THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS Julius Family History

Descendants of John Julius of Nth Yarmouth & St Kitts


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64. Hugh MORE [1479] (Catherine Charles JULIUS31, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

65. William MORE [1480] (Catherine Charles JULIUS31, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

66. Jane MORE [1481] (Catherine Charles JULIUS31, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

67. Catherine Mary MORE [1482] (Catherine Charles JULIUS31, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

68. Henry JULIUS [769] (John James J P39, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 12 May 1799, was baptised on 14 Jul 1799 in St Thomas Middle Island St Kitts, died in 1799, and was buried on 8 Aug 1799 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean.

General Notes:
Register of St Thomas, Middle Island and St Christoher 1729-1832.
Baptised 1799 July 14 Henry s of John James & Susanna Frances Julius b. May 12 1799.
Godfathers: Richard Anderton Esq and Francis Goodwin Robinson Esq by his friend John B Abbott Esq. Godmothers: Mrs Martha Leeson Anderton by her friend Mrs Margaret Abbott and Mrs Mary Frances Robinson by her friend Mrs Katharine Delaney and miss Susanna Grimes by her friend Mrs Susanna Frances Julius.
Ref: Caribbeana Volume 4A page 22.

Register of St Thomas, Middle Island and St Christoher 1729-1832.
Buried 1799 August 8 Henry son of John Julius & Susanna Frances Julius.
Ref: Caribbeana Volume 4A 50 page 52.

69. Anne JULIUS [770] (John James J P39, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Mar 1801, was baptised on 10 May 1801 in St Thomas Middle Island St Kitts, and died in 1801.

General Notes:
Register of St Thomas, Middle Island and St Christoher 1729-1832.
Baptised 1801 May 10 by the Revd. Wm Julius, Anne da. of John James & Susanna Frances Julius. b. March 30 1801

70. Jane Adelaide DARE [1387] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1797 and died on 23 Mar 1872 in Housnlow LON at age 75. She was usually called Aunt Jane.

General Notes:
Jane was known as "Aunt Jane" and did not marry.

Her history is sketchy did she fall on hard times

Death notice of Jane Adelaide DARE: On the 23rd March 1872 at Hounslow Jane Adelaide eldest dau of the late Phocion Dare Esq. Of Woodford Park, Dorset granddaughter of the late William Julius Esq. Of the Manken (Mansion) Estates Island of St. Kitts, niece of the late John Julius Esq. Governor of the said Island. Aunt to A.L. Jackson.
Ref: Oddie Brown

Jane Dare
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1797
Date of Registration: Jan-Feb-Mar 1872
Age at Death:75
Registration district:Brentford
Inferred County:Middlesex
Volume:3a Page:40

Dare Jane 16 April The Will of Jane Dare late of Inwood-road Hounslow in the County of MDX Spinster who died 23 Mar 1872 at Inwood Rd was proved at the Principle Registry by John Edmonds Tozer of Downs Rd Lower Clapton in the said County Warehouseman the sole executor.
effects under L.100.
Ancestry.com

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, The Ceres Isleworth MDX. Jane is recorded as an unmarried boarder in the home of Joseph Hall Independant Minister aged 73 an annuitant born Dorsetshire.

71. William DARE [1388] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1798 and died in 1820 in Berkampore Bengal at age 22.

General Notes:
William had no issue.

72. Lousia Caroline DARE [1389] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1802 and died on 7 May 1882 in Scarborough, Yorkshire at age 80.

General Notes:
Louisa's address at her death was 8 Alfred St Scarborough Yorkshire



Lousia married Lieut William Augustus LOADER [1393] on 28 Mar 1821 in St Lukes Chelsea LND. William was born in 1800, died in 1821 at age 21, and was buried on 27 Nov 1821 in Wallajahbad Madras.

General Notes:
William was a Lieut in the 12 Regt. Madras Native Infantry.
Ref: Marriage Certificate Augusta Louisa Loader.

There is conflicting data on the year of William's death 1821 or 1822, This tree has adopted a burial date of 27 Nov 1821 meanwhile. His rank at death is described as an Ensign in the Asiatic Journal, at his daughters marriage, a Lieut.
2nd Lieut replaced Ensign as a rank in the 19thC.

Asiatic Intelligence Bombay
29 July 1822
- At Wallajahbad, (Madras) of the Cholera, Ensign Loader, of the 1st bat. 6th reg., and lately doing duty with 3d Light Infantry.
Ref: The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany, Volume 14 pg 96 July 1822
http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=SMrpDhHb1k8C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Loader
India, Deaths and Burials
Name: Loader
Gender:Male
Burial Date:27 Nov 1821
Burial Place:Wallajahbad, Madras, India
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: B00200-5 , System Origin: India-EASy , GS Film number: 521839
Ref: <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FGPG-F2R> :

Louisa Loader (nee Dare), departed from Madras (with her daughter) on 4 August 1822, this may support William Loaders death in July 1882.
Ref: J Aitken 2015


The child from this marriage was:

+ 101 F    i. Augusta Louisa LOADER [1394] was born on 13 Feb 1822 in Madras India, was baptised on 29 Jul 1822 in Madras India, died on 9 May 1899 in Talford St Rockhampton QLD at age 77, and was buried on 9 May 1899 in Rockhampton Cemetery.

Lousia next married Paul Mildmay PELL [1395], son of Paul Francis PELL of Tupholme LIN [21542], on 7 Jul 1830 in Long Ashton SOM. Paul was born on 30 Dec 1806 in Frieston LIN and died in Oct 1873 in Nth Riding Yorkshire at age 66.

General Notes:
Paul Mildmay. Pell
College: EMMANUEL Entered: Michs. 1825 Adm. pens. at EMMANUEL, Feb. 11, 1825. [S. of Paul Francis, of Tupholme, near Bardney, Lincs. B. Dec. 30, 1806, at Frieston, Lincs. School, Louth Grammar.] Matric. Michs. 1825. Col., Royal South Lincs. Militia. Died, s.p. , at Scarborough in 1873. (Goulding, Some Louth Grammar School Boys; Lincs. Pedigrees ; P. B. G. Binnall.)
Ref: Cambridge Alumni.

Paul was a singleman when he married Louisa, he died s.p.

73. Frances DARE [1390] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1803 and died on 17 May 1825 in Ashton England at age 22. Another name for Frances was Fanny.

74. John Julius DARE [1391] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1805 and died on 12 Feb 1850 in New Amsterdam Berbice British Guiana at age 45.

John married Louisa Antoinette de St. FELIX [1401], daughter of de St. FELIX [1487] and Mary OSBORNE [1488], on 13 May 1840 in All Saints Berbice British Guiana. Louisa was born in Jul 1821 in Walton ESS and died on 24 Jun 1882 at age 60.

Marriage Notes:
Ref http://www.vc.id.au/tb/bgcolonistsD.html

General Notes:
JULIUS JOTTINGS. Jan 1902 No 6: refers to Louisa's Grandfather.
Extract of Letter from Miss Jane Dare.
" Dr. de St. Felix was attached to the Court of Louis XVI., and fled from France at the breaking out of the Revolution.
He accumulated large property in Demerara, British Guiana and married a Miss Osborne, of Upshire Hill, near Waltham, Essex.
Two of their sons entered the Army, one in the 27th Regiment, the other, Anthony, in the Guards.
The former married his cousin, a Mary Osborne, born in 1800, and had three children, Louis, a daughter who married a Mr. Campbell, and Louise Antoinette, who has inherited a little of the property of her grandfather, Mr. Osborne.
Mr. St. Felix, of the 27th Regiment, was very intimate with Prince Louis, afterwards King of Sardinia, who took much interest in and provided for Louis St. Felix, who could only speak Italian and French.
Louis St. Felix paid a long visit to England in 1857, and died at Chamberry in 1859. Louisa Antoinette St Felix was born in July, 1821, and in July, 1840, married Mr. John Julius Dare. Her mother, Mary St. Felix nee Osborne, died at Turin, in 1832.
The Dare's Swiss property comes through Dean Abbott, who was related to the Osbornes."

Dare Louise Antoinette: 25 Aug. The Will as contained in Writings A B & C with a codicil of Louise Antoinette Dare late of 119 Adelaide Rd Hampstead in the County of MDX Widow who died 24 June 1888 at 119 Adelaide Rd was proved at the Principle Registry by George Julius Dare of 13 Kingdon Rd West Hampstead in the sd County collector of Coal Dues and the son and William Ramsay Scott of 51 Belsize Park Gardens Hampstead merchant the nephew two of the Executors
Personal Estate L623 6s 11d Resworn May 1889 L1456 6s 11d
Probate Callendars

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Hampstead LND MDX. Louisa is recorded as head of house a widow aged 59 living on private means born Walton ESS

Children from this marriage were:

+ 102 F    i. Mary Geraldine DARE [1402] was born in 1841 and died in 1848 at age 7.

+ 103 F    ii. Nina Sarah Louisa DARE [1407] was born in 1842 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 16 May 1918 in Teignmouth DEV at age 76.

+ 104 F    iii. Jane Anna DARE [1403] was born in 1843 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 19 Dec 1882 in 119 Adelaide Rd Hampstead LON NW at age 39.

+ 105 M    iv. Hon. John Julius DARE E.C. [1404] was born in 1846 in George Town British Guiana and died on 12 Mar 1896 in Duncairn Manor Rd Bournmouth at age 50.

+ 106 F    v. Louisa Antoinette DARE [1405] was born in 1847 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 22 Nov 1917 in Teignmouth at age 70.

+ 107 M    vi. Capt George Julius DARE [1406] was born about 1849 in Jamaica West Indies and died between 1901 and 1934.

75. George Julius DARE R.N. [1392] (Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1807 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 11 Jan 1846 in Farnham SRY, died on 27 Sep 1856 in Buccleugh Tce Upper Clapton LON at age 49, and was buried on 29 Sep 1856 in Nunhead Cem Linden Grove Upper Clapton LND.

General Notes:
George was on the Royal Navy list, he resigned and bought a sailing ship the "John Bagshaw", trading to the Far East. He settled in Singapore.


George was an adult when baptised in 1846, this was noted in the register. His cousin Henry Julius was curate at Farnham at that time, register illegible, Henry buried him 10 years later.

Capt George Julius Dare
Lived in Dorset. Source: Note from Brian MacDonald: Captain George Julius Dare R.N.
SOURCE: p 243 History of Hongkong Shanghai Bank, HH King. "Captain George Julius Dare, a well known Singapore resident who died in England in 1856"
An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore:
From the Foundation of the settlement under the honourable the East India Company on February 6th, 1819 to the transfer of the Colonial Office as part of the Colonial Possessions of the Crown on Arpil 1st, 1867. Charles Burton Buckley. Kuala Lumpur, University of Malaya Press, 1965. p. 373 Captain George Julius Dare was a well known Singaporean. He had been a navigating officer, in those days called the master in the Navy, and married at the Cape when on the Station. His grandfather, Mr. Julius, then helped him to build a vessel of his own, and he afterwards built others, trading out to China with three different vessels of his own. In this year he was passing through Singapore, on his way from Bombay to China, and left his wife on shore at a boarding house kept by Mrs. Clarke at the south west corner of North Bridge road and Middle Road, where the baby Julius, who has been mentioned, was born. About two months afterwards Mrs. Dare left in the unfortunate Viscount Melbourne for Macao, with the two children, to join her husband there. Captain Dare sold his vessel for a very handsome price, remitting home the money at the exchange of about six shillings to a dollar! In 1845 he went home, and returned and settled down in Singapore in February 1848. These particulars are found in the evidence he gave in favour of Sir James Brooke, on the famous enquiry related under the year 1854. He commenced business in Singapore as a shipchandler and commission agent in the Square. There were then four shipchandlers' firms, namely, W.S. Duncan, John Steel & Co., Whampoa & Co., and Mr. Dare . . . . . In 1855 Mr. Dare went to England, leaving a man in charge, whose name there is no necessity to mention. He was a very plausible man, with a particularly pleasant manner, but he turned out untrustworthy and ruined the business, as well as his employer. Mr. Dare died in London, 50 years of age in 1856. He had a family of nine children, one of his daughters married Mr. William Ramsay Scott; another Captain C.J. Bolton, very well known and a great favourite in Singapore, who commanded Jardine Matheson & Co.'s crack opium schooner, and when steam came, the Glenartney. He is now living in Essex. Another daughter was married to Mr. Whitworth Allen who was in Singapore and Penang for many years, now retired from business. Another to Mr. Jackson, now Sir Thomas Jackson K.C.M.G., of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank; and another daughter to Dr. William Hartigan of Hongkong.
SOURCE: Heather McAlister: "Of the Honbi. East India Company"

Burial Record 9339 - George Julius Dare abode Buccleugh Tce Upper Clapton buried Sept 29 1856 aged 50 yrs buried by H R Julius Curate of Wrecclesham.
Nunhead Cemetery Linden Grove LON
Ref for burial date: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/Amy_Lloyd_History_p2.htm

George married Sarah Shrieve PARKE [1412], daughter of William Tollemache PARKE [7719] and Elizabeth BUSCHE [7728], on 22 Jan 1839 in St Pauls Cape Province South Africa. Sarah was born in 1817 in Cape Town and died on 10 Sep 1879 in Yokohama Japan at age 62. The cause of her death was cholera.

General Notes:
Amy Lloyd's Jackson Family History.
George Julius Dare married Sarah Shrieve Parke in 1839. He was in the Royal Navy and when his ship was in Capetown, met Sarah Parke of Newlands, Rondebosch. She and her sister were married on the same day, the sister to Captain Sedgwick of the ship "Addingham". Among the visitors present were Sir Harry and Lady Smith. Soon after his marriage, George Julius left the Navy to command a ship in the fleet of his uncles who were trading in the East. He became a partner and his headquarters were in Singapore. When they had two children, his wife went out to join him in the sailing ship "Viscount Melbourne", she was the only woman on board. A few days out from Singapore the ship was wrecked on the Luconia Shoal in the China Sea. Everyone abandoned ship in rive boats. They were attacked by pirates but managed to get away, and after great hardships in an open boat for thirteen days, were picked up and brought to Singapore. The youngest son, Julius, was thought dead and nearly dropped in the sea but the ship came just in time. Years after in Japan she died nursing him of cholera end both were buried in the Cemetary at Yokahama in 1879. The family returned to England from Singapore when Captain Dare was suffering from severe blood poisoning of the hand. They lived at Upper Clapham till he died. His widow then went back to South Africa with seven of her children, leaving George and Julius the two eldest who were at school, with their Aunt Pell. They afterwards went out to Singapore in business , and later to Japan where their mother and remaining unmarried children joined them.
George Julius Dare married Sarah Shrieve Parke in 1839. He was in the Royal Navy and when his ship was in Capetown, met Sarah Parke of Newlands, Rondebosch. She and her sister were married on the same day, the sister to Captain Sedgwick of the ship "Addingham". Among the visitors present were Sir Harry and Lady Smith. Soon after his marriage, George Julius left the Navy to command a ship in the fleet of his uncles who were trading in the East. He became a partner and his headquarters were in Singapore. When they had two children, his wife went out to join him in the sailing ship "Viscount Melbourne", she was the only woman on board. A few days out from Singapore the ship was wrecked on the Luconia Shoal in the China Sea. Everyone abandoned ship in rive boats. They were attacked by pirates but managed to get away, and after great hardships in an open boat for thirteen days, were picked up and brought to Singapore. The youngest son, Julius, was thought dead and nearly dropped in the sea but the ship came just in time. Years after in Japan she died nursing him of cholera end both were buried in the Cemetary at Yokahama in 1879. The family returned to England from Singapore when Captain Dare was suffering from severe blood poisoning of the hand. They lived at Upper Clapham till he died. His widow then went back to South Africa with seven of her children, leaving George and Julius the two eldest who were at school, with their Aunt Pell. They afterwards went out to Singapore in business , and later to Japan where their mother and remaining unmarried children joined them.
George Julius Dare married Sarah Shrieve Parke in 1839. He was in the Royal Navy and when his ship was in Capetown, met Sarah Parke of Newlands, Rondebosch. She and her sister were married on the same day, the sister to Captain Sedgwick of the ship "Addingham". Among the visitors present were Sir Harry and Lady Smith. Soon after his marriage, George Julius left the Navy to command a ship in the fleet of his uncles who were trading in the East. He became a partner and his headquarters were in Singapore. When they had two children, his wife went out to join him in the sailing ship "Viscount Melbourne", she was the only woman on board. A few days out from Singapore the ship was wrecked on the Luconia Shoal in the China Sea. Everyone abandoned ship in rive boats. They were attacked by pirates but managed to get away, and after great hardships in an open boat for thirteen days, were picked up and brought to Singapore. The youngest son, Julius, was thought dead and nearly dropped in the sea but the ship came just in time. Years after in Japan she died nursing him of cholera end both were buried in the Cemetary at Yokahama in 1879. The family returned to England from Singapore when Captain Dare was suffering from severe blood poisoning of the hand. They lived at Upper Clapham till he died. His widow then went back to South Africa with seven of her children, leaving George and Julius the two eldest who were at school, with their Aunt Pell. They afterwards went out to Singapore in business , and later to Japan where their mother and remaining unmarried children joined them.
Ref: Ancestry. http://trees.ancestry.co.uk/tree/3368802/person/524972900/story/9f039e61-2358-415b-8278-08519d74c803?src=search

