The Kings Candlesticks - Family Trees
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John TORLESSE [1627]
(1738-1810)
Anna Maria ROBINSON [1628]
(1765-1834)
Edward WAKEFIELD [1637]
(1774-1854)
Susannah CRUSH [1638]
(Between 1767/1775-1816)
Rev Charles Martin TORLESSE [1633]
(1795-1881)
Catherine Gurney WAKEFIELD [1636]
(1793-1873)

Frances Harriet "Fanny" TORLESSE [1681]
(1839-1935)

 

Family Links

Frances Harriet "Fanny" TORLESSE [1681]

  • Born: Aug 1839
  • Baptised: 27 Sep 1839, Stoke By Nayland SFK
  • Died: 13 Nov 1935, 15 Elmsworthy Tce Hampstead LND aged 96
  • Buried: Golders Green.
picture

bullet  General Notes:


Frances did her family a great service with her book of data and intimate memories "Byegone Days" on this website under "Books"

Frances, always known as Fanny to the family, had stong ties to New Zealand emigrating in 1883 she resided to 1905.
She wrote of her first impressions in a letter written 7 June 1883 from Rangiora NZ a poor copy of which is under "Other Records" below.

Miss F H Torlesse Age: 50 Born abt 1840 Departed 7 Nov 1890 from London, to Melbourne, on the ship Oruba, Master: J R Park
Ref Ancestry

Miss F H Torlesse Departed 18 Oct 1895 London, to Wellington, New Zealand on the ship Richmond Hill, Shipping line: Wilson-Hill Line of Steamers, Master: Jas Brown
Ref Ancestry.

In the 1870's the Christchurch NZ Diocese recognised a need for better pastoral work among women and the need for women to undertake this work. In 1883 Frances emigrated to Christchurch with her sister Priscilla and settled in a house in Gloucester St. Frances had had some experience with teaching in England and found a position with a Christchurch private school, she to became concerned with the needs of young working women and attracted the notice of Bishop Harper who asked her to become a Deaconess and organise pastoral support for young working women. He offered a stipend of L80 p.a. but on her acceptance she would only accept L60. She became responsible for "The Refuge" "St Mary's Home for Fallen Women" and "St Catherine's Lodge"
Knowing nothing of the training & role of a Deaconess, Frances in 1890 visited England and an assortment of Deaconess Institutions and Sisterhood Communities. She interested several women she met in coming out to NZ to serve.
Returning to Christchurch convinced of the need for a Deaconess Order in NZ, she found a new Bishop, Churchill Julius, who held the same view. In 1892 Julius conducted a service inducting Frances and two further women as probationary Deaconesses.
In 1893 Deaconess Sister Edith Mellish of London, answered a call to come to Christchurch and establish an Order that grew into the Community of the Sacred Name.
Frances continued to serve in the Community as a Deaconess and on the Management Committee, until her health forced her to retire from active work in Oct 1898.
It was Frances's idealistic but practical approach which created the Deaconess Community in Christchurch. About 1905 she returned to England living at Shottermill and Wimbledon, and published " Bygone Days" a history of the family in 1914..
Ref: "The Community of the Sacred Name" by Ruth Fry, Published 1993.

RESCUE WORK.
LONDON. July 4. Frances Torlesse is apppealing for trained helpers to undertake rescue work in the Diocese of Christchurch.
Colonist, Volume XXXIII, Issue 5848, 7 July 1890, Page 3 (Papers Past)

PASSENGER FRM THE WEST COAST.
BEALEY, Feb. 24. There are fifteen passengers by coach for Christchurch, viz. : . . . . . Miss Torlesse (Christchurch), . . . . .
Star , Issue 7214, 24 February 1892, Page 3
Placing this report against Frances is pure conjecture 2010

INTERESTING RELIGIOUS CEREMONY.
By Telegraph. (United press association.) Christchurch, 5th January. Three ladies - Misses F. H. Torlesse, Mary Ann Vousden, and Mary Louisa Percy, were admitted to-night as probationers for the office of deaconess in the Cathedral. Bishop Julius conducted the service
Evening Post, Volume XLIII, Issue 4, 6 January 1892, Page 2

Ordination of Deaconesses.
Miss F.H. Torlesse. and Miss M. A. Vowsten were ordained as deaconesses by Dr Julius, Bishop of Christchuroh, at Holy Trinity Church, Avonside, yesterday afternoon.
Star , Issue 4849, 13 January 1894, Page 5

St Marys Home.
Funds are urgently needed for the maintenance of that very deserving institution, St Mary's Home. The House Committee asks for contribution in kinds- groceries, produce and clothing material. A pound of anything, from a pound of sugar to a pound in money, will be gratefully received. Materials suitable for any description of garment will also be most acceptable. Contributions may be sent to St Mary's Home, Addington, or to Deaconess F. Torlesse, 233, Gloucester Street, from Dec. 2 to 9, inclusive.
Star , Issue 5424, 27 November 1895, Page 2

