at every clap of thunder. Siss was there too and was so frightened and unhappy that the Butler took him inside \endash it was raining still hard when father came out and that wise tip declined moving one inch beyond Thacker's so father had to pick him up and tuck him under the apron \endash are you not very pleased with yours and Tips photographs? I think they are excellent now Dolly is most anxious to be taken with Pie. Milly went to church yesterday with Miss Annie Proveten, as it was St Michael's day sat in the front seat under the pulpit with her and was so . . . . . and good.
Aunt Annie Hand had Lance Mabel and indeed to stay at Dedham 2 or 3 days before they went back to Belgium they crossed from Harwich to Antwerp last Thursday night. I expect Dolly will want to add a line when she comes in from school about stamps \endash so I'll say goodbye,
Much love from your loving aunt
Isabella
30 Sept 1890
Written on 6 sides of note paper, two with a fine black edge.

1 Mount Ararat
Richmond
dear old highway
I must first put in a line as mother is writing to you. I heard from Charlie yesterday, and he said that he had heard from you, and that you had got him some stamps for the swaps he gave you \endash I do hope you have got some for the ones I gave you \endash mind and send them if you have \endash I have about forty-three stamps now \endash mother has told you all the news so there is none left for me. The photos that I like best is the one of you and tip with you looking down. I think it is much the most natural. Don't you think they are all very good? Many liked the side face of you alone best \endash Charlie says that his new study is very nice. Charlie's last day we made some plum jam it was simply beautiful \endash he took back to pots to school with him about three \endash we put into pounds of sugar so it ought to have been sweet enough.
Now I must say goodbye, as I have got to go back for drawing.
Your loving cousin
Dolly
Sept 30th
Written on 2 sides of a sheet of note paper

1 Mt Ararat Road
Richmond
27 Oct 1890
My dear Harry
I was very glad to hear from you - your friend Sequa is here I have seen him twice driving through George Street in his gilt chariot and four with his band and attendants. He is having so many patients that he talks of being here two or three weeks, last time I saw him he was surrounded by lovely bouquets, he holds his meetings near the Gas Works.
Dolly is hoping to see him but poor child she has been shut up all the last week with cold and very bad toothache - not been to school for a whole week. Father has been in every day to see her and given her lots of medicine. Tomorrow she is to go Mr Davies to see what he can do for her teeth. I have a horrid cold now from hopping in and out of bed on Saturday night when D was very bad, to get her brandy etc - so we are a pair of miserable objects wrapped up in shawls Father has promised us one of yours and Tips photos and he has also given you to your godmother Miss Fanny Torlesse to take back to New Zealand with her next month. She is going to live in the same place - Christchurch - where Uncle Churchill is.
The Hopkins have got a fox terrier now by name Pat Uncle Nathanial got it at the home for lost dogs - but the poor little beast is very ill with distemper and has to have a doctor, I hope it will recover for they have all got so fond of it - your old Nelly is living at Aunt Lucy's now for a little time till she can hear of a French nurse. Jn Edward Kitty Rees and Lewis and my old Julia has taken Nelly's place at your house - Billy calls her "Judea" - I have not been able to collect many postmarks for you yet, I enclose a few.
Aunt Annie at Dedham has lost her favourite little Alderney cow - it died of fever
With Dolly and my best love ever dear Harry
Your loving Aunt Isabella
Written on 4 sides of a sheet of folded letter paper, over written on the front with the Closing and "27 Oct Monday What do you think of my verses on Pie?" With its original envelope addressed Master H L Fenn Malvern House, River, Dover. Franked Richmond Surrey OC2790. No stamp.

The Rev EV Fenn
Rock
St Minver
Cornwall
Your letter, very interested in all your news, shall think of you on 29 May. The rumour for Cambridge has come to nothing so far. Perhaps we shall see a name in H.M's. birthday honours list. Harry and Dolly went to the service at St Paul's for the Centenary of Bible SY (Society) heard the Archbishop and saw the Royalties. The B's have a foreign countess living with them \endash who is slightly crazed but very charming. Jack and G not come north yet.
Love from us both
I.F.L.C. 17 March 1904
Written on a Post card of St Mary Magdalene Richmond endorsed in Isabella's hand
"In remembrance of the old Chancel which is now pulled down, the walls of the new one are rising fast. Many Thanks"

78 Harbour Terrace
Fowey
Cornwall
11 October 1926
My dear Harry
I was very pleased to get your letter on July 29 and to know you have a cousin living with you, much more cheerful than being alone with only servants and I am glad he is a good worker. I think it was splendid of you to give a dance, but am sorry you have had a bad epidemic amongst your dogs but hope the very valuable one has recovered. You dreaded blindness for the poor animal.
Dolly is away for a few weeks and I have a very nice Miss Park to keep me company and do my shopping and everything I want whilst she is away, I was wanting Dolly to have a change she had been having so much headache, but seems to be enjoying her change very much, she stayed with me and the Arthur Ingrams at Boscombe at Trisk(?) then went to her club in London and did various matinees and went to Richmond and saw Aunt Ada the Todd's, & Rugge-Prices etc then went to the Cotes Reedys and Gerrards Cross they took her to see the Lawrences at Iverna Heath, their eldest girl Esbeth is now married out in China to a Mr Norman in the Yorkshire Regiment who has unexpectedly been ordered home so the marriage has been hurried on Esbeth was staying with Bertram, I think she is only in her teens and not at all good looking the last time I saw her and wears spectacles. Mabel's elder boy has been entered at Trinity Cambridge and Dolly says he is a regular Giles only has red hair. I expect Dolly back next week Miss Park is a great church worker at Streatham but does not know Charlie or Ella I like her very much she is a great friend of a friend of mine in this place.
12th. Tom Fenn is in England now in a nursing home near London Lucy writes to me and she and Dick have been to see him and she says he is much better in every way except that his speech has not yet thoroughly recovered I can only think that he has had a kind of stroke Lucy and Dick are very good to their brothers & Josephine, his wife and two children are in Brighton and she does not seem to trouble herself much, Tom has always been such a good husband and father the I hope he will get well again Lucy means to have him to stay with her as soon as he can be moved - the East Grinstead Sisters may send Josephine to one of their schools to teach in South Africa this winter. I was very glad to see the Mater and Adria in June for a week the last time I heard from the Mater she had had the Archbishop and Ada to stay a few days with her they were in good spirits and he mended some of her clocks and watches for her! but left her to preach the following Sunday at Richmond.
Well dear Harry I feel I must only say goodbye for this time my hand and head gets tired too soon
Best love
From your loving aunt
Isabella A Cotes
Written on 4 sides of 2 sheets of heavy letter paper.

Research Notes:
Pewsey VIII 364 1842 E-G Sept.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Isabella is recorded as a daughter aged 8 a scholar born Rushall WIL

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 43 Bear St Nayland SFK. Isabella is described as a daughter unmarried aged 18 born Rushall WIL

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bear St Nayland SFK. Isabella is recorded as a sister aged 28 unmarried born Rushall WIL

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 1 Mt Ararat Rd Richmond SRY. Isabella is recorded as head of house a widow aged 48 living on her own means born Rushall WIL

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 1 Mt Ararat Rd Richmond SRY. Isabella is recorded as head of house aged 58 widow living on her own means born Rushall WIL

Isabella married Rev Digby Henry COTES [11] on 27 Jan 1874 in St Matthais Church Richmond Surrey. Digby was born in 1847 and died 10 ? 1878 in Kurrachee Sindh India at age 31.

General Notes:
Digby was Chaplain Bombay Presidency, and on Roberts Staff Kandahah Afganistan. COTES: On the 10th inst., at Kurrachee Sindh, the Rev Digby Cotes, Chaplain, aged 31. His date of death may have been 1877.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Upper Mall House St Peter Hammersmith LON. Digby is recorded at the home of his widowed grandmother who ran a lunatic asylum for ladies. He is described as a grandson aged 4 a gentleman born Hammersmith MDX

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Henley On Thames. Digby is recorded as a pupil at Northfield End Grammar School aged 14 born Hammersmith MDX

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stockport Cheshire. Digby is recorded as a lodger unmarried aged 24 Curate of St Thomas born MDX LON

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1326 M    i. Kenneth COTES [485] was born about 1875 and died in Infancy.

+ 1327 F    ii. Dorothy Eleanore Digby "Dolly" COTES [486] was born on 20 Mar 1877 in India, died on 6 Dec 1962 in St Marys Convent Chiswick LON at age 85, and was buried on 11 Dec 1962 in Lanteglos by Fowey CON.


1083. Dr Edward Liveing FENN M.D. [3] (Maria ALSTON891, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 20 Aug 1843 in Stourbank Nayland SFK, was baptised on 6 Oct 1843 in Nayland SFK, died on 8 Dec 1907 in Nayland SFK at age 64, and was buried in Nayland Burial Ground.

General Notes:
Sponsors at Edward's christening, were Sam Alston, Frederick Hand, Mary K Liveing. Edward was educated at Sherborne School (Head Boy, Capt 1st Eleven) MRCS Kings London 22 Apr 1865, Vienna, MD Edin 1873, MRCP London 1892.

The Sherborne Register 1823-1892.
Entries Aug-Dec 1853.
Fenn Edward Liveing, son of T.H. Fenn, Nayland, Colchester; born 1843; (S.H.), vi, xi, 1860-61; Captain of the Games; left 1861; Warneford Scholar Kings College, London; Physician at Kings College Hospital 1865-67; M.B. 1865; M.D. 1873; Edinburgh University; studied in Berlin & Vienna; Surgeon to Richmond Hospital since 1875.
The Green Richmond Surrey.

University of Edinburgh
Medical Degrees.
Degree of Bachelor of Medicine. Fenn Edward Liveing, England.
Ref: The Caledonian Mercury 2 August 1865.

Edward was a well qualified and published physician, the Medical Times and Gazette of July 4th 1863 Pg 24 records: KING'S COLLEGE, LONDON, Medical Department: Warneford Prizes : Edward Liveing Fenn, 1st Prize.
Ref: Internet 2008

Royal College of Surgeons.
The following gentlemen having undergone the necessary examination for the diploma were admitted members of the college at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 28th. inst., viz . . . . . Edward Liveing Fenn, Nayland, of Kings College.
Ref Ipswich Journal, Saturday May 6 1865.

Nayland
Appointment - Mr Edward Liveing Fenn, who was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons on the 28th ult., has since been elected Resident Physician at Kings College Hospital for Midwifery and the diseases of women and children.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday May 13 1865

In 1868 he returned to assist in his fathers practice at Stourbank Nayland. After his fathers death he sold Stourbank (1873) and moved to Richmond (1872 -74 to the Wardrobe Court until the lease expired*, then 1 Portland Tce.) where he married and practiced for 20 years. His Nayland practice was sold to Dr H D Palmer.
Edward in a letter to his son E V Fenn 30 Jan 1898 mentions seeing Raphael's Transfiguration in the Vatican Gallery in Rome.

Concealment of Birth at Stoke by Nayland.
This article reports on the inquest into the death of a newborn infant, the mother was a patient of Edwards, and his lengthy testimony on the matter is reported verbatim.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 3 April 1869.

Court of Probate
Cook and Goldsmith v Goddard and others.
This is a report of litigation over the disputed Will of the late Dennis Goddard of Stoke by Nayland. Many residents of Nayland gave evidence including Edward, Sam Alston, Reverent Torlesse, etc.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 17 January 1871.

Fenn Edward Liveing M.D. 1 Portland Terrace, The Green, Richmond.
Kelly's Directory of Sussex 1891

A small Hall house, No 16 Fen St Nayland dating from abt 1400 was owned by Edward Fenn by a conveyance dated 7 Mar 1889, he then may have sold it to Prof Liveing?.

At the death of Katherine Fenn, they were living at 1 Portland Tce Richmond. In poor health he left after his second marriage to live at Grey Friars East Hill Colchester. In 1902 he obtained possession of the property "Grooms" he inherited, in Nayland, returning to live there he restored the house renaming it Alston Court. Obituary Alstonania pg 403. Ref article A Julius book one E L Fenn 1998. Will proved at L30,000.

Buried in the old cemetery Bear St Nayland, his tombstone reads "In loving memory of Edward Liveing Fenn eldest son of Thomas Harrold and Maria Fenn. Who entered into rest Sunday Dec 8th 1907 Aged 64. The free gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom 6-23"

Portrait in possession of E L Fenn Auckland NZ 1998. Pastel at age 8 by Sydney Buck 1854 in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

MY FATHER, EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Adria Margaret Fenn. 1962.
The eldest son of Dr. Thomas Fenn was born on August 20th, 1843 at Stourbank, Nayland, Suffolk. If today you visited Stourbank garden you would see a tall tree on the lawn, which he used to climb when a little boy. Next door to the house there is a grocer's shop, with the name "Faiers", written over the door. It is kept by a man named, Alec Faiers. My father used to climb over the fence which separated Stourbank and the Faier's yard! to play with Alec Faier's father.
Father must have been a very nice little boy. There is a story that one day he was playing ball with one of his sisters, when her ball went through the window of a cottage, and broke the glass. Instead of running away he knocked at the door of the cottage, explained about the breakage and offered to pay for new glass out of his own pocket money. Father had a very happy childhood with delightful parents. He was number three out of a large family of boys and girls.
When he was old enough he was sent to school at Sherborne a very long way from Suffolk. When he first went there, the railroad was not built all the way and he had to travel partly there by coach. He did very well at School and became Head Boy, Captain of the lst Cricket Eleven, and the winner of a pewter tankard at Fives. There is an old photograph, still in existence of Father in the Sherborne cricket eleven.
At the age of eighteen he went to King's College Hospital to train as a medical student. He took the M.R.C.S. diploma in 1865 and afterwards studied at Vienna and Edinburgh, becoming an M.D. of the latter place. At a much later date he took the Chair at the Annual Dinner of the British Medical Association. He became a physician of King's College Hospital, was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London, and a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London. But he resigned his good appointment at King's College to come home to his native village to help his father, who had been stricken with a serious illness. Father stayed in Nayland four years and took great interest in the social life of the place.
He and his sisters got up penny readings for the villagers, and these were extremely popular. Even in my day they were still spoken about, especially the occasion when the young actors illustrated the tale of "The four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie". And twenty-four real birds flew about the village school over the heads of the delighted audience when the pie was cut.
On the death of my Grandfather my Father left Nayland and went to live in Richmond, selling the village practice. In Richmond, he became a partner to Dr. Julius, in his extensive practice and married Dr. Julius's pretty daughter, Katie.
They had nine children, five of whom lived to be grown up. When Dr. Julius died, Father and Mr. Bateman (Father's brother-in-law) became partners. Father took a great interest in Richmond. He was a member of the municipal Vestry and a churchwarden. His young wife died soon after the death of her youngest child., Edgar.
Father was a very good parent to his motherless boys, though in some ways strict, he had a great sense of humour.
There is a story that he once took Harry, then a very small boy, to be fitted for shoes. Pair after pair were tried on but Harry kept a grim silence and would not say if they were comfortable. The stout old lady who kept the shop, went panting on to her knees, trying on one shoe after another. Father added his entreaties to hers. "Now, Harry, you must say if they are comfortable." At long last Harry remarked solemnly, "They are puce:"
This episode held great amusement for my father. He had the gift of being able to tell a joke in a really amusing way, and he used to tell this story, until he was quite weak with laughter.
In 1892 he married Edith Todd, my own mother, and by her he had three children, Dorothy, who died when a baby, Edward Gerald Palmer, who was killed in Palestine during the First War, and myself.
Father's health not being very good, he resigned from his practice in Richmond, soon after his second marriage and went to live at Grey Friars, Colchester. He became consulting Physician at Colchester Hospital. I remember my mother telling me this little anecdote of him. He was one day walking down the Hospital drive when he came on two men violently quarreling with one another. Father went up to them and tried to settle their dispute. An old doctor was watching the scene from the steps of the Hospital. Afterwards he went up to my Father and said "Blessed are the Peacemakers".
I was a very small child at the Colchester house but I well remember the happy home atmosphere there, with parents devoted to one another, five good natured big brothers, and "Beau" a year older than myself to share our nursery. Father used to tell Beau and me an original story about a little girl called Lucy, who fell from a stile and spilt her basket of strawberries. He read aloud to us, often the books of Mrs. Ewing, or the Pilgrims Progress.
Later on when we all went to live at Nayland, he taught us to play Chess, Cribbage, Backgammon, and Whist. He himself was a great reader and had a large library of books. He particularly liked Dickens and Trollope.
At Colchester, and at Nayland he organized Shakespeare readings amongst his friends and relations. He was a good amateur actor and recited very well, and loved to recite from the Suffolk Ballads. He took the part of "Mr. Primrose" in a play called "Popping the Question" acted at Nayland. I was only a small child at the time but I was allowed up to see it acted in the village schoolroom. At the end, Father was called on to make his bow in his kneebreeches, shirt and three cornered hat, and he certainly gained a truly "deafening applause".
He loved Nayland. He liked to talk to the people, to discover old names he remembered from his boyhood alive in a new generation. He was a churchwarden at the 15th century village church, and attended Church services on weekdays as well as Sundays. He was also a local magistrate, and as a consequence "Meggs" (the coachman whom I dearly loved) wore a cockade in his top hat, when driving the brougham or dogcart.
But Father's true memorial is Alston Court, the old family house he inherited from an aunt. He restored the old house, uncovering beams and hidden carving and having the lovely heraldic glass put back into its original places. He only lived four years in this house he loved so dearly. He had a bad illness during the Spring of 190?, and died nine months later, on December 8th.
His body was buried in the little cemetery on the hill, given to the village by Samuel Alston, the uncle from whom he inherited the house. My mother had a stained glass window put up to his memory in the parish church. One of the figures portrayed in this window is St. Luke, the Beloved Physician,
Well, I can only very inadequately write about my Father's life for I was
only twelve years old when he died. My elder brothers knew him when they were grown up and so could have given a far more comprehensive picture of him.
I will end by a remark made by Charlie when the news came from New Zealand, telling us of the birth of "Edward Liveing Fenn the Second". Well, I only hope he will be as good a man as his grandfather.
Compiled by Adria M. Fenn.

DEATH OF DR E.L. FENN OF NAYLAND.
We regret to have to record the death of Dr. Edward Liveing Fenn, which took place at seven o'clock on Sunday morning at his residence, Alston Court, Nayland. The deceased gentleman, who was well known and universally esteemed, not only in Nayland and Colchester, but throughout a far wider district, was son of the late Dr, Fenn of Nayland, and was born at Stourbank in that parish on August 30, 1818. He was educated at Sherborne College,and afterwards went, to King's, College Hospital in 1861. He took the diploma of M.R.C.S. Eng. in 1865, afterwards studies for a year in Vienna, and in 1873 he became an M.D. of Edinburgh. He held the position of Physician at King's College Hospital (where he had been a distinguished student), be was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London (1893), a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London and also of the British Medical Association.
He resigned his position as physician to King's College Hospital to come home to Nayland to assist his father in practice there and he remained at Nayland for four years,when he went to Richmond, Surrey, where he took over the extensive practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. This practice he carried on for some twenty years with great credit and renown and was consulting physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital. During his residence at Richmond he took a great interest in the public life of the place, he was a member of the municipal vestry, and a churchwarden and he married in 1872 Katharine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace.
Owing to ill health he relinquished practice at Richmond, and came and settled down in Colchester in January 1892, residing at Grey Friars, East Hill. He was shortly afterwards appointed physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, and occupied that position until he retired from practice and left Colchester, in July, 1903, when he was appointed Honorary Physician to the Hospital.
In March 1902, Dr. Fenn inherited Alston Court, Nayland on the death of his aunt, Miss Alston The Alston family have lived in this interesting old house for over 150 years, and when Dr. Fenn left Colchester in 1903 to reside there be took a great interest in its restoration. Among the family papers which he discovered at Alston Court was a valuable and interesting record signed by the famous Dr. Gilberd, of Colchester, which Dr. Fenn presented to the Colchester Town Council, and now hangs near the Gilberd picture in the Moot Hall.
In the autumn of 1892 Dr. Fenn was elected Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and he was President of the East Anglian Division of the British Medical Association in 1898. In February, 1892 his first wife being deceased, he married Edith, second daughter, of Mr Chas. Todd, of Wentworth House, Richmond, who survives him.
Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace and Magistrate for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession, and during his connection with the Essex and Colchester Hospital he was held in very high regard, not only by the medical staff and other officials, but by the patients, while he was also extremely popular among all classes in the borough. He was a devoted member of the Church of England, and was, from 1893 till he left the town, churchwarden of All Saints, taking a keen interest in parochial affairs. At Nayland, as formerly at Colchester, be was foremost it, every good and philanthropic work. He was a member of the Parish Council and of the local Education Authority, and also rendered excellent service in regard to the preservation of footpaths and rights-of-way. In the early part of this year he was taken seriously ill, but, thanks to the skill and care of Dr. Syrett he rallied. About a week ago, however, it became evident that his vital power was failing, and on Sunday morning be quietly passed away, to the deep regret of all who knew him. He leaves five sons by his first marriage, and one son and one daughter by the second marriage. His oldest son, Dr Charles E. Fenn was for some time recently House Surgeon at the Essex and Colchester Hospital and is now in practice in London, another son is an engineer, one is in the Navy, and two are in the Church.

OBITUARY.
EDWARD LIVEING FENN, M.D., M.R.C.P., J.P.,
EX-PRESIDENT OF THE EAST ANGLIAN BRANCH.
DR. E. L. FENN, of Alston Court, Nayland, whose death occurred on December 8th, was the son of the late Dr. Fenn of Nayland, and was born In Nayland on August 20th, 1843 He was educated at Sherborne College, afterwards entered King's College, London, and qualified in 1865. A painstaking and hard-working student he was elected to the office of House-Physician at the hospital. From thence he went to Vienna, where he studied for a year, and, returning to Nayland, he joined his father in practice there. On the death of his father he removed to Richmond, Surrey, in 1871, where he took over the practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. Here for twenty years he carried on an extensive and highclass practice, and was Physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital.
In November, 1872, he married Katherine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace. During his residence in Richmond he took great interest in the public life of the place; he was a member of the municipal vestry and a churchwarden at the parish church. Ill health compelled him to relinquish his practice at Richmond, and he settled down in Colchester in Jauusry, 1892, and resided at Grey Friars, East Hill. In February, 1892, he married again, his second wife belng Edith, a daughter of Mr. C. J. Todd, of Richmond, who survives him. ln 1893 he was elected Physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, where he remained for ten years, and also took a prominent part in the general management of that institution. He carried on a practice as a consulting physician in the town and neighbourhood, having taken the diploma of M.R.C.P. in 1892. In 1903 he finally retired from practice, and settled down in his old family residence of Alston Court, Nayland.
In October, 1892, Dr. Fenn was Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and in 1898 he was President of the East Anglian Branch of the British Medical Association. A capital public speaker, he filled both these offices with distinction. Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession. A dignified gentleman, he was universally beloved and esteemed by all who came into contact with him.
British Medical Journal 21 Dec 1907.

THE FUNERAL:
The funeral of the late Dr. Fenn took place at Nayland on Thursday at noon the sad ceremony being attended with every testimony of the great esteem and respect in which the deceased gentleman was held in Nayland and the large district surrounding. All the shops were closed, and the blinds of every house lowered, and the procession was followed to the graveside by a large number of the school children, who had been given a half holiday by the managers, of which body the deceased was chairman. The remains were enclosed in an elm shell within a coffin of polished oak with brass furniture, and on the breast was a heavy brazen cross, on which was inscribed "Edward Liveing Fenn, died 8th December, 1907. Aged 64 years." The coffin was born from Alston Court, which adjoins St. Stephen's Church, on a bier, and was followed by the mourners viz Dr. Charles E. Fenn, Rev. E.V. Fenn, Lieutenant C. D, Fenn, R.N, Mr. E. J. Fenn (sons), Miss Adria Fenn (daughter), Mrs. Hand, Mrs. Cotes, Mrs. Hopkins (sisters), Miss Cotes (niece), Colonel Fenn C.I.E. (brother), Mrs. Harold Fenn, Miss Todd (sisters-in-law) Mr. A. O. Julius, Mr. Gerald Todd; Mr. Algernon Todd (brothers-in-law), Professor Liveing, Mr. W. Liveing (cousins), Captain Smythies R.N, and Miss Johnson. The servants at Alston Court also followed. The large church was quite filled with a sympathetic congregation, among those who attended the service being Dr. Sydney Curl, Dr. Leigh Day, Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Chichester, Dr. Clowes, Dr.E. Worts, Dr. Bassano, Dr. Renny, Mr. A. G. Buck (representing the Essex and Colchester Hospital, Colchester), Dr. Syrett (Nayland), Rev. J. Storr (Little Horkesley), Rev. R. H Wilkinson (Stoke), Capt. Kelso, R.N., Mr. Neville Stud (Great Horkesley), Mr. R. M. B. Otter-Barry (Little Horkesley). Superintendent Peake (Essex County Constabulary Boxford), Rev. E. C. Sawdy (Congregational minister), P S. Bailey, Messrs. Thomas Cuddon, Raymond Cuddon, Wilfred Deaves, A. Y. Littlebury, F. G. Chippington,C. E. Vowing, W. Cook, G. Grimsey, R. Wheeler, T. Webb, P. Biggs, T. Faiers, F. Harding, W. E. Church, A. E. Harvey (Nayland), etc. At the entrance, the cortege was met by the vicar of Nayland, Rev. J. D. Gray, and the surpliced choir in charge I of Mr W. F. Hindes choirmaster, and the service throughout was conducted by the Vicar. At the conclusion of the lesson," blest are the departed " was played, and after the Nunc Dimittis the organist, Mr. G. W. Brooks Mills also played " Now the labourer's task is o'er;" as the recessional. On nearing the graveside the choir sang " On the Resurrection morning," and the scene as the coffin was lowered into the grave, which was lined with white cloth, was most impressive.
The floral tributes, which were very beautiful, bore the following inscriptions : - "In loving memory, from his wife, sons and daughter"; "From the staff at the Essex and Colchester Hospital, with sincere sympathy and kind remembrances of a friend to all, and a much valued colleague " ; " In affectionate remembrances., L., M., and E. "; "In most loving remembrance. of our dear brother Edward, from his sisters" ; With deepest sympathy, from all at Wentworth House"; "In affectionate remembrance, from Arthur and Bessie Julius"; "With sympathy from the maids at Alston Court"; " "With sincere sympathy, from Mr. and Mrs. , W. F. Hindes"," With deepest regret from the groom and gardener at Alston Court"; "With deepest sympathy from Miss E. Johnson " "With heartfelt regret and sympathy, Mr. and Mrs. W. Le G. Gudgeon, Stourbank, Nayland"; "Captain and Mrs. Smythies, The Turrets, Colchester"; "With ;deepest sorrow for the loss of their kind friend, from the teachers and children of the Nayland Council School " ; " With sincere sorrow from the members of the choir", Dr & Mrs. Frank Syrett, Nayland" ; and From Lady Grant Duff, Lexden Park."
The arrangements for the funeral were admirably carried out by Mr. William Deaves, of Nayland.

Managers Minute book for Nayland School in 1907.
Dr. E. L. Fenn was a member of the School Board of Managers at the time of his death. He appears to have been Chairman for up to 3 years, as his signature appears with this title at the end of the minutes for each meeting from July 1904 to Christmas 1906
"1907 December 11th: A special meeting of the Local Managers was held in the school-room this evening. Present W Dudgeon, F. Deane, J. Blyth, W. Norfolk.
Re: Late chairman. Before proceeding to deal with the business of the evening the Vice-Chairman, W Le G. Dudgeon Esq referred in a sympathetic manner to the decease of the chairman (late) Dr. E.L. Fenn. His remarks were very warmly endorsed by the Managers. He moved the following resolution:- that the Managers of the Nayland Council School desire to record their deep sense of the severe loss they have sustained in the death of Dr. E L Fenn, and their heartfelt sympathy with Mrs. Fenn and her family in their heavy sorrow and bitter bereavement. This resolution was seconded by F Deane Esq and supported by Mr. Norfolk and carried by the remainder. That a copy of this resolution be sent to Dr. Chas. Fenn; also that the School be closed on Thursday afternoon, 12th December the date of interment. Agreed.
From:Mary.George Nayland 2003

EXTRACTS from the WILL of EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Dated 13 Jan 1903 at Colchester ESS.
Appoints Charles Edward Fenn & Arthur Onslow Julius Executors & Trustees.
To my wife L500, all household effects, books, paintings etc, including the oil painting of myself, then to pass to the inheritor of Alston Court (Charles E Fenn)
To Charles E Fenn my diamond ring given to me by my father, my proof engraving of John Hunter.
To Harold L Fenn my gold hunter watch.
To Ernest V Fenn my signet ring.
To my wife during her lifetime my house Alston Court, gardens, pastures, & fennages, being partly freehold and partly copyhold, then at her death to my eldest son Charles.
To my Goddaughter Lucy Dorothea Fenn L100
The residue of his estate to be vested in his Trustees to be invested (some instructions are given) to provide income for his wife, then distributed to his surviving family at her death.
A Codicil is attached dated 26 Jan 1906 noting an advance of L1530 at no interest, to Charles Edward Fenn out of his share of his fathers estate.
Handwritten copy on file - E L Fenn
Proved London 15 Jan 1908 for L30,111-2-1. FHL 1894240 1908 Jan A-L

Research Notes:
Medical Directories;
Dr Edward Liveing Fenn
Kings College Hospital.
M.B. Edinburgh 1865.
Phys.Accouch's Assistant Kings College Hospital 1866.
H P Kings College Hospital 1867
Nayland Assn Kings Col London.
Late H.P. & R.A. Kings Col Hospital.
Author of "Epilepsy" - prize papers read before the Medical Society Kings Col London.
District M.O. Sudbury, Lexden, & Winstree 1871
The Old Palace Richmond in partnership with Bateman 1872
Contributed "Congestion of the Liver" Medical Times Gazette 1868 (1872).
Surgeon Nat. Orphans Home, Ham, and Royal Female Naval School Isleworth 1873 - 1877, 1883.
1 Portland Tce Richmond 1878, 1879, 1883.
Member Pathology Soc. 1879
Surgeon Richmond Hospital 1882, 1883.
Grey Friars Colchester MRCP London 1892, 1893, 1903.

Colchester Medical Society Records;
Elected to Society 4 Aug 1868.
Resigned 3 Oct 1871.
Re-Elected 18 Oct 1892.
President 1896.
Resigned Nov 1903.
Member of the Ipswich & District Clinical Soc. 1905 - 1907.

Transcription of letter, Dr Ed. L. Fenn to Rev Edmund Farrer about the restoration of Alston Court:
Grey Frairs Colchester.
7 Feb 1903.
Re. access to Alston Court Nayland under renovation.
You and your friend are quite welcome to look around the old shell, for there has been such a large amount of substantial repair required that we have not yet reached the more decorative stage. e.g. There is no glass and not many floors in yet. Next to the picturesque courtyard with its carved beams, the Hall will be when restored an interesting feature, the north wall has bulged and the iron beams of the ceiling rusting out were so insecure, I have determined to set up again the original open roof, the beam with carved Kingpost and braces still stands and the remains of a shaft leading up to a spandrel may be seen on the north wall.
The Hall also presents an example of what began to take place at the end of the 15th century by the cutting of from the main hall of a private parlour for the use of the Master and his family, when they no longer dined with the household in the Hall. The small doorway at one end of the partition remains, the window in this inner hall which has been building for centurys (?) was completely glazed when we opened it but the lead was so soft I had it all taken out that it might be releaded. The bessemer beam over the fireplace in the inner hall is the original one which we found bricked up in the wall, but the fireplace and chimney were so insecure I had to rebuild them. In the dining room adjoining where there is at present no floor and the fireplace is lumbered up with the oak rafters from the Hall roof you will note the massive ceiling and the fireplace is the original size, tho rebuilt for the same reason as the inner hall one, the bessemer beam here is a new one the old one having been badly burnt some few years back. The paneling of this room is at least 120 years later than the building and was not introduced till 1631. If you strike a match you may be able to see on the beam between the windows on the east side a little oak figure 13 inches high in the habit of a Flemish soldier in the time of Edward IV. The room was I believe originally hung with painted cloth, a good large fragment of which I shall possess. You will remember how Falstaff try's to console Mrs Quickly for the loss of her tapestry by telling her instead she can have the story of the . . . . . or German hunting or . . . . . work to . . . . .
signed
Edw Fenn
Ref: HD526/101/1 Bury RO.

Essex County Standard Office.
Colchester
January 28, 1904
The following letter, and Essex County Standard newspaper article are contained in a small envelope addressed to Dr Fenn dated 28th of January 1904.
Letter File 2007

Essex County Standard Office
Colchester.
Jan 28th 1904
Telegrams: "County Standard" Colchester
TELEPHONE NO. 42A

Dear Sir,
The document which you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of an article to appear in this week's E. CS. It is to be supplemented by some notes, I venture to keep the document in my safe, hoping that you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester, who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted, and framed and placed in the Town Hall.
In great haste,
Yours faithfully,
W Gurlinly Benham

Discovery of an autograph of Dr William Gilbert, of Colchester.
By the courtesy of Dr E. L. Fenn late of Colchester, and now of Alston Court Nayland, we are enabled to publish the following document, which Dr Fenn has discovered amongst some papers in his possession.