THE PIRATES AND MRS. DARE OF SINGAPORE. 1841
In the autumn of 1841, Sarah Strieve Dare was decidedly pregnant and while staying at a boarding house kept by "Mrs. Clarke at the south west corner of North Bridge Road and Middle Road" gave birth to her second son, John Julius Dare (later known as "Julius"). About two months after his birth, she sailed on the Viscount Melbourne - young children in tow - to join her husband in Macao.
The ship that she and her two first-borne children were travelling on, the Vincent Melbourne had left Singapore for Macao on a Saturday, 25th December 1841. Four days later they were shipwrecked on the Luconia shoal off Brunei in Borneo. The passengers and crew left their crippled ship in five boats.
The lifeboat, which ferried Sarah and her two children to supposed safety, also had fourteen Europeans and thirteen natives and servants on board. Likely not included in count of the Europeans would be baby Julius, a couple of months old, and his older brother, George, barely two years old. Singapore was 600 miles away. We can assume rain because the following recorded story refers to the powder for the guns being too damp to fire. One would assume that travelling this distance in "the boats" with two infants would be frightening enough, but worse was to come. A junior officer of the Viscount Melbourne recorded the subsequent events in great detail:
About six a.m. as we were all assembled in the launch, hearing the captain read prayers, we saw a proa bearing down towards us. The captain ordered us to take the serang (boatswain over the lascars), along with us and speak to them, to learn if they were friendly; for we much feared they were pirates. If there was danger, we were to hoist a signal, and they would come to our assistance.
We accordingly started to meet them; we waved a white cloth as a token of amity, and they did the same. When we got alongside of them we spoke, the serang acting as interpreter; and they said that they came to conduct us safely in-shore, and that one boat was there already. So, by this we suspected that they had taken them prisoners, and wished to entice the rest of us to the same fate. They now said that they wished to see the captain; so we pulled back, and they soon came up with the launch, where all were ready, cutlass in hand, to receive them, in case of treachery.
They tried all they could to persuade us to go with them, and finally began to make fast to the launch with a rattan rope. When they found that we would not go with them, they assumed a very threatening aspect; so there being so few of us who could fight, and our firearms being useless on account of the preceding rain, the captain gave the order to cut and run. The cook with one blow of his cutlass severed their rope, and we all made sail.
When they saw this, they made sail in chase of us. We gained upon them at first, when to our surprise, they opened fire on us, first from their rifles, and finally from a swivel, the last shot passing through a blanket that was rigged as a screen from the sun at the back of the captain and passengers. It passed betwixt the captain and Mrs. Dare, and then scraping a piece off the skull of one of the lascars, who sat in the bow of the boat, it buried itself in the water. Another shot, cut away the leech of the second cutter's lug.
They gained rapidly on our boat, we not being so well manned or skilful as the rest. When within a few fathoms they made signs for us to desist pulling, at the same time taking aim at us. Mr. Parkhouse, who was pulling the next oar to me, when he saw the rifle pointed towards us, dropped his oar, exclaiming, "Good God! There is one of us gone." It was of no use persisting further, so they ran alongside.
The proa was about the size of a sloop, neatly built of teak, but cleverly covered with matting and bark, to make her appearance as lubberly and clumsy as possible. She had two long straight poles for masts, and a large lug made of matting to each. Besides this, they pulled fifteen sweeps a side.
When they first ran alongside the launch, there appeared to be only five or six half-naked fellows, who were fishing; but now her decks were crowded with Malays, armed and dressed in fancy costumes. Krises, very dangerous, crooked poisoned swords, clubs, spears and guns, altogether made them have a very ferocious appearance. They jumped into our boat; seized upon us; and would, I think, have dispatched us at once, had it not been for the interference of one who seemed to be their chief, who dashing away the swords of the most forward, ordered all but two to get into their own craft and to proceed in chase of our other boats, which by this time had got pretty far in advance.
They accordingly set their sails, and stood for the other boats, whilst we were obliged to steer for the land. Our preserver, a gentlemanly thief, was still with us, and he now began to lay his hands upon all our things, tying them all up in a blanket. But when those in the proa saw this, they, thinking, I suppose, that they were being sent after a shadow, whilst he was making sure of the substance, turned back, and running along-side, began to clear the boat of everything - clothes, provisions, and even our drop of water, about two gallons, for the sake of the keg. As they took our muskets, pistols and other arms, they repeatedly, jumped for joy, exclaiming "bagus" (very good).
When they came to our sextant, they seemed very much puzzled to know what it was, and made signs to me to show them the use of it, which I did. We repeatedly made signs to the chief to let us go after the boats, which by this time were nearly our of sight; to which he nodded his head assentingly, and shook us by the hand. Mr. Parkhouse now very foolishly pulled a small bag from his pocket, containing a fifty rupee note and some silver, which he gave to the chief, at the same time as pointing to our other boats. Directly he got this, the rest began to strip us for more.
They took his watch, Mr. Dainty's watch and ring, but on me they only found a Dutch silver piece. There was a case of herring paste, which they made me taste before they would take it. They also threw our bag of biscuit into the water. When having taken everything, they now, to our great delight, told us we might go. They gave us a small basket of sago, and about three pints of water.
At this point, I stop to imagine the mix of fear and rage that I would feel to be left with an infant and toddler and only three pints of water on an open boat - water which would also have to meet the needs of twenty-seven adults.
The chief politely shook hands with us all; then stepping on board the proa they made sail towards the shore. Luckily for us, one of our boats was just in sight, that containing Mr. Penfold, who had offered the captain, if he would give him six Englishmen, he would rescue us, or share our fate, for they never thought we should return. Guess then our joy, when we saw him lying-to, though a great way off. We made sail, and stood towards him, pulling at the same time with all our might, uncertain for some time whether we gained upon them or not. Had it been night, we should have missed them, and must, unprovided as we were, have died a miserable death; worse, indeed, than the one from which we had escaped.
We came up with him fast, and in two hours after leaving the proa, ran alongside of them, and pleased enough they were to see us. Just as we reached them, away went our mast, and the cutter took us in tow. We soon came up with the launch, when the captain welcomed us heartily. Our boat not being worth repairing was condemned. Half of our crew went in the second cutter. Mr. Dainty and myself into the launch. The sails and oars being taken out of her, she was scuttled, and cast adrift.
We arrived at Singapore at about three p.m., after being twelve days in our boats. The second cutter had got in early in the morning. The first cutter did not get into Singapore until a fortnight after we left, having been to Sambas. The lascars, who deserted us, had been taken as slaves, and did not regain their liberty until twelve months after.
On January 17th, a boat was seen coming into Singapore River to Mr. Johnston's landing steps at Tanjjong Tangkap. Dr. Little and Mr. Read saw the boat coming up to the steps and the former helped Sarah Dare ashore with her two boys, George and Julius. They had been thirteen days in the open boat at sea with few provisions and had lived to tell. Sarah would go on to give birth to seven more live children, one of whom would become the wife of Sir Thomas JACKSON.
SOURCES:
Buckley, Charles Burton. An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore: From the Foundation of the settlement under the honourable the East India Company on February 6th, 1819 to the transfer of the Colonial Office as part of the Colonial Possessions of the Crown on April 1st, 1867. Kuala Lumpur, University of Malaya Press, 1965.
Collis, Maurice. Wayfoong: The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, Faber and Faber, 1965
King, Frank H.H. History of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation .Cambridge University Press, 1987
Sharon Oddie Brown a Canadian author is researching the Parke and other Northern Ireland families and their activities in Asia
Ref http://www.user.dccnet.com/s.brown/index.html

Research Notes:
Sarah was the fourth child.

Marriage register of St Paul's Rondebosch:
"George Julius Dare, born in the County of Suffolk in England, Bachelor & Sarah Shreeve Parke, born in the County of Sussex in England, Spinster, were married by Banns in Rondebosch Church, on Tuesday this Twenty Second day of January One thousand eight hundred & thirty nine, By me, Holt Okes D.D., Officiating Chaplain. This marriage was solemnized by us:
G.J.Dare Sarah Shrieve Parke
In presence of W Menzies H G Smith Col Wm Parke George Napier Charlotte? Eliza Parke"

Death Ref: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=AHN&db=silverbowl&id=I6675


Children from this marriage were:

+ 108 M    i. George Mildmay DARE [1448] was born on 22 Mar 1840 in Peckham LND, was baptised on 19 Jun 1840 in St Giles Camberwell LON, and died on 15 Dec 1907 in The Lake Singapore at age 67.

+ 109 M    ii. John Julius DARE [1450] was born on 19 Sep 1841 in North Bridge Rd Singapore and died on 5 Sep 1879 in Yokohama Japan at age 37.

+ 110 F    iii. Blanch Emily DARE [1414] was born on 24 Sep 1843 in Singapore and died on 18 Mar 1920 in Raeburn Tadworth SRY at age 76.

+ 111 F    iv. Louisa Caroline DARE [1419] was born about 1845 in West Indies, died on 1 Jul 1870 on Board "S S Mooltan" aged about 25, and was buried at Sea.

+ 112 F    v. Sarah Elizabeth DARE [1423] was born on 17 Apr 1847 in Bombay India.

+ 113 F    vi. Annie Maria DARE [1429] was born on 2 Jul 1849 in Singapore, was baptised on 19 Sep 1849 in Singapore, and died on 14 Jun 1931 in Bexhill-on-Sea SSX at age 81.

+ 114 F    vii. Amelia Lydia DARE [1438] was born on 2 Feb 1851 in Singapore and died on 10 Apr 1944 in Herringfleet Hall Lowestoft at age 93.

+ 115 M    viii. Alfred Henry DARE [1445] was born on 26 May 1853 in Singapore and died on 23 May 1924 in Newdigate House Nursing Home Bexhill SSX at age 70.

+ 116 F    ix. Florence Gertrude DARE [1413] was born on 9 Jan 1855 and died on 28 Jun 1938 in Oatlands Park Hotel Weybridge SRY at age 83.


76. Emily JULIUS [775] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Jul 1796 in Bristol SOM, was baptised on 10 Aug 1796 in St Michaels Bristol SOM, and died on 31 Jul 1876 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng. at age 80.

General Notes:
Emily was not married, she looked after her grandmother and father in their old age, she was known as "Aunt Pem".

Baptism FHS film 1595697 - to search 2009

Julius Emily 22 August 1876
The Will of Emily Julius late of Maze Hill House St Leonards-on-Sea SSX spinster who died 31 July 1876 at Maze Hill House was proved at the Principle Registry 22 Aug 1876 by Julia Henrietta Quilter of Black Lake Cottage nr Farnham SRY spinster the neice and surviving Executor. Effects under L3000
Ref: National Probate Calendars

Research Notes:
An alternative birth date for Emily is 31 July 1793.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Emily is recorded as aged 35 not born SRY

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Emily is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 50 born Bristol

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Richmond Lodge Farnham SRY. Emily is recorded as a daughter aged 63 unmarried born Bristol SOM.

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Hastings. Emily is recorded as head of house aged 74 a single Lady born Bristol. Also in the house were three servants.

77. Richard Henry JULIUS [4469] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1798 in Berhampur Bengal (Registered In London), was baptised on 29 Dec 1798 in Berhampur Bengal, died on 20 Jul 1799 in Berhampur Bengal at age 1, and was buried on 20 Jul 1799 in Berhampur Bengal.

General Notes:
Baptism Berhampore.
Julius Richard Henry: 29 Dec 1798.
Son of George Charles, Asst-Surg. 14th NI; and his wife Isabella Maria.
Ref: N/1 Vol 5 394

Burial Berhampore.
Julius Richard Henry: 20 Jul 1799.
Son of George Charles Julius Assistant Surgeon of the 14th Native Infantry, an infant.
British Library
N/1/5 ff.394, 257
Bengal
Ref: Bengal Ecclesiastical Records: http://indiafamily.bl.uk/UI/FullDisplay.aspx?RecordId=014-000151667



78. Arabella Maria JULIUS [777] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Feb 1800 in Berhampur Bengal (Reg In London), was baptised on 1 Jul 1801, died on 3 Jun 1885 in Beverley Yorkshire at age 85, and was buried on 8 Jun 1885 in Canwick Lincolnshire.

General Notes:
Birth.
Julius Arabella Maria:
16 Feb 1800. Berhampore.
Baptism.
01 Jul 1801 Berhampore
Daughter of Charles, Surg.and Isabella Maria his wife.
Ref: N/1/6 f.21
Ref: Bengal Ecclesiastical Records: http://indiafamily.bl.uk/UI/FullDisplay.aspx?RecordId=014-000151664

George Quilter, Alt Clerk of this parish, of Canwick of the county of the City of Lincoln, bachelor and Arabella Maria Julius of this parish spinster were married under licence with consent of parents on 14 October 1818 by me Danl C Delafosse A M Offg Minister.
George Quilter.
Arabella Maria Julius.
Witnesses: Emily Julius, Amelia Cowel (sic) Julius.
Marriage Register, St Mary Magdalen, Richmond.

Marriages - On 14th inst, Rev George Quilter MA Vicar of Canwick
Lincs, to Arabella Maria 2nd daur of G C Julius Esq., of Richmond Surrey.
The Times, Thursday, Oct 15, 1818; pg. 3; Issue 10488; col F
Also reported in the Examiner 18 October 1818 and Gentlemans Magazine. Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg. 334.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. c

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Arabella is recorded as a wife aged 61 born East Indies

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, New Walk Beverly YKS. Arabella is recorded as head of house a clergymans widow aged 81 born India

Arabella married Rev George QUILTER [778], son of James QUILTER [1163] and Mary Anne VOKINS [1164], on 14 Oct 1818 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY. George was born on 15 Jun 1793 in Monken Hadley LON, was baptised on 15 Jul 1793 in Monken Hadley MDX, died on 15 Nov 1871 at age 78, and was buried in All Saints Canwick Lincolnshire.

General Notes:
George was sent to the school of Robert Delafosse in Richmond SRY.

Quilter George: Entered, Michs. 1811 pens. (age 18) at PETERHOUSE, Mar. 29, 1810. Of Middlesex. [A younger s. of James, of Hadley (d. 1818, aged 64), and his wife Mary Ann.] School, Richmond, Surrey. Matric Michs. 1811; B.A. 1815; M.A. 1818. Fellow, 1816. Ord. deacon (Ely) 1816; priest, 1817. V. of Canwick, Lincs., 1818-71. Died there in 1871. Father of Henry K. (1857) and the next. (T. A. Walker, 385; Crockford; Clergy List; P. B. G. Binnall; Cass, Monken Hadley, 170).
Cambridge University Alumni

George is reported as attending a meeting of the Irish Society at Lincoln in the company of other clerics.
Hull Packet 10 March 1837.