PORTRAIT OF A PIONEER.
An interesting addition has been made to the collection of portraits in the Museum in the shape of a small photograph of a painting of Captain Arthur Wakefield, who was killed in the Wairau massacre. The picture was presented to the Museum by Miss Torlesse.
Star , Issue 5471, 24 January 1896, Page 2
Placing this report against Frances is again pure conjecture 2010

CORRESPONDENCE.
A DESERVING CASE.
TO THE EDITOR. Sir, Will you allow me through your columns to make an appeal on behalf of a poor woman, for whom I am trying to collect the sum of L20 to enable her to join her husband in Vancouver? I have corresponded with him, and can guarantee that the case is genuine. She and her five young children are half starved here, and it would be an act of the greatest charity to send the family to their natural guardian. It is most desirable they should go by next steamer, therefore those who will give are asked to do so at once. Subscriptions will be received by the Rev W. Bean, vicarage, Addington, or by me at 93, Armagh Street.
I am, &c,
DEACONESS FRANCES TORLESSE.
Star , Issue 5816, 9 March 1897, Page 4

MAGISTERIAL.
CHRISTCHURCH.
Wednesday, March 31. (Before Mr W. H. Cooper, J.P., and Mr E. Curry, J.P.) Vagrancy. Mary Symonds was charged with having insufficient lawful means of support. Chief -Detective Henderson stated that this woman was a little weak-minded, and had been found wandering about the North Park yesterday. Miss Torlesse was willing to take her into the Samaritan Home. The woman was convicted, ordered to come up for sentence when called upon, and sent to the Samaritan Home.
Star , Issue 5835, 31 March 1897, Page 3

LOCAL AND GENERAL.
The usual monthly meeting of the Christchurch Prison Gate Mission Committee, commencing the thirteenth year of its operations was held yesterday in the rooms in Cathedral Square. . . . . . Several letters of apology for absence were received, amongst which was one from Miss Torlesse, resigning from the committee on account of ill-health. The members expressed their regret at the resignation, as Miss Torlesse had been a member from the commencement of the Mission.
Star , Issue 6221, 7 July 1898, Page 3

In 1914 Fanny published the informative book, Bygone Days packed with personal details of her family, a treasure for a family historian. See "Books" section of this website.

PIONEER DAYS
INTRODUCTION OF BEES TO NEW ZEALAND
"HUNGRY MAN'S GULLY."
The following interesting letter was recently received by Mr. W. A. Edwards, secretary of the Early Settlers' Association, from Mr. Len M'Kenzie, a member of the association now on a visit to the "Home" country:-
"To-day I have had a most, interesting chat with Miss Torlesse, who is in her eighty-seventh year. She is truly, a wonderful lady, with a perfect memory, and I enjoyed every moment of my interview. She is the only surviving relative of Colonel Wakefield, who was her uncle, and it was her brother, when aged 16, who went to Nelson with Captain Arthur Wakefield. Returning later to England, he qualified as a surveyor, and, on account of knowledge of the Maori, was chosen to accompany Captain Thomas to Canterbury to prepare for the first settlers there. One important event she told me was the first introduction of bees to New Zealand. These were presented by Mrs. Allorn, of Guilford Street, London. That lady was interested in bee culture and kept them on the roof of her house. After watching their habits, she decided to send them to New Zealand, and they were landed safely in 1842. They throve and, when we now look back and now think of our honey industry, we certainly have much to thank her for. So interested was Prince Albert in her efforts that he presented her with a very beautiful medal for her enterprise. Miss Torlesse informed me that she had handled that medal frequently. "She also told me that her brother, Mr. Torlesse, when in Canterbury, always wished to explore the hills beyond Lyttelton Harbour, and later he obtained permission from Captain Thomas, so in company with a Native, a donkey, and a dog, they proceeded, only to find hill after hill, but still went on. At last their food ran out and they had to decide whether they had best kill the dog or the donkey. He tossed I up, and it came to the dog, but the animal saved its life by killing a weka. This gully is known as "Hungry Man's Gully.'' On receipt of this letter, a letter of congratulation and good wishes was sent to Miss Torlesse from the Early Settlers' Association, and the following reply was received per last mail: "I received yours of 26th July, and thank you for it. . . . Please convey to the members of the Early Settlers' Association my thanks and appreciation of their kind message. I cannot express what I feel at your words about my mother. Her name was Catherine Gurney Wakefield, the older sister of Edward Gibbon. They were close friends, and she shared all his aspirations and efforts for the colony, but she was such a quiet woman and put herself forward so little that I had no idea her name would be known now. She died in 1873. I can only repeat that the pleasure your letter and the messages given to me are a solace in my old age, for l am 87, and I have outlived all my contemporaries. Yours very sincerely, (sgd.) Francis Torlesse. Mr. Edwards states that perhaps some old Canterbury settler may remember the whereabouts of "Hungry Man's Gully." The incidents related by Miss Torlesse are typical of the manner in which many places have received their name only in this case the gully cannot be located.
Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 98, 22 October 1926, Page 3