To all Christian people to whom this present writinge shall come William Gilbert of London Esq sendeth greetings to our Lord God everlasting.
Whereas Richard Roberts of London, Tanner can now by his deede of bargaine and sale bearing date of the date hereof all the consideracion therein mencioned hath gyven graunted feoffed bargained and released unto the foresaid William Gilbert his heirs and assignes forever, all his right title clayme and interest with (sic) ever he hadd, hath, or by any meanes, may have in the capitall messuage and rents to the said capital messuage on the part of the North and Sowth with all orchardes and gardens thereunto belonginge with thappertanaunces scituat, lying, and beinge in the parish of St Martyn in Colchester, abuttinge as in and by the said deed more att lardge yt doth and maye appeare.
Now Knowe yee me the said William Gilbert to have made an ordayned and thee's presents in my steade and place putt and constituted my welbeloved in Christ Robert Middleton of Colchester, aforesaid, gentlemen, my true and lawfull Attorney to enter for me, and in my name into the said capital, messuage, rents and other the premises with thappurtanaunces or into any partt or parcell thereof, and the full and peceable possession and seizon thereof, for me, and in my name to take according to the forme and effect, of the saide deed and bargaine and sale, GYVINGE and hereby grauntinge under my said Attorney my full power and authoritie in execucion of the premisses as fully as evey thinge is the lawe will the same permit, and as if I were sceft (sic) were there personaly present, ratefienge, confirminge, and allowinge all, and whatsoever my saide Attorney for me and in my name shall, lawfully doe it cawse to be done in about the said premises, by virtue of their presents.

In witness whereof to this my present writinge, I, the saide William Gilbert have sett my hande and seale.
Dated the One and Twentith daie of Aprill in the Eighth and Thirteenth yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of God, Quene of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faithe, scilicet 1596.
W. Gylbert.
Sealed and delivered to the use of the said Robert Myddleton in the presence of me. Ambrose Gilbert, Leonard Wallworth scr.

This document is of great value and interest as bearing the autograph signature of the great scientist and "first electrician" Only one or two other signatures of Dr William Gilbert are known to exist. Further reference to the subject will be found in our "Colchester and County Notes".



Other Records

1. Pictures:

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as a son aged 7 a scholar born Nayland SFK

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Sherborne School Sherborne DOR. Edward is described as a pupil unmarried aged 17 a scholar born Nayland ESS

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as Head of House aged 27 unmarried general practitioner MB Edin. LRCP Lon. MRSC Eng. born Nayland SFK

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is described as the head of the house, a Physician MD Edin., married, 37yrs, born Nayland SFK.
Also resident in the home were his wife and family and Mary C Julius his sister-in-law, plus 5 staff:
Maria Satchell, cook, unmarried, 50yrs.
Ada L Saxon, parlormaid, unmarried, 30yrs.
Catherine A Collier, nurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
Amelia Mann, undernurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
George King, page, unmarried, 15yrs.

6. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is recorded as head of house widower aged 47 medical practitioner/surgeon. Also in the house were 4 children and 4 servants.

7. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 81 High St Colchester ESS. Edward is recorded as head of house aged 57 married a physician/surgeon born Nayland SFK.
Also in the house were his wife and family, plus a cook, a house maid, parlor maid, and a nurse.

8. Letters: 1890 to 1907. Transcriptions of a collection of letters and cards Edward wrote to his family or others:

March 27, 1890
My dear Harry.
I have lost the country post so you will not get this very early, but I can not let the day pass without writing to wish you very many happy returns of your birthday, and you shall have a present when you come home If there is anything you want, tell me and I will see if I can manage it.
I expect you and Charlie will come home on the same day, and he wants to know if he may walk home, but I have told him he must let me know first how many miles it is and the exact road, he is thinking of coming by
W. Hammond gives you a good report, and therefore I hope you will have a happy holidays, for it is only when you have worked well, that you can feel you have earned your holidays.
Billy Barton was very excited yesterday because his colour (Oxford) won the boat race.
Goodbye,
From your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.


Richmond
Saturday afternoon.
July 12, 1890
My dear Harry.
Our dear auntie Polly died this afternoon, she became so weak and weary at last that she prayed to be at rest.
You boys have good reason to mourn for her for ever since your own dear mother died. Auntie Polly has done her very best to fill her place and help you one and all that you might miss her as little as possible and we must never forget her.
Goodbye, my dear boy
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This short letter is in a black rimmed envelope addressed; Master H L Fenn, Malvern House, River, North Dover

Richmond
September 24, 1890
Wednesday evening.
My dear Harry.
I hope you have recovered from ill effects of both wasps and cricket ball both punishments must have been very unpleasant. It is a pity you had not "Sequah" near at hand to cure you.
Our great excitement here was the thunderstorm yesterday, three houses were struck in Richmond. But the worst was Mrs Brewin's house at Strawberry hill, the children were in the nursery and Mrs Brewin and her friend were in the front drawing-room. When the lightning struck the chimney filled the nursery with sulphurous smoke and threw down the ceiling in the back drawing-room, yet no one was in the least injured. The storm raged for an hour. Cyril, nurse and Baa took refuge at Ms Quirks as Cyril could not come back from school during the storm.
Your portraits have not yet come, you shall have some of them when they are ready.
Vandy is removed into the upper fifth. Tip cut his foot with some glass the other day, he bled a good deal on the terrace that he is well now.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.

Richmond
September 28, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am sending you the proofs of the photographs they are all good, but the two I liked best 5888B and 5889A. You may keep these and give any of them away if he wish to so, when Bertha comes home, she might like one. I think Tip comes out greatly. I hope your back has got quite well: Winnie Bateman fell down in the Park yesterday and broke her arm a second time. They had all come with Cyril and Baa up into the park for tea and games and this was one of the results. Cyril is in the upper school now, which is very nice to him. Billy is going to church tomorrow morning, (it being the feast of St Michael and all Angels), with Miss Annie Proctor, nurse is to sit in another pew.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.


My dear Harry
A few lines only to thank you for your letter, and to say I am very pleased to hear you have done well in arithmetic. I have not seen squeak, but I have heard his coach, trumpeting along in the distance: I hope someday you will be a better doctor than he is, for he is only a quack.
Van is coming home on Saturday for the mid-term exeat, and he and Cyril are to dine and spend the afternoon at auntie Annie: I hear that Jack Bateman has broken his arm again. His bones must give very easily.
Billy Barton is wearing a Scotch camp on Sundays, which pleases him mightily.
I take Tip for a long run every afternoon, he is miserable if he thinks he is not to go and won't lose sight of me for a moment. He is rather noisy, each time I start from the house, which is not always pleasant.
Goodbye, dear boy
Your affectionate father,
Edward L. Fenn.
October 28, 1890
This letter in a small envelope was addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House, River, Dover and is damaged.

My dear Van
I expect Mr Allen has told you, you are to come home next Saturday for an exeat until Monday at 11. Aunt Annie wants you to dine at her house with Cyril that she may see something of you in the afternoon and you will come down after tea. I am glad to hear you are working well and making the most of your opportunities. Billy goes every day to Miss Proctor for his lessons, Bible reading, saying hymns and catechism etc, he is quite at home at the vicarage: I dare say you will go in there with them next Sunday.
You made one great mistake in your letter you say "he will no what that means" fancy spelling know, no - shocking
Goodbye dear boy
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Richmond
October 28, 1890

My dear Harry
I hope you have received the hamper safely, cookie was to take it to Victoria this afternoon. I enclose you nine stamps for your letters. Did I tell you that when Dolly went to the dentist a week or so ago he pulled out the wrong truth by mistake. It was most unfortunate. Yesterday Cyril had his mid-term holiday, and he and nurse and Billy went to the Crystal Palace. They enjoyed their day very much Vandy also ahead his exeat from Saturday to Sunday morning.
Auntie Annie, and Win are going to Harrowgate on Friday, the latter had her arm taken out of the splints yesterday. I do not want you to write to many letters so the week, you write to auntie Ada you need not write home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Richmond
November 4, 1890

Richmond
November 17, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am glad to hear that you were not bitten by the mad dog, I suppose all the animals it bit have been killed, and the poor children properly treated. Do you recognize the photograph is it the same man you saw at River and Harrogate? I think he must have emptied all our pockets here by this time, and that he will soon be moving somewhere else.
Vandy's mid-term report was quite a good one it said, "a very good worker who has been making good progress, especially of late, his Latin grammar is especially good".
The new Mayor and Corporation are going to the parish church next Sunday morning for a special service. Sir Whitaker Ellis is our Mayor. Now that I have given up my open carriage Tip misses his regular afternoon run and has to be content with a walk with Billy in the morning and up to Thatchers with Robert in the afternoon.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
Wednesday evening.
February 25, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I do not think I have written to you for some time, so must send you a few lines tonight to let you know I have not forgotten you. I hope you have not been having such terrible fogs as we have been enduring here. Last evening I left Ham Common about six o'clock and we crept along to Petersham but near Barnham Corner see nothing and I had to get out of my carriage and lead one of the horses all the way home I had to walk close to the edge of the footpath to find my way.
Baa went today to the vicarage for the first time since his chickenpox. I have no doubt, they made a great fuss of him. He tells me he saw all four Miss Proctors
Tip seems quite to have recovered the loss of his toenail. I think he had bent it backwards in a scuffle with Pickles, and we had to send him to the dog doctor who removed it for him.
Work carefully at your mathematics, English and French are very important for examinations.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
March 4, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I enclose you 1/- worth of stamps. Charlie wrote last week to say an enormous hole had appeared in his trousers and he must have a new pair as these were past mending, so I was obliged to say he might, as I was afraid otherwise he might be going about like a Highlander in a kilt.
I have just recovered from a sharp attack of asthma, had to keep my bed all Monday but I have been out on my round today.
You will soon be enjoying the pleasant spring walks and lambs, birds nests and flowers, though you will see more of these at the beginning of next term, as we may expect plenty of cold wind yet.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
March 27, 1891.
My dear Harry.
Very many happy returns of your birthday to you - I am still up in my bedroom but getting on gradually and I hope next week to be able to get away to the south of France for two or three weeks and I may see you before I start.
Goodbye, dear boy.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is in a small envelope and addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House River, North Devon

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 10 1893
My dear Van
You will be glad to hear that baby is better, I think I may say that today is the first day we have felt at all happy about her since she was taken ill last Wednesday week.
I had your report last week and was very much pleased with it, you were top for the month and doing well in all your subjects so I hope you will get into the first class for one term before you leave.
Uncle George Hand has been appointed captain of the Shannon lying in Bantry Bay, he is not at all pleased as he wanted another ship which is stationed at Harwich near his house at Dedham.
I am afraid you will not see much of Cyril at Easter he breaks up so late, it is very unfortunate.
With Mater's love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
September 21, 1893
My dear Van
I am sending off today the following books:
1 Hamilton - algebra
2 Pendleburgh - arithmetic
3 Bradley - composition
4 Creighton - history
5 Stedmans - French exams
A classical atlas which will I daresay do as well as the . . . .
So you must order revisers Greek Testament, Benrose(?) Latin verse book, Baureres(?) French grammar.
Glad to get your letter and to know you are comfortably settled. Tell us next about your journey did you go through the Box tunnel? How long did you wait at Taunton etc? Is there a Mrs Thornton?
Would love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn
You ought to get the books on Saturday

Grey Friars
May 7, 1895
My dear Van
I quite meant to have written to you yesterday to tell you we have neither of the books you want so you must get them. Harry and Cyril took away Hall and Knight algebra one of which was doubtless yours. I am glad you like your new study and that you will make good use of it I have no doubt. When Harry last wrote he and two friends were going to make the ascent of the Roche de Naye mountain, 6430 feet high and he says he has been catching some beautiful fish in the lake.
Mr and Mrs Brown have gone away for three weeks and they are going to stay at Oxford with Mrs B's sister.
I drove Edgar over to Dedham last Friday in the dogcart and we had tea with Aunt Annie it was very dusty and windy on the road. As I am writing now in the study clouds of dust continue to roll by, we very much want some beautiful showers of rain to lay the dust and make the vegetables grow.
Edgar is delighted with Miss Peachey
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
May 12, 1895
My dear Van
You are doubtless enjoying the real summer weather, but here we very much want rain, for nothing will grow in the kitchen garden until we get some reviving showers. Charlie Todd bought Miss Winch down here on Friday they stayed one night she seemed to be very pleasant and good-natured but does not talk much. Next Friday (DV) Mr Todd comes down and stays over the Sunday.
Have you heard of Harry's near escape on the mountain? As I do not think you have I will quote his words:
"I and some other chaps began to go up the Rocke de Naye all went well until we got up about 5000 feet then we had to go up steep slopes covered with frozen snow the snow was very hard and it was also freezing hard, well we ascended by dint of hard work cutting our way up them, after we had gone up about 100 yards (I forgot to tell you these slopes were covered with huge rocks) we walked along the top of the slope under a huge set of rocks, after a bit we had to get round one, three of the boys got round and then I came I got half way when just as I was bringing my right foot round to another step my left foot and the step gave way, immediately I began to go down these tremendous slopes at a terrific pace, I crashed through between two trees and then down I went getting faster and faster if it was possible. I pressed my alpine stock head hard down on the snow it made no difference except to keep my head from going down head foremost well at last I crashed on to a rock and rolled over 6 feet to the ground on the other side and would you believe it I was none the worse for it except very much bruised cut and shaken. I went down quite 80 feet it was steeper than the slope in front of the drawing-room window"
He says if he had fallen a little further he would have been dashed to pieces over the precipice.
Thank God for preserving him I say
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Littlehampton
June 26, 1895
My dear Van
We have reached the end of our very pleasant holiday and return home tomorrow (DV). I see the Saijemans(?) still flourish on the beach both Mr and Ben. Last Saturday Charlie came down and stayed until Monday morning going back by the 7:42. Sunday afternoon he and I went for a long walk through Arundel Park, we were very hurried returning to the station and after walking along 5 miles an hour for the last half hour (downhill most of the way) we got into the station just in time to see the train steam out; so we sat an hour and cooled ourselves. C goes in for his examination tomorrow, he is rather anxious but I am very hopeful he will pass all right this time. Your report has come and is satisfactory as you are top in form, but bad in French and still improving in mathematics, you must stick close to the latter as mathematics help to make the mind clear and logical. I should think you are old enough now to enjoy some of Prescott's histories e.g. The Conquest of Mexico or Peru or The History of Columbus by Sir Arthur Helps.
I enclose you six stamps which will last you to the end of the term. Harry sent me a good group of Mr Masson and his pupils this morning, He comes home on the 20th.
Love from Mater Edgar and Bobo
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
April 27, 1896
My dear Van
I do not think you have been vaccinated since you were a baby so it will be safer for you to take this opportunity to be done again, the smallpox epidemic seems to be spreading in different parts of England owing to the culpable neglect of vaccination.
Mr Brown came back from Oldham later on Saturday evening to take the duty yesterday - we gave him some supper on his arrival but he slept at the Rectory - he came in again last evening and left early this morning on his return to Oldham, they expect to be away three weeks
I missed your help very much with the Easter offering book and am getting on very slowly I'm afraid.
Edgar went with me to the evening service yesterday as there was no one to go with him to St Botolph's in the afternoon. I think he likes Miss Collings as well as he did Miss Peachy
We are having the windows on the garden side of the house painted for the woodwork was beginning to decay from want of paint to keep out the wet.
Bo and Adria are very well, they have what used to be our bedroom for their night nursery now
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
May 8, 1896
My dear Van
I suppose you have by this time settled down to the regular routine of work. I see you left Jason behind you I do not know whether it was intentional or not but keep up your reading of all kinds of literature. I hope the shirts arrived in Tiverton in safety Charlie's shoes never reached him, I am afraid you must have tied the address label on carelessly and that it got pulled off in transit. I wrote to the P.O. about it but they wanted to know what day and hour you posted it and that I could not tell them - I suppose you do not remember.
The old house at Nayland had a narrow escape of being burned down yesterday Aunt Margaret happened by chance to go into the kitchen about three o'clock in the afternoon and saw the beam just above the fireplace in a blaze, she quickly called Wisby(?) and they ran for Mr Deaves and his men and with buckets of water they fortunately put it out, if it had gone on for another 10 minutes I believe all the old part of the house would have been burnt to the ground - I was at Nayland yesterday and saw the burnt beam and the kitchen was in a frightful mess from soot and dirt and water. Mary gets slowly weaker and weaker and has at times a good deal of pain but she is very patient. Adria is rather fretty with Tish coming
All here send their love to you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
May 20, 1896
My dear Van
I was going to send you a paper giving an account of the great fire at Richmond but Linnie has frustrated me - it must have been a terrific affair. You will be sorry to hear that poor Mary died in the hospital last Saturday after much sad suffering born with great patience and resignation. We buried her yesterday just at the foot of little Dorothy's grave. The Webbs at the cemetery two your servants (sic), and two nurses from the hospital and myself followed her to the grave. We shall greatly miss her for she was a good faithful friend and servant of the old school.
I am glad you have moved into a better bedroom, I hope you are going to have a try for the prose or verse prize it is always good practice to go in and even if you do not win.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Wentworth House
Richmond Green S. W.
July 15, 1896
My dear Van
We have had a very warm week at Richmond and the heat has been rather too much for Bow who has been very poorly for two days - we have seen a good many old friends since we arrived. The opening of the new ward at the hospital brought together a great many, and yesterday there was a diocesan missionary gathering at Sir Whitaker Ellis's house where I saw others.
Florence takes the children by the waterside generally as it is cooler there than anywhere else and Bow delights in seeing the trains go over the bridge.
Charlie dined here on Monday, he rode over from Thames Ditton on his bicycle and as he was entering Richmond he ran into a dustcart owing to some mutual dodging and bent his machine which he had to leave behind and return by train.
I have been to the Sherborne commemoration this year so cannot go to Tiverton though Mr Thornton sent me a card of invitation to luncheon; I hope you all have a good day.
I am so disappointed at Cyril's complete collapse at his exam; that I feel very hopeless about him - but I must try and get him another nomination for a last chance if I can.
With love to you from Mater and all here
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
September 13, 1896
My dear Van
I enclose the health certificate, if Mr Chase has any reason to suppose you have been exposed to infection during the past week I shall trust to his communicating the fact to Mr Thornton.
I am afraid the weather has been very unsettled with you as it has been here but I dare say you have enjoyed the novelty of your surroundings. I attended a luncheon yesterday at the new School recently built by the Roman Catholics here; Cardinal Vaughan presided and made a very sensible speech. I was introduced to him and had a few minutes conversation, later on I drove over to Nayland to see Mr Palmer's patient and managed 10 minutes with Aunt Margaret, but we shall go over and see her again on her birthday next Friday.
There will be a vacancy at Paxman's works before Christmas so I must devise something for Harry to do until then. Aunt Isabella is I believe still at Clacton and we rather talk of going over there on Tuesday for the afternoon and so give Grace a blow of fresh air. We went to a concert on Thursday given by Arthur Roberts it was very amusing.
We are I am glad to say all well here - Bo still calls out for Annie sometimes.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

57 Marine Parade
Great Yarmouth
September 27, 1896
My dear Van
Mater and I came down here last Friday and we hope to stay until Tuesday week. Mr and Mrs Todd propose joining us here tomorrow, we are most fortunate in our apartment nice large rooms facing the sea, very clean, cooking good etc
Bo was very sad when we left home crying after us "Bobo cab to".
Grace and Miss Ethel Auchinclass(?) are staying at Grey Friars to keep house and look after the babys and Harry. The latter has had a bad cold with a bad asthma and inflamed eyes - he was getting better however when we left. He goes up to 45 Great Marlborough St on Wednesday from month and then goes on to Wentworth House until Christmas, as he is going to attend classes at King's College for one term before he begins a course of practical engineering at Paxman's works.
We went to St Nicholas Church this morning for a grand thanks-giving service for the Queen's long reign, it is you know the largest parish church in England it was quite full - the Mayor and Corporation, the Norfolk Regiment, an artillery contingent, sailors, police, and the general public filled every seat in the church. They say there were about 4000 in the church, we had a grand special service with the band, the Vicar of Yarmouth preached a stirring sermon we both enjoyed it greatly, after the . . . . congregation had dispersed Mater and I stayed for a quiet celebration of the Holy Communion.
With love from us both
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 21, 1896
My dear Van
I thought the enclosed toast list drawn up my Mr Benham with humorous drawings of ancient and modern Colchester might amuse you. Observe the oysters being offered to Cunbeliuos(?) also the Roman soldiers devouring them and slaves opening them in front, then old King Cole etc etc.
I enjoyed the banquet yesterday for Lord Roseberry spoke exceedingly well and with great earnestness.
Gilbert who you see on one of the oyster shells was a natural philosopher who live in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I and discovered a good deal in connection with magnetism which has finally developed into the electric light which they talk of introducing into Colchester. Gilbert was buried in Trinity Church here
Cyril tells me that old Foster has retired from school work and that Minnie is now the head, I hope all this will not affect his passing.
The babies are very flourishing they are crawling at a tremendous pace now, and will soon walk expect
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 15, 1896
My dear Van
Your report was quite satisfactory though Francis still points out your weak points as I daresay he often does to you. He says your work is well prepared and that composition occasionally shows more life. Your essay writing is weak, that you wander from your subject. Mathematical report that you always try your best, I hope as you read more both prose and verse your powers of composition will develop.
I am afraid Cyril's chances are very small in December Mr Foster says he works steadily but is so dreadfully slow, so in examination he is nowhere.
Mater and I went yesterday to a matinee at the theatre and saw the "Sign of the Cross" it was really very well put on and the subject was treated quite reverently; the scene lies in the time of Nero and the catastrophe is brought about by the young Christian girl converting Marcus the Roman prefect who was in love with her to Christianity, and they passed hand-in-hand from the dungeon to the amphitheatre and the lions.
Harry you know is at Wentworth house now, greatly enjoying himself
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 29, 1896
My dear Van
How dreadfully soon you break up this term we seem hardly to have settled down quietly from the effects of the summer holidays and here you and Cyril we will be upon us in about a fortnight. Cyril passed his medical all safely and now for the real text I hope most on sincerely he may succeed though my hopes are very faint I am afraid. I cannot expect him to do more than his best however.
We had our Shakespeare reading party last Thursday the arrangements much the same as when we had two years ago. The bow window in the drawing room a bank of flowers for the stage, tea in the study, and supper in the dining room. Everyone said it was a most brilliant evening so we were repaid for our trouble.
Harry is teaching Mabel and Adria Todd to ride a bicycle, I believe they can both manage it pretty well. Mr Weir of Horksley died last Monday after a short illness, I saw him two or three times with Mr Palmer.
With love from Mater and the family upstairs
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
February 5, 1897
My dear Van
I am afraid you have not had many letters as yet so I will send you a short one this evening. Harry has began his work very well and is I think quite interested in what he has to do - it has been a bad week for him to begin work at 6:30 a.m. wot - wot - wot his alarm goes off at six and he makes himself a cup of cocoa before he starts on his bicycle. A paper was given him today to fill up with the other workmen to say how many hours work he had done, I believe he put some 26 hours as he did not begin until after breakfast on Tuesday.
Aunt Lucy has settled Lewis at Stubbington - the Fosters seem to think that Cyril has been dull and slow over his work ever since he had the measles, I think I must make some enquiries about Epsom College for him after Easter, they have a good modern side there, and it seems useless for him to do any more classics. I hope you will do well in your exam and it will be nice clearing off "Little Jo" before you go up to the University
Have you heard that Aunt Lucy has taken a house at Midhurst close to Aunt Margaret and I think she could not have done better - very pretty and healthy. Rees is at a private tutor at Bramley near Guildford.
Mater and I went to London on Wednesday to a matinee of "Under the Red Robe" we enjoyed it very much but the roads were like running rivers and we went straight from the station to the theatre and back again
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
February 11 1897?
My dear Van
Harry asked me to enclose some more photos to make yours . . . . . complete.
Edgar is doing more work now and Mr Brown comes to him twice a week - Mr Todd is lending him a leg rest for his plaster of paris leg is very heavy, and his thigh aches at times. I have asked Mr Fry the house surgeon and one of Harry's friends Mr Kennedy to dine with us on the 21st and I have taken stalls at the theatre so we shall go there afterwards and see the "The French Maid" which they tell me is very amusing.
I hope to go to London before it is over to see the performance of Julius Caesar at Her Majesty's Theatre.
I hope you are in the minority in the vote on the Civilisation v Barbarism debate you have only to read the accounts given by any traveller in the uncivilised countries to see the squalor misery and suffering endured by the "noble untutored savage" I go with Tennyson, better a year of Europe than a cycle in Cathay or words to that effect.
Harry reads Bardolph next Tuesday, I hope we shall be able to get his hands clean before he goes.
Beau goes with his mother to a children's party at Miss Peachey's tomorrow - a conjurer is expected - I hope Beau will sit still.
Last night he was put to bed but was not asleep so Florence said, shall I take you in my arms and rock you off in the next room, "Oh Nannie says B how can you take a poor little boy out of his warm bed I think you had better go into the next room and do your work" so she did and in a minute or two she heard him snoring.
I hear from Harrogate that Aunt Ada has been very unwell but is getting better.
Love from Mater and babies
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 5, 1897
My dear Van
We were much interested in your budget postcard, quite a little book. I suppose you experienced a very heavy gale last Tuesday, as its chief force seems to have expended itself on the south and west coasts.
We had gone that evening to a Shakespeare reading at Miss Lockwood's and at 10:30 when we were about to start it was blowing and raining great guns; three sets of people had come on foot the Hunt's the Curtis's and the Mitchell's so we sent our carriage two journeys before we started ourselves. One gentleman the curate at St Giles in walking down the garden path to the carriage had his hat blown off and of course he saw it no more for it was pitch dark.
I walked over to Nayland this morning and sat for three quarters of an hour with Aunt Margaret who looks wonderfully well, she walks better than she did and has got as far as Mr Rees on the Stoke Road. I had luncheon with the Palmers and came back in the omnibus.
Cyril had a preliminary test 10 days ago and did much better than he has done before so we must still hope on. Aunt Annie stayed here two night's last week, one night we went to the theatre and saw Arthur Roberts and the next night we had two of Harry's fellow pupils Mr Seeker and Mr Jones - Preece had an engagement and could not come, Dr and Miss Mitchelson and a neice and young Mr Larsen. Our new organist Mr Tyndall came in after dinner and played I had the old piano tuned for the occasion
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
March 19, 1897
My dear Van
Your report arrived a few days ago, good in most respects but poor Mr Francis still groans over your composition tho you have cheered him a little even in this for he says "composition shows a little more vigour multiply this still more and use the great models more and dictionaries less". I daresay he tells you how to try and do this, we used to be told to read a paragraph of Cicero again and again until we knew it by heart or at any rate had fully grasped the method of expression.
Cyril goes to London next Tuesday for the examination returning to Stubbington on Saturday and his holidays begin on April 6, a week before yours unfortunately. We are expecting Mr and Mrs Todd next Thursday to stay with us until the following Tuesday they want to see the grandchildren.
Edgar's leg has been so troublesome the muscles starting when he walked that he has gone back to the irons and gets on more comfortably now. There was a long report about the Post Office affairs in the Morning Post a few days after your debate - if it had appeared a little sooner it would have a afforded you material for your speech. Mr Hales from Ardleigh is to take Canon Irvine's place and my old school fellow Mr Ball from Mersea goes to Ardleigh.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
The two men injured on North Hill are getting on well

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Thames Embankment
May 17, 1897
My dear Van
Here we came last Thursday and hope to stay for a week returning home next Friday. The weather meant well for it changed the day we arrived, I am not sure so long as it was fine that I should not have preferred it to be rather cooler. We are making a round of the theatres we have seen Ellen Terry in "Mme St Gene" and we have been to the opera once Faust. Tonight we are going to see "The Physician" on Friday met Simon at Wentworth House and met meet Mr and Mrs Gergun and baby - the last pretty little mite, but certainly a mite - on Sunday morning I was not well so we stayed at home and Uncle Harold called and so fortunately we saw him - in the afternoon we went to Richmond, the Mater stopped at Wentworth House while I went on to him to see the Bishop of Christ Church and found him not feeling well but I sat with him in his room for some time - Aunt Alice was staying in London so I only saw Polly and Ethel the latter was very anxious to meet you but I told her that she had no chance of doing so unless she called upon you at Tiverton
Uncle Arthur [59] and Bunt Bessie took me all over the place, all very nice, a long garden plus two pigs, plus horse and pony, plus a chicken run. I thought it all very nice and comfortable especially in the summer. Today we had been looking in the shop windows and then went to the Guildhall, where we met Mr Todd to see the collection of pictures by painters of the Victorian age
We left Harry with a bad cold which became asthmatic after we left so that he had to go on the sick list - the babies we hear keep very well.
Cyril tells me they all drew lots as to who should go to see the Jubilee Procession, he lost I am pleased to say for the losers were to go to the Naval Review at Spithead which will be much better for him.
How about the Latin dictionary you must get a new one if you fail to get a second hand one, it's a good plan to get one half bound, it is so much stronger than cloth. With love from Mater who thanks you for your letter
I remain
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
May 19, 1897
Dear Van
I have just seen a second-hand large White and Riddle Latin English dictionary clean and good order 9/6 - if you have not ordered one I think you had better send me a line by return and I will buy it and send it down to you. I shall just have time as we go home on Friday.
Charlie dines with us tonight and we go to see "Saucy Sally"! Tomorrow Aunt Isabella and Dolly dine with us and we go to see "Seats of the Mighty"
Mater is waiting for me
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

White Hart Hotel
Reigate
Surrey
Wednesday, June 16, 1897?
My dear Van
Here came Mater and I last Monday to stay with Mr and Mrs Todd and tomorrow is the wedding day and home we go (DV) on Friday. Bertie and Nellie Evered drove over and paid us a short visit last evening Horley is about 4 miles from Reigate.
I believe there is to be a large gathering at this wedding feast. This is a nice old-fashioned country Inn our sitting-room looks into the garden with a French window opening on to the lawn. Yesterday we had a very pretty drive through the lanes to Cheapsted about 5 miles to the north of this. Mater and I propose returning to Grey Friars on Friday Mr Gwyon(?) has not heard of a curacy yet but yesterday we went to see a vicar near Norwood, but I am not sure if Mr G. will take it. I hear that Edgar is enjoying his visit at Richmond immensely, he spent three hours at the vicarage one day and is to go again to have tea with the vicar.
With love from Mater and self
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
July 2, 1897
My dear Van
You seem to have had a very spirited celebration on Jubilee day, I should have liked to see the ring of beacons handing on the good news from hill to hill.
Cyril wrote us a capital account of the naval review - he seems to have thoroughly enjoyed himself - he went over the "Renown" and the "Eldorado", the Prince of Wales sent word on board for the cadets to splice the mainbrace, and then he ordered them a glass of port wine all round.
Edgar will come home next Tuesday (Mater's writing) he seems to have enjoyed himself in the immensely - he went to see the river fete, they were in a nice garden and saw it very well and to crown all did not get back till 10:30!! Your friend Mr Minchin had lunch and tea here last Thursday this Thursday we had a garden party about 35 or 40 people - croquet . . . . . (in abundance) ices and strawberries were the chief attraction with two exceptions viz Bo and Chick who appeared in white from head to foot (E.L.F's writing) and were much admired. Harry is on the sick list today
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Mater and Father

Grey Friars
Colchester
July 22, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I suppose you will not know the result of your examination for some time - I trust you have passed - at any rate I am sure that you have done your best. Have you heard from Aunt Ada at all about going to Harrowgate this year she mentioned it to me some months back but not lately
Today we have the National School Festival at the Holly Trees I think it will be fine - yesterday for about two hours we had a big thunderstorm and deluge of rain; though not so badly as Ipswich where much damage was done and two boys and a pony killed
The Swimming Match day here is fixed at August 12 Harry is rather excited about it as he hopes to win the plates under water, Cyril I hear swam his test distance but his style was not so inelegant that they would not pass him. Florence is away for two weeks one of which has expired I am thankful to say for we have both babies in our room and our nights owing to Beau's company are, to put it mildly, lively, Chick is very good until 6 a.m. when she wakes up for sports and pastimes
I took the chair last Monday at a SPG Missionary meeting, after it we received the Bishop of . . . . . and about a dozen of our friends had tea in the garden
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

7 Cavendish Place
Eastbourne
October 1, 1897
My dear Van
I hope you had a comfortable journey with no mishaps on Tuesday. We enjoyed rather a tedious one for the 12:42 was very slow and tiresome up to Chelmsford and then we had 11/2 hours to wait at London Bridge, so first of all we had some luncheon and then walked across to the Southwark pro Cathedral i.e. St Saviour's Church which has been lately so beautifully restored. We had a carriage to ourselves most of the way down here, our rooms are very comfortable and close to the sea. Eastbourne is a much larger place than I thought it was they have built so many fine private houses at the west end. We amuse ourselves chiefly in walking and sitting about by the seafront. This morning Mater declining the treat, I rode on one of the Char-a-bangs (motorised transport) to Beachy Head. I enjoyed it all very much as you wind up the hillside you get a very good bird's eye view of the place and when you get to the top the precipitous chalk cliffs are very grand.
I expect you escaped the thunderstorm of Wednesday night, Harry said it was heavy at Colchester, one very sharp clap even waking up Beau but he was not at all alarmed.
We propose going to Wentworth House next Thursday and so home on Friday in time for Chicks Happy Tea
With love from the Mater
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
October 10, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I enclose 2/6 so that you can put your name down for 5/- for the bookcase.
When your turn for reading the lessons comes round, try and get away somewhere where it you can read them out aloud, it makes such a difference when you come to read them out in Chapel - the verses sound so much more familiar if you have heard the sound of the words before - merely running your eye over the chapter is of little help compared with the previous recital aloud - remember it is almost impossible to be too slow - slowness, distinctness and proper emphasis are the points for a beginner to cultivate.
We enjoyed our two visits very much and we enjoyed lovely weather both at Eastbourne and Richmond. Mr Todd, Mater, Mabel and I went to the Victorian era exhibition at Earls Court and enjoyed it very much - the animated photographs are very wonderful - you see the horses in the (diamond) Jubilee procession (22 June 1897) walking along and tossing their heads and the people waving hats and handkerchiefs - the only thing as thrown on the screen is an exact representation of what took place(sic).
Charlie has settled down comfortably at:
6 Alexandra Place
Jesmond
Newcastle on Tyne
With love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 5, 1897
My dear Van
We are enjoying? dull cold north-east winds and skies - I expect you are warmer or wetter in Devon.
Yesterday Mater and I with Florence and the two babies drove to Nayland for them to plant their Jubilee trees in Aunt Margaret's garden. The gardener had prepared two get capacious holes into which they descended with their little spades and with his help they soon securely planted two apple trees, they then adjourned to the ancient kitchen and enjoyed a hearty and substantial tea. Aunt M was I thought very lame. Tomorrow Harry goes to the Macandrews for a bicycle "Hare and Hounds" Mary Macandrew and he to be the hares.
I have obtained your certificate of birth if you should want it for Cambridge, I have heard nothing from Mr Francis as yet - ought I to write to him or do you think he has settled the matter? Mr Brown thinks Edgar might begin Greek soon
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
I do not think I ever congratulated you on getting full marks for your holiday prep. You deserved your Tennyson.