I am in the process of transcribing a diary of my wife's great great grandfather the

The Diary of Revd Thomas Smith of Brailes, WAR. 1843
March 13. Clerical Meeting at Harmston. Rev Clarke's
April At Canwick. Rev Quilter
Ref: V Maldoom.

A prebendal stall at Lincoln Cathedral has been confirred upon the Rev George Quilter M.A. of St Peters College Cambridge, vicar of Canwick, near Lincoln. Mr Quilter took his B.A. degree in 1815, and is nearly eighty years of age.
Pall Mall Gazette 23 Dec 1870.

Julius Jottings. No 2. April 1900.
A REMINISCENCE OF THE REV. GEORGE QUILTER,
Being an extract from a local paper.
The departure of one of the oldest and most deservedly respected of the clergy of the Diocese of Lincoln, the Rev. George Quilter, Prebendary of Lincoln and Vicar of Canwick, from the scene of his labour, carried on for more than half-a-century, calls for a brief notice.
Having taken his degree at Peterhouse in 1815, the same, year as Dean Wadington, of Durham, and Dr. Archdall, the recently deceased Master of Emmanuel, Mr. Quilter was ordained by Bishop Sparke of Ely, and in 1818 was appointed by the Mercer's Company to the living of Canwick. It is an interesting fact that one of the candidates for the living was the Rev. Richard Sibthorp (whose vacillations between the Churches of England and Rome form such a curious page in the religious history of the last quarter of a century ), whose brother, the once famous Colonel Sibthorp, M.P., was the owner of Canwick Hall.
A fast friendship soon arose between the successful and disappointed competitors, which no change of faith could impair, and one of those who walked nearest to his old friends coffin at the funeral was the Rev. Richard Sibthorp, Roman Catholic Priest, of Nottingham.
Mr. Quilter was one of the assiduous workers who, without attempting great things, by the singleness of their aim, utter self-forgetfulness, and unvarying Christian love, effect more for Christ and His Church than many whose names are far more widely known. It has been often said of him that "he worked before it was the fashion to work," and gave an example of the laborious, affectionate, Christian pastor, when perhaps such were rarer than they now are.
For some years Mr. Quilter took pupils, among whom was Admiral Eden. His village lying on the brow of the hill overlooking Lincoln, within a short walk of that city, he was enabled to devote his spare time to good works among its inhabitants. The dispensary numbered him among its founders and to the last he was one of its most active managers. The workhouse and hospital benefited by his gratuitous ministrations to their poor and suffering inmates. Never, indeed, was there a call of duty or charity which was not heeded, and, as far as possible, obeyed by Mr. Quilter. Almost his last act was to send a cheque towards the restoration of St. Mary's Church in Lincoln.
Last year Mr. Quilter received a well merited recognition of his labours from the Bishop of Lincoln, in the appointment to a Prebendal Stall in the Cathedral. He loved the Minster, and rejoiced to attend its services as a devout worshipper, and it is pleasant to feel that, for the last year of his life, he could do so as a member of its foundation.
Mr. Quilter's death was what one could have wished for him: a sudden easy passage to the other world, not preceded by sickness or accompanied by pain. On the morning of Wednesday, the 15th inst., he was on his way to family prayer, when he fell, and in a moment his spirit had joined the blest in Paradise.
Sint nostrae animae cum illo. His body was interred on Tuesday, the 21st, beneath the ivied walls of his little church, a large number of the clergy and leading laity of the city testifying their respect by their attendance. The service at the grave was read by Mr Quilter's old friend, the Rev. Edward Wilson, formerly Fellow of St John's Vicar of Nocton, and Prebendary of Lincoln. The pall was borne by Chancellor Massingberd, Precentor Variables, Prebendary Blenkin, Rev. T. S. Nelson (Rural Dean), etc. Great Tom was tolled from the Cathedral tower during the ceremony, and at Evensong Spohr's anthem, Blest are the Departed," was sung by the Cathedral choir, and the Dead March in Samson played.

Sir Francis Hill writes - George Quilter was deeply involved with the Lincoln branch of the British & Foreign Bible Society, formed in 1816, this was the first clear expression of the evanagelical movement in Lincoln. It received support within the lay members of Lincoln society, including the Sibthorp family of Canwick, a few country clergymen lent their support, including Mr Quilter of Canwick - most of the clergy however, and in particular the cathedral clergy, kept aloof from the movement. Mr George Quilter, the rector of Canwick, together with Mr Bergne, the Independent minister, launched the Lincoln Temperence Society in 1833.
Ref: Georgian Lincoln and Victorian Lincoln by Sir Francis Hill (published by Cambridge Univ. Press 1966 & 1974 respectively)

The Lincolnshire Chronicle of 17 November, deaths column: Quilter, on the 15th November, at Conwick, suddenly, the Rev. George Quilter Prebendary of Lincoln Catherdral and Vicar of Canwick, aged 78.

Also reported: "We announce with extreme regret that the Rev G. Quilter, vicar of Canwiok, we believe for a long period of 54 years, died on Wednesday morning last. The deceased gentleman was appointed to the prebendal stall of St Mary, Crackpool during the past year, and few appointments have given more satisfaction.Mr Quilter was highly respected by all to whom he was known, and was a liberal benefactor to the City charities, especially to the Dispensary, in which institution he took a very great interest.Mr Quilter died somewhat suddenly, for on Tuesday last he was in Lincoln, apparently in good health".

The Lincolnshire Chronicle of 24 November 1871 writes:
"The funeral of the justly respected Prebendary Quilter took place on Wednesday last at 12 o'clock. He was buried where he had lived, in the midst of his people, whom he had tendered with fatherly care for more than half a century - beneath the walls of the church in which he had fed his flock with the word of life, led their devotions, and imparted to them the blessed sacraments of Christ.
The funeral was as largely attended as was to be expected from the
universal esteem and affection entertained for Mr Quilter in Lincoln and its neighbourhood. The church was filled with his parishioners, and an omnibus conveyed to the service the aged inmates of St Annes Bede Houses, of which institution the reverend gentleman was one of the oldest trustees.The pall was borne by the following clergymen, robed in surplices, hood and stole: the precentor, the chancellor, the Revs T.S Nelson, G.B. Blenkir, F.B. Bleokir, and W.T Hathway. Among the clergy present, who wore surplices, were the Revs (and here it lists 11 persons, one of them being Richard Sibthorp of Nottingham). Among the laity we may mention the Hon. A.L. Melville,
Coningsby Sibtborp esq., F. Burton esq., Messrs W. Ashley, J. Norton, R. Trotter, and Dr G.M. Lowe. The coffin was preceded by the surpliced clergy, who were immediately followed by Dr George Lowe and the Rev. Richard Sibthorp, the old and beloved friend of the deceased. The introductory sentences and the service at the grave were read by the Rev. E Wilson of Nocton, and the psalms and lessons by the curate of Canwick, the Rev. Haskett-Smith. The venerable of Mr Quilter supported bv her son the Rev. Frederick Quilter, and others of her sons and daughters, followed the remains of her husband to the grave.
In additon to those above enumerated, we observed amongst the crowd that surrounded the grave the faces of many with whom the late vicar had been associated in deeds of trust, benevolence, or charity, and to whom he had been, as he always was to all who came personally in contact with him, a gentleman, minister, and true friend. Last Sunday afternoon the Dead March was played after service in the Minister, and on Wednesday afternoon Spoirs beautiful anthem, 'Blest are the departed' was sung as a tribute of respect to Prebendary Quilters memory."

After the death of the Rev. George Quilter. his son, the Rev. Frederick Wm Quilter was put forward to the Mercers Company, the patron, to take over the incumbency.
A petition to this effect was signed by every person in the parish and submitted to the Mercers' Company. At that time the Rev. Frederick Quilter was the vicar of Leyton Essex. However, despite the pressure from the local community, the Mercers Company, voted in a mercer, the Rev. James Watney, of the famous beer family.

The Lincolnshire Chronicle of 1 December 1871 reports that a resolution was passed at an ordinary monthly meeting of the Committee of the Lincoln General Dispensary, as follows. "that this Board cannot allow the lamented death of the Rev Prebendary George Quilter to pass by without tendering to his widow and family the acknowledgment of Mr Quilter's very long and valuable services, rendered by him to this institution for a period of upwards of 15 years, and expressing their sympathy with them in this their domestic trial."

Research Notes:
Baptism IGI FHL Films 0568853, 0579288, 6903837.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. George is recorded as head of house married aged 57 Vicar of Canwick born Hadley MDX

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Canwick Vicarage LIN. George is recorded as head of house aged 67 married Vicar of Canwick born Headley MDX

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Islington St Michael London. George (Ann?) Quilter is shown born 1791 Epsom SRY Head of family also in the house was Charlotte Quilter born 1834 Ipswich SFK Daughter.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 117 M    i. Archdale Julius QUILTER [1175] was born on 28 Jul 1819 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 29 Aug 1819 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 30 Apr 1853 in Calcutta India at age 33.

+ 118 F    ii. Arabella Emily QUILTER [1176] was born on 10 May 1821 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 17 Jun 1821 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 12 Dec 1904 in Paignton Devonshire at age 83.

+ 119 F    iii. Julia Henrietta QUILTER [1182] was born on 5 Dec 1822 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 19 Jan 1823 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died in 1881 at age 59.

+ 120 F    iv. Mary Anne QUILTER [1183] was born on 2 Jul 1824 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 9 Aug 1824 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 27 Mar 1915 at age 90.

+ 121 M    v. George QUILTER [1191] was born on 3 Mar 1826, was baptised on 11 May 1826 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 8 Feb 1849 at age 22.

+ 122 M    vi. Cameron Aeneas QUILTER [1192] was born on 10 Aug 1827, was baptised on 10 Sep 1827 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 23 Feb 1853 in Birr IRL at age 25.

+ 123 F    vii. Katherine Ansilla QUILTER [1193] was born on 31 Jul 1829 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 4 Sep 1829 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 17 Apr 1917 at age 87.

+ 124 F    viii. Sarah Connington QUILTER [1198] was born on 30 Mar 1831, was baptised on 18 May 1831 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 4 Jun 1832 at age 1.

+ 125 M    ix. Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD [1199] was born on 10 Jun 1832 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 27 Jul 1832 in Canwick Lincolnshire, died on 6 Feb 1911 in Waddington at age 78, and was buried in Canwick Lincolnshire.

+ 126 F    x. Charlotte Sophia QUILTER [5049] was born on 23 Jul 1833, was baptised on 25 Aug 1833 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 8 Feb 1843 in Harrington at age 9.

+ 127 F    xi. Agnes Amelia QUILTER [5050] was born on 18 May 1835, was baptised on 28 Jul 1835 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 3 Jun 1925 at age 90.

+ 128 F    xii. Emma Theresa QUILTER [5051] was born on 13 Jul 1836 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 20 Sep 1836 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 1 Nov 1857 in Canwick Lincolnshire at age 21.

+ 129 M    xiii. Rev Henry King QUILTER [5052] was born on 28 Mar 1839 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 27 May 1839 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 29 Sep 1905 in Thirsk YKS at age 66.

+ 130 F    xiv. Nona QUILTER [5053] was born on 17 Feb 1842 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 30 May 1842 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died in 1936 at age 94.

79. Amelia Cowell JULIUS [779] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Apr 1802 in Burhampur India (Reg In London), was baptised on 25 Oct 1803 in Arrah India, died on 6 Jan 1831 in Richmond SRY at age 28, and was buried on 13 Jan 1831 in Richmond Cemetery. She was usually called Minnie.

General Notes:
Baptism Arrah.
25 Oct 1803 Amelia Cowell
Daughter of George and Isabella Maria
Ref: N/1/6 f.197
Ref: Bengal Ecclesiastical Records: http://indiafamily.bl.uk/UI/NonTabBriefDisplay.aspx?SearchType=AdvanceSearch

Bride Amelia Cowell Julius
Groom James Quilter
Marriage date 05 Jan 1830
Marriage place Richmond
By Licence
Groom's parish Middlesex - St Pancras
Bride of this parish
County Surrey
Parish Register Transcripts Surrey Marriages

James Quilter Esq., bachelor of the parish of St Pancras in the Co of Middlesex and Amelia Cowell Julius spinster of the parish of Richmond in the Co., of Surrey were married in this church by licence with the consent of all parties concerned on 5 January 1830 by me Thos King Offic minister.
James Quilter.
Amelia Cowell Julius.
Witnesses: George Charles Julius, Emily Julius, Christian Kidd.
Marriage Register, St Mary Magdalen, Richmond.

The Times, Thursday, Jan 07, 1830; pg. 4; Issue 14117; col C
Marriages - on 5th at Richmond, James Quilter of Hadley Mdx to
Amelia Cowell, 3rd dau of G C Julius Esq of Richmond

Gentleman's Magazine
January 5, 1830 James Quilter of Hadley Middx and the Gray's Inn to Amelia Cowell daughter of C. G. Julius Esq of Richmond.

The Times, Monday, Jan 10, 1831; pg. 7; Issue 14432; col B
Deaths - At Richmond, after short illness, in her 29th year,
Amelia, beloved wife of James Quilter, to whom she had been united one year and one day.

Amelia died with her child in childbirth.

Richmond Churchyard on a slab.
Amelia Cowell
Wife James Quilter Esq.,
of Hadley Middlesex
To whom fhe was united one year & one day
And Third Daughter
Of George Charles Julius Esq of This Place
Died 6 Jan 1831
In the 29th Year of Her Age.
Ref: Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg. 334

Ellen Hannah wife of F.C. Julius Esq. M.D.
Born 7 July 1813. Died 21 Aug 1869.
Ref: Richmond Churchyard SRY

Minnie married James QUILTER [780], son of James QUILTER [1163] and Mary Anne VOKINS [1164], on 5 Jan 1830 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY. James was born on 6 Oct 1784 in Monken Hadley LON and died on 12 Dec 1864 in 1 York Tce Regents Park MDX at age 80.

General Notes:
James Rumball
Birth Date:6 Oct 1784
Birth Place: St Mary Walthamstow, Essex, England
Christening Date:24 Oct 1784
Christening Place:St Mary Walthamstow, Essex, England
Father's name:James Rumball
Mother's name:Mary Anne Quilter
FHL Film Number:1564135

James Rumball
Birth year1784
Birth placeSt. Marys, Walthamstow, Essex, England
Baptism year1784
Baptism date24 Oct 1784
ResidenceWalthamstow, Essex, England
PlaceWalthamstow
CountyEssex
CountryEngland
Father's first name(s)James
Father's last nameRumball
Mother's first name(s)Mary Anne
Mother's last nameQuilter
Record setEngland Births & Baptisms 1538-1975

James was a Solicitor of 7 Grays Inn Sq LON in partnership with a John Taylor, and of 1 York Ter., Regents Park. Memorial tablet at St Marys Monken Hadley MDX

James had erected a memorial window to the Quilter family, in the chapel of St Catherine, in St Marys church, Monken Hadley.

Quilter James Esq., 7 January 1865 The Will with a Codicil of James Quilter formally of Hadley and Grays Inn but late of 1 York Terrace Regents Park all in the County of Middlesex Esq deceased who died 12 December 1864 at 1 York Terrace aforesaid was Proved at the Principal Registry by the oaths of the Rev George Quilter of Canwick in the County of Lincoln Clark the brother John Gillam Booty of Raymond buildings Grays Inn aforesaid solicitor and Richard Butt of Raymond buildings aforesaid solicitor the Executors. Effects under L7000 re-sworn at the Stamp Office March 1866 under L8000
National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, York Terrace Regents Park St Marylebone LND. James is recorded as aged 55 a solicitor not born in St Marylebone.

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, York Tce St Marylebone LND. James is recorded as head of house a widower aged 76 an attorney & fundholder born Walthamstow

80. Dr George Charles JULIUS M.D. [781] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Aug 1804 in Assam Dist. Sharhabad Behar India, died on 1 Dec 1885 in Claremont Hse. Nr Tilford SRY at age 81, and was buried in Tilford Churchyard Nr Farnham SRY.