MISS FANNY TORLESSE: THE VICTORIAN AGE
A correspondent, wrote to the London "Times" recently concerning the death of a lady well known years ago in New Zealand as follows:-
The death on Wednesday of Frances Harriet Torlesse at the great age of 96 means the loss not only of a dear and widely loved friend and counsellor but the breaking of a precious link with the Victorian past and with the Dominions.
Born in 1839, the 10th and youngest child of the Rev. Charles Torlesse, for 58 years vicar of Stoke by Nayland, in Suffolk, and Catherine Gurney Wakefield, his wife, she was brought up in the austere but living Evangelicalism which in the early years of the nineteenth century had stirred the Established Church. Her parents were no ordinary people.
Her father was a scholar with a touch of genius. The classics, music, science, mathematics, history, all gripped him. Her mother, born of a Quaker family, was a sister of Edward Gibbon Wakefield, the colonizer of New Zealand, and a cousin of Elizabeth Fry. Husband and wife had one dominating thought, how best to raise the condition, spiritual and material, of the Suffolk labourer, then practically a pauper throughout his life. They devoted themselves to the promotion of friendly societies and emigration among their people, and their children shared in what to them was a vocation.
Fanny Torlesse could remember no toys in her childhood; their place was taken by the collecting of seeds and beechmast to be planted in the Colonies, and the problems of emigration coloured all her early life. When in later years she went herself to New Zealand, it was to join the families of her brothers, already settled there, and as a deaconess of St. Andrew's Community to take up rescue work, till broken health compelled her return to England as an invalid.
It was now that the real influence of her life began. For over 40 years she was the centre and mainspring of a great family circle, its members kept in touch with one another by the steady flow of her letters written to cousins, nephews, nieces, and their children scattered over the globe. Her love and sympathy were always with them, and with the very many correspondents and friends to whom, though not connected by ties of blood, she was always " dear Aunt Fanny." She had an intense love for her childhood's home and wrote several books of recollection for private circulation, full of value for the light they throw on ways of life so remote from the present generation that they might almost be written of another world. But her interest in every modern movement was as keen as her devotion to the past, and this made her a remarkable example of progressive Victorian life. Though her sight and hearing had failed during the last months of her life she kept her beauty of feature to the end, together with the charm and dignity which never failed. Such a life of intellect, sympathy, and capacity for friendship will be a never-fading memory to the many by whom she was revered and loved.
A number of Miss Torlesse's nephews, nieces, and great-nephews are resident in New Zealand.
Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 145, 16 December 1935, Page 17

WAKEFIELD'S NIECE
DEATH OF MISS FANNY TORLESSE
CONNEXION WITH EARLY CANTERBURY
Miss Fanny Torlesse, who died in London recently, was directly connected with this country, and especially with this province in its very early days. Born in 1839, she was the tenth and youngest daughter of the Rev. Charles Torlesse, for 58 years vicar of Stoke by Nayland, in Suffolk, and Catherine Gurney Wakefield, his wife. Her parents were no ordinary people. Her father was a scholar with a touch of genius. Her mother, born of a Quaker family, was a sister of Edward Gibbon Wakefield, the coloniser of New Zealand, and a cousin of Elizabeth Fry. Husband and wife had one dominating though, how best to raise the condition, spiritual and material, of the Suffolk labourer, then practically a pauper throughout his life; They devoted themselves to the promotion of friendly societies and emigration among their people, and their children shared in what to them was a vocation. Fanny Torlesse could remember no toys in her childhood; their place was taken by the collecting of seeds and beechmast to be planted in the colonics, and the problems of emigration occupied all her early life. When in later years she went herself to New, Zealand, it was to join the families of her brothers, already settled there, and as a deaconess of St. Andrew's Community to take up rescue work, till broken health compelled her to return to England as an invalid. It was now that the real influence of her life began. For more than 40 years she was the centre and mainspring of a great family circle, Its members kept in touch with one another by the steady flow of her letters written to cousins, nephews, nieces, and their children scattered over the globe. Her love and sympathy were always with them, and with the very many correspondents and friends to whom, though not connected by ties of blood, she was always "dear Aunt Fanny." Early Canterbury Connexions Miss Torlesse's oldest brother. Charles, came to the Dominion in 1841 as a surveyor, and was engaged in laying out the province of Nelson into sections. He returned to England in 1843, and then came back to New Zealand in 1848 with Captain Thomas as assistant surveyor. It was he who ascended Mount Torlesse, which was afterwards named after him. On this same trip he went so far that provisions ran out at a place which is still known as Starvation Gully. They were saved from starvation by a parly of natives. Mr Torlesse afterwards bought land in Rangiora, where he was instrumental in building a church school. The Rev. Henry Torlesse. another brother, came out to New Zealand with Edward Gibbon Wakefield, and for a while was engaged in shepherding for his brother at Fernside, while still keeping up his classical studies. After his ordination, he was appointed to the charge of Okain's Bay, where he built a church and established a school.
Four years later he was appointed chaplain to the gaol, the hospital, and the mental hospital in Christchurch, until the chaplaincy was given up by the Provincial Council in 1867. Miss Priscilla Torlesse, the eldest sister of the family, lived with Sister Frances for many years. The surviving nephews and nieces in New Zealand are Mrs C. G. Torlesse, of Timaru; Mrs C. H. Hamilton, cf Sumner; Mrs C. Waterston, of Tauranga; and Mrs P. H. Pritchett, of Riccarton. These are all children of the Rev. Henry Torlesse and Mrs Torlesse.
Ref: Press, Volume LXXII, Issue 21673, 6 January 1936, Page 2