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 30 1897
My dear Van
I suppose you are now in the midst of the exam; I hope the papers will suit you and that you will make a fair show. You will return, I presume, by the same route as you went on Friday so we shall not see anything of you, but you will get a whiff of East Anglian air.
I do not think you remember your cousin Launcelot Giles he entered Christchurch last October. When you go into residence you will make his acquaintance. I believe his father is to be the new Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, curiously the professorship of Chinese at Oxford fell vacant yesterday; I expect Uncle Herbert would rather have gone there if he had known it was so soon to be vacant, for his wife's relations live there and his father was an Oxford man; still having Lance at Christ's may be an attraction though on the other hand Lionel is at Wadham.
Beau is much better now and has gone for his first walk today - he has had two drives already. Mr Tanner from St John's College, Cambridge lectures here tonight upon "The Dissolution of the Monasteries" with Limelight illustrations.
Edgar has not begun Greek yet so now I suppose it will be postponed until next term.
I am very sorry to see the death of Archdeacon Jones-Bateman at Zanzibar, he was a pillar in the central African mission
Love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
P. S. you will remember to give the porter who let you lodgings a tip, 1/- ? Ask Chase what.

address defaced
December 16, 1897
My dear Van
I enclose 25/- for your travelling expenses I think you come back on the 20th?
We are expecting Cyril this evening. Mater and I enjoyed our two days at Richmond we spent the major part of Tuesday in London roaming through the shops.
I was sorry to miss Lionel Giles who was coming to stay with Aunt Isabella last evening, he took a first on Monday at Oxford - he is at Dedham. Charlie comes down by boat from Newcastle on the 22nd he talks of going to Richmond on the 28th
With love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 19, 1898
My dear Van
Many happy returns of your birthday and may you ever grow in grace and wisdom and usefulness as the years recur.
I hope you are fairly well again but do not use your eyes to soon if they show any sign of weakness. I am sending you a watch chain and spade guinea attached I thought your watch would last a short time longer you have taken good care of it and will deserve another someday. Grace is staying here and Mr Todd comes (DV) next Friday for four or five days and he will escort her back.
Next Monday Mr Fry H S at the hospital and Mr Kennedy a fellow pupil of Harry's dine with us and we are going to the theatre afterwards to see the "French Maid"
I had a long day in London on Wednesday and saw Uncle Ernest in his room at the Guards Hospital
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friday's
Colchester
January 30, 1898
My dear Van
Many thanks for sending us the "Navy and Army" it is an interesting number, I could not however recognize Cyril amongst those splicing the mainbrace though the cadet on the left hand of the picture looked like him.
Edgar is carried down to the playroom every day now and is getting on happily I hope. Harry took a spin around Dedham, Stoke and Nayland and used yesterday afternoon and he(?) saw and had a little talk with Aunt Annie in Dedham Street and Ann Margaret gave him some tea before he left Nayland.
The Bishop of Colchester preached at our church this morning a quiet thoughtful sermon on the Transfiguration; the picture of this by Raphael, engraving of which you are familiar with, struck me when I saw it in the Vatican Gallery at Rome as one of the most beautiful pictures in Italy the colouring of our Lord's face was so wonderful.
I have nearly got to the last page of Tennyson's life and the more one reads him the more one is astonished at his great genius and what a mine of philosophy and religion is buried in his poems only to be dug out by careful study. I advise you to continue to read him and to commit pages which strike you as beautiful to memory. Those who knew him say that he is - far and away - the only English poet to be ranked alongside Shakespeare
With love from us all at home
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 2, 1898
My dear Van
I have been hoping to hear from you as you ought to be fairly convalescent by this time but perhaps your eyes are weak and the doctor thinks you had better not use them.
The Britannia is quite disorganised, 180 cases of either measles mumps or whooping cough fortunately he is not down with either, I fancy indeed that he has had all three.
Mr Todd and Grace left us yesterday the Grand Papa was pleased with Beau and Chick who were very good friends especially when he shook his box of sweets at them.
I have bought a bath chair and a carrying chair for Edgar, as he will probably not be able to use his foot in walking for another year nearly, I think they will be very useful and helpful for him.
What a snowstorm you seem to have had at Tiverton and indeed in all the west and south of England, here we have not had a flake. Cyril and two other cadets won a prize for modelling a Sphinx in snow - the other prize was won by some cadets who modelled a Man of War
Mr Minchin and Mr Ingram had luncheon with us on Monday, the former as usual wanted to hear about you and Tiverton.
With love from Mater and boys
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 20, 1898
My dear Van
I suppose you have quite shaken down into regular work again, I hope to some extent you will be able to make up for lost time. Cyril has migrated to "Sick Quarters" Ford Hill Dartmouth a victim to mumps and I am sorry he has had this interference with his regular work but I hope particularly it may not prevent his being confirmed as I had an idea it was fixed for the end of this month.
Harry is better but will not go back to work for a few more days in fact he may go to Richmond on Friday for the boat race and come back on Sunday night and then return to the workshop on Monday he looks thin and pulled own - Fancy that great baby's 21st birthday is next Monday week. Today is Dolly's 21st I sent her a pearl ring.
I am just going to take Edgar across to the children's afternoon service in his bath chair.
5:45 p.m. the babies have just gone to bed. Edgar and I managed very well I went quarter of an hour before service began and placed him in his chair next to the font and I sat in Denton's pew by his side, after the first part of the service was over Mr Brown told the children about some Chinese mission work.
Next Tuesday week Mr Garwood is going to lecture us on his explorations in Spitzbergen illustrated by lantern views - I am in the chair so I am afraid I shall be too near to see well
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 16, 1898
My dear Van
I enclose your certificate of birth if it is returned to you take care of it and bring it home with you. I wrote to Mr Francis 10 days ago asking amongst other things what arrangements were made for your lodgings whilst you are in Cambridge I have not however heard from him.
Beau has been very poorly since Saturday with a fever and stomach upset he is however better today and will I have no doubt soon pick up again. Mater and I are going up to London tomorrow (DV) to see Hamlet at the Lyceum - I believe Forbes Robertson is particularly good as Hamlet.
Tonight we're going to a lecture in the Corn Exchange by the Very Rev the Dean of Ely "Life in a Benedictine monastery in the 14th century"
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 4, 1899(?)
My dear Van
I see Harry has placed these photos on my table, so I send them on, there are some more to come yet I understand, but the man seems to be very slow in printing them off. We want some cold weather now to keep back the buds and bloom otherwise I am afraid the March frosts will do us great damage.
Harry went with us to Shakespeare reading and read a small part very well and he is asked to go to the next at General Montague's where we to read Henry IV Pt 1.
I am reading the life of Jowett just now, late Master of Balliol College he was a great tutor in his day and made his men stick to scholarship translating and re-translating Latin, Greek and English. I believe . . . . . to prose and verse will pay you better than anything else. Work with Mr Tatum? and get all you can out of him. I am very anxious that you should succeed at the University and an hour or more brisk walk every day and a longer stretch on Saturday will greatly keep you in health and for the rest - study study study your classical authors - your future position in life depends so much on your work now and a little self-denial in the way of pleasure is in all respects good discipline for you.
I believe you're doing your best but I don't think that all out-of-school hours must be given up to relaxation and amusement, until the June exam is over you ought give up everything to work and so command success.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
August 11, 1901
I hope Charlie will find his letter from chief office at Berne safe to poste restante Zermatt tho I daresay my letters would arrive before the letters of advice.
I follow you day by day in my minds eye the scenes visiting very vividly before me as I have gone over all the ground myself, tho when I was last on the Riffel there was only one small wooden hotel on the Riffelberg. Harry Hand is coming to spend the day with Edgar on Tuesday, we all went to St James this morning, I explained to C that I thought you ought to reserve three pounds in your pockets at the time you start from Riffel to see you home. Hope your luggage is safe
ELF
Postcard addressed to:
E. V. Fenn Esq
The Riffel Alp Hotel
Zermatt
Switzerland

Colchester
August 14, 1901
Very pleased to hear good accounts from all as far as Rhone glacier - you have had some good walks and you ought to return refreshed in mind and body. It is 39 years this month since I walked over Firka, we turned off there over Grimsel to meyring(?) on over the Oberland, but you have a finer prospect before you at Zermatt, where I am glad you will be staying the rest of your time, as it is well to avoid the dusty roads as much as possible. Harry Hand has been yesterday with Edgar here is growing a big sturdy fellow. I have opened a letter for you from Northcote(?) asking you to go over next Saturday, I have replied properly. There is a letter for Harry from Mrs Leatham to tell her woes that Agnes has had to lose her leg.
E. L. F.
Postcard addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
Hotel Riffelalp
Zermatt
Switzerland

Post Office Telegraphs.
June 15, 1901
Handed in at Colchester 10:48am
Received Cambridge 11:20am
To - Finn Sydney College Cambridge warmest congratulations on your success
Edward L. Fenn
Telegram is in a brown envelope addressed to: Finn Sidney Coll Cambridge.

Saturday morning
June 15, 1901
My dear Van
Your telegram was most welcome and your success has given me the greatest pleasure. You owe the good class you have taken more to your own diligence and steady perseverance than to any natural brilliant gifts and therefore it is all the more to your credit. I have no doubt you will continue to do your best in the future. The training which leads up to the class is invaluable, but it is character and the high standard a man sets before himself in his life's work which makes a man useful and honoured in his generation and brings him peace of mind at the end.
I enclose the bedders tip so that you may have it ready on Tuesday
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
(The term "bedder" is short for "bedmaker" and is a housekeeper in a college of the University of Cambridge <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Cambridge> )

Colchester
September 10, 1902
My dear Van
I enclose P O O for 5 pounds payable to E V Fenn. Cyril was gated because he did not arrive by 9 a.m. a foolish hour we disregarded for it meant that the lad must sleep in London or Greenwich the night before - I do not think the punishment weighed very heavily on him and it gave him time to study his surroundings in the college and settle himself in his room. These sorts of regulations show an inconsiderate want of common sense on the part of the officials.
Like you I enjoyed reading the life of Walsham, how very much a simple minded earnest man.
We are expecting Mabel and Adria on Friday to pay us a visit they have not been here for more than a day or two at a time for a long while. Mr Todd has been staying with the Routh's in Wiltshire, Donhead St Mary, somewhere between Salisbury and Shaftesbury I believe.
I bought a large basket of most delicious greengages from Nayland yesterday - being alone I use the bus in and out. They are beginning to tile the new wing so I hope the clouds will hold up until the process is completed. We shall shortly look more ruinous than ever as the hall roof has to be taken down and renewed.
Mr Brown is home again and was told the first day of his arrival the Fenns are going, and Mr Locke has brought Grey Friars and is going to live there, the relief of hearing there was no truth in the last half of the statement partly mitigated his grief about the first I think
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
June 3, 1903
My dear Van
Your two cases were dispatched this afternoon so I hope by Monday at the latest you will hear of their arrival at Rock. I always look forward to being in the church when you were ordained but the fortunes of war have carried you so very far away that I have reluctantly abandoned the idea. I am much obliged to Mrs Chase for her kind invitation, but with the strain of the Nayland house business and this house - valuers, auctioneers, architects and lawyers all press upon me just now - I do not feel my mind is sufficiently disengaged to go away for the inside of a week.
You are much in our thoughts this Ember-tide week of course and I often think what a pleasure it would have been to your mother to see you consecrated for the work of the church. At one time she hoped very much Charlie would have entered the ministry, so I know what her feeling would have been about you. Her early death has been an untold loss to you boys, for she possessed a rare and holy mind, with much good judgement and dislike to all exaggeration about sacred subjects. If those who are passed away can follow our earthly actions be assured that her loving spirit will not be far from you next Sunday. With much love and good wishes for your happiness and usefulness in your sacred career
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Thursday morning: Many thanks for Wells list and letter
Stamped envelope addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
C/o Archdeacon Cornish
Kenwyn Vicarage
Truro

Essex County Standard Office
Colchester
January 28 1904
Dear Sir
The document you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of the article to appear in this weeks E.C.S. it is to be supplemented by some notes.
I venture to keep the document in my safe hoping you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted and framed and placed in the Town Hall
In great haste
Yours Faithfully
W Gurnly-Benham
Stamped envelope addressed to:
Dr Fenn
Alston Court
Nayland
Nr Colchester.

Nayland
March 25, 1906
My dear Van
Charlie and Cyril met Harry Edgar and myself at Fenchurch Street station on Thursday morning and we travelled down to Tilbury Pier whence a tender took us off to the ship moored in mid-river. Harry was told off to share a cabin with a Mr Morris at 51, who seems likely to prove a fairly agreeable cabin mate if he does not talk too much; he was going out to Wellington with very indefinite views as to his future.
It was a trying ordeal for all of us saying goodbye to the Emmigrant. Personally I felt that my goodbye was likely to be a final one as he must have years of hard work before him before I(sic) can hope to make an assured position for himself.
But we must leave the future and I only hope he may find work to suit him which will enable him to build up a home for himself, as it is in a happy home life that the largest amount of happiness is to be found in this world.
Harry posted a few lines to me at Plymouth - all well
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn.
This letter is stamped and addressed to:
Rev E. Vanderzee Fenn.
Rock
St Minver
Cornwall

Alston Court
Nayland
April 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
We were very thankful to learn that your uncle got safe to land after the accident with the propeller, as on such a stormy rocky coast the vessel may easily have been wrecked. I have not heard anything of the bride yet, I suppose she ought to have arrived in England by this time. Nothing startling has happened here since you left, which would interest you. I have bought a horse, which will I hope turnout well: she is a blue roan, young and too fast at present, not having done any regular work. I think she has the makings of a strong useful brougham horse if we are only fairly lucky with her.
Cyril spent Easter with us, on the bank holiday he went over to Shirley and stayed the night. The first Lieutenant sending him home the next morning, in his motor car, which Cyril enjoyed very much, fairly humming along at 30 miles an hour sometimes. After lunch and I drove him and . . . . and Bob to Bures station and he went down to Portsmouth by an evening train. Edgar returns to Oxford the day after tomorrow, W. and Mrs Dudgeon, have presented a pair of large brass pedestal candlesticks to stand in the sanctuary they look exceedingly well and were placed in position for the first time on Easter Sunday. W. Todd has been spending a fortnight at Exmouth, with the Ren . . . They all seem to have enjoyed themselves very much up to yesterday, the weather having been delightful, but the last two days have been just as disagreeable, dull high northwest wind and clouds of dust.
I expect you are at present feeling rather astray, you will of course consult uncle Churchill before coming to any decision, he knows New Zealand now and he is gifted with sober judgement and plenty of good common sense. We are looking forward to your next letter to tell us how you got on with your seemed "chum" Your first experience was most unpleasant the fact of a man of 51 emigrating with no definite object in view looked fishy as if in fact, his friends were sending him out in the hope of something turning up for him at a distance from home. I have always understood that life on board a big liner is the worst place for a dipsomaniac and the temptations and opportunities to nip simply endless.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland.
May 2, 1906
My dear Harry.
I expect by the time this reaches you, you will be beginning to feel quite an old New Zealander. News is a very scarce commodity with us in Nayland, and the horse (house?) goes on satisfactorily on the whole, and his daily getting into better condition.
The Dudgeons are going to Germany 10 days or a fortnight and the Grays were going to the sea but their son Arthur has reached England from Uganda, where he has been studying the sleeping sickness so they are staying at home to receive him.
Tom Fenn is also expected home in a fortnight on furlough this week. He has been away on the Indian station for five years, I believe, and he has I think qualified for First Mate now. He is a very good steady fellow, though not brilliant.
I opened the enclosed letter as I thought it might be open to misapprehension if the writer waited four months for an answer without knowing the whys or wherefores. . . . . I have written to Ethel and told her of your move, and then I have forded her letter to you.
Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, and the next day Bob returns to his school. Mrs Dudgeon, and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment for the middle of June, but we are at a loss for actors, with all your young man away, and as in the days of Terquin, old men and boys will have to man the walls I suppose.
I have not heard anything of Mrs Hansell yet, but very likely when I go to London on Friday, I may see uncle Arthur and hear some news from him. Mrs Knott celebrated her 89th birthday last Monday, and talks are paying us a visit in the summer with Mr Todd.
We're hoping shortly to get a letter from you, posted at Cape Town. We value your letters now very highly, for absence draws the bonds of family affection nearer, I think.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court,
Nayland.
May 9th 1906
My Dear Harry.
We were very pleased to receive your letter posted at Cape Town and to know that so far all was well with you, I am particularly glad that ultimately you got a pleasant cabin companion. By the time this starts, you will, I suppose be in sight of New Zealand shores. I hope before long, you may see your way to take up some work and feel your way towards your future career. I am sure you will find your uncle, a wise counsellor in what you ought to do.
News with us at Nayland is an almost unknown factor, and family news stands in almost the same category. Tom Fenn was expected home a few days back, having been away for five years. He is a very steady good fellow, I believe, and will be sure to rise in due time, to the command of his ship, he hopes his next ship will be one going from London to India and back and not a continuous Indian coaster.
Edgar got up early on the first of May and went to hear the Magdalen choir sing the may hymns is at the top of Magdalen Tower. Bob says they have seven new boys at the school this term, a very happy addition to their numbers. Mrs Dudlen and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment here towards the end of June, with Charlie's help they may finally pull it off. These entertainments are always a source of great anxiety, where you depend upon outside help, which has a way of failing you at the last moment. The most important person writing in the cheerful vein "I have no doubt you will have no difficulty in supplying my place" etc I'm pretty certain to have to step into some gap at the last moment, I think I don't ha ha want to do. Our spring cleaning in January, glad to say, is drawing rapidly to a close now, it is an excellent institution, for a show house like this, but a vacation of spirit, while it lasts.
And now good-bye dear boy, and with love from all of us at home.
Believe me.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.

Nayland
May 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I thought you would like to have the enclosed letter as I know you are still interested in the family at Clinton, Lewis's great success will please you.
It will be a long time before we can hope to receive a New Zealand letter from you, but we are anxiously looking forward to hearing that your long voyage has been safely accomplished and of your first impressions, but don't be in a hurry to make up your mind about anything.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying at Bembridge, Isle of Wight and Dolly seems to be gaining strength her mother thinks, but is still very soon tired. Aunt Annie has gone to stay with aunt Lucy at Westgate, Harold's death is ever with her and she is depressed and sleepless. I hope the change of surroundings may do her good as we did ask her here, and she may come later on but I dare say. She rather shrinks from the Dedham neighbourhood, where so much of his early life was passed. She and uncle George, have bought a house near Gunnersbury Station, with more rooms and comfort than Brook Green affords them. I hope the move will not be too fatiguing for poor
Uncle Henry has been suffering so much lately that he has just submitted to an exploratory operation on his abdomen and Aunt Ada sent me a card this morning saying that it was over and she believed the result was hopeful for the future outlook but that she would send me more particulars in a few days time. The great success of George's operation, no doubt encouraged your uncle to see what surgery could do for him, as medicine failed to relieve him from the attacks of abdominal pain, which have been occurring so frequently in this past six months. I am anxious to hear what Aunt Ada's first impressions of Miss Pearl Lavinia Mason were, as I believe she and her mother are now in England, and they hoped to meet aunt Ada the beginning of this month.
We had a curious instance before us the other day, how lost things are sometimes found Mr Craig, bought me a letter addressed to the vicarage Nayland from the Secretary of Lloyd's shipping register saying that a piece of plate had been picked up which was part of a presentation to a Captain T G Fenn, who they found from their register was born in Nayland 1846, and could the vicar, tell them if any representative of the family was still living there. It turns out that Aunt Margaret was being driven about the . . . . in a trailer by Dick last month, and after one of his rides she discovered that she had lost her watch chain and locket, the jewellery was probably picked up by some seafaring man who seeing the market was inscribed to Capt T G Fenn, with an address from the passengers of the "Waihora", with an engraving of the ship, thought that he can could probably be traced through Lloyd's and so wrote to them with success, you see. Curiously, Tom Fenn, who has just returned from India, saw the old "Waihora" in Bombay harbour where she had been sold to a native company.
Tom, Lucy and Frank looked Cyril up last week and had luncheon with him at the Naval barracks. Tom has to stay from a month in London this summer to pass for his captains Certificate and Frank goes in for his second try for Assistant Paymaster on June 19. Lionel and Val Giles are both fathers, the former called his daughter, Sylvia Sarah and the latter his Margaret Saint or at least I presume he did not put Giles in twice.
Mrs Davidson Mater and Miss Gray are trying to arrange a theatrical entertainment for the end of next month. Mrs Davidson's one idea seems to be to introduce to the public's notice, a Denham and a Bunbury in "A Pair of Lunatics" all other pieces seem to be left to chance and, if Charlie does not come down to help there will be a fiasco.
With much love from Mater and Adria.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1906
My dear Harry.
I do not know when we ought to expect a line from Hobart but we are still hoping to hear of you from the port. Algernon Todd spent the Whitsuntide with us and fortunately he had delightful weather which he enjoyed sauntering about the grounds, and on Monday I took him for a nice drive around Boxted and Langham. We were expecting Cyril to come up from Portsmouth yesterday that as he had found he could only get two clear days before joining the 'Barfleur" for the . . . . . he thought it best to postpone his holiday they were over (sic). He has been again acting as Master of a Ceremonies the Admiral at Portsmouth sent him out to Spit Head one day to receive the new Japanese man of war Kahima on his behalf. Cyril flew his pendant on the bow of the steam launch, was received on board by a guard of honour presenting arms, piped over the side, bugle sounding attention. The Captain escorted him to his cabin, where they had a long yarn and the Captain spoke English very fluently. In the evening the Japs were entertained onshore Cyril and the Jap Lieutenant next to him got very chummy and exchanged names. The Jap looking very puzzled at Cyril's flourishing signature. Last Friday he delivered his lecture to the Signal School and Officers of the Post on long-distance signalling. He says he got through all right, and was congratulated afterwards on. We began our rehearsals today for the theatricals of the 26th. I play the part of an old beau, because they could not get anyone else to take it. It is against my will, as I find it difficult now to remember the words but with the assistance of Edgar the prompter, I hope to pull through.
I think I told you that Aunt Annie Hand is about to remove into a new house at Chiswick. I am afraid it will be a great effort for her. Your uncle Henry has just undergone an operation in London, and I'm glad to hear from Aunt Ada that he is getting on well. The operation took place about a fortnight ago, so we may fairly conclude he will soon be about again.
Van hopes to get a fortnight's holiday towards the end of July and is thinking of paying Holland a visit, especially Delft the home of his ancestor Vanderzee. If Cyril is at home at that time it would be nice for them to go together.
Charles Routh's portrait in pink hunting coat etc is in the Academy this year well placed on the line. It was kept a profound secret until discovered on the walls of the Academy. I hope your uncle and aunt are well give them my love and with love from us all.
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
July 5, 1906
My dear Harry.
We are all very pleased to receive your first New Zealand later, and to learn your first present impressions of your surroundings. I daresay uncle Churchill thinks it is best for you to see the various sides of New Zealand life before you settle definitely down to one or the other. In many ways, the sheep farmer life is a healthier and perhaps offers a better prospect for your future, when having learnt your business, you are able to invest a little money in the concern.
I have great confidence that your uncle's wise experience of New Zealand life and ways and your own fund of common sense will together work out some career, which will lead to your happiness. You must not expect prosperity, will come very quickly, though unfortunately years are slipping away from you, however be patient and hopeful and stick manfully to whatever you begin in.
Our village theatricals on the 26th ult were a great success we had first "A case for eviction" said played by Charlie, Mrs . . . . . . and Miss Williams, I thought it was a capital piece and well performed. Miss K. Lockwood, dying a few days before Miss Lockwood could not of course take any part, but it had been arranged some little time before that Miss W. should be her understudy. Then we had "A pair of lunatics" Mr Bunlay acting Denham from the . . . . . also well done, and we wound up with a dear piece, which I dear say you know, called "Popping the question" Miss Grey, Mrs Dudson , Miss Denham, Miss Johnson, is is a Mr Wilkinson and myself. The afternoon, a first class well behaved audience, but in the evening the two rooms were crowded and the fun was fast and furious. Any joke being seized by the audience and roared at we took 19 pounds a record take, and a record audience.
An attack of asthma, on Ree's part and the sudden flight to Canada on the part of Edward (the wherefore of which I have not yet learnt) prevented aunt Lucy and her party coming to us as they had arranged. I have written to Polly Hansell, to try and fit in a short visit here before she and her husband return to New Zealand. Charlie and a friend are going to Norway for two or three weeks hiking at the end of this month. Uncle Henry has gone back to Harrogate, his progress is somewhat slow. Thank aunt Alice you next see her for her letter and say I hope to write to her before long.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
July 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
Before you receive this letter, you will have had a little insight into New Zealand life and I'm wondering how you think you will like it. We have been having Van and Cyril with us lately, but the latter joins the Dido on Friday the 20th, Cyril does not think it is likely to be a long appointment. She is a second-class cruiser in the home waters . . . . he is glad to go on a small ship for a time he will probably be attached to her for signaling duties.
Van is going to Midhurst at the end of the week to stay with aunt Lucy, who has taken a home there for two months, and from there he goes on to aunt Ada at Harrowgate for a few days, he expects to meet the Hansell's there and they propose coming on to us for a few days about the 10th of August. I'm glad there is a chance of our seeing Polly before she returns to New Zealand. Uncle Henry is better but still quite an invalid, George Hunt is expected home very soon and will I suppose stay until after his wedding in September. I hear that Edith Giles is engaged to a Mr Bobby Reid, whom Van rather thinks he knew at Tiverton. She is staying with Val in the Punjab. when she met Mr Reid, an army man. I hope he is worthy of her for she is as you know, very sweet girl of a gentle disposition and deserves the best of husbands.
Edgar has been staying at Wentworth house, from whence he visits "Lords" or the "Oval" almost daily according to his letters. He returns today, (the 19th) and will cross Cyril on the railroad. He
I was very pleased to hear this morning, that Frank Fenn has passed for the paymasters . . . , he failed in his first attempt, but passed in 16th out of 20 the successful ones on that occasion so that he now has his life career open before him. We are thinking of having the Sunday School treat in our meadow this year. I thought some of the villagers would like to walk around our garden, courtyard etc. It could be a change from the field at the back of Greys house. Van and Beau and Giles would all be home to help entertain. I expect a photographer next week to spend three days in Nayland taking views of the house for publication in the architectural review. The difficulty is to get a proper account written for Blomfield is a very poor hand at descriptive writing.
With best love from everybody at home
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston court.
Nayland
July 26, 1906
My dear Harry.
Your letter of the eighth of June was very welcome, and you have given us an interesting account of your start on the Holme Station. I too am sorry that it turned out to be so difficult to get you into any good position in the engineering world, but in a way I do not at all think you will find the training you have had will be thrown away. There is no knowing even in your present, pastoral life, what useful work, you may yet find falling in your way, which may greatly improve your position. At any rate, if your health keeps all right qualify yourself as well as you can to become in your own turn a clever sheep master. I want to see you in the course of a few years able to marry and settle down with a small property of your own. I am very glad that you liked Mr Elworthy, the caravan arrangement will I daresay not be disagreeable for a while and is much pleasanter of view than barrack life with the "omne gatherum"
It is a strange thing how often one is struck with the smallness of the world. Here is your cousin Audrey in New Zealand, engaged to a girl who is through her aunt, Mrs Charles Bowen connected with Great Horksley. I remember Mrs Bowen's father Canon Markham as rector of Great Horksley though I was only a child when he died, but we used to enjoy going to the school feast in his time. Audrey is a lucky fellow to gain the affection of such a nice girl as I hear she is. We are expecting Miss Fanny Torlesse to luncheon here today. She has been staying at Stoke, a few days and leaves tomorrow. I think I told you that Edward Hopkins has gone out with a friend to seek his fortune in Toronto, I expect Lewis will follow him out as soon as he is 23, and his own master.
Van is enjoying himself at Midhurst, with his young cousins Lucy, Jo, and Frank. (perhaps Tom, if he is successful in his exam this week) Rees also, and Lewis. He goes on to Harrowgate tomorrow and will pick Bob up at Victoria on Tuesday on his way home. We are having the school treat in our field on the first and I want the villagers to come in between five and seven and give them an opportunity of seeing the house. I am afraid we cannot run to a band, but I am having the flag hoisted and the bells rung to cheer everybody up.
With love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
August 9, 1906
My dear Harry
It is difficult to imagine that you are passing through a winter wet and cold . . . . . while we are just dried up with heat as we have not had any rain worth mentioning in the district since the spring. When you write remember I like to hear all the details of your daily life and work nothing is too trivial to interest me. Where expecting the Hansell's tomorrow so I shall learn all about the Holme Station at first hand from Polly when she is here. We are expecting a run of visitors as Mr Todd and Mrs Knott come next Wednesday when they leave Aunt Lucy and Rees follow in September . . . . . . . to come into the country in the winter that we have to . . . . . our few visitors in during the summer months. Charlie's fishing trip to Norway was rather marred by wet but on the whole he enjoyed it very much: Dr Drake left for his holiday the day after Charlie's return so probably he became busy immediately and had no time to regret that his holiday was not a longer one. I heard from Cyril a day or two ago from Invergordon near Cromarty the Dido with the Channel fleet is touring round the coast feted and entertained by the various important towns . . . . . . as they progress round the island.
Van is making enquiries about curacy in Surrey which he could take up after Xmas but whether the Vicar . . . wait so long removing remains to be seen, on the other hand curates are very scarce in the market; I know Corbett has been waiting months to . . . . One. The great event here last week has been the school treat which was held in my meadows I tried to liven it up a little by having the flag hoisted in and the bells rung between five and seven, I also let it be known that the house would be on view, I was kept busily employed conducting parties round for about two hours of the afternoon. Roberts and his assistants had a busy time serving tea and light refreshments to all and any who wanted them and his table seemed to be thronged most of the evening . . . . . the general opinion was that it was the best treat Nayland has known for many years. Today we are going to the Stoke flower show as usual but I do not intend to stay long we received our invitation to George Hand's wedding yesterday it is fixed for September 5 at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception will be at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Although she is rather a grand young lady according to Aunt Ada's ideas yet she likes her and hopes she will realise that she is marrying a poor man and to be happy must accommodate herself to her surroundings.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
This letter has been badly defaced with punch holes! making it impossible to read fully