General Notes:
JULIUS JOTTINGS. OCTOBER, 1900. No 3.
GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS. 1804-1885.
Reminiscences by Florence Stevens.
George was born in India in 1804. His parents soon afterwards returned to England, and settled at the Old Palace, Richmond, and George was brought up to the medical profession. He began practice with his father, but not for very long, and on his marriage, in 1829, to the beautiful Miss Spaight (*), he went to live in Ireland. His wife died in 1840, and leaving a daughter, Ethel, to be brought up by her grandmother, Mrs. Spaight, at the Hermitage, Castle Connel, co. Limerick, he went to live with his three boys at Wakefield, in Yorkshire, and sent them to a day school.
In 1844 he married Susan Thorley, the only child of a wealthy old friend in Richmond ; she died left him with another baby girl, Ella, who became the charge of his niece, Julia Quilter. Dr. Julius was very unhappy, and buried himself in the wilds of Ireland, with his three boys.
Whilst on a visit to Mr. Spaight, at the Hermitage, the house was nearly burnt down, and his boys had a narrow escape ; the bed in which two of them were sleeping was in flames, and Dr. Julius was only just in time to rescue them. He has shown me part of the charred bed hanging, handsomely worked by hand, which he always kept.
Very early in life his son Reginald went to seek his fortune in New Zealand, whilst Herbert and Edric practiced as solicitors in Maidstone, and at Holt, in Norfolk. After a time they joined their brother in New Zealand, and Dr. Julius settled at Washfield, in Devonshire, with his brother William, a retired major, and his niece, Julia Quilter, and her charge, Ella. He spent some happy years in beautiful scenery, for which he had a painter's appreciation, doctoring the poor people, by whom he was much loved.
Later on he spent two years at Willey Mill, at Wrecclesham, with Ella, and then took a little house near Brecon, in South Wales, a very beautiful part of the country, moving later into Peterstone Court. Whilst here he entered into and thoroughly enjoyed county society, for which he was eminently fitted, and also spent much time in fishing.
During a visit with her father to his, sister at St. Leonards, Ella contracted typhoid fever, which developed on a visit to Wrecclesharn, and of which she died at the age of 25.
This was a sad blow and lifelong sorrow to her father. He left Wales, and after a time settled at Seale, near Farnham, where later on his son Edric, now an invalid, and his widowed daughter-in-law, Mrs. Reginald Julius (Catherine Cameron), and her three children joined him, and remained with him to the end of his life.
He died at Tilford, near Farnham, in 1885, aged 81, and was buried in that pretty churchyard by the side of his brother, Mavor Julius, and his niece, Julia Quilter. He was a fine,looking man, about 6ft, 2in. in height., fond of art, music, and painting, a, fascinating talker, fond of society, and yet shrinking from it, a reader of every kind of literature, a good classic scholar, and also a lover of Nature. Fishing was his favourite pastime. He was not a successful man, and perhaps this made him rather morbid. He was very kind-hearted, and greatly loved by the poor wherever he lived.
He was a very able man, and would probably have done well in his profession if only he had kept to it.
(*) Said to have been an unhappy marriage - Pg 30 "A power in the Land"

Edinburgh University.
George C. Julius of Surrey studied medicine there for three sessions.
1821-2 Chemistry, Materia Medica, Anatomy.
1822-3 Chemistry, Clinical Medicine, Botany.
1824-5 Institutes, Practice of Medicine, Anatomy, Chemistry.
He graduated M.D. in 1825 with a thesis entitled De Hydrocephalo and was one of the president's of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh, a student society, in 1825.

Translation of Notice of George Julius thesis.
Inaugural Medical Dissertation
concerning Hydrocephalus
submitted to the examination of scholars
with the consent of the most reverend
D George Baird S.S. T.P.
Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh
and with the consent of the full convocation of the University Senate
and the decree of the most noble Faculty of Medicine
for the degree of the Doctorate
with the highest honours and privileges in Medicine
which duly and naturally accrue to it
by George Charles Julius
an Englishman
Extraordinary Fellow of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh
and also some time annual President
House Physician of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital
Fellow of the Society of Physicians of St Bartholomew's Hospital
on the first of August at the accustomed time and place
published by James Ballantyne and Coe at Edinburgh 1825.

Partnerships dissolved.
December 12. Henry Willmer and George Charles Julius the younger, Baker Street, Portman square, Middlesex. Surgeons.
Ref:Aris's Birmingham Gazette Monday, 21 December 1829

Dissolution of partnership.
Willmer Henry and George Charles Julius Jr., surgeons, Baker Street, Portman Square, 12 December - Debts etc by H Willmer.
Ref: Perry's Bankrupt Gazette Saturday, 6 March 1830.

1862 20 June; George was issued a British Passport No. 58373
Ref: findmypast 2011

JULIUS JOTTINGS, January 1900 No 1. Pg 10.
Maria Louisa Brewin writes: " Part of this time his eldest son Dr George Charles Julius was practising with his father, and for his services to a young Princess was presented by King William the IVth with a silver vase dated september 18th 1833, which is now in the possession of his grandson Bertie Julius of Tilford".
2001. This vase is in the possession of the family of the late Awdry Julius of Australia and is inscribed:
TO
GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS Jun'. M.D.
for his
kind attention and successful treatment
of
His Majesty's Grand-daughter
The daughter of the Lady A.K. Erskine.
"WILLIAM R."
September 18th 1833

Deaths.
Julius. On the 1st inst, at Clermont House, Tilford, Farnham, Surrey, George Charles Julius, Esq, MD, aged 81.
Ref: Morning Post Monday, 7 December 1885

Julius Dr George Charles M.D. 29 Dec 1885
The Will with Codicil of George Charles Julius late of Claremont House, in the parish of Churt nr Tilford, in the County of Surrey Esquire M.D. who died 1 Dec 1885 at Claremont House was proved 29 Dec 1885 by Arthur Onslow Julius of 15 Finsbury Circus solicitor nephew and Katherine Robertson Julius of Claremont House widow the Executors. Personal estate L19210 1s 4d Resworn Jun 1886 L19420 19s 4d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

MEMORIAL AT TILFORD CHURCH SURREY.
George Charles Julius b. 9 August 1804 d. 1 December 1885.

Research Notes:
West Indian Book Plates.
Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg A76.
654. George C. Julius. Arm. (F.C.)
Arms of Julius impaling Argent, a fess Sable between three martlets.
Crest and Motto of Julius

Guildhall Library: Records of Sun Fire Office [MS 11936/535]
FILE - Policy register - ref. MS 11936/535 - date: 1832-1833
item: [no title] - ref. MS 11936/535/1160606 - date: 17 September 1833
Insured: Charles Julius Junr,, Richmond Green Surrey, surgeon

To find out more about the archives described, contact Guildhall Library:http://www.archon.nationalarchives.gov.uk/archon/searches/locresult_details.asp?LR=76
Guildhall Library: Records of Sun Fire Office [MS 11936/535]
Catalogue Ref. SUN
Sun Fire Office, 1710-1891
Exchange House Fire Office, 1708-1710
Sun Insurance Office Ltd, 1891-1959
Sun Alliance Group, 1959-1996
Royal and Sun Alliance, 1996-

For guidelines for how best to use the detailed index of policies for some of the London insurers policy registers (old series, MS 11936) on A2A please see The "Place in the Sun" project - using the online index of Sun Fire Office policy registers 1816 - 1824 at: www.history.ac.uk/gh/sun.htm <http://www.history.ac.uk/gh/sun.htm>

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. George is recorded as head of house married aged 46 Physician MB of Edinburgh MRCS of London born East Indies.

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Willey Mill London-Southampton Rd Farnham SRY. George is recorded as a widower aged 56, M.D. Edinburgh, member of the Royal College of Surgeons, not practising, born East Indies Bengal, head lodger.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. George is shown at the home of his brother Frederick aged 66 born in Bengal.

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Sands Seale Farnham. George is recorded as head of house a widower aged 76 retired medical doctor born Bengal East Indies

George married Jean SPAIGHT [782], daughter of Francis SPAIGHT [2204] and Agnes PATTERSON [2205], on 13 Oct 1829 in Kilrush Ireland. Jean was born in 1813 in Kilrush Ireland and died on 13 Oct 1840 in Hermitage, Castle Connell Limerick at age 27.

General Notes:
The Times, Wednesday, Oct 21, 1829; pg. 4; Issue 14050; col B
Marriages - On 13th inst at Kilrush Ireland G C Julius Esq of
Baker-street, Portman Sq, to Joan, eldest daur of Francis Spaight Esq of Limerick

The Times, Tuesday, Oct 20, 1840; pg. 7; Issue 17493; col E
Deaths - On 13th at Hermitage, Castle Counell, Jean, the wife of
George C Julius Esq, MD and eldest daur of Francis Spaight Esq of Limerick


Children from this marriage were:

+ 131 M    i. Herbert Amelius JULIUS [785] was born on 4 Nov 1830 in Ireland, was baptised on 19 Jan 1831 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 31 May 1868 in New Zealand at age 37, and was buried in Oamaru Cemetery NZ.

+ 132 M    ii. Edric Adolphus JULIUS [786] was born on 13 Apr 1833 in Ireland, was baptised on 15 Apr 1834 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 13 Jul 1890 in Farnham SRY at age 57, and was buried in Tilford SRY.

+ 133 M    iii. Reginald JULIUS [787] was born on 19 Nov 1835 in Ireland, was baptised on 8 Feb 1836 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 2 Sep 1871 in Oamaru New Zealand at age 35.

+ 134 F    iv. Ethel JULIUS [794] was born in Sep 1840 and died in 1889 at age 49.

George next married Susan THORLEY [783], daughter of Robert THORLEY [2206] and Elizabeth SMYTHE [2207], on 19 Feb 1844 in Petersham SRY. Susan was born in 1804 and died before 1852.

General Notes:
WILL of SUSAN JULIUS
1st May 1850.
This is the last Will and Testament of me Susan Julius the wife of George Charles Julius late of Petersham in the county of Surrey but now of Wakefield in the County of York whereas under and by virtue of an Indenture . . . . . on or about the 16th day of February one thousand eight hundred and eighty four made between my husband George Charles Julius therein described of the one part . . . . . by my then name of Susan Thorley spinster of the second part and Thomas Scott Smyth and Herbert . . . . . Julius of the third part being the settlement made on my marriage with the said George Charles Julius and under which settlement (notwithstanding my coverture) I am empowered by will to dispose of any property I then was or should thereafter become entitled or acquire Now I the said Susan Julius in pursuance and by virtue and in exercise of the power to use for this purpose reserved or given an end by the herein before mentioned settlement and of all other powers and authorities what ever enabling me in this behalf do by this my last Will and Testament in writing or instrument in the nature of a Will direct and appoint the said trustees or trustee for the time being of the aforesaid indenture shall stand secured and possessed of all and every of the real and personal estate to which I now am or may hereafter become entitled in trust to assign transfer or otherwise make over the same unto my husband George Charles Julius his heirs executives or administrators for his and their absolute use and benefit and I hereby give devise and bequeath the same to him and them accordingly and whereas under the Will of my late father Robert Thorley I am entitled to retain copyhold and personal estate settled as therein mentioned upon myself and children and by which Will it is provided that if no child or children of mine shall live to attain a vested interest in the said property that then and in such case the trustees or trustee of the said Will should pay assign or transfer all the said trust property to such person or persons and upon such trusts as I (notwithstanding my covature) should by my last Will and Testament in writing direct or appoint. Now I ever said Susan Julius in pursuance and by virtue and in exercise of the power to me for this purpose stated or given in and by my father's said Will and of all other powers and authorities whatsoever enabling me in this behalf to by this my last Will and Testament in writing or instrument in that nature of a Will signed sealed and delivered by me in the presence of and attested by two reliable persons whose names are hereunto subscribed as witnesses direct or appoint that in the event of my dying without leaving any child or children or in the event of all and every my child or children dying under the age of 21 years and without achieving a vested interest under the Will of my said father that then and in such case all the property both copyhold real and personal to which I am entitled under the said Will shall be paid signed transferred and made over unto my husband George Charles Julius his heirs execututors or administrators for his and their sole use and benefit and whereas under a certain Indenture made the blank day blank one thousand eight hundred and forty nine between Edward Smith of the city of Norwich Esquire of the first part George Charles Julius Esquire therein described (and . . . . . therein described as) Susan his wife of the second part Alfred Alexander Julius and the Rev Hugh Blagg Smyth therein also described of the third part reciting that William Smyth late of . . . . . by his Will dated the 17th day of September one thousand eight hundred and forty six bequeathed the sum of five hundred pounds to the use of his neice the wife of the said George Charles Julius and her trustee the same to be invested in Government or real security in the names of trustees who were to pay the dividends to his said neice Susan Julius for life with power to his said neice absolutely to dispose of the said sum of five hundred pounds by her last Will and Testament in such manner as she might think fit and he appointed the said Edwards Smyth and Thomas Stott Smyth executors of his said Will and . . . . . of the estate of the said testator and that his will was proved on the twenty fourth day of June eighteen forty nine in the prerogative Court of Canterbury by the said Edwards Smyth . . . . . that the said Alfred Alexander Julius and Hugh Blagg Smyth had been nominated trustees and that the said Edward Smyth had laid out the sum of four hundred and eighty five pounds being the amount of the said legacy of five hundred pounds after deducting the legacy duty due thereon in the purchase of five hundrd and twenty two pounds eighteen shillings and three pence per cent Consolidated Bank Annuities in the names of the said Alfred Alexander Julius and Hugh Blagg Smyth Now I the said Susan Julius in pursuance and by virtue and in exercise of the power to me for this purpose given or received in and by the said Will and of all other powers and authorities whatsoever enabling me in this behalf to hereby absolutely dispose of the said sum of five hundred pounds so bequeathed to me as aforesaid and I gave and bequeath the same and the securities on which the same may at any time hereinafter be invested unto my husband George Charles Julius for his own absolute use and benefit and I hereby nominate and appoint my husband said George Charles Julius sole executor of this my Will and revoke all former and other Wills and testamentary dispositions made by me at any time heretofore and declare this alone to be my last Will and Testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set up my hand and seal the first day of May one thousand eight hundred and fifty
Susan Julius
Signed sealed and delivered by Susan Julius the Testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us present at the same time and in her presence of her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses
I. G. Skipworth Sol Wakefield Herbert A Julius gentleman Wakefield.

On the 17th April 1852 Admon (with the Will attached) of the goods chattels and effects of Susan Julius formerly of Petersham in the county of Surrey but the late of Wakefield in the County of York deceased was granted to George Charles Julius the lawfull husband and the sole executor named in the said Will having been first sworn duly to administer the said George Charles Julius being as the lawful husband of the said deceased the sole person entitled to her personal estate and effects over which she had no disposing power and concerning which she is dead intestate.
Copy of the Will on this file

Medical Notes:
Susan may have died in childbirth?.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. Susan is recorded as a wife aged 48 born Petersham Surrey.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 135 F    i. Ella JULIUS [784] was born on 22 Sep 1845 in Petersham SRY, was baptised on 27 Oct 1845 in St Peter Petersham SRY, died on 29 Oct 1870 in The Parsonage Wrecclesham SRY at age 25, and was buried on 1 Nov 1870 in Wreccclesham SRY.


81. Major William Mavor JULIUS [797] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Feb 1807 in Shahabad Behar India ( Reg In London), was baptised on 5 Oct 1807, died on 18 May 1876 in Black Lake Cottage Lobswood Manor Tilford SRY at age 69, and was buried in Tilford Churchyard Nr Farnham SRY.

General Notes:
WILLIAM was Baptised by Henry Martyn of Arra, aged 7mths 19 days.

On the 22 Jul 1823 William was contracted by his father to William Sandys of Crane Court Fleet Street in the City of London, gentleman, to serve him as a clerk in the Profession of Attorney at Law and Solicitor in Chancery for 5 years. Signed 23 July 1823.