bullet  Research Notes:


Images courtesy of "The Community of the Sacred Name" by Ruth Fry, Published 1993.

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bullet  Other Records



1. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward Liveing, Bef Aug 1854.
Liveing Archive: Image Letter 15 a b

My dear Edward
We expect Pater home the end of this week but you know his movements are uncertain - we have no visitors and Mrs C is just now away - we have no engagements this week but the school fait (sic) on Friday we have a poney (sic) that will go. If you come you will be very welcome
Page 2.
I would meet you anywhere on Tuesday - at any time you mention - the Fenns know you are at Copford, & told me of it -
Yours affectly
Fanny Torlesse
Stoke. Sunday



2. Frances (Fanny) H Torlesse: Copy of a letter to the family in England, 7 Jun 1883, Rangiora Canterbury NZ.
Liveing Archive.
This copy by Edward Liveing Jnr is not a faithful representation. It uses shortened words, shocking writing and little continuity. Edward also has put his own sometimes critical comments into it !
Accordingly this transcription is in the form of extracts from the letter where I can make some sense of it.
Where the words sound like Fanny's I have put them in quotation marks. Ye is from Edward L I think.

"My Dear Friends and Relatives,
I think I must send an Encyclic
First I must thank you all for letters.
The mail service now brings four mails a month
The Francisco mail is the quickest no doubt but only comes once a month.
The new direct steamers from London to Lyttleton bring us in Canterbury within 46 days of London.
We send you plenty of good news [?] so you ought to send something in return.
Well I have been here now more than a month and felt quite settled and established as a colonist.
I have felt at home from ye first and the feeling increases.
I think it is the numbers of people who know the name so that wherever I go I have a pleasant greeting."
Mentions Rangiora is one of the chief towns in North Canterbury and Fanny had gone to a Ball on 21 May, ladies of Rangiora provide supper, the bachelors pay most of the expenses (music and wine), dancing (at the Ball) was kept up till 3.30.
Says it reminds her of provincial life in England 50 years ago when mothers came out at the County balls. (Edward notes "They did nothing of the kind E.L.)
She comments how life in Rangiora resembles provincial life in England 50 years ago (Edward. That is when I was 2 years old, from what I know of that life at that period she has formed a wrong concept of it. E.L.)
25 May
Fanny went to Riccarton and stayed at the Bowens (Sir Charles1, politician & brother Croasdaile the Vicar of Riccarton), they have lived there for 20 years. They have a passion for plants and have all kinds, a really lovely place. Mentions various European trees and Pinus Insignia and various flowers including scarlet geraniums and camellias.
"The house is just like in English house, you could not tell you were away from ye old country, the Leonard Harper's2 at Ilam is ye same only larger"
The few Maoris about were in European clothes
"Mr Bowen was unfortunately at Wellington at the time I was at Middleton3 but I enjoyed my visit and saw several people and heard of "Australias. (Co-passengers with her in ye steamer of that name E.L.)
From Middleton I went to Opawa the Lyttleton side of Christchurch to stay with the Parsons4 who used to live at Govenors Bay. Mr Parsons came out 30 years ago threatened with consumption and given 8 years of life by the doctors ("Were doctors such fools as to make such utterly impossible predictions in those days \endash or was their folly kindly attributed to them E.L.)
Mrs Parsons is a very hale active little lady, Mr Parsons had an endless stream of talk a mixture of very ancient reminiscences of life in Suffolk then about the Maoris, first clearing of bush all told in the very broadest strangest Suffolk [accent].
"They go out in the best of society having been extremely hospitable. " (Does that absurd fiction exist in New Zealand ? E.L.).
"Mr Parsons reads Poverty and Progress (The pamphlet lately issued by Mr George) and considers it may avert a revolution by showing the rich that it won't do to get all they can \endash it does sound so very odd to hear an old Suffolk farmer talking advanced to socialism."
"While at Opawa I went to see the Mertons (Merton was at Stoke when I married 1854 E.L.) I must say they were very glad to see me and he poor man fairly cried. (Mr Merton was the village schoolmaster at Stoke by Nayland 1849 - 51 ?. He was a very clever intelligent fellow, and very musical, and his only fault, not a very disagreeable one, was a good deal of conceit E.L.) "a few years ago he was a rich man owning large farms keeping his carriage and pair and able to lose many thousands. He has been an honourable man through it all and gave up everything, and has now gone back to his original work of keeping a District (Government) School. He says he is quite happy, and looks it, though he said he should be able to have receive me in his beautiful home. However there was no nonsense or affectation, only real pleasure. The old lady (his mother) looks about 5 years older than she did 30 years ago has all her faculties even sees and hears quite well. Charlotte (Merton's wife née Street the Torlesse's nurse native of Boxford) is quite unchanged! Only warmer in her manners. The elder son is Vicar of Woolston \endash Sumner (I can read and copy their name as I can) His second [Son], headmaster of the Cathedral school, the 3rd son a very successful music master"
"they are all in the position of gentlemen and seem to be liked except for a little pardonable conceit. I have promises to go and stay"
"I went to see Mrs March (née Chisnall) (Tom Chisnall, the father, was the shoemaker at Thorington Street in my younger days say 1846 \endash 57. The family was an old Stoke one E.L.) Mr March is secretary to the charitable aid trust, immigration agent etc. It is in a good position and good salary and she much liked. She has the manners and appearance of a lady (Was this Marianne Chisnall . . . . E.L.) and is giving her girls a first rate education."