Alston Court
Nayland
August 16, 1906
My dear Harry
I'm afraid from what uncle Churchill reported you have experienced an attack of your old enemy, asthma at Pareora, I hope it may only prove to be a passing bout as anything like a frequent occurrence would drive you elsewhere, as there is no comfort in life or ability for exertion when asthma is to the fore. I believe you will not find the work to strenuous, if you are not weighed down by this trouble, but I shall be anxious to hear how you fare in this respect. Polly Hansell and her husband left us two days ago, we enjoyed their short visit very much. She is quite unchanged, and as sweet as ever, I was very much taken with him also and I think they may be mutually congratulated on their respective choices. Polly showed us an Elworthy group, they must be a strikingly fine pair she looks very handsome, and he a giant in build with a kind benevolent face.
Mater, and I are going up to George Hunt's wedding (DV) on September 5. He is to be married at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception is to be held at the Grand hotel afterwards. We are giving him a pretty little pair of silver sweetmeat dishes for his dinner table.
Mr Todd and Mrs Knott? arrived yesterday, they both seem very well considering their respective ages, 88 and 89, at any rate they have splendid appetites. Dick and Tom Fenn and making a bicycle tour and hope to reach Nayland tomorrow, I dare say they will stay a night or two here. Tom goes back to India in October. He prefers working altogether on that side of the Suez Canal, and not going from England to Bombay. He unfortunately failed to pass his Masters exam and will have to try again in India. Frank has been appointed to H. M. S. "London" on the Mediterranean station and sails almost immediately. The "Dido" with Cyril on board is cruising round the coast of Scotland just now being feted wherever they put in, he thinks the cruise will be prolonged into the New Year. Van is nibbling at curacy at Cuckfield in Sussex, a place, with almost 2500 inhabitants, but I don't know if the vicar will be able to wait for him as he does not want to leave St Nineveh until the end of the year. Hobday? was curate at Cuckfield or near to it for a time I believe, and speaks well of the place.
The Mater tells me that she is writing to you by this mail so I will close with best love to you and all good wishes for your health.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
August 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I have not left myself time to write at any length this week, but send you a few lines to greet you. I shall be anxious until I hear that your asthma has gone its so terribly crippling. You had just commenced an attack when your uncle, Churchill was last in Pareora. We are passing through a second spell of hot weather and the rain holds off, all ponds are empty and I live in constant anxiety about the depth of your well.
Cyril says the "Dido" is being very hospitably entertained round the coast. The last call was Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, very royally entertained them, making the officers free of his grounds and fishing. In return they took him and his Duchess out to the sea for a day and showed them some guns firing. Mr Todd and Mrs Nock? are still with us, and aunt Lucy and Rees come on the fourth prox to be followed like Gerald and then our guest season ends.
I think, very likely Edgar will spend 10 days with Van next month before he returns to Oxford. I think visits away from home are good for his mind. Mater and I go to George Hunt's wedding at St Margaret's Westminster on the first prox and to the reception at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Aunt Isabella and Dudley are going to the hotel in Hindhead shortly to see if the air will help to set up Dolly.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
Addressed: H L Fenn Esq C/o A S Elworthy Esq Holme Station Pareora nr Timaru NZ

Alston Court.
Nayland
August 29, 1906 (to sail on the 31st).
My dear Harold.
I was glad to hear a better account of you in the letter of birthday congratulations which you kindly sent and which arrived punctually on the 26th as you foretold. I was much relieved to hear that your attack of asthma, though sharp was brief.
Mr Todd, and Mrs Knott left us this morning having been with us a fortnight, the weather has been perfect for them, and the walls (sic) provided a fair supply of plums greengages and figs to their great delight as they are both fruit lovers. Our next visitors will be aunt Lucy and Rees who come next week, and then Gerald. After that I think Mater and I may go away for the inside of a week and visit Stratford on Avon, Warwick, Kenilworth, Coventry and Leamington, as they all literally a stones throw from one another so to say. Adria has gone back to her grandpa for a week's visit at Richmond, and will return with us (DV) after George Hunts wedding at which Mater and I hope to be present.
We went yesterday to a garden party at Edwardstone Hall, (Colonel Corrie), a most delightful garden of smooth lawns, yew clipped hedges and fine trees. I daresay you remember driving to Edwardstone with Charlie and me and photographing the church soon after we went to Colchester. I forget whether I told you Edgar thought of paying Van a visit in the last half of September. I think it is a very good for him to go about and make new acquaintances, and develop his brainpower. We are getting rather uneasy about the water supply here. We have virtually had no rain for three months. the lawn in the field looks as brown and dusty is the high road and it is difficult to keep things growing without incessant watering. I think both Edgar and Beau would take first-class honours if there was an examination on the respective feats and merits of English cricketers, they spend so much time over the accomplishments of these gentlemen, however it is a most useful topic of conversation.
The officers of the Dido had a splendid time at Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, entertained them and made them free of his fishing preserves etc.
Your accounts of the details of your daily routine are full of interest to us.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
September 13, 1906
My dear Harry.
I suppose the Mater gave you an account of George Hunt's wedding last week. I was glad that we were able to go as it gave me an opportunity of meeting scattered members of the Julius family including Ellie Julius from Tilford, Polly Hansel and her husband, Hunts, Bateman's and their party. George rather thinks of following in his father's footsteps and working in Harrogate, during the summer months, I think he might do well here and also keep in touch with his parents and others.
Edgar has gone down to St Minerva for a fortnight, I think he will find Cyril there for a card from him to Adria tells us that he has got leave for a few days and was going to see Van. It will be nice for the three to meet and visit some of the . . . . . of that coast together. Aunt Lucy and Rees left us yesterday, they stayed with us a little more than a week. Rees is rather a funny they lad, but brighter in his manner than I suspected. He is looking out for a berth, his brother Edward has joined some friends and gone on to Toronto, where as far as I can understand they have started an agency for the sale of patented medicines. To his mother's surprise appeared in England last week on "business" and he meant to have returned within the week, but the boats were full, so he will have perforce to stay until next week. Gerald comes down on a visit tomorrow, and when he goes I think our season for visitors closes. I take Bob up to London next week en-route to school and Mrs Johnson returns on the same day (21st) Rain clouds mock us with great promises, but no rain comes, we have only had a very few showers this May and long for a soaker. I am thankful to say my well continues to give a good supply for if it gave out we should be in a fix. Rumours are flying about, that the Grays? are again talking of retiring. The last place favoured by them is Westgate. He has not mentioned the subject however, to me. Frank Fenn has joined the "London" at Malta, where he proved himself a good sailor, having only experienced a few hours of "mal-de-mer" wrote altogether very happily about his surroundings.
Tom and Dick on their return ride from Nayland had no mishap until they reached Cowdray Park in the evening when a stag suddenly charged Tom's light, he pulled up dead and Dick ran into him and his bicycle was crumpled up, but Dick only got a shaking himself.
I hope you're keeping well and feel interested in the work of your sheep run.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
September 20, 1906
My dear Harold,
I must certainly get into the way of calling you by your proper name, which is more dignified, and in accordance with your age. I was glad to receive your letter of August the eighth last Sunday (September 16) as it tells us you are a well and that you are able to write in good spirits, both which points are a great comfort to me. If only you enjoy a good health I think this farming life will offer more happiness than the engineering; but you are at any rate qualifying for either as opportunities for advancement offer themselves.
Van has been entertaining both Cyril and Edgar lately, they were both anxious to see St Minver before Van left, which as you know, he probably will at Christmas. Whether his overtures in the direction of Cuckfield will come to anything is at present uncertain. Gerald is spending about a fortnight with us, as he had not made any other special plans for his holiday. Since he came the hot weather has broken up, and the much longed for rain has arrived, of course much as we were glad to see it, staying in the house is a little dull for Gerald. However, we have so far, always gone out somewhere, one part of the day.
We had a visit two days ago from Mr Kempe the architect and rather famous stained-glass man. He was delighted with the old house and the stained-glass we could show him; I enjoyed my talk with him. The day after tomorrow, I take Bob to Victoria enroute of the school and Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, so we shall soon settle down to our quiet routine again.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly have gone to Eastbourne for two or three weeks. Dolly picks up her strength, very slowly.
Yesterday Gerald and I drove over in the dogcart to Gifford Hall and called upon old Mr Britain (?) he was very genial and took us over the house, showing us the tapestry room, which I had forgotten and the kitchen in which I never penetrated before. The poor old man is very lonely, his chief companion, being as he pathetically said his pipe, his book, and his dog 'Tip". I fancy, his daughter-in-law rather tires of him. The old man said to a lady who was calling upon him. "I have lived too long"
Gerald has cycled to day to East Bergholt and Brantham to see Constable's other alter pieces.
We play bowls every day after tea as a little amusement for Gerald and the children.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
September 27, 1906
My dear Harold.
In the first place, led me say that I sincerely hope that Ada Elworthy has recovered from the painful and dangerous affliction of the ear of which you told us in your last letter.
I daresay you will find the riding rather trying and painful at present, that tenderness of skin however will soon pass away, and you will get tough like the rest of your colleagues. I am very glad to hear that you are settling down to the farming life as I think when you have gained experience and have flocks of your own you may start a very happy home for yourself and your posterity. People in the old country are always striving after money, and less and less work, whereas the happiness life is the working busy life.
Gerald went home yesterday after paying us a fortnight's visit, the weather was pleasant and I think he enjoyed his country outing.
Edgar stayed a fortnight with Van and proceeded last Tuesday, (1y 25) to Westgate when he proposes staying a week with Aunt Lucy. These little changes of climate and company, are I think good for both his body and brain. Charlie talks of running down for a few days in the first week of October, I think he is getting on very well in his work at Streatham, getting a new patient of his own occasionally, which is all he can expect at present.
The photographs of his old house, done by Mr Brocksee for the architectural review, have turned out as good as could be wished. Now comes my part the letterpress, which with such scanty material to hand is no easy task, but I do not know of anyone who could undertake it, I if I shirk the undertaking. Adria does a little preparation, now in the evening, a tray of sustenance being taken in for her and Miss Johnson, when that is over.
I see you're Archbishop, or is he only primate, Neville has just married, a Miss Fines - Clinton, a relation doubtless of W. Fines - Clinton, who used to be at Burlington House School, Richmond.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is enclosed in a small envelope addressed: H L. Fenn Esq c/o A S Elworthy, Pareora, Timaru, New Zealand

Alston Court
Nayland
October 4, 1906
My dear Harold.
The advent of Nayland fair reminds us that the Autumn has well set in again, and the pig killing season commenced in the village. The steam organ with the American galloping horses is fixed, as usual within a few feet of the schoolroom windows but as the business of the day does not commence until the afternoon lessons are nearly over, it does not really interfere much with lessons.
Edgar returned home last evening, having enjoyed a fortnight with Van and a week at aunt Lucy's very much. Lewis, Rees and Kitty were all at home, Edgar and Lewis went over one Saturday afternoon and took Bob out and divided their time between Ramsgate and Margate and Westgate. We are half expecting Charlie down for a few days, but we feel no certainty in his arrangements until the last moment arrives and he appears. After Edgar has returned to Oxford Mater and I may go up to London for a few days and refresh ourselves with a few plays, as we never go up to a matinee now. Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying in Eastbourne. The latter does not get on very satisfactorily, I believe her powers of digestions are at fault, it must be nearly a year since she began to go downhill. Mr Todd was presented with a handsome piece of plate by the Wax Chandlers company last month to commemorate this connection of 50 years with the company. Gerald selected a new kind of American beaten silver work, very artistic I believe, but I think the old gentleman would have preferred something he understood better with an inscription upon it.
I suppose you are living within your income and have not had to touch your nest egg in the bank at Christchurch. Charlie expects to put by 50 pounds his first year. This will not bad as there are always special expenses on first starting a house.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
When you can send us any pictures or photographs of persons or places about you wish your like to see them.
ELF

Alston Court
Nayland
October 11, 1906
My dear Harold.
As week by week rolls by this has I wonder what I can find of any interest to you and I am afraid you will conclude that my stock of news is of the slenderest
Edgar leaves us tomorrow for Oxford, I hope he is deriving some good from it all but I cannot at present see much result in his conversation or interests, some of this however must be ascribed to shyness. I shall be anxious to hear the result of Vans interviews with Canon Cooper of Cuckfield. Van was to spend the day there yesterday and sleep at Streatham tonight ready to make an early start for Wadebridge? tomorrow morning. Charlie comes to us tomorrow a few days change, and then next week, all being well Mater and I talk of staying in London for a week before the winter sets in. I feel an inclination to go to a few theatres and see what is going on just now on the boards. Did I tell you that Mr Docksee has sent me copies of the plates he took of this house, I think they are splendidly done and I hope the editor of the architectural review will not keep me very long in suspense before publishing them. I hope to send you a copy of the review when they are published in it.
Uncle Harold talks now of settling some were in Worcestershire, where he can hire 700 acres of shooting with the house, Alston's regimental quarters in South Africa were burned down in lately h is is servants pluckily managed to save most of his belongings but lost their own. Do you begin to feel fairly at home in the saddle now. I hope the New Zealand horses are not buck jumpers like the Australian. It must require a world of practice to ride such animals.
Adria had 12 presents on her birthday, her dog goes on very satisfactorily and is a pleasant companion out walking, a great contrast to her predecessor.
Love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Colchester
October 25, 1906
My dear Harold.
I think I told you last week that Charlie spent a few days with us. He was rather tormented with toothache, and in consequence, pain. Dal . . . . . two visits and got rid of some broken stumps and returned home in peace.
Van hopes to begin work at Cuckfield the first Sunday in January, he was favourably impressed with the old vicar Canon Cooper. The Dido is floating around Ireland, returning to Portsmouth early in December I believe. Cyril was very pleased with the way the Dido's came out in a recent examination on signaling and wireless telegraphy four Dido's being bracketed first. He has a voluntary class in the evening for instruction in fleet manoeuvres, and he says some of the men are very keen on it. He says Bantry Bay is a wretched place, barren rocks onshore, and nearly always blowing and raining at sea.
Mater and I begin our London visit, the day after tomorrow and if our purse holds out hope to stay a week. We have not been able to begin our Shakespeare readings yet, as our company is rather scattered. Little John Lycett has just been operated on for appendicitis 10 days ago and is I believe going on well The choral class begins its winter course on November the sixth. Having agreed to become an honourable member of the ancient order of Foresters, Stoke by Nayland Lodge, Dudgeon, Gray, Carruthers, Wilkinson, and myself are to be ceremoniously admitted at a special Lodge to be held at the White Heart this evening. No branding with the hot poker I hope.
W. B. Spurling is to be Mayor of Colchester next year. He is rather an old sheep, but will do his best I daresay. I can hardly imagine him presiding on the bench or speaking anywhere. Adria's dancing class has been altered to a Friday, which is very inconvenient for me is that it is my Boxford day; on these two accounts I have declined the Oyster feast, which takes place tomorrow (Friday). Mr Haldane is to be the chief guest.
With love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
Nov 2 1906
My dear Harold.
Mater and I thought we required a week in town, where we might refresh ourselves with a few sights and theatres. We have enjoyed some of the latter very much, especially a fine performance of "A Winter's Tale" One day, we had Grace and Mabel Todd and Mrs Lycett to luncheon here and took them to see the "Man from Blankneys" with Charles Hautrey in the chief role, it was very amusing. We returned after the matinee to Richmond and dined there to see the old gentleman, who keeps wonderfully well. Yesterday Aunt Isabella and Dolly lunched with us and went to see a musical piece at the Vaudeville. Mrs Lycett is staying in town, at a surgical home, with little John, who has just been successfully operated on for appendicitis. The only drawback to the enjoyment of our visit has been a very rainy atmosphere at intervals, but often the dry season, but after the dry season, we have had this year, the rain is very acceptable.
We are looking forward to your account of the wedding, I wonder if the Hansells will come down for it. I hope if she does, she will bring her snapshots with her and show these to you. I hear that George Hand and is giving up his curacy at King's Lynn wishing for a change of a Vicar, it only points the moral as we all anticipated, that it was foolish for a young Curate, to take a house and furnish it. At any rate, I should say his father must think so. I hear that Frank Fenn is very happy on his ship in the Mediterranean. Bob wrote the other day, to say he was carrying his arm in a sling, as he had injured the muscles about the shoulder by a heavy fall at football, but it was getting all right again.
Adria is learning a kind of hornpipe dance at her class and does the club exercise, she has not knocked any other child on the head yet.
Mr Todd was to dine at the Wax Chandlers last night, as it was the anniversary of his jubilee as a member of the Court. He has been on the livery, however, for 63 years.
I hope all is well with you and that you continue happy and interested in your work.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
Letter written on the Hotel note paper.

Nayland
November 8, 1906
My dear Harold.
Your last two letters have been full of interest, the routine of your own life, and the account of the wedding afforded us a good deal of interesting reading. Your meeting with Mrs Acland was curious, I think she must have been one of the younger girls, as I think, the eldest became a nurse, and joined a sisterhood. You would know her because she would have a slight blue scar line under her lower lip, the result of a fall on to the top bar of the fireplace.
You certainly were in luck about your rig out, first that you found some good Samaritan ready to lend and then that all the articles fitted you so well. As we had not been away since last December, when we went to the birthday dinner party, Mater and I have been spending a week in London, and as I think you know we were neither of us very well, and the weather unsettled, so our chief amusement was theatre going, and this we enjoyed very much managing to see seventh plays in six days! Grace Mabel and Mrs Syrett? lunched with us one day and went to a matinee afterwards and Aunt Isabella and Dolly another day. The latter still looks thin and cannot do much
Mrs Cooper Van's new vicaress to be is a sister of Mrs Buckley-Paget whom I think you have met when they were staying at Gt Horksley rectory. The world is not such a very big place, after all, as you have already experienced. I quite agree with you that as soon as you have regained sufficient experience it will be well to make a start on a small scale on your account if you can find a steady hard-working man like Hobbs to join you. I am sure the Elworthy's would do their best to advise you. I sincerely hope the new secretary will turn out to be of a pleasant and hospitable disposition, and show a disposition to help him that he may be drawn to you. The temper of his wife is of almost more importance!
Miss Proctor passed away last week, at the age of 86. Miss Mary will now be moving into a small house, Poor "Gilly" has had an asthmatic bronchial attack, which he does not shake off and talks of coming home for a time to try to get rid of his cough.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland.
November 16, 1906
My dear Harold.
Many members of the family will probably be sending you their Christmas good wishes by this mail, so I too must send you every good wish of the season for your health and happiness. I believe helped by your zeal and steadiness there is every prospect that you will in time carve out for yourself a happy and successful career in the young country of your adoption. Communication between us, by letter is after all a very satisfactory means of keeping in touch with one another, for personally, how little we see of each other, who are working in the same country. I see Van or Cyril once, or maybe twice in the year. So I feel that you are not much further removed from us than the rest. I am sure at home in the present day, young men think a great deal too much about sports athletics and having a good time. Whereas in the colony you have to think and apply yourselves a good deal more to work, which brings to you, a much more lasting and satisfactory kind of happiness when the stress of work is over and you can enjoy some leisure. I feel with you a great deal depends on Mr Elworthy's choice of a new secretary as to your personal comfort. I particularly hope he may have a nice minded lady for a wife, who will be willing to welcome you to her house as a friend when she gets to know you.
I am sending your wedding letter round to the brothers and shall be always ready to do so as I can quite understand you feel to fatigued at the end of your day to write much. Aunt Ada was much interested in seeing it and your photographs. They have just moved from Harrogate, finally, I have no doubt, and gone into lodging at Brighton for a couple of months (47 Devonshire Place) where they can meditate upon their future plans. Uncle Henry seems to be much better.
A hot Christmas must seem rather unnatural to you brought up as you were on Dicken's descriptions and pictures
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.

Nayland
November 22, 1906
My dear Harold.
My paper looks as if I contemplated along letter, whereas I am writing on this paper, which I do not like because my stock has run out. It seems curious to think of you enjoying? a hot Christmas, with sunshine and roses. It cannot seem quite like Christmas to you, I should think. We now wish you however a happy New Year and I hope it will be a prosperous one to. Edgar went back to Oxford, three days ago, and looking much better and with very little cough left. I think his exam begins on Monday week he does not seem at all nervous as to the result. I think he works pretty steadily Bob had his shoulder examined with the Rontegen rays. The injury was found of no import the bruising of the shoulder muscles seemed to be the cause of the partial movement.
The Wentworth house dinner party is fixed for December the 18th. It will be as crowded as ever, I am afraid for the . . . . . . . . be waylaid on the way from school and . . . . to the dinner. Did I tell you, the Rouths are going to lease Wandsworth in the spring and go further into the country a place at Wendover in Bucks. Uncle Hanover has also taken over a house with shooting about 2 miles from Kidderminster. Your letter and card (Timaru) of the 10th has just arrived. It looks a nice clean town. I am sorry you were not able to go in for the service when uncle Churchill preached but duty stands first of course.
I was most sad about the new secretarial arrangements, but one never knows what good may perchance come of it like you go up to the Homestead. Do you ever get a chance at the . . . . . well all these pleasures will come again to you by and by I have no doubt.
Mrs Marshal shook her shook her head the other day when I met her about Bertie's prospects - poor she thought.
With much love from all at home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Nayland,
November 29, 1906
My dear Harold,
The week seems to come round very quickly, without bringing any news to send on to you and I daresay to one so busily employed as you fortunately, as they flying still quicker. A rumour reached me recently that your cousin, Bertha was engaged to one of the younger Elworthy's and I am wondering if we shall have as confirmed by you, perhaps it is your clothier?.
Edgar, has had no more trouble with his cough since he returned to Oxford, and he is I believe sitting for the first part of his final this week. Did you hear that Bob is to be present at the birthday dinner party this year, which has been fixed for Wednesday the 18th. the dinner that he returns from Broadstairs. He is rather young to begin such festivities, and I only hope he will not be too much upset the next day for us to travel home.
Old Miss Stopford was found dead in her bed last week. She was 86, but looked years younger, being always so upright with a fresh complexion. I expect you remember her for she is sat at one in of your pew in the parish church.
I am glad that this change of secretary into foreman and clerk is taking place in the summer as you will have time to look about and see how you can accommodate yourself to the new arrangement. Keep your head up, however, and do not drop into a lower circle. After all, your present life is not likely to continue very long as you will, I hope soon acquire sufficient experience to venture onto a farm of your own with a good partner to assist.
I don't know much about Charlie's progress at Streatham, but I hope and believe he is getting on as well as we can expect. It takes a long time to build up a practice, and he has hampered himself for some years to come up with periodic payments of purchase money. At present I think the sailor is the best off as he knows exactly what his monthly payments will be, and there can be no happiness if he does not live within his income.
Good bye
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston court.
Nayland
December 6, 1906
My dear Harold
By the time you receive this Christmas (your first hot Christmas) will be passed and the New Year at hand so I wish you with all my heart a very happy and successful New Year. Life after all is so short that it does not much matter where we live, if only we can find work congenial to our tastes, and with a fair prospect of offering us a profitable career.
Edgar comes down tomorrow for the Christmas vacation. He was passed in the first half of his finals, taking up the other half in June of next year when he will be qualified for a BA. But then comes the rub, what next?
I heard this morning that uncle Billy has some serious mischief internally, which will necessitate an immediate operation. He has been looking so very well lately that I am inclined to think there has been some exaggeration as to its impact, but we shall know more about it in the day or two. They are of course very much upset and highly anxious about it at Bridge house.
Tell us a little more about the three Elworthy brothers when you write, their characters and temperament, are they all doing well, like your "Boss" is Ella nice to deal with. I hear that Edward Hopkins is hopeful about his business in Toronto, though I cannot explain it - he seems as he seems to be an agent for the importation of English goods into Canada, it sounds rather a big order, but I dare say, means very little.
Louie Howard was married in the same church at Calcutta, that she was baptised in, her husband, Mr Ede is a tea planter in Assam I believe. Miss Louise Round told me yesterday, when I met her in the street that Mr Brown missed me very much and that she hoped I was going back again and did I know they had the nuns there now? so you see, she is very much as you left her.
I think uncle Harold and wife and Olive are going to Monte Carlo or some neighbouring resort for the Christmastide. I suppose he will retire altogether from the Army in February next and settled down as a country gentleman, near Kidderminster for shooting and motor car-ing.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
December 20, 1906
My dear Harry (Harold).
Long ere you will receive these few lines Christmas will have come and gone. We shall all think of you on Tuesday and drink your good health. Wishing you every prosperity in your adopted home, like everything it will require patience and perseverance, and I hope you will not be disheartened by present disagreeables. I presume you're not saying anything to the contrary, that you are the only gentleman pupil on the run.
Mater, and I returned from our annual Richmond visit last evening. Mr Todd was very happy and well, looking more like a man of 70 and one of 88. The Hooper's and Dolton's were guests as usual. A wet to fog or Scotch mist reigned supreme most of the time we were there, so we could not get about very much.
Uncle Billy has had some sharp attack of obstruction inside but he was better when I saw him, though he was looking thin, and I think there is reason to fear a repetition of his troubles. Charlie had supper on Sunday evening at Wentworth house he was looking well, but confessed it was slow disappointing work building up a practice, but I told him we all have had the same experience. Van and Cyril hope to stay a few days with us early in the New Year. Miss Johnson, left us this morning for the Christmas holidays. So Adria now has leisure to follow Beau about like a shadow Aunt Margaret has happy letters from Frank on the Mediterranean station, he seems to have taken quite kindly to the sea, I am thankful to say. Bob has brought back his class prize for classics, I am pleased to say, he has also done better in mathematics than he has done in previous terms.
God bless you my dear boy in the coming year.
Believe me always.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
January 3, 1907
My dear Harold,
We were very pleased and surprised to receive your Christmas greeting on Christmas morning. It was very remarkable that it could be so well hit off from the other side of the world. Your photograph was an excellent one, you look fatter in the face than when you left England, and certainly you seem to have enjoyed good health in New Zealand, barring, the one attack of asthma on your arrival in Timaru, or rather I should say Pareora.
Cyril has got three weeks leave after rejoining. We shall in all probability not see much of him for two years as after their cruise on the Spanish coast in February or March, then the payoff, and at once recommission probably for East India or China Station.
He and Charlie are going this evening to the winter dance at the Masonic Hall. I am surprised at Charlie's taking the trouble to come from Streatham for the one night, I hope there is no attraction in that quarter. We expect Van this evening for a week's visit, before taking up his new work in Cuckfield. Our friends all tell us that it is a charming spot, and the church, one of the finest in Sussex, I wish the rector was not so old but I hope Van will be able to stay on there some years. Cyril brought a little fox terrier back with him. Jenie has given him a very friendly welcome and they tear about together. We had a very heavy fall of snow on Boxing Day, and this morning. the floods are rising rapidly our further meadow is covered to a large extent with water and Beau is giving his boat a sail on the wide expanse.
The two children with Edgar's assistance, composed and acted a play on Christmas night entitled, "The last of the Highwaymen" It was carried through with great spirit. Uncle Billy has been very unwell with some internal stoppage, but I hear he has weathered the storm this time, but I fear of further trouble by and by
With much love from us all,
Your affectionate father,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court,
Nayland
January 17, 1907
My Dear Harold,
It was a relief to hear that you were to have all your meals in the cottage, instead of the cook-shop, as it sounds quite a decent and comfortable arrangement for you.
I daresay you are not sorry that the very busy shearing time is over, for it must have been a prolonged strain for the workers and an anxious time for the scorer.
I am glad you saw George Julius, when he was over. I don't suppose you have seen him since he was in shirt and knickers. The day after I had your letter about him and his voting machine, I saw the enclosed account of a similar invention of a voting machine by a Signor Boggiano, was it one of those curious coincidences re matters of invention or did Boggiano hear of Georges invention to patent such a machine: I expect it was just a coincidence, but nevertheless very annoying for George and his company, because Boggiano may have anticipated their patents rights in Europe.
We went to some family theatricals at Little Horksley School, two days since, a W. Brodie, who acted there two years ago was splendid as the cabman as found in a . . . . . . W. Wilkinson is getting up some at Stoke from Shrove Tuesday. Last night, our servants had their party. They numbered about 20 and our young people acted a character to amuse them . . . . . . . the first scene was an excerpt from Box and Cox Edgar was Box, Bob was Cox, Miss Vinder Vox was a character added that for Adria's sake, Miss Osmham (maid), Mrs Bouncer (girl) The next scene, had a burglar entering the servant, Miss Denham's room and stealing plated etc, two old ladies were represented by Cyril and Edgar and the last scene was a quack doctor, his patients - they all did well, but Cyril was the life of the whole affair. The servants and their friends were immensely amused, our Christmas gaieties are over now, and schoolwork begins again on Tuesday.
This painful scrawl is owing to my intense desire to go to sleep. I have fallen off several times whilst trying to write what I have done.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
January 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
Bob returned to his school two days ago, and Cyril leaves us today, spending two nights with Charlie before rejoining the Dido, and this exodus makes us feel that the Christmas holidays are over and that we are now fall back once more into our quiet routine country life. I think you heard of our children's party magic lantern and visit of Mother Goose with presents. Since then our servants had there's, they mustered 20 all told. Our young people with Miss Denholm's help acted a charade in three scenes. The first was taken from Box and Cox, the second was a burglar piece, Cyril and Edgar were two old ladies, Adria, the next-door neighbour got up wonderfully in coat and artificial nose, and Bob the burglar: Cyril was particularly good at a timid old lady: the third scene was a quack doctor, (Cyril) and his patients, whom he professed to cure of their rheumatic afflictions by means of mesmerism, but he mixed them up and got them all wrong and there was a general rumpus. The word was rheu-matic (room-attic) true to the ear, but quite modern phonetic spelling. I thought they all acted with great spirit. I was Captain Drawer. We went recently to Little Horksley for a matinee theatricals set up by the Alten-Barry's is in aid of their coal club, their friends in the neighbourhood rallied round well and they sold 70 half crown tickets, they also gave two cheap evening performances.
Last night, we had a Shakespeare reading at Mrs Dudgeon's the play being Taming the Shrew. Mr Gray, taking Petruchio and Mrs Dudgeon, Catherine. We are enjoying (?) just now, a second cold snap with a piercing north-east wind. It is this latter, which makes the cold so penetrating, wrap up as you may, but I do not suppose it will last long.
I have not sent you any paper, because Van told me that he had arranged for your having the Daily Mail, I believe for a year, if you wish for anything else, I shall be pleased however to arrange for its transmission.
I wish you would tell me about what you would like me to give you for your birthday, you have so little room, I imagine, that a hint would be very acceptable.
Uncle Billy is I believe better, but I have not heard very much of him since Christmas. Uncle Henry and aunt Ada remain at Brighton, until spring at any rate, I expect.
I hope you're keeping well and that you continue to be interested in your work, getting, I hope, a grasp of the ins and outs of sheep farming.
Love from all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
March 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
I am too late for your birthday I am sorry to think but the intention is the same viz to wish you very many happy returns of the anniversary and may you in the course of time build up a happy and prosperous family in your new country. Miss Torlesse writing to me the other day and asked me to tell you how pleased she was to hear such good accounts of you and that you were well. I'm getting on, by degrees, I am thankful to say, feel very well in myself and can walk about fairly well. My speech however is still spluttering and difficult and eating and drinking are not easy, but I must have patience and am very thankful that I am as well as I am. Do you ever get into Christchurch, I suppose it is beyond a bicycle ride. Your letters are a great pleasure to me. Jack Bateman has given up trying to pass the Edinburgh exams and he is doing locum-tenens work which is very good for him he would never have been happy or successful at Richmond so it is much better for him. Guy is married he was in hospital in Toronto and fell in love with his nurse and she foolishly accepted him. If she is a sensible person it may be a very good thing for Guy to have someone to look after him and keep him straight. Charlie has been getting some patients of his own lately, which has greatly pleased him. I am hoping to see Cyril shortly as he is back in Chatham (from Portugal), he sent a wireless message . . . . . to . . . . . Isle of Wight to say he was coming up channel. Van paid his bishop, a visit at Chichester last week he was in to great a hurry to please Van by the brevity of the visit enabled Van to run up to up to . . . . . Place at Brighton between the incoming and out going trains and see Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada. Uncle Henry has not been so well the last month, I am afraid both he and Mr Bateman suffer a good deal. We are rejoicing in the first appearance of spring flowers. I am sitting in my dressing room today for the first time it makes a pleasant change from bed room during the day hours.
With our united love and good wishes for your health and happiness.
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
March 14, 1907
My dear Harold.
You're very welcome bundle of letters arrived yesterday. So glad to hear that you are able to share and stand the hard work of the harvest field. All previous personal experience of farming operations will be of service hereafter, when you have your own hands to direct. I am getting on slowly, but to the doctor's satisfaction, as a matter of fact a stroke like mine leaves you very different to what it found you. The articulation of my words is thick and not ready, but my mind is clear and I am not paralysed in arm or leg. So I have much to be thankful for, but to what extent I am going to recover is I think very doubtful. I heard two days ago of the not unexpected death of Mr Bateman. He had a malignant growth near the bowel, which obstructed all passage through it; they operated at first they thought successfully, but two days later, his strength collapsed and he passed away in a few hours. Poor Aunt Annie is nearly heartbroken; they were devoted to one another; but it was a merciful release for him from a life of her helpless suffering. When you write again explain the mystery of your postscript we cannot imagine who Louisa is who has an anecdote to tell about her father; stockings.(sic)
Edgar goes to Wentworth House tomorrow for a fortnight, so he will just be in time to see the boat race. It promises to be a good race, though the Cantab's are rather the favourites; one of Dr Burns sons is rowing in their boat. Van hopes to come and see me in a few days after Easter and Cyril was here last week calling on his way to join the Vernon at Portsmouth where he has gone for a course in wireless telegraphy. I am glad to see my son's in turn when they can come for my time may be very short. Whether you and I will meet again in this world God only knows, nor does it much matter so long as you live soberly and uprightly following in the steps of your saintly mother for a life so spent is the only thing that brings a man happiness at the last.
Goodbye, and God bless you dear boy in the daily prayers of your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Nayland
April 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
We received a capital letter and illustrated sheet from you last week. Uncle Churchill must have had the sun full in his face for him to make such faces as he was doing. Bishop Wilson was good but he seems to be ageing in appearance, the effect no doubt of climate and anxiety.
With the exception of an attack of giddiness and convulsive tremors in the left arm ten days ago I have gone on steadily improving but Lycett is very nervous about giving me leave to do anything in the way of exertion, but I hope to get more rope given me by degrees. I go out in a bath-chair now, the Dudgeons have lent me a very nice one that belonged to Lady Dalhousie.
Van has been here for three days. He is much more on under vicarial discipline than he was at St Miniva. This is a good thing to him I am sure for a beginner St Miniver ways were to easy-going. Edgar and Bob come home tomorrow, and Grace Todd came down with them. This is Edgar's last term, and what to do for him when he gets his B.A. I don't know. Charlie was going to Richmond last evening to take Willy to a dance organised by old Mrs Ball for her nephew and nieces very spirited for an old lady of 80. Mr and Mrs Gray are just off to Westgate for a fortnight, and the Dudgeons are going to Seton South Devon, Billy has been sleepless and nervous lately owing to the excitement of our parish council elections. Has Bertha given Percy leave to go and hunt in Africa? Corbert goes to his new living at Wanstead next week I believe, he and his family have had various presents given by friends and parishioners are library table, a brooch, a purse with 105 pounds seven shillings etc. The Ma . . . . . are having electric light installation laid in at Westwood, with engine and dynamos, water pumping apparatus and exotic bathroom. They have not been able to let our dell(?) as yet.
I hope to sell my horse and carriage before long for now that I cannot drive myself in the dogcart there is no pleasure in keeping my own. I can hire a variety of close carriages when we require them at much less cost than keeping a man 2 horses of our own. I am only anxious for Megg's future, situations in or near Nayland are scarce. I was very glad to hear that your asthma did not hang about you badly for long this time and I hope you have been able to manage the dipping operations without any great fatigue or distress of breathing. Cyril got his certificate all right at the end of his short 3 weeks course A most disastrous one for him as he has two watches, his purse with three pounds in it and sundry details in the way of gloves, tobacco etc, stolen out of his cabin whilst on board - at the same time as you lost your watch and glasses.
Goodbye with love from as all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
April 11, 1907
My dear Harry or Harold (old habits die hard)
I hope the dipping has gone on successfully, I suspect it was better for you than the dusty harvesting, and it was a new experience to. I am going on very well until a week ago, when I had a sudden shaking spasmodic attack of the left side, which has weakened me a bit but I am picking up again. Dr Ferrier has kindly promised to come down one day next week and overhaul me.
I trust you have had some good rains before now, New Zealand and Australian droughts are terrible scourges and must bring ruin to thousands when they come round. Grace is staying here for 10 days and Aunt Isabella and Dolly are in lodgings at Gowings for a week or so. They are going on then to Cuckfield for a short visit, if Van can get them lodgings. Edgar made a long visit to Wentworth house before he came home, it gave him a nice opportunity of seeing his relations in that neighbourhood. Aunt Annie is trying to dispose of the last six years of her lease of Bridge house. She tells me she has had a nice letter from Guy and his wife in Toronto they must pay a surgery assistant at the hospital there much better than they would in England, or Guy could never support a wife on his pay. Dr Lycett has gone for a weeks holiday into South Devon with the Dudgeons. Cyril has had no tidings of his watch's so it must be regarded as a dead loss doubtless. Ask Uncle Churchill to chose you one when you decide to replace yours. I expect your visits to Christchurch are few and far between. I hope Ella and boy are doing well.
I am sending off a box today containing a pair of pince-nez for you. I have not opened it, but possibly there may be both distance and reading glasses as I was not sure what kind you wanted, and cannot remember when I ordered. If it is not right you must let me know after you have examined them. Charlie tells us he is going to a Shakespearean, fancy dress ball, his character to be Sir Walter Raleigh in green velvet trunk hose, feathers and jewel velvet cap. All very smart evidently.
I see my writing is getting very shaky so think I had better give over as they do not like me to tire myself writing letters etc.
With much love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
April 18, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're going on well now, no asthma and unpleasant sheep washing experiences. I am going on quietly in the right direction I believe, though I am kept in rather a state of uncertainty by having experienced one or two slighter fits of an epileptic form character, my speech, the muscles of the left side of my face and my left arm all being affected. Dr Ferrier, kindly came down last Saturday to see me and gave me a hopeful prognosis, but good as this is I feel it is all very uncertain and that no one can be very sure of his opinion.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are staying at Gowing's lodgings for a week or two. I enjoy my chats with Aunt Isabella. I am glad to hear that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge House, the club next door, having taken it and she has taken a house called the Retreat down Friars Lane, where Chancellor used to live, there is a convenient walled garden, where Dolly can keep her chickens, and the girls will not annoy their neighbours with their musical practices.
Cyril has been rather troubled with sciatica in both legs at the same time, which has been rather bad for him. He went to Wentworth House for five days and seen all the better for the change, he will be very glad when they leave Sheerness. My mind is much exercised about Edgar's future. I think house of business . . . . . suit him, if I could hear of any clerkship, I suppose Mr Elworthy does not want a bookkeeper or trustworthy clerk. I should think he could soon be trained but not being able to ride would be a serious drawback. I must try to get him something in the city I suppose, or as a junior master in a preparatory school perhaps.
Dr Lycett has just bought a new and more powerful motor car; he and Mr Wilkinson went to Coventry for it and brought it home, via Rugby, Northampton, Bedford, Cambridge, and Haverhill about 2 miles the side of Haverhill it suddenly stopped dead, no petrol - their tank had not been properly filled before starting fortunately, a bicyclist came up who road back to Haverhill and had some oil sent out, but it was un-pleasant sitting in the on the hedge side in the pitch dark on a cold night he was very glad of the companionship of Mr Wilkinson.
Have you had any tidings of your lost watch or field glasses. Cyril has heard nothing of his watch and watches, even Edgar has joined the band of losers, I sent him up P.O. 15/- to Wentworth house a fortnight since, he never received it and the order was cashed by someone who must have abstracted it.
Nayland is quite a deserted village just now, the Dudgeons at Seaton in South Devon, and the Gray's at Westgate. Edward Hopkins has dissolved partnership with his man, and is again seeking a post. Rees has gone to Scarborough upon what sounds like a wild goose chase. Those boys pick up with any plausible traveller they may meet and get taken in of course. It is a good thing to believe in yourself but you must be as cautious as the serpent in your dealings with strangers.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Uncle Harold, Aunt Bertha and Olive have gone down to their new house at Wolverley near Kidderminster.