Exchangers and Promotions.
13th Regiment of Light Dragoons
William Maeve Julius, gent, to be Cornet by purchase, vice Terry, who retires. Dated July 9, 1829.
Ref: Morning Advertiser 5 August 1829.

ARMY LIST 1835
Julius William Mavor
13th Regiment of Light Dragoons
Lieut 18 Apr 1834.
JULIUS William Mavor.
13 Regiment of [Light] Dragoons.
2nd Lieut. [Cornet] 9 July 1829.
Lieut 18 April 1834.
Capt. 4 Sept 1840 (On half pay 4 Sept 1840.)
ANNUAL ARMY LIST 1874. Majors who have retired by sale of their commissions. JULIUS. William Mavor. 6 Dragoons, Inniskillings, 11 Nov 1851

Army Records TNR Office Kew. WO25 784 fo 123
William M Julius b. Bengal 16 Feb 1808
Entered Army aged 21.
Cornet 13th Dragoons 9 Jul 1829 by purchase.
Lieut " " 18 Apr 1834 " "
Capt " half pay 4 Sep 1840 " "
Service abroad 1830 5 Jul to 1838 23 Feb Madras.
Summary:
To 31 Dec 1829 full pay 6 mths
Abroad 7yrs 7mths.
At Home 3yrs 1mth.
J F Patterson Lt Col Commanding Officer.
A Strange Paymaster.
B McMahon Lt & Acting Adj.

War Office September 8, 1840.
13th Regiment of Light Dragoons. Lt William Mavor Julius to be Captain, by purchase, vice McMahon, who retires; dated September 4, 1840
Ref: Morning Advertiser 9 September 1840.

War Office, Pall Mall, July 27.
To be Captains, without purchase.
Captain William Mavor Julius, from half pay 13th Light Dragoons.
Ref: Evening Mail 28 July 1858

William was invalided out of the Army with the rank of Major. Lived at Lincolnshire, then Devon, with his father GEORGE at Richmond in the 1841 Census, a Captain aged 30 yrs. later at Farnham Rd. Tilford with his niece Julia Henrietta Quilter (1861 Census) Also lived for some years in Black Lake Cottage Tilford nr Farnham Surrey.
In 1900 Black Lake Cottage was bought by the wife of Sir J.M. Barrie. Black Lake was used by Sir J.M.Barrie as the centre of "Never Never Land" in his book "Peter Pan". He used Black Lake Cottage [now Lobswood Manor] as his country home from 1900-1909. The house was almost entirely surrounded by pine forrest, with only a dusty winding road to connect it to the outside world. On the far side of the road lay the Black Lake, hidden among the pines, while beyond it rose the crumbling ruins of Waverly Abbey. [There are other references to Black Lake Cottage in the book and some reproductions of snapshots of the garden and lake].
Black Lake Cottage was given as the address of Major William Mavor Julius at the time of his death 18th May 1876, however he died at his niece's home in Farnham Rd. Tilford.
There is a Memorial at Tilford Church, Surrey for Major William Mavor Julius d 18 May 1876.

Julius William Mavor Esq. 12 June 1876
The Will of William Mavor Julius Esq formerly of H.M. 6th Dragoons but late of Black Lake Cottage nr Farnham in the county of SRY who died 18 May 1876 at Black lake Cottage was proved 12 Jun 1876 by Julia Henrietta Quilter of Black lake Cottage spinster neice and sole Executor. Effects under L12,000. Resworn July 1876 at under L8000.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. William is recorded as aged 30 Army captain not born SRY

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Farnham Road Farnham. William is recorded as head of house aged 54 unmarried retired Army Major a British Subject born Middlesex England. Also in the house was his neice Julia H Quilter and a servant.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 42 Black Lake Tilford Farnham SRY. William is shown as head of house aged 64 unmarried born East Indies retired Major Also in the house was his neice Julia H Quilter and two elderly servants

82. Dr Frederick Gilder JULIUS MD FRCS [50] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Feb 1811 in Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY, was baptised on 29 Jun 1849 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 4 Jan 1886 in 4 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 74, and was buried in Richmond Cemetery. The cause of his death was bronchitis.

General Notes:
Julius, Frederick Gilder. b. 28 Feb 1811, 4th s of Dr George Charles Julius of Richmond, Surrey. Day Boy, Jan 1823 - Sep 1826. M.R.C.S. and L.S.A. 1833; M.D. (Lambeth) 1851; F.R.C.S. 1853: practised at Richmond. m. (1) 1839 (sic) Ellen Hannah o.d. of William Smith of Nottingham; (2) 1871 Sarah Hannah, widow of Hon. Judge Charles James Hargrave, Judge of Landed Estates Courts, Ireland. d. Richmond 4 Jan 1886.
Ref: Charterhouse School Register.

Quotes from A "POWER IN THE LAND" : G & A Elworthy
Frederick went to Charterhouse School with his brothers. He took his Medical Degree in Edinburgh. Dr Frederick's career was equally as distinguished as his father's before him and he too was under the patronage of the Royal Family. He was a Medical Officer of the Royal Hospital, the opening of which was chiefly due to him. Originally known as the Richmond Infirmary [1868], it enjoyed the patronage of Queen Victoria and by her command [1893] was hence-forth known as the "Royal Hospital". After his retirement Dr Frederick usually spent the winter months travelling in the Mediterranean region, visiting on different occasions the Azores, Spain, Italy, Corsica, Algiers, Egypt, Palestine and Constantinople. Finally he 'fixed his abode upon Richmond Green', where he died from inflammation of the lungs, in his 75th year, after a very few days illness. He was buried in the Richmond Cemetery, thus ending a family association with that village which had lasted three quarters of a century.

Julius Jottings, January 1901. No 4.
Notes from various contributors.
He practiced for a few years at Bognor, where his eldest sister, Emily, kept house for him. He then fell to bad health, and had to travel abroad. On his return he went into partnership with his father Dr George C Julius snr. (note he was apprenticed as an Apothecary in 1827) He lived most of his life in the Old Palace, Richmond, but retired from practice when about 60 years and travelled extensively.

Recollections from Mrs Florence Stevens:
He was a fine looking man, about 5' 11 ", with fair complexion, blue eyes and a long white beard. He was very witty, clever, and amusing; very sarcastic and alarming to those who did not know him very well; but very kind and gentle in sickness.

Two of his daughters, Anne Ellen and Katherine Pauline married doctors. Dr. William Bateman and Dr. Edward Fenn respectively. These two doctors carried on their father-in- laws practice in Richmond until 1912, when the practice, which had been in the hands of the JULIUS FAMILY since it was first established by Dr. George Charles Julius in 1814, 98 years before, passed into other hands.

Richmond Census 1841: Frederick Julius, 30yrs, Surgeon. Ellen Julius, 27 yrs.

Frederick and his father appear to have had a close association with Arthur George Onslow the 3rd Lord Onslow (1777 - 1870). Onslow had no surviving heir, it is clear Frederick's youngest son was named after Onslow, who was his godfather.
It is unclear what the note below refers to.
With every kind of wish for your well being here and my highest aspirations for your eternal happiness hereafter
believe me to be
yours sincerely attached friend
Onslow

This note relates to a French snuff box left to Frederick presumably at Onslow's death.
"I leave the snuffbox to my good and excellent friend Mr Frederick Julius; in token of my high regard for him, and under the full appreciation of those truly Christian qualities which so are not ostentatiously adorned his private character"
Onslow.
Ref E L Fenn 2005

THE SOCIETY OF APOTHECARIES LONDON :
FREDERICK GILDER JULIUS.
An apprentice to George Charles Julius of Richmond Surrey Apothecary for 5 years. Indenture dated 6th Feb 1827.
Licentiates Aug 1 1815 to July 31 1852 MS 824 1B/1
Apothecaries of London. Court of Examiners - Candidates Qualification Entry Books 1832 to 1835. M. S. 8241/6
June 13 1833 Mr. Frederick Gilder Julius of full age candidate for certificate to practice apothecary.
Testimonial of moral character from Dr Hope Seymour Street
Evidence of age given by affidavit - 22 years of age [Illegible initial]
Lectures :
2 courses on Chemistry [?] Harraway
2 courses on Materia Medica and Botany ?
4 courses on Anatomy and Physiology - Lane
4 courses on Anatomical Demonstrations - Lane
2 courses on Principles and Practice of Medicine ?
Hospital Attendance :
9 months at St. George's Hospital
2 courses of lectures on midwifery - H. Davie
Examined by Mr Bacot and approved.

INFORMATION FROM MEDICAL DIRECTORIES :
M.D. University of Edinburgh 1825.
Member Royal College Surgeons England 1826.
Lic. Soc Apothecaries London 1833
M.D. by Doctorate granted by Archbishop of Canterbury 1851.
Registered 1 Jan. 1859. Julius Frederick Gilder Richmond Surrey surgeon.
Member 1833, Fellow 1853, Royal College Surgeons England.
Registered 17 June 1859 Julius George Charles Horwood Bideford Devon.

NOTES ON FREDERICK'S EDUCATION AND WORK.
NOTABLE BRITISH TRIALS - Dr Thomas Smethurst 1859 - L.A.Parry. Penguin Books Famous Trials, edited by James H. Hodge - Dr Thomas Smethurst 1859 by L.A. Parry.
Extracts from these two books :
Miss Bankes was until her marriage [to Dr Thomas Smethurst] in reasonably good health, though subject to bilious attacks. Soon after, she was taken ill and for the first few days her husband attended her. As she got no better it was decided to call in another doctor, and on the advice of the landlady, Dr Julius a well known I Richmond practitioner, was sent for. He first attended on 3rd April. When he was told by Smethurst that his wife was suffering from violent diarrhoea and vomiting -------- As the drugs tried led to no improvement, Dr Julius began to suspect that some irritant poison was being given to her. He asked his partner, Dr Bird, to see Miss Banks------- lie came to the same conclusion as his partner, but only after Dr Julius had mentioned his own fear to him.
1st Trial 7 July 1859 abandoned owing to illness of a juryman
2nd Trial 15 August 1859.
Dr Julius gave evidence about Miss Bankes's illness and her treatment.
He was cross - examined by Mr Sergeant Parry, for the defence.
Mr Sergeant Parry: Are you a Doctor of Medicine?
Dr Julius: Yes
Mr. Parry: Is yours a London Degree?
Dr Julius: Yes
Mr Parry: What Degree is it?
Dr Julius: It is the Archbishop of Canterbury's degree.
Mr Parry: What ! Can he make a doctor of medicine.
The Lord Chief Baron: Yes; and he can also make a Master of Arts.
Mr Parry:Did you take your degree as a matter of course?
Mr Julius:Oh, dear, no ! It is a very uncommon thing. I had to get a certificate from 2 members of the College of Physicians, Stating that they had known me for a length of time, and that I was a proper person to have a degree?
Mr Parry: And having that certificate you got your degree?
Mr Julius: Yes; but it only entitles me to call myself "doctor"
The Lord Chief Baron: But you are a member of the College of Surgeons, and a member of the Society of Apothecaries?
Mr Julius:Yes.
Note by the Editor, L.A. Parry. This power to grant medical degrees was a remnant of Papal authority, which was reserved to the Archbishop of Canterbury by a statute passed in 1533 in the reign of Henry VIII. The Medical Act 1857 abolished any qualifications to practice with these degrees unless they were granted prior to the passing of the Act.
Evidence given by Master Julius.
I am the son of Dr Julius. On 30 April 2 sealed bottles were given to me by Dr Bird and I took them to Mr Buzzard's in Great Marlborough. . . . .
It was noted that Dr Julius had bought the case to the attention of the magistrates, after a statement had been made to the effect that Drs Julius and Bird grounded their conviction of the guilt of the person on the evidence of Dr Taylor, who found arsenic in certain evacuations of Miss Bankes.
Dr Smethurst was found guilty of murdering Miss Bankes, whom he had married bigamously. He was however given a Royal Pardon as impure reagents had been used in the tests for arsenic. He was then charged with bigamy and found guilty and was sentenced to one year's hard labour.

THE TIMES Wednesday - Sept. 7 1859. Pg 7 col. f.
"Sir will you kindly allow me through the medium of your columns, to correct a statement in several papers? It is asserted that -
Dr Julius and Mr Bird waited on the Home Secretary with the view of undoing their evidence against Dr Smethurst. They represented to the right hon. gentleman that they chiefly grounded their conviction of the guilt of the prisoner on the evidence of Dr Taylor relative to the finding arsenic in certain evacuations of Miss Banks. ; whereas it is now ascertained that the arsenic so discovered came from the impure reagents which were employed as tests of the presence of poison in the lady's body. We further understand that the two medical gentlemen in question are most anxious to relieve themselves, by this course, from the moral responsibility they had incurred by the criminating nature of the evidence they gave on Dr Smethurst's trail.

In reply to the above, I beg to state that I was requested to attend at the office of Messrs Symes, Teesdale & Co. the solicitors for the prosecution, to answer certain questions, I believe suggested by the Home Secretary, and my answers were corroborative of the evidence I gave on trial ; and I can truly say that neither Mr Bird nor myself feel any desire to be removed from a responsibility which has unavoidably been incurred by the discharge of a most painful duty to society and to ourselves as conscientious men. And I would also add that our opinions as to the cause of Miss Banks death have not been in the slightest degree shaken".
I am, Sir, yours obediently,
Frederick G Julius.
Old Palace Richmond Sept. 6.

Some 2 years after his release Dr Smethurst bought an action to prove the will of the woman whom he had been convicted of poisoning and actually won it.

Death of Dr Julius.
With sincere regret, we record the death of Dr Frederick Gilder Julius, which took place on Monday last, at his residence on Richmond Green, after a very few days illness, from inflammations of the lung. The deceased gentleman, like his eldest brother and father before him, practised for many years in Richmond, with which town the name of Julius has now been closely connected for nearly three quarters of a century. Dr F.G. Julius was born at Bristol in February, 1811, immediately after the arrival of his parents from India. His father shortly afterwards joined Sir David Dundas, at that time Sergeant-Surgeon to George III., in practice at Richmond, taking up in his residence in the Old Palace in 1814, where he and his son Dr Frederick Julius after him continued to reside until the latter retired from practice in the summer of 1871. After his retirement, Dr F.G. Julius usually spent the winter months travelling in the neighbourhood of the Mediterranean, visiting upon different occasions the Azores, Spain, Italy, Corsica, Algiers, Egypt, Palestine, and Constantinople. Finally he fixed his residence upon Richmond Green again, where the first 60 years of his life had been passed, and where his career has now ended in the 75th year of his age.
The funeral is to take place at the Richmond Cemetery today, at 12 o'clock.
Ref: Richmond Library SRY.

Royal College of Surgeons of England.
Julius, Frederick Gilder (1811-1886) M.R.C.S., April 22, 1833; F.R.C.S., June 2, 1853; M.D. Lambeth, 1851; L.S.A., 1833. Born in Bristol; his father soon afterwards removed to Richmond and joined Sir David Dundas in practice, Sir David being then Sergeant Surgeon to George III. Here he was afterwards joined by his two sons, George C. Julius and Frederick Gilder Julius. The letter received his professional training at St George's Hospital, and his Lambeth degree was granted by the Archbishop of Canterbury. "my degree is not the London degree" he said, "it is the Archbishop of Canterbury's; he has the power of granting it; I did not take it out as a matter of form, it is a very uncommon thing. In order to obtain it, I had not merely to pay the fees, I had to go to to Fellows of the Royal College of Physicians, who stated that they had known me a certain length of time, and then I was a person upon whom a doctor's degree might be conferred; upon that you are enabled to call yourself a doctor, that is all; that was my object."
Julius was for many years ago led in practitioner in Richmond, Surrey, and in 1859 was the principal medical witness in the trial known as "The Queen against Thomas Smethurst", which began on August 15 of that year and lasted several days. Dr Smethurst was accused of the murder by poison of a Miss Isabella Banks, whom he had bigamously married - he having as wife an older lady, alive at the time. Miss Banks, when suffering from severe illness, involving constant diarrhoea and vomiting, had made a will in Smethurst's favour on May 1. Julius who was called in and was in constant attendance upon her suspected that some drug of an irritant nature was being administered to her in addition to those prescribed by him. She died on May 4. His suspicions having been aroused, Julius had applied to a magistrate sometime before her death, but Smethurst was not arrested till the death occurred. Many important medical witnesses were called both for the prosecution and for the defence, and eventually Smethurst was found guilty of murder, but was reprieved owing to insufficiency of evidence, and in the end, after litigation, succeeded to Miss Banks fortune. Julius, however, had acted with entire propriety in the whole matter, as had his partner, Samuel Dougan Bird MRCS. He retired in 1871 and travelled much in countries bordering on the Mediterranean. His death occurred at Richmond on January 4, 1886.
Ref: Plarr's Lives of the Fellows July Pg 640.