"Yesterday I spent at Miss Cuddons (Cuddon nee Boggis - Boggis was the saddler and harness maker at Stoke \endash and an old relative was the famous Mrs Boggis of barley sugar and sponge cake celebrity she having been cook and Tendring for old Sir William Rowley) "she is really a very superwoman with a keen intelligence and a quick sympathetic manner. I cannot tell you how all these people love our father and mother; Mrs March said to me "The name of Torlesse will always be a hallowed one here for your parents sake and dear Mr Henry's" they do not forget for a moment that their respective fathers cobbled one shoes and mended ones chaise. And were our servants receiving wages. They are all rich folk now, and they have welcomed me with a warmth that seems to sweep away the years of Stoke difficulties; a warmth of gratitude and affection that seems to give me a new life. The longing to tell mother is very strong, but perhaps she knows she rests from her labours and her . . . . ."
"Very nearly all the Suffolk people have done well and it just shows what stuff there is in the old country with new surroundings \endash the dreadful oppression of landowners is recovered (I have not read a word of poverty and progress). Everyone can get their own land and house and there is a manliness that gives strength to the community \endash Drink has been the curse of the country, but on all sides is said to be diminishing. The causes are not far to seek, but every advance to comfort and civilisation ought to diminish them."
"On Saturday I went up to Fernside5 where Charles lived and Katie and Prissy were born. It is about 5 miles from here nearer the hills and from there I could see much more of the surrounding country and further a notion of what it was 30 years ago. It was there that Henry first lived a shepherd's life in a hut: very desolate it must have been. The Mannering's who live there now are very faithful to old landmarks and have only recently pulled down the great wool shed etc. Mrs Mannering took me all about you fields and garden showed me the trees my brothers had planted etc. And so I could make a kind of picture of their lives. The trees are 90 foot high and the wattles 8 foot in circumference certainly things do grow here."
"There is a railway [?] within 2 miles of the old station; church, school, and village growing up."
"And now a few words about [the] place I first arrived in N 3 [? in May] There had been . . . . . rain and half the country was under water, it was more or less wet for a fortnight although the harvest had been a splendid one very large quantities of corn were destroyed by the rain, and in some districts the farmers were ruined especially where they had taken much larger farms than they could find labour for. Then it cleared up and there has been most lovely weather for 3 weeks, very cold nights, the ground generally white in ye morning, but the days most lovely. I have never felt anything so exhilarating as some of the days have been; it reminded me of the Swiss mountains. The flowers have lingered on and many are still to be picked, geraniums roses, violets in great quantities. Here and there are stray carnations marigolds lupins . . . . . while the chrysanthemums have been splendid. The weeping willows have become nearly an evergreen and the leaves are still on. The other willow has long lost its leaves, but as the 3 commonest trees here gums, Pinus Insignia and wattles are all entirely evergreen the country does not look bare. Today 11th of June it's cold indeed like an English winter day, cloudy and cold wind. I think the oddest thing here is a Norwester. The first time I felt one I was out walking about a week after I came here when reaching a cross road I suddenly felt a puff of hot air I said to Maggie W when I was walking "I suppose there is a fire around you corner" (as just then they were burning straw etc all about) "oh no that's a nor'wester wind ! I would not believe her and so distrusted I was with this hot wind that I went to look for the fire) Since then I have felt it often tis pleasant, but even in winter rather exhausting. I cannot imagine the reason of it. It arrives quite suddenly."
Fanny describes going into Christchurch it was bitterly cold when they left then all at once it turned not warm but hot. "I was quite done up with the weight of my garments, in summer it must be dreadfully trying, for if it blows hard and dust abounds I should think one would be suffocated." (Note from transcriptor, a New Zealander - Fanny is describing the hot foehn wind, that blows across the Canterbury Plains from the north-west.6) "I think ye nights are much colder in proportion than the days, and the wooden houses are so thin one feels it more. I was nearly frozen at Opawa; now I am very comfortable, as I have a fire in my room. The native coal is very woody and keeps alight all night like wood. It is one cause of ye constant fires as servants throw out the ashes still hot".
June 13th
"I shall finish today and faithfully record that the cold of the last 2 days has been horrible! The Port Hills, as well as ye mountains are covered in snow, and as I sit close to the fire I can hardly feel my pen.
Rangiora is a very cold place (so like Stoke) and these wooden houses are very thin it is generally warmer out of doors than in. Of course it tried me, as I had an English winter" (Very little: she left before we had any cold weather and we had very little at all last winter E.L.). "However I have neither cold cough neuralgia or any other pain and I am growing fat as a pig."
"So goodbye all, do send me newspapers stray magazines or anything of that sort Not the Guardian ! I get them regularly from the clergyman here. I am going to a Ball tonight "
FHF
15 June 1883