Alston court.
Nayland
May 1, 1907
My dear Harold,
Your letter and photo of 6000 sheep in the . . . . reached us a few days ago. I was most interested in your account of the sheep dipping procedure. Am thankful to hear that you are keeping well I hope you will have a good time at Christchurch and see (sic) the exhibition will be a nice change for you and one you will deserve after your recent labours.
Edward Hopkins is home again, bothering everybody to get him into a berth. I think Canada was too hard for him. He had not gone through your in engineering mechanics training which, although it was very hard for you at the time has been of great value to you in your present labourers employment. It will all turn up trumps to you by and by.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly have been at Gowing's Lodgings for the last month and Grace has been staying here so we have had quite a nice gathering during the Easter holidays. Now Miss Johnson has returned and Bob goes back at the end of the week
I continue to gain strength in my left side but my head soon gets confused if I have business matters to attend to like the Stoke and Melford club accounts. I can walk four or five times round the garden without much fatigue, and for greater distances I go in my bath chair.
I am very sorry that you are so cut off from church privileges but at any rate keep yourself well in hand until you are more fortunately situated. It is such a comfort in middle life to look back and feel that you had an upright, cleanly life in your younger years. There is nothing that brings you more satisfaction and peace of mind, than the recollections of that as years advance.
I was very grieved to hear that Percy Elworthy's engagement to Bertha has been broken off. How was it. Had they not seen enough of each other beforehand, so as to have proper opportunities to knowing each other's peculiarities. It is a most unfortunate time for the girls to be coming to England. Uncle Arthur has let his house was three months Aunt Ann . . . . is about to change her house and besides she has no heart for gaiety just now. I am not able to entertain anybody and Uncle Henry is too unwell to be depended upon and has no house as they are living in lodgings at Richmond or Brighton at present. Everybody will be very disappointed as the New Zealand rail and relate relatives are always warmly welcomed and their visits much appreciated.
This letter was unsigned

Nayland
Wednesday,
May 7, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think I may rightly report that the last week has been one of slight improvement in my walking, though I still require a balancing arm on one side with my stick on the other. I suppose Ada and Bertha will be due in about 10 days or a fortnight I wish the families over here were better able to entertain them but as you know, we are all in rather an unusual unsettled state just now in trouble or moving house etc.
Aunt Annie has not been able to let Bridge house, yet, nor hear of a cheaper one that would suit her and her family. Aunt Isabella left the yesterday she has been staying in the village six weeks, I have seen more of her than I have done since her return from India. I have much enjoyed my chats with her reliving old memories with her. I heard Eden Everett yesterday about your glasses, and he says that I ordered two pairs a month ago to be sent to you. I am quite puzzled, I hope I shall shortly hear from you that you have received them and then it will be all right. I don't want to send them to you twice. I get very confused often now about matters of business and waiting for an answer from New Zealand is a long business.
A picture of some of you on the "Tongariro" taken from the tender at Tilbury, puzzled me at first, and I thought you were the young man you were the young (sic) leaning on his elbow, whispering into the. . . . . man's ear. I was glad afterwards, to discover you more for on the right-hand of Miss B. The first man had to cunning a smile but was really absurdly like you. I'm . . . . your . . . . . one best.
Aunt Annie, has not got Bridge House of her hands yet which is rather a worry, nor has she found a cheaper one large enough for herself and family. Charlie says that Jack has grown a beard and looks ruffian in consequence. Cyril is off shortly for a tour around about Norway. Bob has had rather a shock being told by Mr Sinclair in Ipswich that he must wear spectacles continuously, except at hockey when it is considered dangerous so Cyril will be the only were the only glassless one amongst you, and it is lucky for him in his profession.
The Routhes go to their new home at Wendover in Bucks this week, and Uncle Harold is supposed to have got into his new house Wolverly Kidderminster about fortnight ago, though I am afraid it is far from being ready for them. He has . . . . . . . a Humber motorcar, which is very useful in the country.
Has Ella ever said anything to you about Bertha it must be most uncomfortable for her. I gathered from you that he seems such a good sort, how came he not to know his own mind better. I am very sorry about it. Is Bertha very different to her sweet . . . . . . . sisters, if not Percy has lost a good thing and wife.
Goodbye and God bless you, dear boy.
Your affectionate father's.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
May 23, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was very pleased to get your letter written from Christchurch, I think at the end of your holiday, it was fortunate you had George for a companion and Uncle Churchill was up in the mountains. The exhibition must have been very enjoyable.
Although you have the . . . . . . . winter weather before you it is not your first taste of it so you know what to expect and can provide clothing according to your needs. I hope "Bob" will turn out well, it is good idea to make her train some young ones for you and it will pay you well I should think even if hereafter it you did not keep them all. Charlie has gone in a parrot, supposed to be a talker. I suppose we ought to get some news of the travellers soon.
I have not much to tell you about myself, improving I think I may say, but soon tired especially with business accounts. I am getting free however of all my trust matters as quickly as I can I cannot trust myself with the accounts now and the correspondence worries me. I shall hope to go about and see my friends more when the dentist has fitted me with a new plate as I am at present plateless which makes me talk worse than I need otherwise do.
I spend an hour in the garden in the afternoon, if it be warm enough. My dressing is slow in the morning, Mr Gowing comes to wash and dress me every morning as I require a good deal of assistance in these operations.
I am sending you a copy of the architectural review with an illustrated account of Alston Court. They may might have made a better selection of plates, especially I should have liked to have seen the library or drawing room instead of southeast corner of the courtyard as we already have one of east side and one of the north-east corner of west. But what is most tiresome is that they evidently did not know what a treasure they had of this old house, for they only printed the usual few, they sell to the trade and the issue was sold out on the third day. I have had great difficulty in acquiring copies, even now (sic) have not got nearly enough for my wants - I wanted to give away a good number to my friends and relations and say there stupidity is very vexatious.
We are in the midst of spring cleaning, and I have had a line from Cyril to say he has been put on half pay for a time for the economy and it is most trying to him, and poor economy when he was so busy with his wireless telegraphy. Everything is going to the dogs under our present government. Rumours are again flying about that Gray is going to retire, Mrs G. worries him and he is much more desirous of going on with his work as long as he can. I am anxious because I enjoy his sermon and general teaching and we might very easily get someone like Walls of Boxted or Rawlinson of Wiston, etc. Like you I enjoy a good service and sermon at the church I am glad you heard uncle C ("him"deleted) preach on Easter day,
I think there is a better prospect of business it seems in New Zealand than in England. I don't think the old country made a good impression upon the Colonials and old Botha managed to go of with his pockets for the money a loan of 5 million I believe guaranteed by we poor folk at home. Mr Taylor, Mater's uncle Frank was buried yesterday at Blackheath. He was Mrs Todd's only brother.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.

Alston Court.
Nayland
May 28th 1907
My dear Harold,
You're number of the architectural review, ought to go off tomorrow. I believe by parcel post. It has been very annoying, only being able to get such a few copies. I call it a pretty . . . . . concern, not accustomed to deal with such an interesting gem as Alston court and so they only published their usual numbers for the trade. We are expecting to hear from Ada or Bertha tomorrow as to their engagements, and when they would like to come to us with so many of their relatives unable to receive them just now I am afraid it will not be easy for them to make out a nice list of hostess to last them on until January. Aunt Ada, who saw them last week told me that they were two very nice girls, and that Bertha did not wear the air of a bitter young lady. I hope you are keeping well and fit for plenty of hard work in the coming winter. We were rather astonished a day or two ago, to hear from Cyril that he had been discharged on half pay a stupid administrative muddle for he was busy with large classes he was instructing in signaling and wireless telegraphy . . . . . on the fourth day . . . . . the Admirals head got clearer (?) and he was appointed to the Warrior Channel Fleet, and much bigger ship than the Widow. Mrs Dudgeon has immediately pounced on him for summer theatricals and . . . . . his part very willingly - but now Cyril will . . . . . service and they must get on as well as they can. Charlie is coming down to help to their great delight unless he cant find a substitute . . . . . try his hand.
Jessie had a litter of six puppies yesterday, great excitement on Adria's part, but I do not suppose many will survive long. I want to put down my stable as now that I cannot drive the dogcart myself I see no pleasure in keeping my own horse, merely to be driven occasionally with brougham and . . . . . hired out . . . . . serve just as well at much less cost.
Keep a supply of postcards by you so that when you dont feel inclined to write you may send me a few lines on a card. I like to hear from you pretty often, I am going on a very, well, I think but soon get tired especially by figures or calculations. I hope to field more like myself when . . . . . has fitted me up comfortably with what T M Clark . . . . . euphemistically to call "dentures"
I am very glad to hear that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge house, to a . . . . . . . . . . I think to open Terrace Gardens there, and she is hoping to secure a good house in the Avenue . . . . . . . . . . near the railway bridge and close to the landing place of two Ferry boats. I think by crossing the river she gets a larger and better hose for her money than she could do in Richmond and they want a fair sized garden for Winnies chickens and plenty of bedrooms, probably Mrs H. . . . . the patient will stay with them if they have a house with a sufficient number of rooms.
Wishing you every happiness and success in your career (in which you must steadily persevere
Believe me
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're not finding any bad affect left behind by your hunting cropper, wire mixed with fencing is not fair and very dangerous for the riders.
Bessie Julius saw the girls the other day and they astonished her by telling her they were going to commence a three months training course of nursing at St Bartholomew's on Aug 1 and they hope to come to her when this was over. So I am afraid the dull month of November will have began by the time they can reach us. I know Ada has been thinking of going through such a course for a long time past, and I suppose Bertha's broken heart has driven her with the same service. I don't much like the work for young girls, but it is the fashion nowadays.
Aunt Annie Hand came to us yesterday for a few days, she arrived quite exhausted after spending six hours in the train. She had been paying a visit to Lyme churchyard. Would you care to have the Essex Standard sent on to you sometimes when I should remember it. I don't think foreign newspapers publish(?) too much.
The young folk here are working hard at their parts and holding frequent rehearsals, here or at the Dudgeons, 3 plays "A Voyage Benoit", "Poor Pillicuddy" and "Miss Flipper's Holiday". Actors; Mr Wilkinson, Mr Williams, Dr Lycett, Charlie, Miss Gray, Miss Denholm, Miss Gresham, Miss Williams, Miss Johnson.
The Bishop of Colchester commemoration of his golden wedding day he had a golden challis and paten presented to him by the clergy of the diocese and a golden goblet and cover by the city of Chelmsford, and parishioners of St Mary's.
I am thankful to say I still progress slowly on the way to recovery, but my mouth both for speaking and eating hangs fire. I have not found your Mr Agne very successful in fitting me out with a new plate. In reply to a little wedding present we see sent Phoebe Storr, she mentioned a George Adams and says they are all so fond of him than they are lost to imagine how they managed to get along without him before. They have changed his name to Brownie now.
Cyril likes his new appointment to the "Warrior" very well I think, he has Chatham again for headquarters. He will miss his uncle Harold, now, however, they are not yet settled in their new house, nor has he got a chauffeur yet who can drive at all safely.
I am afraid I must shorten my letter this week, for I have an inflamed eye and letter writing tires me more than it used to do.
With love from us both
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
Suffolk
June 20, 1907
My dear Harold.
Your letter of May 9, reached me this morning, and it gave me great pleasure to receive it and know that you are keeping well. I am very thankful to say that I have been going on well with only just two convulsive seizures of which to head, chiefly in my left arm and side of my face. Dr Ferrier kindly came down and examined me with the opthalmascope(?) report very encouraging. I am of course still very shaky and have more difficulty in letter writing. Sometimes, I am afraid making sad nonsense of my sentences.
Mr DeVere's(?) photos came out beautiful prints and a copy was posted out to you, some little time back, May 29 I think. So it should reach you, I hope in due time, and you can show the modern New Zealanders what the old country can do in domestic architectural works. I cannot send in the original photos away as I only have one copy, and they very fragile.
I am quite sure that you have done your best during your first year, . . . . . Everything was so new to you and the manual work so unusually hard work for you . . . . . should be of great assistance to you, and prepared you for the hard physical work you have had to do.
I often thank God for your steadiness and determination to stick to your work, and do your best to qualify yourself of the work that lies before you and I trust you may in time build up a happy home for yourself. That your character is being formed upon good principles. assure me that you will do well . . . . . I am sure Arthur Elworthy is a good man to work with.
Let me know when you get it that the bank . . . . . . difficulty about crediting you with the 20 pounds I sent you a cheque for. I was not certain, they might not require me to send it through the Bank of New Zealand in London.
Aunt Annie has sold the lease of the Bridge House at Richmond(?) - a lucky stroke as it . . . . . . . . . to sell - a public house at the back and bridge and steep slope in front most it most difficult to find and purchase. A man from Hammersmith has brought it I believe and will convert it with tea gardens.
Aunt A has taken a house in St Margaret's Avenue, close to the ferry landing place. so she can get over to Ariah(?) Lane immediately and so to Richmond. We are so surprised to hear that the girls are going into St Bartholomew's nursing training home. I wish they had left it for two or three more years before plunging into this unpleasant work, and it is a great strain upon the strengths of young girls.
I see my sentences are becoming confused so will leave this to Mater to finish the page.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.
My dear Harry
It is quite time for your dear father, to have his afternoon nap, and I am winding up for him. I have just read him off to sleep first your letters always give him so much pleasure. The weather has been rather against him so very changeable, but I think if it once get settled and he is able to be out more he will get stronger.
Charlie is coming next Monday (June 24) he is taking part in the Nayland Dramatic Entertainment July 27 Miss Johnson is also acting the proceeds are to go to the Cricket Club
Much love from us all.
You're very affectionate.
Mater

Postcard
Nayland
July 4, 1907
Mater wrote to you yesterday I believe and I am only sending a few lines in my own writing as a postscript so to speak. I cannot say much about progress, as I do not think it is within measure or continuous, but I am thankful . . . . . I am not any worse, nor have I had any reoccurrence of the convulsive attacks. Adria with Miss Johnson and the little Lycetts are staying at Felixstowe but the weather so far has been cold and wet.
I was very pleased to hear that Edgar has passed his final exam for the Oxford B.A.
It is a great pleasure to me to have such good account of you that your health is good and that you stick steadily to your work.
God grant, we may one day be spared to meet again . . . .
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
July 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
The weather has at last changed at little and we are enjoying the commencement of a little summer warmth, nearly all July was cold and wet, and we were rarely without a fire in the evening. I continue to gain strength, but I am worried with a good deal of pain in my right leg, however, I live in hope of improvement. We have enjoyed visits from Mr Todd and Mabel, Charlie, Van and Edgar during the past month. Bob returns home on the 30th.
I hope I hope your work is going on well and that you feel you are a getting hold of the details of New Zealand farming. I believe Ada and Bertha enter upon the hospital nursing course next week, but we have not heard anything of them yet from themselves directly, so can tell you nothing about them of interest. I am asking Van to go on for me as I am soon tired of writing. Perhaps this tires me more than anything else, but don't shorten your letters in proportion as I always enjoy hearing of view and from you.
In Van's writing.
Many thanks for your last letter which reached me a week or so ago, I am at home just now for part of my summer holiday. I had to divide it up, this year and opted a week first of all at St Minver with the Bucknalls at the beginning of the month and Tuesday last I came down to Nayland to spend a fortnight or so at home. Edgar has gone off to Richmond and Charlie (also on holiday) is we don't know where: but I'm hoping to see him down here this week. Robert comes on Tuesday from school. We are looking forward to the Sunday School treat which has been fixed for this afternoon. Miss Johnson, Adrian and I hope to attend. It takes place at the vicarage this year.
I am afraid I shall not see Ada and Bertha during their stay in England. They are not coming to Nayland until later in the year and I do not suppose they will be near Cuckfield.
Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada will be coming back to Brighton in the autumn, I always in my visits to Devonshire Place, which take place periodically when they are there. Did I tell you how on one occasion Aunt Ada and I saw Professor Cyril diving off the pier on a bicycle.
I have just purchased a new tire for the back wheel of your old machine. This is the first big sum I have spent on it. It still travels well, although it looks a bit rusty in parts from being out in all weathers, and not getting cleaned as often and as it should. I hope it will not be long before you are able to get a bicycle yourself. We have not had news of Cyril has some time, but he is I fancy cruising about in the Channel with the home Fleet on HMS Warrior.
We saw the Prince of Wales, dashing through Head Street yesterday in a motorcar. It reminded me of the day when you and Cyril and I saw the present king on his way to the station when you were returning to school.
The Colchester sports, I see are fixed for next month but too late for me to go to them, I have not had a bathe and the old baths for a long time. A letter has just arrived from Cyril. He is at Chatham, and he sends us a photo of himself and fellow officers taken on board. Now I must leave room for father to wind up.
In ELF's writing
Van having kindly filled up my lacking brain for me.
I now remain.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
August 8, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was glad to receive your letter yesterday, dated June 24 in which you mentioned that you came to have sole charge of the electric shearing machine. It is also nice to hear it you are going to turn your old business to account, and it ought to pay you well after a time besides giving you a better position on the station. Your "Boss" seems to be a fine rider, generally coming in first in the steeplechase. I will let you know when the girls have decided when they will come to Nayland. November ish I expect be the month a dull month for a country visit, but it seems to suit their other engagements. But we are not likely to hear whether Charlie or Van or Cyril are home just then, but the latter is always uncertain now so we much hope for some help for him(?) Charlie and Mr Fuller came down in the motorcar a fortnight ago and that very evening, just after their arrival I had an attack the first one since February. It was a short affair and left no paralysis afterwards, but I was unconcious and slightly convulsed, while it lasted. I hope I shall not feel any worse for it in a little while but a relapse was very disappointing having had no return since February.
Aunt Annie and Margery are staying at Mr Gowings for a week and afterwards Margery goes to Holland with Lottie Alston on a sketching expedition
With with every good wish for your health and happiness.
Believe me, ever
Yr affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
August 9, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think Van helped me with my last letter but I hope to manage better today and write to you myself. I have felt better and more like myself, for the last week or so now I am still weak in limb and forgetful in mind.
Aunt Annie Hand has been staying in Nayland for three weeks partly in lodgings and partly here. And next week, Aunt Lucy and Margaret and Kitty Hopkins come for a fortnight so I am not deserted by my relations. We are trying for a post as a junior master in a preparatory school for Edgar. It could be bad for him to be hanging about here doing nothing, so the sooner he gets something to do the better. For a month or until we hear of something he is going to stay with Van at Cuckfield
I hope your coaching about your shearing machine has gone off satisfactorily and that you feel quite competent now to direct your workers under you, you are no doubt right not to undertake too much mechanics work as you want to become an adept at farming generally in all its branches. I hope someday you will meet with some one with whom you can join forces, but go slowly and require more years and experience before investing money in the matter.
I am very much hoping to be able to take my seat upon the bench at its next sitting at the end of September, but I cannot help feeling rather nervous at appearing at any public function. We have found five wasps nests in the garden and field and hope we have now destroyed them all. Mr Taylor stayed two nights with us and gave Bob the character of being a good steady worker, but neither quick nor clever So he follows in his elder brother's footsteps, but it is a very good character for a boy to be good and tidy at his work. I am afraid, his mother would not like him to emigrate, but personally I think the openings in the new world are better than in the old. But you miss the amenities of life, music etc, and the church privileges of the old country.
Thank you for writing so regularly, your letters, give me great pleasure.
With love from us all
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Postcard
Nayland
August 15, 1907?
My dear H.
A card is better than nothing, as a greeting to you. I am going on fairly well but very soon get tired. Aunt Annie comes to us tomorrow. George Sumner and Maggie go on their various ways then. I think you are right as to your future to aim at a thorough all round knowledge of farming with an eye to your future and not stick to one depart (sic) to exclusively. Your reports of your work, are a great comfort to me and I have great confidence in your future progress.
E. L. F.

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 3, 1907
My dear Harold
I sincerely trust you are quite well now for your account of yourself tormented with asthma and boils made me very sorry for you in immersed in your work and no one to look after you. I do not know of anything that does much good for either complaint unless it be sometimes a change of residence -- going up to higher ground for instance, but you cannot . . . . . beforehand it is a matter of experiment. A tablespoonful of yeast taken three times a day in a little beer or water (I don't know if it is nasty or not) is said to be of considerable use in checking their repetition.
I have been going on more satisfactorily for the last month past, gaining strength and no return of the fits. I walk up the village sometimes though to no great extent. Edgar is trying for an appointment as a junior master in a preparatory school - I think he will do if only he can show enough force of character to control the boys. Taylor does not think that Bob has much chance of winning an entrance scholarship in a public school and so we must let him plod on in the usual course. Taylor says he is a very steady worker and a favourite amongst his schoolfellows and developing into a good cricketer.
Although your letters are very welcome don't bother to write when you are seedy but try and send a postcard if you can just to tell me how your. Our prayers go with you in your life and work
Believe me ever
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

September 4
Your letter of July 23 just received - glad to hear you are rather better and that you have seen a doctor about the boils - sharpened little wooden matches dipped in carbolic and glycerine equal parts and then rolled in fingers and thumb and tell until the vesicle onto top of a boil is perforated is the base is the best thing I know of to destroy the germ and stop the repetition.
We shall anxiously look out for your next card

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 12, 1907
My dear Harold
I was much relieved to have a better account from you about asthma and boils. I too am going on fairly well and the weather being finer and warmer has been much in my favour. I hope New Zealand has enjoyed some nice rains - we have been full of garden parties here but all out holiday pursuits are coming to an end and we are thinking more of school, and serious occupations. Edgar has not heard of any opening yet but he must be patient cheerful. I hope you're Uncle Churchill's . . . . . up the West Coast has been satisfactory and that he suffered no mishaps by land or flood. Aunt Margaret returned to Eastbourne on Tuesday . . . . . and I think Aunt Lucy and Kitty return early next week. Aunt Isabella and Willie are staying at the Isle of White: Tolland Bay(?). I shall be glad to have a card from you and I hope be cheered about you.
Are the prospects hopeful for the year . . . . I suppose in your specialty of sheep farming you cannot tell much until the lambing season is on. I must ask Mater to finish this finally. I am so helpless in better writing by . . . . When you have share received it let me know the amount of your doctors bill as I should like to settle it for you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
In Mater's is writing
My dear Harry
At last I am sending you Adria's photo you must not think she really looks like that though she has grown very much, very nearly as tall as me - but her face has not that heavy expression. Your dear father has been decidedly better during the last month and he says himself that he feels better which is lovely to hear. Beau's holidays are coming to an end and he returns to Broadstairs, 22nd inst - they have all had very happy holidays with of course heaps of cricket -if they are enjoying Kitty Hopkins company she seems a nice girl. We are sorry about the asthma I do hope it has quite gone by now.
Much love from us all
Your very affectionate
Mater

Alston court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 26, 1907
My dear Harold
I wish I was on telephone to Pareora and could therefore hear before I write how you are. I trust that asthma and boils are things of the past. I have not been very grand just the last week a tendency to spit blood obliging me to be careful about my exertion. But I do not believe it means much more than nose bleeding in the wrong place.
Edgar is my chief anxiety just now, it seems so difficult to get him into any work. Employers are afraid of his arm leading to great a hindrance to his usefulness. Have you heard from Charlie that he called upon that little nurses as he calls them and he thinks that they have had about enough of it already and will not be sorry when December 1 arrives. They paid him a return visit one Sunday afternoon and had tea at Streatham Place. I saw very good photos enlarged at gallons a day at Gowan's the other day showing the octagonal font in Stoke and a view beyond between two of the pillars beyond showing the stained-glass panel to the memory of Mr Torlesse. I bought it and gave it to Miss Fanny Torlesse to remind her of her father and of your baptism. She was very pleased to have it.
Are field glasses useful to you, as Christmas is coming on and I should like to give you something really useful, your last pair was taken and that made me think you might like to have them replaced but I shall be glad of any suggestion from you if there is anything you would prefer.
I hope the electrical shearing change will add a nice little bit to your wages you have been so careful with your money that you ought to be able to plant a nice little nest egg for the future
I do not think I can write any more today I am in the bed and writing fatigues me
Believe me all ways
Your affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
October 23, 1907
My dear Harold
I am delighted to know by your last letter that the boils are apparently on the wain in severity(?), are you and your chum occupying the Elworthy's dining room now, is the young men in the office. I congratulate you on the possession of such a fine dog as "Black Darkie" Aunt Isabella and Dolly are here just now and Gerald has just gone the New Zealanders are still coming the first week in November I believe (Charlie suggested) but they keep changing their plans so that we are still uncertain as to when we shall really see them but these repeated delays mean that they have driven their visit off to the worst months in the year . . . . . when we shall probably have neither weather nor visitors . . . . . and none of the sons at home except Edgar who having failed to obtain the post he was trying for will be our only helper in guiding the visitors about. Edgar has also tried for a stool in a bank but one of his duties was to reach over and arrange the big ledgers at the opening and closing of the bank and his left-hand was too crippled to manage this office work with such . . . . heavy lifting . . . . . or a tutorship. I lost my Oyster Feast this year and I must remember to send you a Standard to shake up your remembrance of Colchester Worthies.
For myself I remain the status quo pretty well, weakened chiefly in my walking. I seldom go beyond the garden . . . . . in a bath-chair as my left . . . . . 3 weeks and uncertain in walking
Whenever I see our little flocks of 200 or 300 sheep strolling down the road I think of your thousands on the open prairie is and think what a very different job it must be but you are only going back to the earliest times on earth shepherds everywhere. Have you been so lucky as to hear any music of late I am so glad whenever you get the opportunity to hear some music or a play etc for sheep farming must be very monotonous but may turn up very lucrative, in the end you may yet get the opportunity opportunity (sic) of enjoying all these things
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
Wednesday October 30, 1907
My dear Harry
I will begin my letter a day before the proper day in case I am not up to writing tomorrow. I am so sorry to hear that you are still enduring the boils I really did hope they were more decidedly on the wane. Resin(?) ointment smeared on linen and a piece of rag outside ought to help you pressure is nearly always helpful on top of these horrors. I am glad you have acquired another good dog they are such a necessity in your life.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are spending a fortnight with us. Nayland is all in excitement today as a menagerie pays us a visit tomorrow procession followed by an exhibition tent in a big tent. I heard that Henry is shortly leaving the White Hart to start a wine merchants in Colchester. The weather has been very unsettled on the whole, September was very fine Oct
. . . . so but is going out wet(?)
I expect your paddocks are frightfully muddy however these will dry and come off. I am sending you another watch for your Christmas present for I have quite forgotten if I sent you one or not after you lost yours in the spring. Our deaf parlourmaid makes all manner of awkward mistakes but we best wait a little longer to see if she can improve because she has several good points.
Poor Edgar cannot . . . . . . of a tutorship yet which seemed just the thing when the man thought he had better choose one with more experience - quite unnecessary with such young pupils 101/2 to 13 he kept his name on Gilberts(?) list but he has had no luck yet, his arm poor fellow cripples him in all directions. No news of Ada and Bertha coming yet they are going sometime between . . . . . and Xmas to Aunt Ada who has now come back to Brighton with Uncle Henry. I hear that Charlie is taking up your daily(?) paper from Van for the next 12 months do you crave any books from time to time or are you to sleepy for evening reading boils and asthma . . . . . may perhaps rather . . . . . to a novel.
I have been going on fairly well lately but am very staggering at times especially if I start off at all quickly before I have got my balance correctly
Our united love and best wishes for the coming Xmas, fill up your next letter with an account of your life's daily routine are you still being looked after in Mr Elworthy's house or are you altogether in your own quarters and what are these quarters I don't know it at all just now where you sleep and live
Oct 31
Do you pay for your sheepdog yourself or does the Boss look upon a dog as a part of a necessary outfit for looking after his sheep. I suppose you must get them to know to obey you and you only.
I seem to have ended my letter twice so accept our united love again
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
November 13, 1907 12:15 p.m.
My dear Harold.
I was very glad to hear from you this morning and that you were able to give a good account of yourself. You are reaping the benefit now of facing weathers and duties, wherever, they may call you. I know, I quite realise you live a very hard life, but it is a wholesome, manly, and it is so difficult to . . . . . alone in England. I believe there will get to you, this will get to you . . . . . about Christmas . . . . . any of our letters so you must accept our . . . . . good Xmas wishes for the year, I am sending you a key less watch for a present in place of the one you lost, as I forget whether you ever placed replaced your lost one. I hope to send a card photo also. Mr Gowers first was a failure, and the NZ girls are here for a week and if I could have entertained them I would have persuaded them to stay longer - but this all falls on Edgar's shoulders. They go on next to Aunt Ada's at Brighton, I am sorry so many of their relations are hors-de-combat just now when we are all anxious to entertain them. They are both very pleasant, good looking delightful girls Ada has her mothers voice and very delicate pretty features Bertha is rater like . . . . . They showed me the large Julius group taken I believe shortly before they left New Zealand it was very interesting as it included all the married daughters and their children and then their mother and the Bishop and the sons-in-law so it was a very comprehensive picture. Bertha has plenty of spirit in her and energy, the girls and Edgar were all nearly shot out of the dogcart yesterday they had kept Molly (the horse) waiting and she was restless having only been clipped a day or two before and felt cold so she began to jump herself up and down to warm herself, poor Edgar . . . . . no firm hold Bertha slid down onto the mat in front on her knees but was not discomposed in the least - they both behaved like born horsewomen. I suppose they have a good deal of practice in NZ and showed no nervousness. I feel I know your life etc much better since I have talked with A & B it all seems more lifelike, they give you great credit for your perseverance and say you are sure to succeed as you have learnt your . . . . . work from the beginning
We all wish you every good Xmas wish with happiness and success in your life progess. I am glad you heard Faust the music is such a treat and must be so refreshing amidst your work. Edgar has had no luck yet in his search for a tutorship for a small boy but he must have patience applicants all seem to be afraid of his arm. I think tho except for games it makes no difference its his ability to do all that is wanted . . . . . .
Though still very weak in my leg I am fairly well in myself only I walk very little now and trust more to my bathchair
With much love from us all
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn
My writing is very shaky

Nayland
November 21, 1907
My dear Harold
Xmas has passed but I can still wish you all good wishes for the year ahead for the new year - I hope this superintending of the shearing house and machinery will not only give you some responsible work undercover but a decided increase of pounds shillings and pence for you want to save and keep keeping with an eye to your future. We enjoyed the . . . . . .visit the girls were able to spare us they were so much in request that we had to be contented with rather a short visit, they are very nice girls and I like them both very much Edgar was in love with both of them and rarely took his eyes from them whilst they were here they took part in . . . . . the Choir Society practice . . . . . . whether or no on the strength of this Edgar joined the club this year as an active bass.
The girls are making a long stay in Europe . . . . . they proceed next to Wiesbaden I believe and they have still got . . . . . to do. Uncle Arthur is still most poorly he still sees double and he has someone one and has someone to go up and up to London with him it will probably get right again when the blood the result of the blow is all absorbed
Maters writing
I am finishing this for your father as he stopped writing to go out for a hour before luncheon in his bath-chair we all went by the Stoke Road and the sea and the sun was very bright so he found it very pleasant he was able to go over to Roberts yesterday afternoon to be present with Mr Dudgeon at the distribution of "Cole's Loaf" 170 loaves were given away to the poor of Nayland. They seemed very pleased to see your father there.
He has been pretty well lately I wish he could gain more strength but they say cases like this are always very slow
I had a nice letter from Ada today she and Bertha are now at Brighton with the Hunts the same post brought news of the death of my aunt Elizabeth she had not been very well but they thought was getting better but a bad heart attack came on last Monday and she died (quite peacefully) at 10 o'clock the following Wednesday morning, my dear father will miss her very much I fear
Beau writes they are getting up a play at school he is to be Dame Rumple an old woman he is getting quite a swell at football. I do hope so much your asthma has left you
Much love from us all
Yours very affectionately
Mater.