Julius Frederick Gilder Esq. M.D. 8 Feb 1886.
The Will with codicil of Frederick Gilder Julius M.D. late of 4 Portland Ter., parish of St Mary, Richmond who died 4 Jan 1886 at 4 Portland Terrace was proved 8 Feb 1886 by Arthur Onslow Julius of 15 Finsbury Circus the son, and William Adolphus Frederick Bateman of Rothsay House, Parish of St Mary Surgeon Exors at L6023 15s 2d Resworn Aug 1886 L7126 15s 5d.

Research Notes:
Awdrey Julius's notes, and notes from the family Bible of George Charles Julius put Frederick born at Bristol. Baptism date is doubtful.
Mar Qtr 1839 Nottingham shown for marriage is unchecked.
The above Bible is a 1723 version of the King James, printed by John Baskett.
Ref: In the possession of E L Fenn 2011

West Indian Book Plates.
Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg A76.
655. Frederick G Julius Arm.
Arms: Julius with Smith on an inescutcheon. (F., 16,770)
Arms: As above, but the stars Gules, and on an escutcheon, Or, a chevron cotised between three demi-griffins Sable [Smith].
Crest and Motto of Julius.

The following concerns a pivotal case at law in which Frederick was somewhat of a pawn.
THE TIMES - Friday March 5 1880. pg. 4 col. a.
The Clewer Case
Details of an appeal to The House of Lords against a decision of the Court of Appeal on a complaint against the Bishop of Oxford concerning the practice of the Rev Thomas Thelluson Carter Rector of the Parish of Clewer.
The action was taken by Dr Julius the appellant v The Bishop of Oxford & others. The Times report, include statements under the hand of Dr Frederick G Julius of the Hermitage Clewer Berkshire as:
"I now reside and have for many years have resided in the Parish of Clewer Berks and am a parishioner of the said parish of St Andrew."

The Oxford Movement was the cause of concern to some of the Parishioners of Clewer as it had influenced the Rev Thomas Carter and his form of worship. The Movement began in Oxford in 1833, and had reawakened spiritual and devotional life of the Church of England. However some people feared it might lead the Established Church towards Roman Catholicism.
Carter had on accepting the living of Clewer in 1844, began introducing "order and decency" into the worship of the run down parish.
After two petitions by some Parishioners backed by the Church Association were rejected by Carter's bishop they found a new complainant in Frederick Julius. Whilst legally a parishioner, Frederick rarely resided within the parish and did not attend the church; indeed the affidavit dated December 28th 1878, was sworn at Her Majesty's Consular Court in Cairo. The Bishop was minded to veto the application as before. But now the Church Association endeavoured to force the Bishop's hand by challenging the right of veto.
Undaunted by the bishop's veto Frederick applied to the Queen's Bench Division for a writ of mandamus to force the Bishop to issue a Commission of Inquiry. Bishop Mackarness decided to stand firm and face the court himself. The case was heard in February and March 1879, the Judges finding in favour of Frederick. The Bishop appealed the original case had focused largely upon the Church Discipline Act, but in the Court of Appeal attention switched to Rev Carter and to Frederick's charges against him, which were:
Wearing Eucharistic vestments.
Mixing water with the wine at the offertory.
Standing by the Altar with his back turned to the congregation.
Bowing during the Consecration and elevating the bread and wine.
Making the sign of the Cross.
Using lighted altar candles.
Singing the Agnus Dei.

The outcome of the Bishop's appeal was a reversal of the Queen's Bench decision, but this was not the end. Frederick took the case to the House of Lords. Once more attention was focused not on the original charges but on the bishop's right of veto. The Lords upheld the Court of Appeal, Frederick had finally lost his case and the bishop's veto was never questioned again.

The case of Julius v the Bishop of Oxford made legal history in establishing the principle that if a party has a discretion in a matter, i.e. they may act in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean they must do so. The Clewer case is cited when this point of law is at issue and has been used as recently as July 1986.

Carter's daughter Jane, records in her biography of her father how Carter and Frederick met for the first time at a house on Clewer Hill. Frederick was charmed by him and expressed regret at having commenced litigation. The two men shook hands and parted as friends. In 1887 Mary Isabel Julius [1032] Fredericks neice was admitted as a Clewer Sister where she was known as Sr Mary Isabel. She was professed in 1889 and in 1890 went to India where she served until 1894. She died on March 3rd 1898.
Ref: A History of Clewer
The Clewer Group
CANON CARTER CENTENARY LECTURE
Given by Valerie Bonham on 4th May 2001at St Andrew's Church, Clewer Village.
http://www.clewervillage.co.uk/carterlecture.htm

England: Canterbury - Index to the Act Books of the Archbishops of Canterbury, 1663-1859 (A-K) Lambeth. County: General Country: England Julius, Frederick Gilder (of Richmond, Surrey, M.R.C.S.), 1851 : Degree Doctor of Physic; 17, 73.

Other Records

1. Moore's Royal Prophetic Almanack: The Book of Fate, 1840, Thought to Have Belonged To Dr Frederick G Julius.

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Frederick is recorded as head of house married aged 40 a surgeon born Bristol

3. Lambeth Degree Dr of Physic: 24 Jun 1851. Transcription of Grant of Doctor of Physic.
John Bird by divine providence Archbishop of Canterbury primate of all England and Metropolitan Authority of Parliament lawfully empowered for the purposes herein written to our beloved in Christ Frederick Gilder Julius Esquire member of the Royal College of Surgeons Health and Grace in Jesus Christ our saviour. Whereas in schools regularly instituted that laudable usage and custom hath long prevailed and that with the approbation as well of the pure reformed churches as of the most learned Men for many ages past that they are have with proficiency and applause exerted themselves in the study of any liberal Science should be granted with some eminent Degree of Dignity. And whereas the Archbishop of Canterbury enabled by the public authority of the Law do enjoy and long have enjoyed the power of conferring degrees and Titles of Honour upon well deserving Men as by an authentic Book of Taxatious Faculties conferred by authority of Parliament both more fully appear. We therefore being vested with the authority aforesaid and following the example of our Predecessors have judged it expedient that you whose proficiency in the Study of Physic uprightness of life and purity of Morals are manifest unto us be dignified with the degree of Dr of Physic and we do by these presents so far as in us lies and the laws of the Realm do allow accordingly create you an actual Doctor of Physic and we do also admit you into the Number of the Doctors of Physic of this realm; the Oaths hereunder written having been by us or our Master of the Faculties first required of you and by you taken;
I Frederick Gilder Julius the person to be admitted to the Degree of Doctor of Physic by the Most Reverend Father in God John Bird by Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury Primate of all England and Metropolitan do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to her Majesty Queen Victoria - So Help Me God.
I Frederick Gilder Julius
do swear that I do from my heart poor detest and abjure as impious and heretical that damnable doctrine and position - excommunicated or deprived by the Pope or any authority of the see of Rome may be deposed or - by their subjects or any other whatsoever And I do declare that no foreign prince person prelate state or protectorate hath or ought to have any power jurisdiction superiority pre-eminence authority ecclesiastical or spiritual within this realm - So Help Me God
I Frederick Gilder Julius
do swear that I will to the best of my skill and judgement diligently use and exercise the Art or Mystery of Physic indifferently both to poor and rich - So Help Me God

Provided always that these Presents do not avail you and anything unless duly registered and subscribed by the Clerk of Her Majesty for Faculties. Given under the seal of our office of Faculties at Doctors Commons this twenty sixth day of June in the year of our Lord 1851 and in the fourth year of our translation
J.H.T. Manners Sutton - Registrar.
Registered on the twenty-sixth day of June in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty One by the Clerk of her Majesty for the Faculties in Chancery.
George Humphreys and Josiah Humphreys.
Ref: Original document 50cm.w. x 45 cm.h. on paper with seals, in possession of E L Fenn 2013

4. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Frederick is recorded as head of house aged 49 General Practitioner M.D. born Bristol SOM

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Frederick is recorded as head of house a widower aged 60 physician born Bristol. Also in the house apart from family was a visitor Charles E Unwin an Oxford undergraduate aged 24 born Chepstow Monmouth, plus 7 servants, and a boarder Sophia Bowsher aged 66 born Leaton MDX

Frederick married Ellen Hannah SMITH [49], daughter of William SMITH of Nottingham [2423] and Peggy HEATON [2424], on 26 Feb 1841 in St Marys Nottingham. Ellen was born on 7 Jul 1813 in Nottingham, was baptised on 19 Jul 1813 in Marygate Chapel Nottingham (Register No. 35), died on 21 Aug 1869 in The Old Palace Richmond SRY at age 56, and was buried on 27 Aug 1869 in East Sheen & Richmond Cemetery..

General Notes:
Evelyn was born at Nottingham on Wednesday at half past eight o'clock in the evening.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

The family bible recording Ellen's birth and baptism details says"Registered at Marygate Chapel Nottingham its register is No. 35 in register list deposited with the Register General London an agency for the nonparochial chapels 5 Bolt Court Fleet St. It also puts her marriage date at 26th Feb 1839 at St Mary's church Nottingham

Ellen Hannah Smith
Event Type:Baptism
Father:William Smith
Mother:Peggy Smith
Baptism Date:19 Jul 1813
Baptism Place:Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
Denomination:Independent
Piece Title:Piece 1890: Nottingham, St Mary Gate (Independent), 1778-1839

The Times, Monday, Mar 04, 1839; pg. 7; Issue 16980; col D
Marriages - On 26th ult. Frederic Julius Esq, of Richmond to Ellen
only dau of W Smith of Nottingham

Frederick's neice Arabella Emily Parkinson (nee Quilter) was a bridesmaid at their wedding.

In 1871 Mrs Julius was made a Life Governor of the Royal Hospital (Richmond Infirmary) in recognition of her work with the hospital.

Ellen Hannah Julius
Age:56
Birth Date:1813
Burial Date:27 Aug 1869
Burial Place:Richmond Parish, Surrey County
FHL Film Number:991698
Reference ID:p 215 no 1713.

Richmond Churchyard on a slab.
Amelia Cowell
Wife James Quilter Esq.,
of Hadley Middlesex
. . . . .
Ellen Hannah wife of F C Julius Esq M.D.
born 7th July 1813, died 21 Aug 1869
Ref: Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg. 334

Other Records

1. Letter from Ellen Smith: 19 Jul 1831, Staly Bridge Manchester.
Staly Bridge July 19th 1831
I hope my very dear Friend that I have not been too long in answering your kind letter, for which I thank you, it gave me very great pleasure to hear from you.
We were very sorry to hear that Uncle Churchill was not well when he left home, I hope he has returned quite recovered and enjoyed his journey.
I wish you could walk with us in Aunt Harrison's beautiful garden: the rose trees are very beautiful, but everything is shaded with smoke from the Town as Staly is now called. We have not been out much, except into the garden: occasionally we have taken a walk in the evening.
The week before last week went to Manchester and saw the Rail road, we saw a train of carriages go out, it is a very pretty sight.
We called (last deleted) yesterday to see Mrs Cheetham: she is very infirm, but Mamma thinks she looks better than when she saw her two years ago, she is much as usual. Mifs Cheethams are pretty well Sarah Jane Bailey is better I had a very pleasant walk with them one evening to Ashton.
We have attended the Independent Chapel at Ashton, on a Sunday, and have been very much pleased with Mr Sutcliffe it is very delightful to meet with a person we like so well when one is from home.
Mamma has not determined whether to go to the Lakes or not, I wish you all could meet us there how delightful that would be.
Is Cousin Mary as much pleased with Mr Buckingham as you and I were? I am glad he does not think the Charter will be rescued(?) I hope we shall every one be at home when he returns to give his course of Lectures.
Where are you going to this summer do you think we shall meet at the lakes?
We heard from Mifs Strivens on Saturday, she wrote from Camberwell where she had arrived quite well. She proceeds to Ramsgate today. I hope the change will do her good.
We were very glad to hear from Mr John Cheetham that you are much better. I hope you will soon be quite well, and also return with the same kind of roses you so kindly wished me to have.
Have you heard from Mifs Reads lately, I hope they are well. We little thought when we last saw each other that we should both so soon have to mourn the lofs of a dear relation. I feel the lofs of dear Aunt more than at first, sometimes it seems like a dream that she is gone, but it is too true. But it is wrong to complain or wish her with us she is far better off, and it will be happy for us if our last end is like hers.
How is Mr Bailey? he will I hope be spared some time longer to his family and friends.
Mamma was much pleased to receive a letter from Mifs Deverill on Sunday.
Mr D Harrison was at Liverpool yesterday and tells us that the money received for pafsengers on the Rail road in the race week amounted to L4500 and the receipts last week were L3700 it is almost incredible. If there was one between Nottingham and Manchester we might see each other now and then. I hope you will be so kind as to write again soon we shall want to hear how, and where you all are. I hope Cousin Mary will be so kind as to write too.
Mamma writes with me in very kind love to yourself, Uncle, Cousin Mary, Mr and Mrs D. Churchill and family. Aunt H desires her respects. We hope soon to see Mrs D. Churchill and Charlotte Ann at Staly.
Believe me dear Cousin,
Yours sincerely affectionate
E. H. Smith
Please to give our love to all friends

Addressed to:
Mifs C Churchill
High Pavement
Nottingham

Folded and sealed on one sheet of notepaper franked Manchester JY 20 1831

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Ellen is recorded as a wife aged 37 born Nottingham

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Ellen is recorded as a wife aged 46, no entry as to where born.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 136 M    i. Dr George Frederick Heaton JULIUS [1976] was born on 7 Jul 1842 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 17 Jul 1842 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 29 Sep 1865 in Heidelberg Melbourne Aust. at age 23.

+ 137 F    ii. Annie Ellen JULIUS [54] was born on 29 Jul 1843 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 30 Aug 1843 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 12 Mar 1927 in Durdans St Margarets at age 83.

+ 138 M    iii. William JULIUS [55] was born on 23 Jul 1845 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 5 Sep 1845 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 20 Feb 1854 at age 8, and was buried in Swinton Churchyard Nr Nottingham.

+ 139 M    iv. Archbishop Churchill JULIUS D D [56] was born on 15 Oct 1847 in The Old Palace Richmond SRY, was baptised on 19 Nov 1847 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 1 Sep 1938 in Cloudesley Christchurch N.Z. at age 90, and was buried in Linwood Cemetery Christchurch.

+ 140 F    v. Ada Frances JULIUS [57] was born on 29 May 1849 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 29 Jun 1849 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 9 Apr 1942 in London. at age 92, and was buried in Richmond Cemetery.

+ 141 F    vi. Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10] was born on 27 Nov 1850 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 15 Apr 1886 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 35, and was buried on 20 Apr 1886 in Richmond.

+ 142 F    vii. Mary Caroline JULIUS [58] was born on 20 Mar 1852 in Richmond, was baptised on 23 Apr 1852 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 12 Jul 1890 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 38.

+ 143 M    viii. Arthur Onslow JULIUS [59] was born on 14 Oct 1854 in Wardrobe CT Old Palace Richmond SRY, was baptised on 18 Nov 1854 in St John Richmond SRY, and died on 4 May 1929 in 113 Church Rd Ham London. at age 74.

+ 144 M    ix. JULIUS [12768] was born on 30 Aug 1855.