1. Civil servant, Magistrate, Speaker of the Legislative Council, educationist.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/1966/bowen-sir-charles-christopher-kcmg
2. Leonard Harper a lawer politician & businessman in early Christchurch, the son of Henry Harper Bishop of
Christchurch NZ. Owned at one time Ilam Homestead Christchurch. He left Christchurch leaving a cloud
relating to an embezelment and insolvency of his Law firm. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Harper
3. Middleton Homestead Christchurch now a school:
https://www.middleton.school.nz/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Listed-Heritage-Place.pdf
4. Likely Henry Parsons a passenger on the Minerva 1852, which ship brought Fannys brother Henry and
Edward Gibbon Wakefield to Canterbury.
http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~nzbound/genealogy/minerva.htm
5. Fernside Station. http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-AclEarl-t1-body-d3-d13.html
6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foehn_wind



3. Frances (Fanny) Torlesse: Notes of conversations with Edward Liveing [100] about the family and villagers, 1884.
Fanny was much travelled especially to New Zealand, she was the authority on her side of the family, writing the valuable family history "Bygone Days". (See the books section of this website).
Recorded are Fanny & Edwards memories c 1884 when Fanny had returned from NZ

Edward's writing was in the tradition of his profession. The webmaster feels inadequate in respect of a transcription and invites those interested to make their own sense of it.

Part 1
Contains details of these and other families some from Stoke or Nayland some emigrated to NZ.
Chisnalls Tom and family
Boggis
Weyland
Merton
Barford
Norfolk Family.



4. Frances (Fanny) Torlesse: Notes of conversations with Edward Liveing [100] about the family and villagers, 1884.
Fanny was much travelled especially to New Zealand, she was the authority on her side of the family, writing the valuable family history "Bygone Days". (See the books section of this website)
Recorded are Fanny & Edwards memories c 1884 when Fanny had returned from NZ

Edward's writing was in the tradition of his profession. The webmaster feels inadequate in respect of a transcription and invites those interested to make their own sense of it.

Part 2.
Contains details of these and other families some from Stoke or Nayland some emigrated to NZ.
King (Abraham)
Wilson (Old Jack)
Harringtons
Jones
Lilly
Trigg
George Cook
Blesett
Hammond
Button
Hill
Dyer
Maude
Munnings
Browns of Polstead
Torlesse.



5. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 8 Jul 1920 (Post Mark), St Leonards-on-Sea East Sussex.
Liveing Archive: 20042020

56 Church Rd
St Leonards-on-Sea
8 Jul.

Many thanks for the loan of letters received today, shall be returned \endash very sorry re the report of yourself.
Am still in bed, but as the weather is better hope soon to be up \endash will write \endash this is only to acknowledge the letters
Ys
FHT



6. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 12 Jan c1921, St Leonards-on-Sea East Sussex.
Liveing Archive
Fanny appears to be refering to gathering material for a publication however her definitive book on her family Bygone Days, see in the books section, was published in 1914.