Edward married Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10], daughter of Dr Frederick Gilder JULIUS MD FRCS [50] and Ellen Hannah SMITH [49], on 12 Nov 1872 in West Molesey SRY. Katharine was born on 27 Nov 1850 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 15 Apr 1886 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 35, and was buried on 20 Apr 1886 in Richmond. The cause of her death was T.B.

General Notes:
Katherine was born about a quarter before 10 o'clock in the evening. Baptised at Richmond Old Church by Henry R Julius. Alfred A Julius, Miss Clifton, and Miss Julia Quilter sponsors. Ellen Hannah Julius stood proxy for Miss J. Quilter.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Wedding Notice:
Fenn - Julius : 12 inst., at West Molesey, by the Rev Churchill Julius, brother of the bride, assisted by the Rev G Nicholas vicar, Edward Liveing Fenn Esq., M.B. the Old Palace Richmond, Surrey, eldest son of the late T Harrold Fenn Nayland Suffolk, to Katherine Pauline, third daughter of F G Julius Esq., M.D. The Grove West Molesey Surrey.
Ref Ipswich Journal Sat Nov 16 1872

Katherine is mentioned in a scrap of an undated letter to "Jemmy" signed by an elderly woman, Katherine Clifton(?):
"I forgot to say that I saw Katie Julius now Mrs Fenn looking very well and happy; they dined with us at Annie Bateman's and I thought her husband a very pleasant and superior man. It seems so odd to see Katie mistrefs of her old home. Dr Julius came up to see me, and spent a few hours with us; he is not as well and strong as he used to be"

Tour in Switzerland.
7 August Monday. (1876)
Edward, Mary, Arthur and I started a most jovial party at 6 pm en-route for Switzerland Ernest came to bid adieu at Charing Cross - Our first journey proved long and tedious, owing to the Bank Holiday and we only arrived at Folkestone in time for the boat 10 pm two hours late. The first hour on the sea was lovely by moonlight - but a fog came on when we were half across and we beat about for two hours before getting into the harbour, we went to the Hotel de Louise and got to bed at 3.
Up again at nine when we had a long hot dusty journey to Paris, a nice dinner at the Palais Royale revived us, and we started at 8 pm on our long journey arriving at Geneva at 10.30 on Wednesday morning. We slept pretty well all night and enjoyed the view in the morning the scenery from Culoz along the banks of the Rhone was very beautiful.
At Geneva we went to the Hotel du Lac, and after a wash and breakfast went in a steamer on the lake for three hours to a small town (Nyon) with an old tower and fortifications. After Table d'Hote we strolled out again round the town and had cafe in the street Ed and A smoking.
Thursday, August 10 we started at 7 in the diligence (coach) for Chamonix gradually we ascended towards the mountains and the last half of the way was most beautiful with most lovely views of Mont Blanc especially from Sallanches where we made a halt at 1 pm for lunch it was a long hot drive and we reached Chamonix at 3.30, it is in a lovely valley, just under the Mont Blanc chain - a bath and table d'hote revived our party except myself who knocked up had a shivering fit, and was sent to bed with champagne.
Friday, August 11 at half past 8 we set out for the Mer de Glace I had a mule who assisted Mary with his tail, passing through a pinewood to Montanvert we came on the glacier which we crossed with a guide, and much enjoyed walking on the ice and the fine air on the glacier, we then descended the rocks on the other side by the Mauvais Pas to the Chapeau where we lunched and the mule meeting us took me back to Chamonix After table d'hote E & I sat talking on the balcony with the two Miss Giles who arrived in evening from Lausanne.
Saturday - the weather is still continuing warm and fine, we made another delightful excursion starting early we got over the zig zags on the lower part of the Flegere before the sun became powerful and a nice wood was then entered with numerous refreshing streams & after a three hours climb we reached the summit the view quite repaid the long walk Mont Blanc towering above all the Aiguilles the true monarch of the Alps which it scarcely appeared to be in the valley - after luncheon and a rest Ed & A crossed the ridge towards the Brevent and came home down part of that mountain - Mary & I sat in a lovely wood enjoying the views until 3 when we slowly strolled back taking short cuts and climbing rocks with the aid of our trusty Alpine stocks. The Giles came to our hotel & sat with us in the evening watching signals made from a party up Mont Blanc.
Sunday, August 13 there is a pretty little English church at Chamonix where we went for Morning Service we saw Lady A Onslow there and had a few words with her coming out, after an early dinner we took a walk with the Giles half way up the Brevent it was a long walk and we did not reach home till after dark, we liked our companions very much.
Monday much to our regret at 7 am we left Chamonix and started in a carriage finis
Ref: This unfinished account was written by Catherine in her Mr Punch's Pocket Book dated 1876.

The Mount Dore
Bournemouth
Nov 3 1885
My darling Boy
I ought to have written to you last week, for I am afraid you have lost my address, I am sorry I did not do so - Did you write home on Sunday - I hope you will write to me here as soon as you can - Poor Mother feels very lonely, in the grand big house, and very tired too, for I have, every morning to go into some very hot rooms, have a bath in one & sit for a long time in steam in another, I am so tired after it, that I can scarcely walk, and am very glad that there is a lift, to get upstairs to my bedroom again, where I have do go back to bed again.
Bournemouth is a very beautiful place, I wish I could get out and see more of it, & go down to the sea but it rains nearly every day- it is pouring now - I have only once been to the sea, it is a long walk for me, but all through beautiful gardens, so pretty a stream runs through them for 2 miles with pretty little bridges crossing it - I have been out for two drives, in a health chair drawn by a pony, it rained each time, & the window had to be put up & I felt as if I was packed up in a box.
I do hope my darling Wags that I shall really get better soon, & come home with enough to have really happy Christmas holiday with you all.
Father tells me that Harry came home on Saturday quite well again.
Goodbye dearest boy so much love to you from your ever loving
Mother
K P Fenn
Letter to Ernest "Van" Fenn the only letter to survive from Katherine Fenn

THE TIMES:
On the 15th April at 1 Portland Terrace Richmond Surrey KATHERINE PAULINE wife of EDWARD LIVEING FENN Esq. M.D. Aged 35.
Buried Apr 20 1886
OBITUARY: April 1886.
Death of Mrs Fenn : With great regret we have to report the death of Mrs Fenn the wife of Dr E L Fenn, which took place on Thursday at no 1 Portland-place Richmond at the early age of 35. The deceased lady was the third daughter of Dr Frederick G Julius, who died in the early part of the present year. She was married to Dr Fenn in 1872 and has left a family of five sons. Her death has occurred after a long illness from chronic inflammation of the lungs. Dr Fenn and his family may be assured that they have the sincere sympathy of very many residents in Richmond and its neighbourhood.

Extract from a letter by Dr E L Fenn to their son Van on his Ordination.
Grey Friars
June 3, 1903
My dear Van
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . You are much in our thoughts this Ember-tide week of course and I often think what a pleasure it would have been to your mother to see you consecrated for the work of the church. At one time she hoped very much Charlie would have entered the ministry, so I know what her feeling would have been about you. Her early death has been an untold loss to you boys, for she possessed a rare and holy mind, with much good judgement and dislike to all exaggeration about sacred subjects. If those who are passed away can follow our earthly actions be assured that her loving spirit will not be far from you next Sunday. With much love and good wishes for your happiness and usefulness in your sacred career
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Upon Katherine's death her sister Mary Caroline Julius (Aunt Polly) looked after the Fenn children. Portrait of Katherine in Possession of E L Fenn Auckland 1998.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 4mths born Richmond

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 10 scholar born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Katherine is shown at her fathers home aged 20 single born Richmond

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Katherine is recorded as a wife aged 30yrs, born Richmond SRY


5. Pictures: Katherine P Fenn, Richmond Green Surrey.

6. Pictures: Letter by Katherine Fenn & Diary. Richmond Green Surrey.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1328 M    i. Dr Charles Edward "Charlie" FENN [18] was born on 23 Sep 1873 in Richmond SRY, died on 30 Apr 1947 in 8 Priory Rd Kew London. at age 73, and was buried on 5 May 1947 in Richmond Cemetery.

+ 1329 M    ii. Walter Robert Julius "Bobby" FENN [32] was born on 5 Feb 1875 and died on 9 Aug 1880 in Isle Wight at age 5.

+ 1330 F    iii. Evelyn Alston FENN [34] was born on 29 Feb 1876 in Richmond SRY and died on 27 Sep 1877 in Portland Tce Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 1331 M    iv. Harold Liveing "Harry" FENN [33] was born on 28 Mar 1877 in Richmond SRY, was baptised in Stoke, died on 6 Jan 1969 in St Georges Hospital Christchurch NZ at age 91, and was buried in 1969 in Timaru N.Z.

+ 1332 M    v. Reginald Alston FENN [35] was born in 1878 in Richmond and died on 11 Jul 1879 in Portland Tce Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 1333 M    vi. Rev Ernest Vanderzee "Van" FENN M A [37] was born on 20 Feb 1880 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 31 Mar 1880, died on 22 Jan 1956 in Timaru N.Z. at age 75, and was buried in 1956 in Timaru N.Z.

+ 1334 M    vii. Edward Churchill FENN [36] was born on 19 May 1881 in Richmond SRY and died on 20 May 1882 in Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 1335 M    viii. Lieut Commander Cyril Duncan FENN R N [38] was born on 19 Aug 1882 in Richmond SRY, died on 9 Aug 1921 in Nayland SFK at age 38, and was buried on 12 Aug 1921 in Nayland Burial Ground.

+ 1336 M    ix. Rev Edgar Julius "Baa" FENN M A [39] was born on 16 Jun 1885 in Richmond SRY, died on 7 Aug 1942 in Castlethorpe at age 57, and was buried on 12 Aug 1942 in Castlethorpe Churchyard.


Edward next married Edith TODD [14], daughter of Charles John TODD [536] and Elizabeth Anne [8221], on 13 Feb 1892. Edith was born about 1858 in Kensington MDX and died on 22 Dec 1938 aged about 80.

General Notes:
Edith lived at Alston Court until 1938 when at her death it passed to Charlie Fenn.
Buried with her husband in the old cemetery Bear St Nayland, her grave reads after E L Fenn "Also Edith beloved wife of the above died Dec 22nd 1929 The free gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom 6-23"

DEATH OF MRS. FENN OF NAYLAND
Former Colchester Resident.
The death of Mrs. Fenn, of Alston Court, Nayland, which took place on December 22, removes a personality much loved and respected in the village and neighborhood. She was the widow of Dr. E. L. Fenn, formerly physician to the Essex County Hospital, and during the first eleven years of her married life resided at Grey Friars. East Hill. She then moved to Alston Court., Nayland, the old family residence of her husband, where she took great pride in keeping up the beautiful old 15th Century house in which she lived for over 35 years and was always ready to receive with a kindly welcome the numerous visitors who wished to view the ancient house. She was a devoted member of the Church of England, of a kind and charitable disposition and will be greatly missed by all who knew her.
THE FUNERAL The funeral took place on Thursday at noon, the service in the Parish Church, Nayland. being conducted by the vicar (Rev. Canon Cliff. R.D.). assisted by the Ven. Archdeacon Buckley. of Polstead. Mr. G. W. Brooks Mills was at the organ.
The immediate mourners were :- Miss A. M. Fenn (daughter), Dr. and Mrs. Fenn (step-son and daughter-in-law), Revs. E. V. and E. J. Fenn (step-sons) and Miss Nancy Fenn. Among the congregation were Col. and Miss C. Rundall, Misses R. and J. Cliff. Col. and Mrs. Gray, Mr and Mrs. Roberts Mr. Tayler (schoolmaster) and Mr Littlebury (postmaster) and others.
The service was choral, and the hymns and psalms sung were Psalm 23, " Abide with Me," " O Strength and Stay," and the Nunc Dimittis.
The floral tributes were from :-Adria ; Charlie, Ella and Nancy. Van and Edgar; Grace; Mabel and Adria ; Dick and Nora; Mrs. J. Coats; Mrs. P. H. Smythies ; Canon and the Misses Cliff; Dr. and Miss Nicholson; Mrs. Syrett and Mrs Rundall; Col. and Mrs C H Gray and Miss Ellinor Gray: Col. and Mrs. Sykes ; the G.F.S. ; Miss Corry : Col. and Miss J. Rundall ; Nurse G. M. Payne the. outdoor and indoor staff; Mr Bernard Walsh.

Correspondance:

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 12, 1893
My dear Van
I have just been writing to Cyril to tell him that his long lost purse is found - there is 4/6 in it so no doubt he will be pleased
Edgar is at home at present as two of Madame's children are very ill - he just does a little with me - but next week we shall have to work a little harder.
Charlie is in London now - he lives with Mr Cotes (a clergyman) and his wife he likes them very much. Father enjoyed the Oyster Feast the speeches were so good. My brother Algernon from Texas is coming home next month - I have not seen him for years - we are all so glad.
George has gone away - the new boy is a good deal younger - his name is John - his father is the custodian at the Museum. Father and I go to the Castle Library on Monday's to a lecture on the French Revolution
Do you find it cold yet? and have you any particular friend yet?
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 20, 1893?
My dear Van
Poor Cyril has been in the wars - he ran against an open knife in the hand of one of his friends - and got a nasty jagged cut - he said it was "an awful accident" - but Miss Hadden got it strapped up for him and it is getting better now. Edgar wrote to cheer him up. Harry is getting on with his football - he hopes to get his badge. He gets four weeks at Christmas and four at Easter - as the headmaster wants to go abroad at Easter.
Father bought some lovely new plants at a sale - he has made the greenhouse look so pretty.
I expect you like getting holidays on the saints days - did you think of Father on St Luke's day? St Luke was the beloved physician you know and the Vicar used often to say something to show he was thinking of Father on that day.
Have you any particular friend yet? Are they a nice set of boys. Do you find it cold yet?
Much love from us all
Your loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 24, 1893
Dear Van
I was glad to have such a nice long letter from you and to hear that you were second in class - Father thinks that is very good indeed. Your school seems to go in for football - Harry seems to like it very much now. Cyril writes that his thumb is quite well now Father says you had better go on with extra classics that will be more useful to you then chemistry - and about the books enquire first if yours will mend - if not - get a new pair.
I have seen Alfred Capper - he is certainly very wonderful he went to Haileybury once. I am glad you like your cap. Are you in the choir? I think you are sure to like the new Cook - she is very good-natured. Edgar and I have just been for a drive in a handsome with father we got down at the Priors the florist, and then walked back while father went on to Nayland to see two patients Prior gave us a huge bunch of lovely dahlias. Have you begun fires yet? We have one for the evening it is getting cold now. Do you get any time for story reading? Cyril breaks up on the 21st the same day as Harry.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 3, 1893
My dear Van
We are very glad to hear you are second in your class again and you have a nice lot of marks again. I enclose six stamps I have just sent some to Harry too Poor Georgie Hand has broken his leg - we do not know any particulars yet - but if it is fine - Aunt Annie is coming over - so we shall hear all about it - I am so sorry for him.
Aunt Lucy is staying here but she has to go back again this afternoon - she only came on Wednesday but she cannot be spared for long from home. We all went to see Aunt Margaret yesterday she was very well and very surprised to see Aunt Lucy.
Poor father has a very bad cold Id hope it will be better soon. Edgar is very well - he is busy doing a puzzle now. I sent the crest of your school to Cyril I knew he would like to see it. How nice that you have a special service on saints days! I had four vases on the altar with pure white flowers it looked beautiful. Did I tell you Cyril's purse was found there 4/6 in it so it is a good thing it was found.
Much love from us all
Your loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 24, 1893?
My dear Van
We all enjoyed the show very much on Tuesday - some of us are going to bazaar for St James Church there is to be a dramatic entertainment but that does not take place till the evening so I don't expect we shall see it - we sent a hamper full of old things for the rummage stalls an old hat and coat of father's - some shoes and a skirt of mine an old saucepan and teapot its etc etc and I am going to send some things is for the Refreshment Stall.
Edgar goes to Mrs Milton Halls school now - he likes it very much - there are 12 boys and at half holidays they play football in Col Howard's field - we walked that way on Wednesday - and peeped at Edgar through the hedge - I have to get him a dark blue jersey.
Enid has to be home in the holiday time so as to be there with Muriel - so she is coming here for a little while tomorrow - her father is going to bring her down - and stay over Sunday.
I am glad your chillblain is better - and hope the boy who is ill is better to - I hope he won't prove to have scarlet fever. Poor Charlie has influenza we only heard today I am so sorry.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
December 1, 1893?
My dear Van
We were very glad to hear you were keeping such a good place in class and having such a number of marks. Edgar was very much astonished at the number! We were all thinking of Harry last Wednesday - we sent him a little book called Eucharistica it is a nice one to use both at home and at church too, at the celebration of the Holy Communion Harry is hoping to receive for the first time this next Sunday.
You will enjoy having the extra week at Easter you will be able to do so much in the garden. Bishop Smythies is coming to Colchester next Tuesday to give our address at a meeting, we are expected (sic) Uncle George Hunt Annie to stay the night here so that they can go comfortably to hear the Bishop. Aunt Annie had lunch with us last Thursday she was very well. But St James Bazaar went off very well Father and I could not go ourselves but Sarah, Emma, Emily, Mary and Edgar all went - there was a concert which they liked very much the choir sang part songs.
With much love from us all
Your loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
February 22, 1895?
My dear Van
I was sorry to be too busy to write to you for your birthday - but father said he would write for us both - I hope you liked Edgar's almanac - he was very excited about it - and wanted you particularly to have something that you could put up in your study. Father and I are going to London on Tuesday - but only for two nights - we are going to spend Ash Wednesday in Richmond - on Tuesday night we are going to the Lyceum to see "King Arthur"
Harry has taken to skating again and seems to enjoy it very much - they had to turn out of the house twice since he has been there and go to an hotel because of measles breaking out - but he is now back again - and I hope won't have to turn out any more. Did you hear that Colchester returned a Liberal candidate - Richmond is far more Conservative.
Gerald sent Cyril the Pall Mall Budget - it was a very good number about ships - so he would like it
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
May 27, 1895?
My dear Van
We are off to Littlehampton on Thursday - so are getting dreadfully busy - we sent off for packages today - Eddies cot being among them - he will sleep in his perambulator for the next three nights. When you next write our address will be Homeside, Norfolk Road, Littlehampton, Sussex
We sent off to bathing towels today you had better mention them to the matron so that they will come back again. There was a review here on the Queen's Birthday - but the disloyal Colchester subjects - did not have any bells rung - how different to Richmond!!!
There was a picture of W. G. Grace in the Graphic - Cyril seems to be getting fond of cricket now - I used to enjoy the matches at Lord's. We had our first gooseberry tart yesterday - and have had some strawberries from the greenhouse three or four times. Your forget-me-not's on the rockery are all full of bloom and look very pretty indeed. Edgar is getting very excited about the seaside - we shall be quite near the sea - so he can easily get there.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Homeside
Norfolk Road
Littlehampton
June 6, 1895?
My dear Van
We are all enjoying ourselves very much here - Aunt Lucy with Kitty Rees and Lewis are staying here to - they leave tomorrow when they will have been here just a week -- but Kitty is then coming to stay here for another week with us -- she is so pleased with Eddie - indeed they all - and all the children have great fun on the sands together - Edgar already walks much better - and enjoys it all thoroughly.
There was a Fete here on Monday a regular Fair on the green -- Kitty threw for coconuts for herself and for Edgar and was very fortunate in getting two. There were some performing animals and a fighting kangaroo but none of us went to see them - the merry go round was a very ancient one some of the horses were headless.
The reading must have been very interesting - Tiverton seems to go in for cricket a great deal - this too its a great place for it - the cricket field here is a splendid one at the back of us - we can see them playing quite well from our windows - there was a very good match on Whit-Monday.
I hope you will enjoy the bazaar Tip is here and enjoys the walks but not the sea he is not brave enough to go in - he follows Bobby about like his shadow. Father is going to try to go over to see Cyril one day - his school is not so very far from here - he says he has a chance of getting into 6th Navy(?).
Harry quite goes in for mountain climbing all his letters are full of it. Blanche - Mabel - and Bertie - met us at London Bridge on our way down - we had a little time to wait there so it was very nice seeing them.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
July 9, 1895?
My dear Van
I am sorry to hear you have not been well - but hope you are all right again now - it must be dreadful to have a cold this hot weather. Charlie telegraphed yesterday to say he had passed his exam - father is very glad indeed. Cyril comes back on the 24th and Harry breaks up 20th - Edgar's date is not fixed yet. Father is in Richmond today - is he not lucky? He has gone to Wentworth House and is going to see both your Aunts.
Tomorrow is the wedding day 300 guests - Dean Hole(?) is to take part in the ceremony and the blue jackets are to stand in lines outside the church - I should love to see Gerald as "best man" but we are not going as it is too long a journey from the wilds of Colchester.
The people have already gone mad after the coming election and we had an organ disturbing our rest last night between 11 and 12!
Edgar and "Bo-bo" are quite well - the latter has eight teeth now. Father has been rather neuralgic but is better now - I think you will find some gooseberries and currents on the 30th unless Harry and Cyrils "first innings" make them disappear - mind you are quite well by then
Yr loving
Mater
Harry has 2 months

Grey Friars
October 12, 1896?
My dear Van
it was very good of you to send Adria such lovely socks - the pink ones fit beautifully and are most useful and she likes the colour very much.
Mr and Mrs Todd came here from Yarmouth(?) on Thursday and have left us for Richmond this afternoon - Bo and Chickadee(?) were very friendly with "Bampie" and demanded sweets when ever they saw him. . . . . . likes his new governess. Harry is now in London with Charlie where he is attending lectures at Kings, he is soon going to Wentworth House to stay there till Christmas is he not lucky? Yarmouth was very nice we were facing the sea - and we had such nice weather that we were able to get two walks every day - and we went twice to the theatre.
Is it not sad to lose the Archbishop? He will be a very great loss.
I will look up the gloves and mittens tomorrow and send them off
Much love from all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
November 29, 1896?
My dear Van
Cyril has passed his medical exam - and we all hope he will pass the one on Tuesday next - he comes back on the 10th so you are only a day or two behind him this time. Harry's last lecture is on the 18th so you all come early for Christmas.
Many thanks to your letter - it contained quite a tragedy how dreadful for the poor mother! The first meeting of the S R C was here on Thursday - your father read the part of Romeo splendidly - we had 30 people here - there were 18 dishes on the supper table the flowers look very pretty - all chrysanthemums.
Harry is having a lovely time at Richmond he went to Hamto see the Julius' one day - the new baby is to be called Cecil. Bo sings a song now it is "Knocking people down" he is always climbing about now - he sleeps in my room now - and sometimes talks for an hour in the middle of the night.
Edgar wears Eton now he likes them very much.
We are going to an afternoon concert here on Thursday - they also . . . . . Penelope (the area belle) it is rather funny I believe.
All send their love
Yr loving
Mater

An ornate card c1897:
My darling Chickie
Mummy is very glad to hear the little maiden is quite well -- she has a booty baby for her in her bag(?) from Aunt Mabel. Mummy will be home again on Saturday and so glad to see her little people again.
much love to . . . . .
Kiss
From your loving Mummy
Give my love to Harry and Ga

Grey Friars
Colchester
January 26, 1897?
My dear Van
Very many thanks for your letter and all your good wishes for my birthday your father gave me a lovely work basket - Harry bottle of sweets - Ga ditto - Beau a pot of Tulip's - and Chick a bunch of violets. Chick began to walk the very day you went away - she is very proud of it and laughs very much - she walks quite straight and can go from one nursery to the other.
You must have been perished without a foot warmer - it was very unlucky you could not get one. Richard II arrived quite safely and I expect you have got the book your Father sent you now. I hope you did not get any cold from your tumble - Harry was skating on the North Bridge meadows this morning - he said it was dreadfully rough - he is going to have your father's ticket for the lecture - there is a bitter wind - and your father has not lost his cough - so think it best to stay at home tonight. Scott has a "son and heir" born on my birthday - a future John perhaps - by that I mean a boy to work in the garden etc. Cyril and Lewis went out with Aunt Lucy on Saturday as it was Lewis's birthday - Cyril says Lewis is getting on all right. A tree had to come down - so Harry helped with that - he got quite warm over it.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
February 12, 1897?
My dear Van
I enclose Cyril's letter in case it may interest you to read it - your last one was a capital one I have just sent it to Cyril but you took the wrong side in the debate - the Bishop of Christchurch is now coming home (viz England) and I am sure he and all true Englishman - think there's no place like home (England) they may be interested in their work in the colonies but if they could find room for them in England all would stay I'm sure. Harry is very happy at Paxman's there is a pupil there named Secker he likes very much - he finds the bicycle very useful. The Officers are getting up a piece to be performed at the Theatre February 18, 19, 20 its called the Alderman's daughter and Mr Isherwood is to take a girl's part in it - I expect it will be very amusing we are going to the matinee on 20th. We enjoyed "Under the red robe" immensely the scenery was splendid unfortunately we had a dreadfully wet day - so we did nothing else except lunch at the Criterion. Your Aunt Lucy has taken a house near Midhurst - so she will be very near the Theodore Fenns.
Harry was delighted with the third "Gilchrist lecture on Spiders".
Your father went to Nayland on Tuesday and found Aunt Margaret wonderfully well.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 11, 1897?
My dear Van
I am so glad you are all right again - I should have written before - but have been so busy - we had Grace here for 10 days and Mr Todd for a few days also - then after thatEllenl and left us very suddenly - so I was busy seeing about a new parlourmaid. Poor Harry is now an invalid - he has asthma rather badly - he is in bed now but hopes to get up for a little change after tea - he was at home all yesterday too - but downstairs - his friend Mr Jones has come to see him and is sitting with him now.
Your father is very well he has gone to Sudbury to see old Golding about some registers he wants him to search about the Alston family. We have made three useful purchasers lately viz an invalid carrying chair for the house for Edgar - a bath chair also for him - and a small wood tree for the Long room where you three boys can hang your coats etc - I expect you will appreciate this.
I enclose a lock (alas curls are things of the past) of Beau's hair according to . . . . . request. Grace Smith is helping with the house work till Monday when Munson arrives - she improves very much on acquantance and is very useful. Scott wheels Ga out for an hour every day - the chair goes very easily. Beau prays every night "for my great big brothers" it sounds as if you were all giants at one time he always said "bless my brother Vandy" he and Chick get more lively every day I think.
Are your eyes all right now you must not over work them - it was annoying for you to lose those three weeks.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater
Mr Minchin and Mr Ingram had lunch here one day lately

Grey Friars
April 8, 1897?
My dear Van
We shall be glad to see you back on Tuesday at what time shall we expect you? We expected Cyril at four o'clock but he did not turn up till seven as he had the queer taste to prefer wandering about London with "that Linnie" (as Mabel says)instead of coming home!!! We expect to hear every day now the result of the exam? Ba(?) breaks up the same day that you do and Charlie comes down Easter Monday Harry is to meet him on his bike at Witham.
Gerald is going to spend a few days with us at Easter - it is just too years since he has been. Did you hear your father walked to Nayland and back one day? He found Aunt Margaret very well. The garden looks so nice now - it is beautifully tidy at present - there may be a change in the next two or three weeks!! Bo and Chick both walk a little on the street now they love it. The wind here has been bitter - the real Colchester Kind you know of the blizzard order. Don't pack up your greatcoat - you will want it when you get near here.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
May 25, 1897?
My dear Van
We came home on Friday - after a lovely week in London - theatre or opera every evening - two days in Richmond - one at Reigate and the other days were spent in seeing pictures and in shopping. We bought Harry a Jubilee beer glass and a water glass for you - Beau and Chick also had red white and blue flags. Harry had a very bad cold while we were away but he is better now and able to work again - we saw his Mr Lewis and his pictures in Bond Street your father bought a very pretty picture of him. Charlie dined with us one night and went with us to see Saucy Sally - he looked very well -- your aunt Isabella and Dolly dined with us another night - and we all went to see the "Seats of the Mighty" it is splendid.
I hear Cyril now has 30 or 31 boys to befriend him - it seems quite a paradise for "new . . . . . "!. Bertie is to be married June 19 we hope to be present - we gave them an after-dinner coffee set with which they were much pleased. Harry sent postcards about Beau and Chick every day while we were away - their day nursery is to be re-papered tomorrow - it wanted it badly.
Father still has a nasty cough the east wind here is trying after London.
Much love from all
Yr loving
Mater
Harry's sport at present is not black beetles or earwigs - but mice.