+ 145 M    x. JULIUS [12769] was born on 31 Aug 1856.


Frederick next married Sarah Hannah NOBLE [1483], daughter of Thomas NOBLE [24414] and Grace NUSSEY [24416], on 1 Aug 1871 in St Mary's Putney. Sarah was born on 10 Apr 1830, was baptised on 11 Aug 1830 in St Peters Leeds YKS, died on 5 Jun 1885 in 1 Cambridge Gdns Richmond at age 55, and was buried on 9 Jun 1885 in Richmond Cemetery..

General Notes:
Sarah Hannah Noble
Birth Date:10 Apr 1830
Baptism Date:11 Aug 1830
Parish:Leeds, St Peter
Father:Thomas Noble
Mother:Grace Noble

SARAH HANNAH NOBLE
Marriage quarter3
Marriage year1856
MarriageFinder™SARAH HANNAH NOBLE married CHARLES JAMES HARGREAVE
DistrictLEEDS
CountyYorkshire
Volume9B
Page422
Record setEngland & Wales marriages 1837-2008

Sarah Hannah Hargreave
Spouse:Frederic Lyldar Julius
Record Type:Marriage
Event Date:1 Aug 1871
Parish:St Mary, Putney
Borough:Wandsworth
Father Name:Thomas Nable
Spouse Father:George Charles Julius
Register Type:Parish Register

Sarah Hannah Julius
Birth Year:abt 1831
Burial Age:54
Burial Date:9 Jun 1885
Archive Provided Parish:Richmond, St Mary Magdalene
Reference Number:P7/1/26

Julius Sarah Hannah 22 July 1885.
The will of Sarah Hannah Julius (wife of Frederic Gilder Julius) late of 1 Cambridge Gardens in the parish of Richmond in the county of Surrey who died 5 June 1885 at 1 Cambridge Gardens was proved at the Principal Registry by Arthur Onslow Julius of 1 Cambridge Gardens gentleman and William Adolphus Fredrick Bateman of Rothesay House Richmond Surgeon the executors. Probate being granted under certain limitations.
Personal Estate L10,871 2s 2d Resworn July 1890 L11956 Resworn Mar 1892 L12,042
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

A small leather book entitled the" Christian Year" and inscribed " Sarah Hannah Hargreaves April 10th 1867" is in the possession of Edward L Fenn (2000) Ref B/10

Research Notes:
Sarah was the widow of Judge Hargreaves, her maiden name was Noble.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 21 The Green Richmond SRY. Sarah Hargreave is recorded as head of house a widow aged 38 of no occupation born Bradford YKS

83. Alfred Alexander JULIUS [798] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 4 Sep 1812 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 6 Nov 1812 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 2 Sep 1865 in Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. at age 52.

General Notes:
Alfred was a Solicitor in London, in his early years he was the leading oarsman rowing for the Leander Club and a prominent compeditor at Henly.

Alfred was a three times winner of the Wingfield Sculls the amateur sculling championship of the River Thames. He challenged the Wingfield Sculls champion Charles Lewis in 1832 and won the race. Lewis won the championship back in 1833. But Julius was preeminent winning again in 1834 and 1835.
Wikipedia

A pair of silver miniature rowing oars inscribed "Alfred A Julius Thames Regatta July 5th 1843" remain in the family. 2011

Julius, Alfred Alexander. b. 4 Sep. 1812, 5th s of Dr George Charles Julius of Richmond, Surrey. Day Boy, Jun 1824 - Sep 1826. Sol. 1836 in London and Richmond. Won the Wingfield Skulls 1832-3-5. And was a prominent competitor in the early days at Henley. m1844 Eliza Julius, 2nd d. of Maj Gen. James Alexander, Bengal Army. d. Mortlake 2 Sep 1865.
Ref: Charterhouse School Register.

Pigots London Directory 1839
Julius Alfred A Solicitor 13 Furnivals Inn

London P.O. Directory 1843
Julius & Cameron Solicitors 19 Buckingham St Strand, & 81 Bermondsey St.

Pigots London Commercial Directory 1846
Julius & Cameron Solicitors 19 Buckingham St Strand

The Times, Wednesday, Jun 26, 1844; pg. 7; Issue 18646; col G
Henley Regatta, Tuesday. - Diamond Sculls; A A Julius of the
Leander club. Won 3rd heat

Alfred was living with his father, Solicitor, aged 25 in the 1841 Census.

On 7 April 1847, his daughter Ediths baptism, his address is recorded as Norfolk Cres Paddington, solicitor.

1851 Directory of Mortlake Surrey lists:
Gentry - Julius Alfred esq.

Kellys P.O. & Court Directory 1859
Julius Alfred Alexander, 19 Buckingham st. Adelphi WC & Stanley ldg. Mrtlk SW.

London Metropolitan Archives
Title: City Plot on the south side of Bishop Street, Perches Plot 31 (20p. in Cunningham's Lane), Perches Plot 111 (34p. on the upper road to Lifford) and Acres Plot 37 (6a. on the road to Culmore)
Reference Code: CLA/049/DD/02/001/013
Level of description: File
Parent Reference: CLA/049/DD/02
Former Reference: LFFG 13
Dates of Creation: 1854 Sep 30
Scope - Content: Original counterpart grant from the Irish Society to Alfred Alexander Julius at a fee farm rent of L6 5s 4p p.a. Includes plans.
Access Restrictions: Available for general access

Partnerships Dissolved.
Alfred Alexander Julius and Dugald Edward Cameron, Buckingham Street, Adelphi, attorneys.
Ref: Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Adviser 22 May 1865.

Death of Mr Julius.
Every aquatic reader, both old and young, will learn with regret the death of Alfred Alexander Julius, the best sculler of his day, and on three occasions, viz, in 1832, 1834, and 1835, the holder of the Wingfield sculls. Mr Julius, in addition to his powers as a sculler, was equally great at an oars end, and in the palmy days of the "old brilliant" Leander, that club had not a more distinguished member. As was Robert Coombs among Waterman so was Julius among amateurs, and long will it be we shall look upon his superior. He died on the 2nd inst at his residence, Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, while yet in the prime of life. It is possible we may recur to his doings in our next.
Ref: Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle 9 September 1865.

Deaths.
Julius. Sept 2, at his residence, Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, Alfred Alexander Julius, Esq, fourth son of G C Julius Esq MD, of St Leonards on Sea.
Ref: County Chronicle Surrey Herald and Weekly Advertiser for Kent 9 September 1865.

Julius Alfred Alexander 15 Sept 1865. The Will of Alfred Alexander Julius late of 19 Buckingham St Adelphi in the County of Middlesex Solicitor deceased who died 2 September 1865 at Mortlake in the county of Surrey was proved at the Principal Registry by the oath of Eliza Julius Julius of Mortlake aforesaid widow relict the sole executrix.
Effects under L12,000. Resworn at the stamp office November 1866 under L20,000
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Alfred is recorded as aged 25 a solicitor not born SRY

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Alfred is recorded as head of house married aged 38 Solicitor and Attorney at Law born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1961, St Mary Mortlake LON. Alfred is recorded as resident at Stanley Lodge Ship Lane Mortlake, head of family, aged 48, a solicitor born Richmond SRY

Alfred married Eliza Julius ALEXANDER [799], daughter of General James ALEXANDER [1484] and Harriet BOWLES [23404], on 19 Sep 1844 in St Marylebone Church London. Eliza was born in 1813 in East Indies and died on 21 Oct 1887 in Kent Lodge Grange Rd. Ramsgate KEN at age 74.

Marriage Notes:
Alternative marriage date: 19 Sep 1844 St Marylebone.
Gentlemans Magazine
Transcription of marriages 1731-1850
Transcribed by Steve van Dulken
Entry from Transcription of marriages 1731-1850
Husband surname Julius first names Alfred Alexander
Wife surname Alexander first names Eliza Julius
Wifes fathers rank/occupation Major General
Wifes fathers unit EIC
Marriage date 19 Sep 1844
Place of marriage St Marylebone
Edition Date Dec 1844
Page number 642
Detail At St. Marylebone, Alfred Alexander Julius, of Richmond, Surrey, to Eliza-Julius, second dau. of Major-Gen. James Alexander, of the East India Co.'s Service.
FIBIS - from Gentlemans Magazine http://www.search.fibis.org/frontis/bin/simplesearchsummarycat.php?s_id=212&sn=Julius&fn=&f=&to=&t=&c=&searchtype=exact&tn=1

General Notes:
Married.
Julius - Alexander. On Thursday, the 19th inst, at St Marylebone Church, by the Rev Henry Julius MA, Alfred Alexander Julius, of Richmond, Surrey, to Eliza Julius, second daughter of Major General James Alexander, of the Honourable East India Company's Service.
Ref: Evening Mail 20 September 1844.

Dr George Charles Julius was Eliza's Godfather, and a close personal friend of her father, hence the family surnames in Eliza & Henry's names.

Deaths - Surname Julius Given name(s) Eliza Julius Place Ramsgate Year 1887 month Oct day 21 Register Entry Oct 21st at Kent Lodge Grange-road Ramsgate Eliza Julius Julius widow of Alfred Alexander Julius of Stanley Lodge Mortlake Surrey and second daughter of late Major-General James Alexander HEICS frmly CO of Benares Division of Bengal Army aged 74 years Year 1887 Date 15 Nov
FIBIS - The Times of India 1887
http://www.search.fibis.org/frontis/bin/aps_detail.php?id=740621

Julius Eliza Julius 21 October 1887
The Will with Codicil of Eliza Julius Julius late of Kent Lodge Grange Rd Ramsgate in the County of Kent widow who died 21 Oct 1887 at Kent Lodge was proved at the Principal Registry 17 Dec 1888, by Edith Isabel Julius and Minnie Jessie Harriet Julius both of Kent Lodge Spinsters the Daughters the Executrixes
Personal Estate L5594 7s 6d.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Eliza is recorded as a wife aged 37 born Bengal East Indies

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Eliza is recorded as a wife aged 47 born East Indies.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Eliza is recorded as a widow head of house aged 57 born in East India.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 146 M    i. Ashley Alexander JULIUS [800] was born on 8 Aug 1845 in Hyde Park London MDX and died in 1881 in Canada at age 36.

+ 147 F    ii. Edith Isabell JULIUS [808] was born in 1847, was baptised on 7 Apr 1847 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died in 1930 at age 83.

+ 148 M    iii. Dr Stanley Alexander JULIUS [809] was born on 26 Jan 1849 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 14 Mar 1849 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 25 Nov 1891 in Hastings SSX at age 42.

+ 149 M    iv. Villiers Alexander JULIUS [814] was born on 19 Nov 1850 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 5 Jan 1930 in Bexhill SSX at age 79, and was buried on 8 Jan 1930 in Bexhill SSX.

+ 150 F    v. Ada Alexandria JULIUS [822] was born on 17 Aug 1852 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 14 Nov 1852 in St John Richmond SRY, and died in 1934 at age 82.

+ 151 F    vi. Minnie Jessie Harriet JULIUS [824] was born on 16 Jan 1857 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 22 May 1857 in Mortlake SRY, and died on 10 Apr 1935 in Bexhill-on-Sea SSX at age 78.

84. Anne Spencer JULIUS [825] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Nov 1814 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 6 Feb 1815 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 28 May 1898 at age 83, and was buried on 28 May 1898 in France.

General Notes:
The Times, Wednesday, Aug 05, 1835; pg. 7; Issue 15860; col C
Marriages - On 4th at Petersham, Capt G Stanford Deverill, 16th
Queen's Lancers, to Anne Spencer, youngest daur of George C Julius MD of Richmond

Gentleman's Magazine.
August 4, 1835 at Petersham Captain G. S. Deverill 16th Lancers to Anne Spencer daughter of G. C. Julius M. D. of Richmond.

Anne lived for many years in France.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Anne is recorded as head of house a widow aged 45 born Richmond SRY

Anne married Col Gervase Stanford DEVERILL [826], son of Samuel DEVERILL [2739] and Susan STANFORD [2740], on 4 Aug 1835 in Petersham SRY. Gervase was born on 19 Sep 1803 in Burnley, Lancaster, Eng., was baptised on 25 Sep 1803 in Clifton NTT, and died on 28 Oct 1859 in Isle Noirmoutier France at age 56.

General Notes:
The Edinburgh Advertiser 1826.
From The London Gazette.
Military Promotions. War Office Nov 13.
16th Regiment of Dragoon Guards, Gervis (sic) Stanford Deverill to be Cornet, by purchase, vice Bonham, whose appointment has not taken place.

In 1837 Gervase was living in a freehold house in Castle Gate Nottingham

Gervase served in the 16th or Queens Regiment of Light Dragoons, and 90th Regiment in the Crimea (wounded), also in India. He was of Petersham.

Deverill Gervas Stanford Esq. 1859 31 December. Letters of Administration of the personal estate and effects of Gervas Stanford Deverill late of Nantes in the Empire of France Esquire formerly a Colonel in Her Majesty's 90th Regiment of Light Infantry deceased who died 28 October 1859 on the Island of Noirmontiers in the said Empire were granted at the Principle Registry to Anne Spencer Deverill of Wrecclesham near Farnham in the County of Surrey Widow and Relict of the said Deceased she having first sworn. Effects under L5,000

Research Notes:
Gervase and Jemima first married at Gretna Green on the 27 Sep 1823.
Ref: Ancestry

A Gervase Stanford Deverill is shown in the IGI as marrying Jemima Helar Bland on 4 Oct 1823 at St Savior York, and a baptism for the same name is also recorded on the 25 Sept 1803 at Clifton with Clapton Nottinghamshire


Children from this marriage were:

+ 152 F    i. Isabella Maria DEVERILL [1242] was born on 5 Dec 1837 in Richmond SRY.

+ 153 M    ii. Percy Julius DEVERILL [1246] was born in 1838 and died on 3 Nov 1863 in Meerut Bengal India at age 25.

+ 154 M    iii. George Charles DEVERILL [1247] was born in 1839, died on 27 Aug 1868 at age 29, and was buried in Nauuanu Hawaii.

+ 155 F    iv. Annie Stanford DEVERILL [1248] was born on 27 Dec 1840 in Richmond SRY.

+ 156 M    v. William Edward Herbert DEVERILL [1253] was born on 6 Sep 1848 in Burnley, Lancaster, Eng. and died on 26 May 1904 in Hanalei Kauai Hawaii at age 55.

+ 157 M    vi. Col Julius Stanford DEVERILL [1259] was born 2nd Qtr 1852 in Colchester ESS and died in 1914 in Croydon LON at age 62.

+ 158 M    vii. Alfred Palmer DEVERILL [2742] was born about 1849 in Burnley, Lancaster, Eng., was baptised on 10 Jul 1850 in Manchester Chapel of Christ Salford LAN, died on 21 Jan 1898 in Kamole, Maui, HI aged about 49, and was buried on 22 Jan 1898 in Kula, Maui, Hawaii.

+ 159 M    viii. Herbert DEVERILL [15928] was born about 1849 in Burnley LAN.


85. Rev Henry Richard JULIUS M.A. [776] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Jun 1816 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 14 Apr 1818 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 27 Mar 1891 in Woodcroft Red Hill SRY at age 74, and was buried on 2 Apr 1891 in St John Church Yard Redhill SRY.

General Notes:
Henry was baptised by his brother-in-law George Quilter.

Henry was educated at Charterhouse, Shewsbury 1832-35. St Johns College Cambridge. Curate Farnham 1839-46. Vicar of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. Henry retired in 1886 aged 70. Tilford was part of the parish of Farnham and did not have its own church in 1844.

Julius, Henry Richard. b.30 Jun 1816, 6th s. of Dr George Charles Julius of Richmond, Surrey. Day Boy, Jun 1824 - Sep 1826. At Shrewsbury, Feb 1832 - Sep 1835. St Johns, Camb.; B.A. 1839; M.A. 1842. D. 1839; P. 1840. C. of Farnham, Surrey 1839-46. V of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. m. 1840, Mary Ann, 1st. d. of J. H. Butterworth of Clapham.
d. Redhill 27 Mar 1891.
Ref: Charterhouse School Register.