56 Church Rd
St Leonards-on-Sea
12 Jan
Dear Edward
I am very sorry you have been to this suffering, but I hope you are losing the catarrh I myself have not been well and could not tackle the letters \endash when I did I found them very painful reading recalling so vividly so much sorrow \endash but they are very valuable for my purpose \endash and I am
Page 2
going to trouble you again, asking you if you could let me have the former packet, when I had it, I did not make extracts, if I have these letters I shall I think be able to extract a fairly continuous narrative.
I am sure it must be a pleasure to you to learn so much of your mother \endash it interests me extremely to relate
Page 3
his and her [?] lovely childhood \endash I don't like giving you so much trouble of postage etc. It must be a satisfaction to have traced [?] the Liveings so far back \endash have you connected them at all with the Irish [?]Livinge, I believe both families came from same stock \endash I trust uncle George
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continues as well as when you wrote \endash when I have collected all my material I will try to get to work but I find I cannot do much at a time.
I am getting very old.
Love to you and Emily.
Your affectionate cousin
Fanny Torlesse



7. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 16 Dec c1921, St Leonards-on-Sea East Sussex.
Liveing Archive

56 Church Rd
St Leonards-on-Sea
16 Dec

Dear Edward
All through the autumn I have hoped to hear that you were coming to St Leonards, now that winter has set in I must give up the hope of seeing you \endash I am putting together a little memorial of my brother Henry* (for his children who cannot remember him) and I should be so thankful for the use of his letters \endash especially 9 written on his voyage to New Zealand and afterwards \endash I wish I had made extracts when you sent them before \endash but it will be very good of you to let me have them, and any others you can get your hands on again \endash I hope you are better \endash I hear you are completing the Liveing pedigree
Page 2
I have put the care of my parents grave at Stoke into the hands of an old woman servant, who will I believe keep it properly \endash I have been cheered by a slightly better account of Susie \endash and trust improvement may have begun I understand that 1 of her delusions was of her poverty \endash I do not know what her income is but I feel sure that she will not be allowed to want the means to live as I am sure your Father intended \endash of course he could not anticipate the enormous cost of living now more however I fear it will be many months before she is well enough to think of such matters.
Dorothy Torlesse has become engaged to a young Horace Butler, great-grandson of my father's old master at Harrow.
My love and all good wishes to you and Emily
Your affectionate Cousin
Fanny Torlesse



8. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 15 May 1923, Ashburnham Hastings.
Liveing Archive: 20042020

19 Ashburnham Rd
Hastings
15 May 23.

Dear Edward
I have filled in the dates you ask for, so far as I can, and hope they will enable you to finish the pedigree. The few dates I have not got belonging to the Pritchard family I will ask for.
The registers of one of Mr Nottages churches should give dates of McRae Davies marriage Susie could probably give date of her . . . . . fathers birth 2 day of death - Mr Nottage was incumbent of both Holy Trinity and St Helen's churches \endash I conjecture St Helen's was really the parish church. I wish someone would search the registers there.
Page 2
I believe the following marriages took place there
Maria Torlesse = David Davies
Harriet Torlesse = Charles Bridges
Charles M Torlesse = Catherine Wakefield
Alfred Fennell =
Uncle George's friend Mr Beale's did not bring a very bright account of him lately \endash I saw her 3 weeks ago, when she had first been to Cambridge.
Hoping you may find your way here again with love to Emily
Your affectionate cousin
Fanny Torlesse.



9. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 30 Aug c1923, Catherine House St Leonards on Sea Hastings.
Liveing Archive:

Catherine House
St Leonards on Sea
30 Aug c1923

My dear Edward
The pedigree has just reached me here (the house where you saw me last). I have not examined it yet but it looks delightful the whole getup Case and all in such good style \endash I am very grateful and hope that all the members of the family will appreciate the long work and trouble
I have
that your father as well as yourself have put into it \endash I have a little idea what it means \endash I only hope that the 4 Torlesse boys now alive will be worthy descendants \endash that 2 n' N Z (New Zealand) promise well as also Arthur's two \endash I hope Emily as well again \endash I shall be curious to hear what Uncle George decides \endash your most valuable gift reached me on my 84th birthday, most appropriately.
With best love and Emily
Yours very affectionately
Fanny H Torlesse.



10. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing & copy of his reply, 18 Nov 1923, Ashburnham Hastings.
Liveing Archive: 20042020

19 Ashburnham Rd
Hastings
18 Nov 23.

Dear Edward
It is nearly a year since you came to see me and we had much to talk over Pedigree and Churchyards. If it is not too much to ask I should be very glad to know if pedigree is advanced, and if you have made any arrangement about the graves \endash this letter is of great importance to me as I have gone on with a very unsatisfactory arrangement, pending your decision, and I should be truly glad to know if you have done
Page 2.
anything, or expect to do so. It is a long time since I heard of uncle George, and if you answer this, I should be glad to hear how he is.
I purpose going to Edwards for 3 weeks from 28th Mar to 18th of April, and 2 Charles Road (off London Road) partly in order to be near Mary Bridges [1677] who had an attack of illness some weeks ago and is still confined to the sofa, and in a very feeble state.
With love to Emily,
Your affectionate cousin
Fanny Torlesse.