Grey Friars
August 1, 1897?
My dear Van
We shall be very glad to see you on Tuesday - we thought Charlie would be the first to arrive as we expected him on Monday - but he is up the river with the Bateman's and told us where to send letters if we wrote after Sunday so I don't quite know when he will turn up.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly go to Nayland sixth inst they have a cottage there for a few weeks. Harry went to see a cricket match with the Macandrew's yesterday - and on Tuesday he he is going to be one of a bicycle party got up by the Curtis they go to Dedham and then intend going on the river.
Beau and Chick are very well - they are out to little chatterboxes - Edgar much benefited by the three weeks he spent in RICHMOND of course!!!!!
Mr Brown has his friend Mr Jones staying with him he took part in both services this morning. Your father took the chair in the place of the "unavoidably absent Bishop" at the S.P.G. meeting - he spoke beautifully - afterwards we had the Bishop of Innervelly(?) and the other speakers and some of the clergy and a few ladies to tea in the garden - they all enjoyed the garden after the sleepy atmosphere of the Castle Library - your garden looks very nice indeed.
Much love from us all
Yr loving
Mater

Grey Friars
October 17, 1897?
My dear Van
We enjoyed our visit to Eastbourne very much - no Colchester breeze's there - but lovely warm sunshine - it is such a pretty place too - we finished up with three days at Richmond which were best of all - and arrived home the afternoon of Chichie's happy day in good time to have her down with Beau at the usual hour after tea - they were both at the station to meet us - and looked a very bright excited little pair - of course there were no end of presents for them from Richmond.
I congratulate you on being elected to the committee of the D.S. and also for your great success in the holiday task - Edgar told us and your father was very pleased. Your father read a paper on "Parish councils" at the Rui de canal(?) meeting - the Bishop of Colchester was in the chair - it was considered by several the best of all - and was much applauded -- Mr Mitchin read one in the morning - he - Mr Ingram and Mr Braun had tea here - and Mr Ingram had lunch as well.
We went to the first of the Pioneer Lectures - it was given by Dr Jersey - and was very nice. We went to the third Dante lecture too - and were very interested. The first Shakespeare evening is October 26 at the Hunts - I believe the play is "As you like it" - but your father has not heard for certain what part he will take.
Charlie seems quite to have settled down - he went for a very long ride with Mr Tweedie and two other men - so he is getting to know something of the country about him.
We shall think of you this day week - to hope you will get through the lesson all right
Much love from all
Yr loving
Mater

Alston Court
Nayland
August 6, 1908
My dear Harry
Van went up to my dearest father's funeral - a week ago today - I did not feel equal to going so I was the more pleased that he went - I feel more desolate than ever now - and I am grieving to those at home - it will change the home life completely.
Van and Edgar left here yesterday morning Van for Cuckfield - Edgar for Midhurst - after about a week's visit there he is going to stay at Streatham with Charlie for a little while - Charlie is leaving his present house in the autumn as his partners wish him to be on the main road it seems a pity he should have the move so soon and he . . . . . is not altogether for the better as the new house has a basement while the other had not.
Edgar received your letter just before he left - it will be nice for you to see you lin. . . . . gain - I hope he feels no bad effects from his accident.
Beau is playing in a cricket match at Stoke today greatly to his joy - he started at 11:30 in a break with his Wisden bat and his pads - this is his first appearance in public here so I hope he will do well - Adria has just gone off with a maid to see how he is progressing.
It seems strange only Beau Adria and me in the house Jessie is my chief companion till the evening.
Much love from us all
Your very affectionately
Mater.

Liveing Archive: Image 3634
Dec 30
1924
Alston Court
Nayland
Colchester
Dear Mrs Liveing
I write to express my sympathy to you at the loss of your uncle he will be missed and mourned by many I know, but you will feel it doubly I am sure, as he has been so much to you during so many years.
With much sympathy
Yours sincerely
Edith Fenn
I hope Miss Liveing is well
On the death of George D Liveing

Research Notes:
Brookfield House
Longstanton
Cambridgeshire
22 May 1934
My dear Mrs Fenn
As promised I now enclose you six prints from old negatives taken by my father and myself of the old house in 1874, they show well in what a dilapidated condition it was before cousin Edward had it so beautifully restored.
I also enclose a photo copy of a watercolour sketch by James Boggis of Nayland Street in 1838 the fine old redbrick vicarage on the right was pulled down before I can remember.
It was a great pleasure to me to see you and Adria the other day and I hope to be able to get over to Stoke and Nayland again sometime this summer.
Yours very sincerely
Edward H. Liveing
Letter without envelope on file E L Fenn 2007.

Key to Fenn Family group at Grey Frairs, picture No 17
1 Dr Edward Liveing Fenn
2 Edith Fenn nee Todd, Edwards second wife
3 Lucy Vanderzee Hopkins nee Fenn
4 Isabella Francis Louisa Cotes nee Fenn
5 Rev Ernest Vanderzee Fenn
6 Katherine Mary Hopkins
7 Cyril Duncan Fenn
8 Rev Edgar Julius Fenn
9 Dorothy E D Cotes
10 Harold Liveing Fenn
11 Lewis Hopkins
12 Rees Hopkins
13 Dr Charles Edward Fenn (uncertain)

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 18 Landsdown Rd St Mary Abbott Kensington LND. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 3 born Kensington MDX

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 83 High St Putney Wandsworth LON. Edith is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 23 born London

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 2 The Terrace Richmond SRY. Edith is described as a daughter unmarried aged 33 born Notting Hill LON

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 81 High St Colchester ESS. Edith is recorded as a wife aged 43 born Paddington MDX

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Alston Court Nayland SFK. Edith is recorded as head of house a widow aged 53 of private means born Notting Hill LND The house Alston Court is described as having 21 rooms including the kitchen but not other service rooms. There were 6 persons in residence.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 1337 F    i. Dorothy Edythe FENN [488] was born on 30 Dec 1892 and died on 3 Jul 1893.

+ 1338 M    ii. Lieut Edward Gerald Palmer "Bo" FENN [489] was born on 2 Sep 1894 in Grey Frairs Colchester., died on 19 Sep 1918 in Killed In Action Kefe-Kasim Palestine at age 24, and was buried in Wadi Rabah.

+ 1339 F    iii. Adria Margaret "Chick" FENN [490] was born on 8 Oct 1895 and died in 1982 at age 87.


1084. Catherine Maria (Kate) FENN [7] (Maria ALSTON891, George738, Samuel574, Samuel391, John Snr197, Daniel Of Edwardstone73, Anthony Of Boxford28, Gregory of Edwardstone14, Henry of Edwardstone4, John Of Newton Suffolk.2, William1) was born on 30 Sep 1844 in Nayland SFK, was baptised on 29 Oct 1844 in Nayland SFK, died on 24 Dec 1882 in Pagoda Anchorage Foochow China. at age 38, and was buried in Pagoda Anchorage Foochow China.

General Notes:
Sponsors at Catherine's baptism were, John Ambrose, Julia Ambrose, Catherine M Liveing.

The 1860's Log Books of the Nayland School show Kate as a visitor, listening to the children recite, or helping with needlework etc.

Extract from a letter to Catherine M Liveing, by Kate's father Thomas shortly before his death.
Dated 13 April 1870
My Dear Aunt
. . . . . I feel quite satisfied about Mr Giles and I think Katie's prospects a happy one as they will start very fairly and if health is vouchsafed them the progress is humanly speaking certain and not slow and Mr Giles is eminently qualified to take advantage of opportunities. . . . .
Origional E L Fenn archive 2005

John Allen Giles: Diary & Memoirs.
Page 600 & 601
Mon Feb 19th 1883
Some days before we went to Churchill we received the sad news of Kate, Herbert's wife's death, which happened on the day before Christmas day (Dec. 24, 1882). This loss plunged us all into the greatest grief, for she was one of the most amiable, cheerful, and happy women I ever met with, and Herbert's position, left with 6 little children so far away, was most lamented.
I copy a letter written by Herbert immediately after her death to her brother.

Letter from H.A.G. to Dr Edward Liveing Fenn
Pagoda Island, Dec. 24, 1882
Dr E L Fenn
Richmond Surrey
Dear Edward
The following account of Kate's illness and death, brief as it is, will give all those details which are of so much interest to friends. Please regard it as a general letter, addressed to both families, and to be sent round from one to the other. After the sicknesses of the summer we had all fully settled down for health and enjoyment of the beautiful winter months. The children were all well and Kate appeared to be thoroughly herself, playing tennis, eating heartily, &c. &c. until the latter end of October, when her appetite began to fail, and she told me, half jokingly, that she seemed to have a growth inside her. On the 3rd of November she took a run up to Foochow, and went to theatricals and to a ball. Her diary says, "I went to bed at one o'clock, as I had got a chill or something, which gave me a good deal of pain." The next day she came back in considerable pain, and on the 6th Dr Underwood examined her and said she had congestion of the liver. She got better, and on the 29th played a game of tennis. A few days afterwards the old pains returned, and on the 4th of December Dr Underwood blistered her over the liver with some relief. But he began to have some suspicions, and on the 7th she was examined by Dr Rennie of Foochow. The latter told me at once the case was hopeless, there being in his opinion a rapidly growing tumour on the liver. From that moment I slept every night on a mattress by her bedside, full dressed and prepared for every emergency. I gave her morphia (hypodermic) regularly at bed-time; occasionally a little during the day, in case of pain: I had only that one consolation left. Gradually she began to get worse, and ceased to see the children; but as she never knew what was really the matter with her, she was buoyed up to the last by the hope of ultimately getting well again. Her cheery spirits never deserted her for an instant. From the 17th I had to feed her day & night at short intervals. On the 21st she began to lose consciousness of her surroundings, but seemed to know me up to the night of the 22nd, when all her mental and physical powers collapsed. At about a quarter to 11 a.m. on the 24th she passed quietly out of her sorrow, and was buried late that night in the cemetery over the water, by the side of her 9th child Gwyneth. Throughout the illness I was her only nurse. We could have had much kindly help, but she preferred to have only myself as her attendant. I wholly devoted myself to watching her every wish, thinking all the time of the 12 and half years we have lived together, during which time she wholly devoted every energy and thought to me. She was indeed an incomparable wife and mother, and I think her life has been as she herself made it a very happy one: every one was her friend, I do not believe there is a living person who ever for a moment felt unkindly towards her. In the early stages of her weakness I used to lead the conversation round to her old home. She was never tired of talking of those days, about her father & mother, Grandma Alston. Aunt Margaret, and the family circle generally. Her life at Camberwell, as a little girl, with Uncle Robert, seemed to have made an indelible impression on her memory, and she could recall many incidents out of those 32 years old. I could fill pages with the names of people she dwelt upon from time to time. The Liveings, Hands. Torlesses, and many others, never forgetting her old friends Henry and Elizabeth: and among her last sympathies were many words of sorrow for Palmer Smithies, the news of whose wife's death reached us whilst she was quite clear in mind. I can think just now of nothing more to add.
With best wishes to all friends
Yours ever
H A Giles.

Rosamond Stewart writes in 2008:
"Catherine died at Pagoda Anchorage up the Minh River, Herbert buried her there at night in a thunder storm in 1882, by the side of her nineth child Gywneth"

A Memorial plaque in St James Church Nayland reads "To the glory of God and in most loving remembrance of Catherine Maria wife of Herbert Allen Giles of H.B.M. Consular Service and third daughter of Thomas Harrold Fenn of this Parish, who died at Pagoda China Christmas Eve 1882. This tablet is erected by her brothers and sisters. Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God".

Miniature in possession of the estate of Alison Redman late of Notley Farm Broughton Hampshire.

Pastel at age 10 1854 by Sydney Buck in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 14 The Green Camberwell Dulwich SRY. Catherine is recorded as a grandaughter to head of house Harriet Fenn, aged 6 born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ramsay Rd St Ives Huntingdonshire. Catherine is described as a scholar aged 16 unmarried born Nayland SFK

Catherine married Professor Herbert Allen GILES M.A. L.L.D. [27], son of John Allen GILES D.C.L. [2048] and Anna Sarah DICKINSON [7494], on 30 Jun 1870 in Nayland SFK. Herbert was born on 8 Dec 1845 in Oxford, Oxfordshire. UK, died on 13 Feb 1935 in Cambridge. at age 89, and was cremated in Feb 1935.

General Notes:
Herbert was educated at Charterhouse, served in H.B.M. Consular Service in China (Ningpo), was Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, the second scholar to hold this chair succeeding Sir Thomas Wade, he published extensively on China its history, customs, religions, politics, literature, language, art, food etc, he was a pioneer of modern sinology. He married twice and had issue. Two grandchildren Sylvia & Lawrence mentioned in a letter to H L Fenn from R P Fenn.

Marriage.
Giles - Fenn : 30th ult., at Nayland, in this county, by the Rev Dr Giles (father of the bridegroom), rector of Sutton, assisted by the Rev J Hunnybun, vicar of Nayland, Herbert Allen Giles , Esq., of H.M.'s Consular Service in China, to Catherine Maria, third daughter of the late Thomas Harrold Fenn, Esq., of Nayland.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 2 July 1870

Herbert's Chinese name was Zhai Lisi.

Extracts from John Allen Giles' Diary & Memoirs.
Page 302.
Saturday, September 16, 1854.
Herbert was now very ill of typhus fever, and his mother and I took it by turns to sit by him both night and day, . . . . .
Page 376
From Herbert in China.
My dear Father,
After the short time I have been grinding away at Chinese, you can't expect me to know or to be able to tell you very much about it, but still I have managed to pick up enough to have a faint idea of what little "genius" there is in the language, and also the method of learning it. Every man has to provide himself with a copy of Wade's Course and Morrisons Dictionary, which together come to $22 and is rather hot on Student Interpreters. Government provides every student with a separate teacher, who lives in the Legation and is at his beck and call from 8 a.m. till 10 p.m. The first day your teacher comes in is naturally rather amusing, and even the first three or four, as you occupy that time in learning the Radicals, of which there are 214, including 30 classical and 47 obsolete. The next step is an exercise on these 137 Colloquial radicals, which merely consist of combining two or more together as "hand" "heart" "hand heart" used figuratively of intimate relationship. By this means you increase your stock of meanings without increasing the number of characters to be remembered. Then you begin the Forty Exercises, in which I am still vegetating and which generally takes three months to know perfectly, as there are over a thousand characters. . . . . . there is absolutely no grammar at all. . . . . The construction of a Chinese sentence is curious in the extreme. . . . . . "We will go this way" becomes in the Chinese idiom "We will be this road's going men". The elliptical character of the language makes it very difficult for a foreigner to understand what is said . . . . . In the Chinese language there are about 50,000 characters, each of which you must have seen and learnt before you can even pronounce it. Amongst these there are immense numbers pronounced exactly alike, and there would be many more, only each word is classed under one of the four tones and so the number is considerably diminished. . . . . Unless you pronounce a word in its correct tone no Chinamen can understand you . . . . . nothing but long practice we'll give it you. I hold most extraordinary conversations with my teacher. . . . . He knows all about railways, and steamships, that the earth is round and smaller than the sun but thinks all is China except a tiny piece far away which belongs to "Ying-kuo" (English literally "Heroic Nation"). Chinese wear mourning for a father or mother three years. . . . . for a husband three years. . . . . for a wife eight days. They consider the race of women as utterly contemptible and only fit to sit indoors and work with the needle, and so one never sees women about on the streets, except old ones. . . . . I sleep on a "cool mat" a smooth kind of straw sheet, and comfortable in the extreme. I am bitten from head to foot by sandflies but I fancy it is healthy, and that you lose bad blood by those means. . . . . I enclose a note for Mamma
Your affectionate son
Herbert A Giles.

Page 412
Saturday, January 6, 1872.
Tientsin 15 October 1871.
My dear Father,
The contents of this letter will concern you more than anyone else, and moreover it will leave Shanghai on your birthday, so it ought certainly to be to your address and not to the old lady's. . . . . . I have been head man in Tientsin for 14 days and shall be so until the return of Lay who has gone to Chefoo for his health. . . . . . We are having lovely weather and are all in No 1 health, especially your grandson and namesake, whose legs are now as big as my arms, and arms in proportion. He has a chest like a small buffalo and lungs like screech owl, promising to be a very strong man. As soon as he is old enough (say 4) I shall send him home by himself, so as to open his eyes early to the wickedness of his neighbours. . . . . . I had just got a note saying the long lost box is on a steamer which arrived today, so that it will be delivered tomorrow. . . . . . From 10 to 4 every day my time is fully occupied in translating dispatches, petitions etc from and into Chinese, and has since the development of my ultra-valetundinarian tendencies I give all the spare hours to fresh air and exercise, and thereby reducing the number of pills to be swallowed per annum, and otherwise benefiting my health and constitution. Pyramid pool occupies me from 6 to about 7.15 each evening, and last month's balance sheet shewed a sum of $40 as my winnings, the previous month bringing in $37. . . . . .
16 October. The box is already unpacked and Kate is very pleased with the contents, except that every thing is much too small for the person intended to wear them. Dozens of woollen socks came out, but amusingly unfit for the leg and a half there was to go into them. . . . . .
Your loving son
H. A. Giles

Page 425.
Monday, August 19, 1872 received a letter from Herbert.
Tientsin 20 June 1872.
My dear Mother,
We didn't let your 60th birthday go by without comment. I broke though my rule and opened a bottle of champagne which K and I drank to your good health and many years of it. As there was so much (half a bottle each) we managed to drink the health of the family in general and everybody in particular. . . . . . I prefer having the money in my own name, power being vested in you and the old man to draw any sum out at any time. . . . . . I want a cheque-book by returned mail if possible.
The mail has just come in bringing me a letter from Edward Fenn, full of our money affairs. This is a quotation " I had one time paid in your money to Herbert's account at the L & C Bank, but Dr Giles's requested them to throw his and Herbert's into one account. I was not therefore surprised to hear from him some time afterwards that he found his passbook in confusion and did not know exactly how you stood". . . . . . Until the receipt of E Fenn's letter I had never heard of Kate's Uncle Sam giving her L97.7.6 for a freak (sic) (freak's health and many of them). We thought it was only given to Isabella and Lucy. E. Fenn says we ought to have quite L600 in the Bank by this time four years. . . . . We are saving away hard out here with parsimony just kept well to leeward. The training of my youth I now consider a perfect one in every respect. Luxuries are within easy grasp, but from never having been used to them I don't want them now, and the consequence is my health is very good. . . . . .
Keep all your spirits up, as do we.
Your loving son
H. A. Giles.

Page 453.
Friday, July 18, 1873. Received the following letter from Herbert.
Ningpo Consulate May 23, 1873
My dear father,
A sudden longing comes over me to write an extra letter and send it by the French instead of English mail. Perhaps you don't know that communication with China is possible four times a fortnight, i.e. by the English French Russian and American mails . . . . . I am sending by this chance some books to the ancient lady, and hope she will admire the wrapper. One dollar each - from 4s.3d. to 4s 8d., as the exchange may make it. . . . . . wouldn't you be on the old familiar brink of ruin if you had to pay the printers bill . . . . . I often think of the ruin period and how you rose where so many would have sunk . . . . . (I) mean to try and keep myself free from the miseries of impecuniosity by a just though not parsimonious economy.
N.B. I have just bought a beautiful set of drawing room chairs and sofa. . . . .
N.B.2. Paid for.
I am engaged on several new books. . . . . I think it possible some good might come of scribbling and no harm. My income in China will always be pretty good in future. . . . . I forgot in my last two and ask the old lady to send hearth rugs with the carpets. Her own "savvy" (from the Portuguese sabe) would prompt that. The piano didn't suffer much by its sea voyage. A tuner comes from Shanghai twice a year . . . . . to the tune of $10 per piano. . . . . coals L5 a ton. . . . . butter 3s.9d. a pound . . . . . beef is only 2d a pound, mutton 6d a pound, vegetables 1d a pound, milk 5d, bread 5d a pound . . . . .
We have been long expecting the arrival of those cabinet photographs which you promised so long ago, but which never come. If by chance Arthur sees this, let him, knowing as he does the happiness of never getting anything you want, set to work in a good cause and conduct you in vi et armis either to Window's all to Elliott and Fry's in Baker Street, and there extract photographs from you as a dentist would a grinder.
I am etc
H.A.Giles

Page 460.
Tuesday, October 7, 1873. Received the following letter from Herbert.
Ningpo August 7, 1873
My dear father,
Another mighty victory have you gained - for how can you defeat an enemy more completely than by outliving him? To be still in the enjoyment of life and health while a foe is rotting in a vault is no trifle, and cancels whole years of insolence of office. You probably have long ago forgiven poor Soapy Sam, and time may even have toned down the bitterness of the old lady's hate; but there are two living beings who grew up cursing the Bishop of Oxford as they rose in the morning and lay down at night, making it their grace before dinner and there thanksgiving after - Ellen and I. No one taught us to curse the soapy prelate, and the old lady used to say Hsh! as we did so, though she enjoyed it all the time; but we learnt by instinct to hate and to curse the man who had sacrificed us and ours on the altar of bigotry and spite. I don't think we shall ever be able to do anything else than think of the old rascal thus; we began to hate to young and too hotly. . . . . .
N.B. I expect to hear the news of his death from the old lady about two months hence.
We are now in cooler weather. . . . . Instance of Harold's precocity:-we found him sitting up on the bed this morning, K(ate) having laid him down 5 minutes before. He got up himself!!! I was seedy for 24 hours 2 days ago. One Cockle and a dose of citrate did the trick . . . . . I have been busy with my two Chinese books. The second must be a hit. I am sure it will pay well. Perhaps I shall be able to send the old lady another velvet gown. I ought to send you one this time; only I know you don't go in for that sort of thing. By the way I was thinking, and am now, of dedicating the Colloquial Idioms to you, only there would be nothing àpropos in so doing, and by putting the name of a certain man out here in it, I could get an introduction for it in a very valuable quarter. I think I hear you say, "Sacrifice sentiment to dollars" and shall very likely take your advice. Still if you would like to appear in the next, write and say to.
Your affectionate son
H. A. Giles.

Page 466
Monday, February 2, 1873 Received a letter from Herbert
2 December 1873
My dear Father,
I have got a new excitement going just now - a hope that I have found a clue or at any rate am on the road to finding one to the right classification of Chinese characters under their phonetics. (Then follows a very detailed description of his ideas, which can be taken as the start of his work which culminated in the Wade-Giles" romanisation of Chinese and the Pinyin system)
The "Daily News" has just come with a review of "Colloquial Idioms" I will send you a copy by next mail. K(ate) sends all the news in her letter to Helen
Yours etc
H. A. Giles

Page 501
Friday June 18, 1875.
Went to a Conversazione at the Numismatic Society Chambers in St Martin's Place, near St Martin's Church. Herbert and his wife went with me from Mr Fenn's (Robert Liveing Fenn) at Kensington where we dined. Herbert exhibited his collection of Chinese coins, which he bought from China. (The collection comprised nearly 1000 items, and was reported at the time as "probably forming the most perfect collection in Europe")
J.A.G.
Chinese Coins.
A correspondant writes to the Athenaeum that the most complete collection of Chinese coins ever seen in this country has recently been brought here by Mr Herbert Giles of her Majesty's China Consular Service, with the view of offering them to the authorities of the British Museum. The collection embraces the period of 4000 years, extending from B.C. 2356 to A.D. 1874, and comprises some very beautiful specimens of "knife" and "lump" money.
Ref: Belfast Newsletter 28 June 1875.

Chinese Sketches.
Under the title of "Chinese Sketches" (Trubner & Co.), Mr Herbert A Giles, of the China Consular Service, gives us a series of short and very readable papers on certain customs and institutions of the Flowery Land, observed by him in intercourse with the natives, or gleaned from the perusal of Chinese literature. John Chinamen does not perhaps always receive justice at our hands, and Mr Giles, a great admirer of his sober, industrious millions, is at some pains to prove how ill founded are our prejudices about his low esteem of women, his tendency to smoke opium overmuch - a thing in practice quite beyond his means - his natural resistance to the Christian missions thrust on him very much against his will. Yet when we turned from these to other papers, our old friend, the Heathen Chinese, comes out in all his pristine colours - superstitious, fatalist, materialist in turn - wholly given (the literati class excepted) to the dubious delights of moneymaking, greedy to credit any fables of foreign travel or domestic quackery, as ever our ancestors were in the days of Sir John Maundeville, or Friar Bungay. . . . .
Ref: Extracted from The Graphic 11 December 1875.

Pages 586 & 587.
Saturday, May 14. (1881)
We heard that Herbert, his wife and five children were safely landed and settled in George Street, Manchester Square.
On the 30th of April appeared in the Sutton Herald this notice of the great ceremonial at which the Red Umbrella was presented to Herbert for his services on behalf of the poor Chinese coolies.
A KING OF UMBRELLAS. -Our readers have often read accounts of Chinese labourers inveigled away under the plea of a contract for regular work and good wages, far from their native land, to which they some day hope to return, with the means of a comfortable subsistence. It appears that some few months ago the acting consul at Amoy, Mr. H.A. Giles (son of the Rector of Sutton,) was informed that a ship belonging to a mercantile firm was on the point of leaving Amoy having on aboard a thousand passengers - double the number which she was registered to carry. The consul immediately interfered, and sent on shore all but the proper number. He, however, not many hours afterwards, was informed that they were all gone on board again, and the result was a second visit to the ship, when a thousand persons were surprised in their beds, The consul declared that the ship was confiscated, but released it on the payment of L5000 into the Consular Treasury. An action was taken against him in the Supreme Court at Shangai, when the consul's conduct was justified, and a verdict given in his favour. The subjoined cutting from the Amoy Gazelle will be of interest to all who feel that a great injustice and crime has been ably frustrated.
"Presentation of a Red Umbrella to Mr. Giles" We were yesterday among the spectators of a curious and interesting ceremony. A deputation, consisting of the heads of the Ten Guilds, or corporations, under which the whole trade of Amoy is distributed, waited upon Mr. Giles at his private residence, and, in view of his early departure, begged of him to accept of what is commonly called a "Ten Thousand Name" Umbrella, as a mark of their appreciation of the services rendered by him to the cause of humanity in preventing British steamers from clearing from Amoy to the Straits overcrowded with Chinese emigrant coolies. The deputation was received by Mr. Giles, assisted by Mr. George Browne, interpreter to H.B M. Consulate, and Messrs. Cooper and Powell of H.B.M. Colonial Service; and their spokesman briefly explained in the Mandarin dialect the object of the present visit. Mr. Giles replied, also in Mandarin, to the effect, that in acting as he had, he had simply done his duty, but that he was none the less sensible of the very great honour they had done him in thus taking cognizance of tile fact. He then thanked them all very much, and concluded by drawing their attention to the Chinese and British National flags, which had been hung together at one end of the room, expressing the wish that the cordial relations now existing between the two countries might long be maintained. This allusion was received with evident satisfaction by the deputation; and, after the usual health drinking and expression of good wishes on both sides, they withdrew, having first formally unfolded and presented the Red Umbrella, The umbrella itself stands about ten feet high, and is made of crimson satin, covered all over with the names of the gentry and merchants concerned, inscribed in guilt letters. At the top is an inscription in large characters, as follows: "He protected our black-haired people;" and below that is another, of which we have been kindly furnished with a translation, viz: "Respectfully presented to H.R. Giles, Esq., H.B.M. Consul at Amoy, by gentry and merchants of the port, in token of his virtuous administration, Dated this auspicious day of the Flowery Moon of the seventh year of Kwang Su." (March 6th, 1881.)

The Amoy Gazette
AMOY, Friday, 18th March, 1881.
Copy of Resolution passed at a meeting of the Committee of the Amoy Chamber of Commerce held on 5th March, 1881
"That in view of the approaching departure of H.B.M. Consul Mr H.A. Giles, the Amoy Chamber of Commerce desires to place on record its grateful appreciation of the measures he has taken, as Emigration Officer at this Port, to preserve life and property hitherto seriously endangered by the practice of overcrowding Chinese owned steamers under the British Flag with Native passengers for the Straits Settlements, and at the same time to express its regret that Mr. Giles' efforts in this direction have not been supported in the way they called for and deserved.
And the Secretary is hereby instructed to forward a copy of the above resolution to Mr. Giles and to the Consular Body at Amoy."

PRESENTATION TO THE BRITISH CONSUL AT AMOY.
[FROM A CORRESPONDENT.]
A ceremony of a very interesting nature, interesting not only from its rarity, but also from the novel light in which Chinese national character was exhibited, took place at Amoy on the 6th instant in the presence of a few privileged witnesses. The occasion was a presentation made to Mr. H.A. Giles, H.B.M.'s Acting Consul at Amoy, by the Ten Trades' Corporations, representing the whole of the native commerce of the port, in token of their approval of the impartial and fearless manner in which he has performed the duties of his office during the last two years. The compliment took the form of the Red Umbrella so much coveted by the higher grades of Chinese officials and so seldom granted by their people, never except in special cases of beneficent rule. It is an honour, I believe, not before conferred on any European official in China, and therefore it is but right to mention the particular course of conduct which commended itself to the native population of the place as deserving such distinguished recognition, The inscription on the umbrella itself gives us some clue to the motives of the subscribers, "He protected the people of our Black-Haired Race." There can be no doubt that this refers to the energetic action taken, during the past summer, by Mr. Giles, as Acting Consul, to check the overcrowding on board certain British steamers carrying Chinese emigrants from Amoy; and it is a remarkable fact that among the subscribers' names, and indeed among the members themselves of the deputation making this presentation, there were some who had suffered no slight pecuniary loss in connection with Chinese emigration through the preventive steps taken by the British Consul. But their patriotism and their love for their fellow-countrymen, which we are day by day learning from the texts of treaties, the wording of public documents, and the policy adopted by the statesmen of the Middle Kingdom, to be qualities possessed by the Chinese to the full as strongly as by Western races, would seem to have forced them to throw aside their personal interests and join in a tribute of respect to an official, though of another country, who had done so much for the good of his fellow men.
Owing to the inclemency of the weather, and the expressed wish of Mr. Giles, the ceremony was shorn of much of its usual outward pomp. Shortly after three o'clock in the afternoon on the day named, the Heads of the Trades' Corporations forming the deputation, proceeded to the private residence of the Consul, the Red Umbrella being borne
in front of them. They were met at the entrance by the gentleman in whose honour they had come, and a few friends present by invitation. The umbrella was then handed to Mr. Giles in due form, a short address being delivered by the Senior Master of the Guilds in attendance, couched in very laudatory terms. An adjournment took place to a reception room decorated and prepared for the occasion, the walls being tastefully draped with Chinese and British ensigns hung in unison. Mr. Giles here made the following speech in Chinese, speaking in the mandarin dialect, which was translated sentence by sentence into the local dialect for the benefit of his less gifted colleagues by Mr. Wang, of the China Merchants' Co.:- "Gentleman, since I came to your honourable country, I have always endeavoured to regard the subjects of China and of my own nation as members of one fraternity, and in my dealings with them, have treated them alike, making no distinction and showing no undue partiality either to one or the other. Although this was no more than my simple duty, the mere performance of which should be to me sufficient reward, yet I cannot conceal how gratifying to me is this sign you have given me to-day, that I have, to some extent at least, succeeded in my efforts. I am deeply sensible of the honour you have bestowed upon me, and trust not to show myself unworthy of it when we meet again, as I sincerely hope we shall, in future years," Attention was then called to the blending of the National Flags on the walls, and Mr. Giles happily remarked that this was an emblem of the perpetual unity which should prevail between the two countries. This was at once converted into a toast, to which all drank with much enthusiasm. Shortly afterwards the guests took their leave, having first satisfied the exigencies of Chinese politeness by profuse bowing and shaking of hands.
The pole of the so-called umbrella, which is in size more like a tent, is some ten feet in length. The covering is of red satin in three flounces. On the upper flounce is inscribed in large gilt characters "He protected the people of our Black-haired Race." On the second flounce is the dedicatory address, also in gilt characters, which may be translated as follows:- "This is presented to H.A. Giles, Esquire, H.B.M.'s Acting Consul, Amoy, by the gentry, merchants and others of the port, in respectful testimony if his beneficent administration. Dated an auspicious day of the Flowery Moon of the seventh year of Kwang-su (6th March, 1881)," On the lowest flounce are inscribed the names of those signing the address. This is, I think, the most interesting part of the whole affair; showing as it does the general estimation in which Mr. Giles is held by all Chinese classes. In parallel perpendicular columns, about half an inch apart, completely encircling the umbrella, are inscribed the names of no less than one hundred and ten native firms in Amoy, and the names and positions of seventy-four literati holding official rank from that of Taotai downwards.
It is worthy of mention that the Foreign Chamber of Commerce at Amoy intends to take somewhat similar action before Mr. Giles's intended departure on his well-earned holiday. We trust that in the future we have more frequent occasion to chronicle events of this pleasant nature, in connection with our officials in China.