Reply
4 Apr 1923
Dear Cousin Fanny
I am afraid your letter has remained unanswered some time I was away from home and have been busy[?] since my return. . . . . . we . . . . . and could do nothing it was my fault as we had not given him notice I have been waiting to go again but so far . . . ..
Edward has rough copied his reply on scrap paper mostly illegible but seems of little importantance ?



11. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Edward H T Liveing, 24 Sep bef 1924, Ashburnham Road Hastings.
Liveing Archive

19 Ashburnham Rd
Hastings
24 Sep

My dear Emily
I have been through the pedigree again, and have made a list of errata \endash with the exception of the W in Bodew [?] and the wrong date of May [?] Butler's birth I do not know that they are of any consequence and I have noted them to make them correspond with "Bygone Days" \endash I am sure it must be most difficult to get all these details correct and I hope Edward will not consider I am critical \endash but I think he may like to know these trifling details \endash Priscilla Torlesse has been in France for some time, but returned to Ventnor last week \endash I should think it would be best to enquire about the Pedigree I believe she shuts up her house when away \endash and do \endash not know what she arrangers about letters etc.
If you do not get if you do get to Lymington and see Arthur Torlesse be sure to ask to see the
Page 2
locket a very curious and interesting thing he has also the original miniature of Anna Marie Torlesse also a locket evidently by same jewellers. I have worn this in my young days \endash I have the miniature of John Torlesse it will go to Arthur at my death.
The Edward Mosley's were to move to Lymington on October 1 \endash he into a nursing home \endash as his days are numbered \endash she into rooms close by \endash the place is close to the Torlesses \endash I do hope you will get there \endash I feel so indignant for Uncle George \endash but one can do nothing \endash you did not say how you are \endash when you write again please mention both your health's. I hope you purpose coming to Hastings again.
With love to you both
Yours affectionately
Fanny Torlesse



12. Francis Harriet (Fanny) Torlesse: Letter To Emily Liveing, 26 Jul c1928, St Leonards-on-Sea East Sussex.
Liveing Archive

56 Artillery [?] Rd
St Leonards-on-Sea
26 Jul
Dear Emily
There is certainly telepathy between us!
I am returning the M.S. (Wileys) and send Edwards nearly similar account which he made like to keep \endash the one which Wiley had was I feel sure writted out by our cousin, Anna Horridge who was most intimately connected with all that . . . . . show - Edwards further needed her help \endash and I think it quite possible that she may have given it to him \endash I am also enclosing [?]
(x she and [?] Bridges wrote so much alike)
Page 2
some photographs \endash which he may like to have \endash how I wish that old one for a stereoscope could be reproduced \endash it is such a characteristic one of my father \endash sitting with Mr Walsh to hand marvelling at the wonderful magic that was going on
I am also sending him the miniature of his great grandmother \endash which I think he will value \endash I should like him to bequeath it to Wiley who takes a great interest in his family \endash the original was set in a very handsome locket \endash set with pearls \endash my father gave it to my sister Emily Holland \endash and she gave it to Arthur Torlesse.
Page 3
In looking for the M.S. book, I came across a packet labelled "Papers collected by Gent [?] Daddington re pedigree" I don't suppose they are of any interest now \endash but if Edward would care for them of course I will send them.
I do not want to keep any family relics, as when I die, no one will care for old relics.
I hope this will reach safely and that Edward will like to have the miniatures
Always yours lovingly
Cousin Fanny
I had an occultist to see
Page4
me yesterday, as my eyes worry me so \endash he says it is the optic nerve \endash not the lens [?] \endash and with drops etc he thinks can be remedied he also said I need not fear losing my sight, and was to go on using \endash so I can going on again, but see what I write very imperfectly \endash I am just on 90 \endash so must not complain.



13. Bygone Days lives on as a source of history.: Another Snippet of Stoke History by Gerald Smith, 2021, Stoke By Nayland SFK.
Gerald Smith an amateur local historian, contributes articles to the "Community News" for the Suffolk Parishes of Stoke, Nayland, Polstead, and Leavenheath, and the Suffolk Review. In this article he tells of the rural poverty in the early 19thC, and the rural protest's of stack burning etc, and harsh game laws.

He has drawn on Bygone Days and uses sketches by Mary Kate Liveing of the locality.
Thank you Gerald for your permission to publish.

Double click on image to read.








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