These notices of Herbert's doings in China and of the honour paid him by the authorities will fill a page of my volume. The umbrella is now at Sutton and has been inspected by many Suttonians - John Allen Giles 1881.
Rosamond Stewart 2008 advises that the Red Umbrella is in the possession of the Bodleian Library Oxford. A search at the Bodleian, the British Library and Museum failed to locate the Red Umbrella - 2012

John Allen Giles Diary and Memoirs.
Page 595
Wednesday 2 February 1882
W. D. Cloete and I went down to Gravesend, and saw Herbert and Kate with their six children off for China by one of the P and O's beautiful steamships.
J.A.G.
Page 600.
24 December 1882, Herbert writes a touching letter to his brother-in-law Edward L Fenn on the death of his wife Catherine.

Northern Life
February 2, 1897
Prominent Local Chess Players
Mr H. A. Giles President, Aberdeen Chess Club 1895-96.
It was while resident in China, as one of her Majesty's Consuls there, that Mr Giles acquired his knowledge of the Royal game, and acquired it, too, by the uncommon and uncommonly difficult means of book study alone, a handicap on the learner which all chess players can appreciate. Notwithstanding this handicap, and, although, until the constitution of the Aberdeen Club in January 1895, he had had no opportunities of playing regularly, save with some very indifferent amateurs, he immediately took his place as one of the strongest players in the newly formed club. He won first prize in one of the two sections into which the members were that year balloted; and next year, with the all-round playing strength of the members greatly increased, he took first place in the Championship Tournament. This session, other engagements have, until lately, prevented his attendance at the club, but his enforced absence has not diminished his strength, or cooled his ardour for the game, and he is to be reckoned with in the forthcoming championship competition. Mr Giles has taken advantage of occasional journeys to London, to visit the chess players Mecca there, Simpsons Divan, to try his strength against the Masters. In the Divan he has frequently played Bird; and there, four days before the death of the brilliant Zukertort, he encountered that great master in a level game. This game, of which, unfortunately, no record was kept, lasted 12 moves! With Bird in August last he played a drawn game, the score of which we give above. Mr Giles cautious and far-seeing play is responsible in no small measure for the great improvement, during the last two years, in the chess play of the Aberdeen Club; and no more courteous, or more obliging, or stronger player than himself can be found in its ranks.
Thought to be an Aberdeen paper.

Doctor of Laws
Professor Dave Wilson, Dean of the Law Faculty presented the L.L.D. in the following order:
Herbert A. Giles
Mr Giles, he said, is now resident in Aberdeen, but he was for over 25 years in her Majesty's Consular Service in China. There he devoted his leisure time to the study of Chinese literature and language, studies of enormous difficulty and he has become in consequence of his indefatigable . . . . . , one of the most distinguished Chinese scholars of the day. He has contributed many works towards our knowledge of it. I may mention his . . . . . of Chinese Literature, his Historic . . . . . , his Chinese Sketches, but the greatest . . . . . works, monument of industry and patience . . . . . I think is absolutely unequalled, is his great English Chinese Dictionary. The Senatus has considered . . . . . services like these to literature deserved the . . . . . recognition it can give, and present . . . . . to you for the degree of Doctor of Laws.
Honorary Doctor of Laws from Aberdeen University.
Unattributed news paper article.

Letters from Herbert Allen Giles writing to his brother Arthur Henry, particularly about their respective children.
These letters are an insight into Herbert Giles ability to relate to, and understand his children, and their cousins. His friendship, warmth, concern for their nurture, education and future. This stands in contrast to another image of Herbert as a the rather acerbic academic. Those who are aware of Herbert's compassionate role in the fatal illness of his wife Kate (Fenn) will not be surprised.
E L Fenn.

Pagoda, 4 September 1882
My dear Arthur,
I have been threatening a letter to you for some time past, but things have up to now been incompatible with works of supererogation in general. We are now enjoying a period of general family health, which we hope to prolong at any rate until next hot season. The boys and girls are all well at once and have got back those ruinous appetites which played so much havoc with my limited bank account when in England last year.
I hope you and Georgie (Georgina) are well and enjoying life in your own circle and that Raymond is himself again - "Raymond, our sad, bad, glad, made cousin's name" - as the boys learnt from me to say. His name is a household word in this family, and with Bertram is likely to outlive the distractions of the next five years. He was more thrown in with us than any of the other cousins on either side, and would have joined readily in a little trip to China, if circumstances had been propitious.
I have been reading an immense lot lately, chiefly Philosophy, and writing very little. You can guess that in that line I am a burning Positivist, just as I am in politics a Democrat, and in religion an agnostic. By the way, I am still a monometalist in finance, failing to see the validity of the double standard arguments altogether. I read the XIX Century , fortnightly, and contemporary, every month, and abstracts of the parliamentary debates, so that I know pretty well what is going on.
I hope the carpets didn't give you much trouble. Mabel's illness intervened, and I totally forgot all about the order and everything connected with it until weeks afterwards. By this time, I should image the things must be nearly if not quite ready. Perhaps they will have to go round the Cape.
When are the Conservatives coming in? and who are the Conservatives when they do come? I have met no one who can answer the second, though many know all about the first. It's a conundrum.
How about the Scottish Club? I found they charged more for a dinner than a Piccadilly restaurant, and twice as much as certain places that I wot of. But I resume your London life has not yet begun. Bayswater suited us well. Yours ever H.A.Giles

Oxford - 23.5.1888
My dear Arthur
We propose to go into Belgian Switzerland for August holidays. It is very cheap. Pretty country. Nothing but French. If it can be arranged, I mean to make Ray (Raymond) our guest. But I want Georgie (Georgina) to come and bring the whole boiling(?). We should form a colony of our own. Unfortunately old Russell (Georgina's father) wants the two elder girls. But surely he could wait. At any rate we might work off a month. I am Death on French, and would see that the time was not wasted. I mean to have a great hammer at Ray, without his knowing it. He has much respect for me, and that means the battle half won.
Meanwhile Mina (Elise) is very unwell. She cannot shake off these nervous attacks. We are hoping that a regular course of treatment will straighten her up.
No further communication on the key subject has reached me. I think I told you my new work is to be out in October. At present I am employed in interviewing celebrities at home, Dr. Tylor (Primitive Cult), Professor Earle (Anglo Sax.), Prof. Sylvester (Mathem.), Dr. Pritchard ( Astronomy), Freeman (E.A.), and other lesser lights.
Yours ever H.A. Giles
Have sent photo of Kathleen to Georgie

No address but believe they are on holiday in Heyst (sic) [Heist, Belgium] - 25.8.88
My dear Arthur,
You never saw in your life such a muddle as the mixture of the two families. All your children call me Father, while mine drop naturally into Uncle Herbert.
A proposition to write to you was received with acclamation. In every way, Ray came out first. He set to work quietly, wrote in a businesslike way, finished first, and produced the best letter. It never occurred to him to read his letter over before handing in. Consequently 2 commas were left out, - neither being of great importance. I put them in. The other letters go as written. Lionel's with all its imperfections on its head: indicative after quoique wrong gender for cirque etc. Bertram's is as good a show of handwriting as he has achieved for some time. Val was not much in form this morning. He can do better. Lance's, I thought good for a small boy. Will send more details of scholarship etc. when I know the boys better. Ray plays very nicely. He is very much interested in politics. I gave him some of my views. He was chiefly astonished to find that there were two sides to the question. He has been getting his knowledge of the skies through a tube. Laura thinks, I believe, that no mortal ever so nearly approached the divine. And I have to live up to such a fraud as that!
Dolly waits or me round corners, and even the small boy (Arthur Herbert?) has expressed his approval - of my chocolate.
Mabel, Edith and Kathleen pair off with the last three, respectively. They are a splendid crowd. Very sorry Marion and Amy are not here.
Ray will, I think, learn to swim before we part. He goes in every day. But I can't get a boat, and don't venture myself. I am so well after Pontresina (Belgium) that it is a pity to risk anything.
Mina is very well but that she is torn with neuralgia. However she gained 2 more lbs in Pontresina.
Very busy polishing off my new book :- Chiang Tzu: Mysic, Moralist, and Social Reformer. Date : 300 B.C.
Will write to Cornish re revision of keys. Directly my book is off my hands I shall have some leisure, though already engaged to catalogue for R. Asiatic Soc. Had writer's cramp. Yours ever H A Giles

Heyst (sic) 30.8.1888
My dear Arthur,
Every morning the 5 boys gather round a table, and receive some four to six "subjects from which they choose each one, according to fancy, and write an "Essay" thereon. I send you a few specimens for you to judge of the result. Ray deals with his in a business like way, and has generally finished first. As you will see, he takes pains to make it look presentable. It is difficult to deal fairly with Ray's intellectual powers. He is such a favourite with all of us that I feel myself really unequal to gauging his head apart from his heart. He seems sharp enough and clear-witted. He doesn't appear to know much. I deny that he has a distaste for knowledge. What he has a distaste for - and I fully sympathise with him - is the form in which knowledge is presented for his acceptance.
Bertram is totally ignorant of Latin and mathematics. But he knows one thing well, - French; and has picked up a lot of scrap information which will do well to fill in the chinks. By the time he has learnt German he will have put a little more Latin into his head, and then he can devote himself to really learning it for purposes of examination. So with mathematics he has the advantage of a fine memory.
Lionel has an equally good memory, but only half Bertram's physique. To make up, he has twice his accuracy and application. If he is not "pushed" he will do well. His Latin and Math. in both of which he was out of sight of Bertram, are checked while he is learning French, which he is doing rapidly. On 1st Oct. last he did not know one word of French. Val is hopeless in the sense of Latin and Greek. He speaks French with some fluency tempered with inaccuracy, and has attracted attention by his skill with his pencil. Lance appears to have learnt nothing as yet. But he is only just 10. Ray goes to G with us about the 7th prox. Yrs ever H.A. Giles

Yvoir (Belgium) - 7 Sept. 1888
My dear Arthur,
I feel a great weight off my shoulders. Ray can swim. He went up and down the bath yesterday, clear water, legs visible all the time, - a total of about 20 yards. Today he goes out of his depth with Lionel alongside, within easy reach. He has a fine stroke, much better than Lionel's; but the latter has the advantage of being fat and buoyant. Bertram is not yet in the running. In three or four days more, I hope he will have it. Ray will swim across the Meuse before he leaves. They are all burning to have a boat.
I hope to get one by this afternoon or tomorrow. They are enjoying themselves immensely. We are in a "little Switzerland" as they call it.
Val is painting. Lance is loafing (an idle devil). Otherwise, you would have had a bigger budget.
The Heyst trip was a great success. Mother (Sarah Anne Giles nee Dickenson) was in great form surrounded by 12 grandchildren (HAG's 7 children and 5 of AHGs). How she stood the racket I can't think. It used to play me out by night time.
Mina (Elise) suffered a good deal from neuralgia at Heyst. So far, she seems better here.
I am nearly at the end of Chiang Tzu. Georgie (Georgina) admired the get-up very much. I think it won't be altogether feeble. Then the Asiatic Soc. catalogue, and then I will write for Horace, to revise at once, with necessary quantities marked, if Cornish agrees. It is aggravating to reflect that I sent it from China nearly ten years ago, carefully revised, with latest lights, and that because of the expense it was consigned to the w.p.b. (waste paper basket).
More about Ray. He has a talent for drawing more marked than Val's, which has already attracted attention at the College. Yet you let him learn Greek, or I should say, pretend to learn it. For never in the swirl of this planet will he succeed, or (in my opinion) with any other but a modern language, learnt in the country where his native sharpness is brought into play! Drawing by all means. Especially for an engineer, royal or civil. And dancing. A young man now who can't dance is more or less an idiot. Dancing is not what it was when I was a boy. It is far ahead of cricket in permanent importance unless of course you are a face or studd blushing unseen.
Bertram will begin in Germany right away.
Yours ever H A Giles

Yvoir lez. Dinant - 23.9.1888
My dear Arthur,
On the 19th I lost what Horace would have called "Animde dimidium mese." Ray left us on that day for England, and it is doubtful when we shall see him again. He is a thoroughly good fellow. On his last day here, he and Lionel swam side by side across the Meuse, while I paddled across some 20 feet down stream, in case of accident, - 1 out of 10,000, as the Chinese say. And you can imagine how disgusted I am when I tell you that Bertram cannot swim yet more than 2 or 3 badly made strokes. Even Lance has beaten him out of the field, and can swim two boats' lengths. B. has been thoroughly impressed by his relatives that he is a boy of genius. Consequently he is going through his Pendennis stage, - happily early in life. He thinks things can be done without the sweat and grind of doing them. But I am now doing him a little injustice. He did think so 6 weeks ago. He doesn't now. He is really beginning to work, and is making rapid progress. Fancy his not knowing decimals! which Val and Lance flying about with ease nearly a year ago in T. B. really knows nothing but
French. Even in that he is inaccurate. He laughed me to scorn our first day at Heyst because I said "un groupe"; but his face fell when the dictionary was produced. At present he and I work hard for 4 hours a day at Horace, Livy, Arithm., Euclid. He will probably stay with us until December, and then go to Germany. I think he sees now that, not scholarships and affluence, but mere bread and butter would be problematical, without steady work. We had some bad quarters of hours at first when I insisted on his giving way in all things to Ray and the younger ones. He had always been taught by his grandmother to take a front place and grab all the best things. Not wittingly, of course. She only did it in gr.motherly fondness but his morale suffered all the same. The other three boys, who are very united, do not disguise their preference for Ray. I hope it will all come right. All this is confidential. Tear up when read, as B. and I are close friends. Yours H A Giles.

Westbourne House, Union Street, Aberdeen - 5 Jan. 1893
My dear Arthur,
New Year's greetings to your Bankeyun circle"
The above (furnished apartments) will be our address I hope for some time to come. We are at present in rather uncomfortable quarters, which we leave on the 10th for Westbourne House. You will have heard of my serious illness on the way home. I told the bosses at the F.O. (Foreign Office) the other day that I should not return to China. I landed at Genoa, collected Val (leaving Lance at Feldkirch), Mabel and Edith, met Mina (Elise) and K (Kathleen) in London after their trip round to Southampton, went to Bath, found Gran (Anna Sarah) in excellent health, and things generally in a prosperous condition.
We stayed in lodgings at Bath for a week. Meanwhile Laura and Dolly burst upon us like two fresh young monsoons blowing two ways at once. Mabel is a fairly attractive girl, but Laura is a real beauty and full of brains into the bargain, which, by the way, if she was my girl, should never be turned to the fatuous pursuit of Latin, Euclid and Algebra. But then you must first know that I am entirely opposed to the so-called "higher" education of women. Laura and Dolly gave us a step-dance against which two young lady proficients even in the differential Calculus would have no chance whatever. Laura sang us a song, but she has no voice at all. Dolly is a sweet little creature, fit to brighten any home but (I should say) unfit for the simplest of simple equations.
Proceeding onto Aberdeen, by night mail, 14% of frost, we find Raymond quite a grown-up young man, (though still beardless), quiet, gentle, unassuming, - the favourite of everybody - even of the she-dragon, Mrs. Mayo. And if you think it is idleness which keeps him from passing the Army Prelim., you are wrong. He is, and has been, working steadily. We were quite astonished at the way in which he refused to join an afternoon skating-party, because he would have sacrificed a mathematical lesson. But he is not a desk man, and the army would be his best career if only he could get in and the medical authorities would pass him, both of which are doubtful. I think I could guarantee his willingness to enter the Army, but nothing beyond that. Too busy to write more. Yours ever H A Giles

Aberdeen - 2 Jan. 1895
My dear Arthur,
Your last, containing news of Raymond's inferred success removed a weight of anxiety from many members of this family. As you say, he must have come out 2nd; and now I think he stands a good chance of getting something, even if his sight does not qualify him for the police.
Arthur (Arthur Herbert) is at last quite well. Since I wrote telling you about his stupidity (I should have done the same at his age) in going to the pantomime when really ill, he developed a nasty attack of dysentery, - of all things, in such a climate. However, he was pulled through just in time for the party on the 30th, though he was refused pratique as regards ices and other such mischief-makers. Meanwhile Dolly (Dorothy) and Madeline arrived arrived, the former round and red, the latter pale and thin. (At this moment even Mad. looks rosy and well). Nothing happened to them en route. They enjoyed the party on the 30th very much, and well they might, as the acting was really excellent. In spite of some disappointments, we sat down 68 to supper, all at once, at a huge table; and then dancing followed. Dolly dances very nicely. I had a delightful round with her. She is a most amiable, quiet, unassuming young lady, and a great friend of mine. Her manners are perfection. Madeline is bright and lively, and (as is right) much more noisy and less well-mannered than Dolly, whose charming demeanour has quite captivated me.
Strange to say the thermometer is high - 53 degrees in the bedrooms - and there is no ice. I doubt if Arthur will have much skating before Gordon's begins. The girls are writing separately, I believe. Yours ever H A Giles

Aberdeen - 6 Jan. 1896
My dear Arthur,
Anxiously awaiting further news about Raymond. Hope to hear tomorrow. The young people seem to have had a fine time with Charley's Aunt. (young Arthur mentions this play in one of his letters in Dec 1895!). Dolly (Dorothy) said she never laughed so much in her life. The thermom. is still high, and there is no sign of skating. That the girls' journey here shall not be quite wasted, skating has been replaced by the bicycle. Lionel spent most of the morning teaching them, and now that jeune diable Madeline can go alone! Not bad for one day's work. Dolly is close behind, and Lionel says that tomorrow will probably finish her off. The light ones always learn more easily than the heavy ones.
Arthur resumes at Gordon's tomorrow. I have been sparing you of late in regard to his prospects, but you may expect the battery to reopen fire shortly - with the much looked-for Record-card. Meanwhile he is in excellent health. Madeline too is much improved. She was very "peeky" and had a nasty cough on arrival. The latter has almost vanished; and whereas she would touch no meat at first, she is now taking to it readily. Our fat girl is but a shadow compared with Dolly, whose waist has a compass like that of a Wellingtonia gigantea. I ought to know, as I spend most of the meal-hours with my arm partially round it. Dolly is a sweet girl, and where the "handful" comes in I can't say. She could be driven with a feather. I heard for the first time yesterday her account of the drowning escapade at Weston. It is in curious contrast with the other account. I am sure the girls are enjoying themselves, as Dolly says the days are flying. Yrs. ever H A Giles

Aberdeen - 16 Jan. 1896
My dear Arthur,
The "O be joyful"s sung over Raymond's success have scarcely yet died away in the halls. Meanwhile, it is quite impossible to express in writing all the satisfaction one feels. I think chiefly of the immense load - Christian's was nothing to it - which has now fallen from your shoulders.
Dolly and Madeline go back tomorrow, after a remarkably short three weeks. It is strictly 3 weeks all but 12 hours though I think it has seemed much less to all concerned. They have gained something beyond ephemeral fun by their long journey. They can both ride the bicycle, for which I fancy they will thank their stars by and by. Dolly, who was the slower at first, is now the better "bikist" of the two. She is calmer and has more nerve. Madeline disappointed me by not shaking off her cough. It continued to hang about her in the mornings, in spite of change of air. This last week I have put her on Kepler's Solution, with very good results. I trust there will be no more coughing at Bath. (It seems that Madeline and Dorothy transferred to boarding school in Bath from Weston super Mare). That girl is not fit for a boarding school. She should be kept at home and be carefully watched for the next 10 years of her life.
Arthur of course went back to Gordon's at due date, and I believe he is shortly to try for a Bursary against boys of between 10 and 11 only. I shall be anxious to see where he comes out. I must write to you in another sense about him before long. At the moment I am busy coaching the girls and Lionel and Val for a French play with scenes from Moliere which they are to act on the 18th at the French Club. Then Mabel and Edith have both been snapped up for a public performance for a charity on the 13th or 14th Feb., and I have promised to stage the piece - Sweethearts - so my hands are full. Love to all. Yours ever H A Giles
Please thanks Raymond for his note to me.

Aberdeen - 23 Jan. 1896
My dear Arthur,
While the family was still reeling under the excitement of Raymond's success, in came the news at the end of last week that the obstinate, perservering, ambitious, and (I am beginning to think) invincible Val, in spite of sickness and hospital disabilities, had positively secured a place in the Engineers. We really don't quite know what to make of it. I had given up hope 3 months ago when he came out 20th in Maths, although keeping his place - 14th - in the half yearly exam. He assures me that he didn't even look at two sets of questions, and had given up hope himself, though as a matter of form he inserted "Engineers" when the paper was brought to him in bed to fill up. Yet he is now 15th on the list. Luckily, this year there were evidently a few more Engineers than usual. Still, it is a little short of a miracle. In addition to the above, and as a pleasant accessory, he got the prize for German! No rose without a thorn. Arthur's sore throat etc. developed, after the mail had left, into high fever (103.5) and symptoms of influenza. Mina (Elise) took it in time with phenacetin, and we were able after all to do without a doctor; but Dolly and Madeline were unable to see him for the last two days of their stay. The boys think he may have been a little overworked (!) of late. For meanwhile his record card has come in and a very good one it is, showing advance all around. Here you are with last half's for comparison.
Reading VG E
Grammar F VG
Composition G G
Scripture VG VG
Arithmetic F G
Geography G G
History G VG
Writing F FG
Drawing G G
Homework G VG
The red (last column) is the new report, and from it you will see that he has only improved; there is no retrograde movement. Writing (Fairly Good) is his worst mark. The boys declare that it is a capital report; besides which he has been selected to compete for a Bursary, and what is more the Master told him he ought to get it. I am sorry he had had to lose a few days with this illness. I could write you volumes about those two girls of yours, who left us, I fear, very much against their inclinations. They seemed to enjoy thoroughly the non-restraint of our establishment. At the same time, they neither of them gave us five minutes' trouble from first to last.; With a slight effort, I got at Madeline. She is a very nervous, not to say hysterical, sensitive, and at the same time defiant young person. Her proper treatment would be, in my opinion, pure kindness, and very little opposition. I am sure I could guide her with a hair. The day after arrival she told Edith that she was sure every one in the house hated her, and that she hated everyone in return! That conviction was soon modified. The boys adored her, and think her far the cleverest of all your girls. Clever she undoubtedly is, but not yet educated. She couldn't tell me how many feet there are in a yard! Don't let this out, because she and I are firm friends now. Dolly is neither sensitive, nor a genius, nor anything but a very lovable girl. Her only fault is her rough, not to say unkind, treatment of Madeline. She is perpetually snubbing the younger one, with bad results for both. Of course, as host, I couldn't afford to correct, and the time was too short to train, or I should have wished to improve Dolly in that sense. I hope you are not bored with all this rigmarole. I find it difficult to be alongside of young people without acquiring an interest in their future; and as a rule I much prefer their society to that of older ones.
Laura is anxiously looking forward to your arrival. She and Mabel exchange volumes weekly. I think I have now said everything, except that we had a very successful performance on Sat. last, programme of which I enclose.
Yours ever H A Giles
Madeline's cough was clean gone before she left. A course of Kepler's Solution would do her much good.

Ref: Above letters transcribed by Celia Stubbs, Valentine's grandaughter - December 2011

Dr Herbert Giles on Chinese Novels
Dr Herbert A. Giles, who shortly departs from the city to enter upon the duties of professorship in Chinese at Cambridge, delivered the opening lecture for the session in connection with Aberdeen University Debating Society yesterday evening in the Debating Hall. Mr. C. G. R. Munnick presided, and there was a large attendance. In briefly introducing the lecturer, the chairman remarked that Dr Giles had given the university four sons, one of who was a very prominent member of their society. In the name of the society, the chairman likewise congratulated the lecturer upon his Cambridge appointment. Dr Giles began by observing that the novel was a comparatively late institution in China - late for China. (Laughter.) Confucius flourished 500 years before Christ, and eighteen centuries rolled away before the novel proper made its appearance. Its development belonged to the thirteenth century of the Christian era; a hundred years before Chaucer composed the "Canterbury Tales", and something like 200 years before novels appeared in this country. Previous to that time there were innumerable collections of short stories, but nothing like a systematic novel. The Chinese were now passionately fond of novel reading; it was one of their two great forms of recreation, the other being drama. They had historical novels, romantic novels, and novels of social life in abundance. Many persons made there living by reading chapters of of novels in public places, and collecting subscriptions from the audience. (Laughter.) Instead, however, of dealing with Chinese novels in abstract, which would be somewhat dry and unsatisfactory, he proposed to lay before them the plot of one Chinese novel, from which they would be able to form their own conclusion as to the mastery acquired by the Chinese in this difficult department of literature. It dated from the middle of the 17th century. It filled in the original 24 volumes of about 4,000 pages, and it contained over 400 characters - (Laughter) - which they might compare with, he believed, 103 in "David Copperfield." He was only obliged to mention three by name, which was lucky, as Chinese names were apt to grate on Europeans ears. (Laughter) Dr Giles then proceeded with the story, which proved of a highly interesting description. It told how three cousins, Pao-yu, the hero; Tai-yu, the heroine; and Pao-Chau, were bought together. The heroine fell in love, but by a stratagem the relatives bought about the marriage of Pao-yu with Pao-Chau, the former only discovering the fact when he lifted his cousin's veil after the ceremony. The result was Tai-yu died of a broken heart after a short experience of madness; and that Pao-yu, whose mind also became unhinged, turned priest. Dr Giles related the charming, though tragic, story in excellent style, and was particularly happy in the humorous passages by which it was enriched. At the close, Dr Giles was most cordially thanked for the rare treat he had afforded.

Herbert was presented with the Royal Asiatic Society's gold medal.

The Chair of Chinese at Cambridge.
Dr Herbert A. Giles, 3 Queens Gardens Aberdeen, has been approached by the authorities of Cambridge University in reference to the Professorship of Chinese, which they intend to resuscitate in the University, with a view to his appointment to the chair. Sir Thomas Wade, the last occupant of the chair, died about two years ago, and a successor has never been appointed. Chinese, however, is now one of the compulsory subjects of examination in the Indian Civil Service, and it is necessary for the University, in order to conserve its interests, to take the step now contemplated. Dr Giles who is a well-known Chinese scholar, and recently catalogued the Chinese library at Cambridge, has reluctantly allowed his name to be brought forward as a candidate. The appointment will be made in October, and it is stated there is little doubt that Dr Giles will be elected to the post.
Ref: Aberdeen Weekly Journal 2 July 1897.

Dr Herbert Giles of Aberdeen, has accepted the Professorship of Chinese at Cambridge University. He was for a quarter of a century in the Chinese Consular Service, and is the author of a number of important Chinese books. He commences his duties in November.
Ref: Daily News 9 September 1897.

Extract from a letter by Herbert's brother-in-law Dr E L Fenn writing to his son Van on entering Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.
Grey Friars
Colchester
November 30 1897
My dear Van
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . you remember your cousin Launcelot Giles he entered Christchurch last October. When you go into residence you will make his acquaintance. I believe his father is to be the new Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, curiously the professorship of Chinese at Oxford fell vacant yesterday; I expect Uncle Herbert would rather have gone there if he had known it was so soon to be vacant, for his wife's relations live there and his father was an Oxford man; still having Lance at Christ's may be an attraction though on the other hand Lionel is at Wadham. . . . .
Love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
P. S. you will remember to give the porter who let you lodgings a tip, 1/- ? Ask Chase what.

The University of Cambridge proposes to confirm a the degree of M. A. honoris causa on Dr Herbert Alan Giles, who was recently appointed to the Professorship of Chinese in the University. Dr Giles, who spent 25 years in the consular service in China, was made an honorary L.L.D. of Aberdeen last year.
Ref: Pall Mall Gazette 27 January 1898.

Professor Giles Chinese Biographical Dictionary:
The second section of the Chinese Biographical Dictionary by Dr Herbert A. Giles, Professor of Chinese in the University of Cambridge, and late H.B.M. Consul at Ningpo (and until recently a citizen of Aberdeen), has been published by Bernard Quaritch, 15 Piccadilly, London, and Kelly and Walsh, Ltd, Yokohama, and Shanghai. The two volumes contained biographical notes of 2579 of the most notable Chinamen of ancient and modern times, and the compilation of the work exhibits in a marvelous manner Dr Giles profound and extensive scholarship. It will take rank as the most comprehensive and accurate survey in existence, of eminent Chinese statesman, generals, writers, and other notable characters. The work of Mr Mayers, which formerly held the field in this department of Anglo Chinese scholarship, only contained notices of 800 individuals, so that in point of completeness Dr Giles dictionary is a long way in advance of any existing lexicon. In his preface to Fascicule II., Professor Giles points out that a knowledge of the subjects dealt with in the dictionary is an absolute necessity for British consular officials and merchants in China, for constant references are made by the Chinese to the sayings and doings, often trivial in themselves, of prominent characters. The list of subjects is brought down to the present day from a starting point of 40 centuries ago. The Chinese characters representing the names of the persons dealt with are given in all cases, and the personal name and surname by which a man is formally known have been transliterated according to the sound of the Court dialect as is now spoken at Peking, an popularly called " Mandarin". Chinamen have generally two names, the style or literary name adopted in the youth for general use, and the fancy name or sobriquet either given by a friend or taken by the individual himself. The dictionary forms very quaint and interesting reading, and has been produced with the greatest care and accuracy. Dr Giles concludes his preface with the following playful note; "The toil of proof reading was performed chiefly by the same practiced reader (on my domestic establishment) to whom the typographical accuracy of my Chinese English dictionary was so largely due."
Ref: Aberdeen Weekly Journal 5 March 1898.

The Ancient Taxicab.
There is no greater Sinologist in this country than Professor H. A. Giles, of Cambridge University, who has just given such irrefragable proofs of the existence in the dynastic records of China of the specification for a taxicab more than 16 centuries ago. Dr Giles who last night told the China Society all about the "measure-mile-drum-carriage", is Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, and has already written enough books on the subject of China, with which he first became acquainted in the Consular service, to fill a small library.
Ref: Globe 1901

Death Notices
The Times 14th Feb 1935
Giles - on February 13th at 10 Selwyn Gardens, Cambridge. Herbert A Giles, lately Professor of Chinese at University of Cambridge and formerly H.M. Consul in Ningpo, in his 90th year. Cremation private, no flowers or mourning, by his special request

Obituary
The Times 14 February 1935
Dr H. A. Giles
A Great Chinese Scholar
Dr H. A. Giles formerly Professor of Chinese at Cambridge died yesterday at his home at Cambridge in his 90th year. His knowledge of the language and literature of China had won for him an honourable place among scholars as far back as the early seventies; since then his philological and literary works, continued until comparatively recently, had made his reputation worldwide and his name a household word in China.
Herbert Allen Giles born on December 8, 1845 was the son of the Rev John Allen Giles DCL (1808-1884), a voluminous scholar and translator, whom he followed to Charterhouse. He joined the Consular Service in China at the age of 22 and after spending the usual period as a student in Peking where he laid the foundations of his lifelong devotion to Chinese letters, he was transferred to Tientsin in 1868. There, among other interesting experiences, he made the acquaintance of the famous Chief Eunuch An Te-Hai, who presented him when he left with a magnificent gold bangle, later he served in important Treaty ports and in Formosa, steadily acquiring a wide knowledge of idioms and dialects. At the age of 28 he had begun to write on Chinese history language and literature, and in 1874 became a regular contributor to the Celestial Empire. In the same year he began the labour of a lifetime, his Chinese English Dictionary published in fascicules and first completed in 1892, revised, enlarged, and republished in 1912. This monumental work was undertaken at Giles own risk and cost, but on the appearance of the advertisement of the first fascicule, Sir Robert Hart with characteristic kindness and generosity, sent the author his cheque in advance payment, for 100 copies of the complete dictionary. For this Giles received the Prix St Julien of the French Academy in 1911.
Having been appointed acting consul at Amoy in 1879, Giles ceased his contributions to the Press in China and thenceforward devoted himself to the study of Chinese, which, as he was want to observe, is quite enough for any one man. He abandoned, therefore, his earlier intention of studying law, a decision in which he was influenced by the advice of Sir Edmund Hornby, H. M. Supreme Court Judge at Shanghai, who held the opinion that a Consul barrister is a Consul spoiled. From the beginning of his career in China he had ambitions similar to those of Swinhoe, who, on reaching the Far East, declared "he would die happy if he could leave his name to a louse". The results of his industry, combined with literary gifts of no mean order, are contained in a long list of published works, beginning in 1870 and covering a wide range of subjects. Educational works for the study of the language, works on the religions, poetry, literature, art, philosophy, and political conditions of China flowed steadily from his pen until only a few years ago.
In 1893 he retired from the Consular Service and returned to England. In 1897 having accepted the post of Professor of Chinese at Cambridge University, he published the work by which he is best known to the general reader, "A Chinese Biographical Dictionary" for which also he received the Prix St Julien of the French Academy. Mr E. V. Lucas in "Over Bremerton's", has born graceful testimony to the human interest and literary charm of this collection of Oriental Worthies. In purely classical research Giles lacked at times something of the book-worm erudition which is so dear to native scholars and meticulous Sinologues in China, that mole-like patience which will burrow for weeks on the track of a quotation, but his qualities of sympathy and intelligence, and his graceful style of paraphrasing even the obscurest of Chinese writers, have made his work as a whole as interesting as it is instructive. Among his best-known works are Chinese "Without a Teacher" now in its eighth edition; "A Record of the Buddhistic Kingdoms" (1877), "A History of Chinese Literature" (1901), "Religions of Ancient China" (1905), and "Chinese Poetry In English Verse" (1898). His "Introduction to the History of Chinese Pictorial Art" (1905), with copious extracts exhibiting the Chinese point of view, is full of delightful examples of the national dry humour and polite self-deprecatio