Shrewsbury School Register - Entrance 1832.
Julius Henry Richard, left 1835; St Johns Coll. Cambridge, BA 1839; C of Farnham, 1839-46; V of Wrecclesham 1846; died 27 Mar. 1891.
NZSOG

Henry Richard Julius. College: ST JOHN'S Entered: Michs. 1835 Died: 27 Mar 1891 More Information: Adm. pens. at ST JOHN'S, Feb. 13, 1835. S. of George C., Esq., of Richmond, Surrey. Schools [Charterhouse and] Shrewsbury. Matric. Michs. 1835; B.A. 1839; M.A. 1842. Ord. deacon (Winchester) July 7, 1839; priest, July 12, 1840; C. of Farnham, 1839-46. V. of Wrecclesham, Surrey, 1846-86. Resided subsequently at Wrecclesham Grange, Farnham. Married, Sept. 2, 1840, Mary Ann, dau. of J. H. Butterworth, of Clapham Common. Died Mar. 27, 1891, aged 74, at Redhill. Brother of the above. (List of Carthusians; Shrewsbury Sch. Reg.; Crockford; The Guardian, Apr. 1, 1891.)
Alumni Cantabrigienses. Ancestry

Julius Henry Richard Wrecclesham, Parsonage, Farnham, Surrey. St John's College, Cambridge BA 1839, MA 1842; Deacon 1839, Priest 1840. P.C. of Wrecclesham, Dio. Win. 1846. (Patron Bishop of Winchester; P.C.'s Inc 350L and Ho; Pop 1271) Formerly C. of St Andrews, Farnham, 1839-46.
Ref Page 380 Crockfords 1868

THE CURATE OF FARNHAM, the Rev*A.B. Julius, obviously knew some Tilfordians as he shewed in a letter to Mr Ware on 21st June 1844. He made some very forceful points and wrote on the subject of a school for Tilford.
As a resident Curate of Farnham for nearly five years, I have become acquainted accidentally with some of the inhabitants of this hamlet in our parish and I deeply regret that neither piety nor morality is at all increasing in the district. On the contrary there are many youths from twelve to twenty years of age with little or no employment who are likely to infect with their evil principles, the younger children, themselves to become serious plagues to the neighbourhood unless they can be brought into contact with the civilisation and correcting influence of Christianity.
I have been making enquiries respecting the practicability of establishing such a school and there seems to be little doubt that from twelve to thirty boys might easily be brought together. This arrangement need not interfere with the school now conducted by Miss Eade as air equal number of girls ought to be under instruction to which she might attend.
The main difficulty seems to be in procuring the rental for a suitable house, and ground attached. Upon this point in particular I should apply now to you, and should feel very obliged of you could either alleviate the difficulty or suggest any other quarter in which to apply. I feel sure that I could guarantee a fair rent for two or three years through the aid of some of the inhabitants, after which time I hope the school may support itself.
I deeply deplore that circumstances should have arisen that led to the closing of the chapel but at the same time I feel that this very deprivation of spiritual privileges is an increased reason why efforts should be made to supply the sad deficiency."
The idea of the school was not acted upon with any haste.- - - The new church was consecrated on 10th July 1867 and the Rev. H.R.Julius read one of the lessons at the first evening service.
* The initials A.B. are undoubtedly an error, for the writer of the letter could only have been Rev H.J.Julius.
Ref: Tilford Through the Ages

JULIUS. Henry Richard.
Alum Cantab. Adm pens St.Johns 13 Feb 1835.
Son of George C. Esq. Richmond Surrey.
Schools [Charterhouse] & Shrewsbury.
Matric Michs 1835 B.A. 1839. M.A. 1842.
Ord. Deac [Winchester] 6 July 1839 pr 12 July 1840.
Curate of Farnham 1839-46.
Vicar of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. Resided subsequently at Wrecclesham, Grange, Farnham.
M. 2 Sept. 1840 Mary Ann d of J.H.Butterworth of Clapham Common. D. 27 Mar 1891 Aged 74 at Redhill. Bro. of A.A.Julius.
FROM : List of Carthusians, Shrewsbury Sch Reg, Crockford, The Guardian 1 Apr 1891.

The Times, Friday, Sep 20, 1844; pg. 0; Issue 18720; col A
Marriages - Henry Julius MA officiating at St Marylebone church
The Times, Friday, Apr 28, 1848; pg. 0; Issue 19849; col A
Marriages - Rev H R Julius at Wreclesham Surrey, officiated

1855 July 16; Henry was issued a British Passport No. 24787
Ref: Findmypast 2011.

Rowledge.
Soon after the year 1860, Henry Julius began to feel the growing hamlet of Rowledge at the junction of three parishes, Binsted, Frensham and Wrecclesham needed more supervision. He consulted the Bishop and the clergy of the parishes affected and it was decided to issue a subscription list in order to build the church. The government gave a quantity of 2 acres of forest land for the church and vicarage of which three quarters of an acre was used for the church and 1 acre and a quarter for the vicarage and garden. £300 per annum was set aside to endow the parish of Rowledge. The church was dedicated to St James and consecrated 28 January 1871.

The Bishop had offered Henry the first appointment to Rowledge who thereupon offered it to his son-in-law Arthur Parker.

On St James Day, July 25 of 1894, the east window was dedicated. The window is a triplet in the style of early English architecture designed and executed by Clayton and Bell. It was given by the Rev A W and Mrs Parker in memory of the latter's parents, the Rev H R Julius founder of the church, and his wife. The subject of the window generally is "The Resurrection"
Ref: A Rowledge History by Florence Parker and others researched and published by Roy Waight

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Surrey.
Rev Henry R Julius Wreclesham. 2a 2r 34p gross estimated rental value. L86/10s/0d

Deaths.
Julius. On Good Friday at Woodcroft, Redhill, the Rev Henry Richard Julius, for 40 years vicar of Wrecclesham, aged 74.
Ref: Sussex Agricultural Express 3 April 1891.

Will of Rev. Henry Richard Julius.
Dated the 24th day of April 1891.
This is the Last Will of me Henry Richard Julius of the Grange, Wrecclesham in the County of Surrey, clerk in Holy Orders I hereby revoke all former Wills and Testamentary dispositions made by me. I appoint my nephews Alexander Kaye Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth (hereinafter called my Trustees) to be the Executors and Trustees of this my Will.
I give all my plate linen china glass books pictures prints wines furniture and other household effects and my carriage and pony to my dear wife Mary Ann absolutely in case she shall survive me but in case my said wife shall die in my lifetime then I give the testimonial presented to me by my late parishioners and the silver tea pot coffee pot cream jug sugar basin and salver given to my father together with the piano pony and carriage to my dear daughters Edith Catherine and Constance Marion jointly and my plate and ornaments other than the articles aforesaid together with the jewellery and trinkets worn or used by my wife I give to my trustees (to whom I have signified in writing my wishes as to the distribution thereof) to be by them divided between my children and grandchildren or some of them according to the uncontrolled judgement and discretion of my Trustees. And all my other household effects I give to my said daughters Edith Catherin and Constance Marion jointly I give my leasehold dwelling house, the Grange, situate at Wreccelsham aforesaid to my dear wife absolutely if she shall survive me but in case she shall die in my lifetime then I declare that the said dwelling house shall fall into and form part of my residuary Estate. To my dear daughter Mary Isabel as I consider that she will find the money she will receive under parents marriage settlement amply sufficient for her wants as a Clewer Sister and to my dear daughter Harriett Emily, the wife of the Reverend Arthur Parker who has already received two cottages at Boundstone and to my dear son Henry John to whom I have advanced in my lifetime a sum of money which I had intended to leave him at my death I make no bequest. I give and devise the cottage situate opposite the Vicarage at Wrecclesham with the garden and appurtenances to my wife during her life and after her death to the use of such of my children or grandchildren as she shall by any deed or deed by her will or any codicil thereto appoint and in default of such appointment and so far as any such appointment shall not extend to the use of my dear daughter Florence the wife of James Stevens. I give to my dear wife the sum of three hundred pounds to be paid within one calendar month after my death. I devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate not hereby otherwise disposed of unto my Trustees upon trust that my Trustees shall sell call in and convert into money and shall with and out of that money produced by such sale calling in and conversion and with and out of my ready money pay my funeral and testamentary expenses and debt and the legacies bequeathed by this my Will or any Codicil hereto and with the consent in writing of my said wife during her life and after her decease at the direction of my Trustees invest the residue of the said moneys with power for my Trustees from time to time with such consent or at such discretion as aforesaid to vary such investments and shall stand possessed of the said residuary trust moneys and the investments for the time being representing the same( hereinafter called the residuary trust funds) upon the trusts following (that is to say) in trust to pay the income thereof to my said wife, Mary Ann for her life and after her decease in trust for my children or of any of their issue as my said wife shall by any deed or deeds or by her will or any codicil thereto appoint and in default of such appointment and so far as any such appointment shall not extend upon trust to sell and convert into money the said residuary trust funds and out of the money produced by such sale and conversion to pay the following legacies that is to say to my dear daughter Ellen Georgina, the wife of Reverend Ambrose Morris the sum of eight hundred pounds . To my dear daughter Mary Louis the wife of Arthur Brewin the sum of two hundred pounds and to my dear daughter Octavia the sum of three hundred pounds and to pay the residuary trust funds and moneys to my said daughters Edith Katherine and Constance Marion in equal parts and if any of my five last named children shall die in my lifetime leaving children then such children shall take in equal shares the share or legacy of their respective parents Provided always that no child or grandchild of mine who shall take any part of the residuary trust funds from any such appointment aforesaid shall be entitled to any part of the residuary trust funds under any appointment as aforesaid shall be entitled to any share of the unappointed part of such residuary trust funds or to any such legacy as aforesaid without bringing the share or share appointed to him or her into hotchpotch and accounting for the same accordingly. And I declare that my Trustees may postpone the sale and conversion of my real and personal estate or any part thereof for so long as long as they shall think fit and that the rent profits and income to accrue from and after my decease of an from such part of my estate as shall for the time being remain unsold and unconverted shall after payment thereout of all incidental expenses and outgoings be paid applied to the person or persons and in the manner to whom and in which the income of the moneys produced by such sale and conversion would for the time being be in payable or applicable under this my will if such sale and conversion had been actually made. And I declare that all moneys liable to be invested under this my will may be invested in or upon any stocks funds or securities of or guaranteed by the government of the United Kingdom or any British Colony or Dependency or any Foreign state, or the debentures securities stocks or shares of any railway or any other company in the United Kingdom or India or upon any real or leasehold securities and in lending money on any mortgage security my trustees may accept whatsoever title or evidence of title shall appear to them sufficient without being answerable for any loss arising therefrom And my Trustees may release any part of the property comprised in any mortgage on security if satisfied that the remaining property is a sufficient security of the money owed to thereon. And I also declare that the power of appointing any new trustees conferred by statute shall for the purpose of this will be vested in my said wife during her lifetime And I also declare that my trustees and any future trustee of this my will who may be a solicitor shall be entitled to charge my estate for all business done by them in relation to my estate or the trusts of this my will in the same manner as they would have been entitled to charge my executors or trustees but had been employed by my executors or trustees to do such business as their solicitor.
In witness thereof I the said Henry Richard Julius have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of August one thousand eight hundred and eighty eight.
Henry R Julius as and for his last will in the presence of us present at the same time who in his presence and at his request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses - George Robert Waterson, School Master, Wrecclesham Schools - George Hoare Gardener, Wrecclesham.

On the 24th April 1891 probate of this will was granted to Alexander Kaye Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth the Executors.
Be it known that at the date hereunder written the last Will and Testament of The Reverend Henry Richard Julius formerly of the Grange, Wrecclesham but late of Woodcroft, The Common, Redhill within the County of Surrey, Clerk deceased who died at Woodcroft aforesaid was proved and registered in the Principal Registry of Her Majesty's High Court Of Justice, and that administration of the personal estate of the said deceased was granted by the aforesaid Court to:
Alexander Kaye Butterworth of the North Eastern Railway Station in the City of York, Solicitor to the North Eastern Railway Company and George Montagu Butterworth of No 5 Brunswick Terrace, Swindon in the County of Wilts. Solicitor the Nephews the Executors named in he said Will they having been first sworn well and faithfully to administer the same.
Gross Value of Personal Estate L3,851 7s. 0d.
Ref: Will Supplied & Transcribed by J Birch 2014

Julius the Rev Henry Richard 24th April 1891.
The Will of the Rev. Henry Richard Julius formerly of the Grange Wrecclesham but late of Woodcroft the Common Redhill both in the County of Surrey. Clerk who died 27th March 1891 at Woodcroft was proven at the Principal Registry by Alexander Kaye Butterworth of the North-Eastern Railway Station in the City of York Solicitor to the North-Eastern Railway Company and George Montagu Butterworth of 5 Brunswick Terrace Swindon late of the County of Wilts. Solicitor. The nephews the Executors.
Personal Estate L3,851 7s 0d
Ref: National Probate Calendar.

Research Notes:
Image Courtesy St Peters Wrecclesham SRY Archive.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 34 Curate of Wrecclesham born Richmond. Also in the house were a governess, cook, 3 maids.

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 54 Vicar of Wrecclesham born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is described as head of house married aged 64 Vicar born Richmond SRY. Also in the house were three servants

Henry married Mary Ann BUTTERWORTH [1031], daughter of Joseph Henry BUTTERWORTH of Clapham Common [2216] and Mary Ann STOCK [2217], on 2 Sep 1840 in Clifton, GLS. Mary was born in 1816 in MDX London and died on 27 Mar 1893 in Woodcroft Red Hill SRY at age 77.

General Notes:
The Reverent and Mrs Parker and Their Servant.
At the County Court held at Aldershot on Wednesday, before his Honour Judge Lushington, Mrs Parker, wife of the Vicar of Rowledge, the Rev H W Parker, was sued by Elizabeth Meadow, a servant, for 16/4p the balance of a month's wages in lieu of notice. . . . .. Elizabeth Meadow received about L13 per annum . . . .. She was given a month's notice to leave no reason was given . . . . . A week later she was told the leave the house at once and given a weeks pay. She was suing for the balance 16/4d.
Mr Jackson for the defendant alleged the plaintiff's conduct was "light".
His honour: Is it worthwhile to go into the question of character for 16/4d I should be very sorry indeed to have to do so for that.
Mr Merry for Meadow: it is a question of principle, the only charge against this girl is of having 2 boys arms round her waist.
His Honour: it is a very little case, and a painful thing for a person's character to be tried for so small a sum.
Mr Merry: We want this girl's character cleared.
Then followed further evidence and cross-examination including.
Jackson: Plaintiff had been walking out with men and one night stayed out late and Mrs Parker had to get up and go down and let the girl in, for the whole household had retired to rest. There was the vicar of the parish, and he must
His Honour interrupting: Oh yes; all of us must keep order if the vicar does. (Laughter).
. . . . .
His Honour summing up, said servant cases were always difficult, and it required the Judge to put himself in a most equitable frame of mind to deal with them. There was always a great deal of feeling in the cases on both sides, and both parties always insisted on their extreme rights, and the present case was an example of the kind. The plaintiff and defendant insisted on their respective rights, and so the whole case was fought out for the trifling sum of 16/4p. The rule of law he always carried out was that neither master or mistress were entitled to dismiss summarily or eject from their house at once, anyone unless some very serious misconduct was proved. He could not allow to a Rector or Vicar any greater rights in law then he could do anyone else; but everybody must agree that the Vicar of a parish had the special duty imposed upon him, if not by law, at any rate by society and his profession, to be strict in the management of his household, and of course very careful indeed as to the behaviour of his female servants. He was sorry to say that for the trumpery sum of 16/4d, he had that day to try the great question of the sex and the behaviour of, and enquire into the character, of the plaintiff. It was repugnant to him to have to do so. It was a natural disposition of the sexes to be drawn together. He was sorry to say it was impossible for him to believe both Mrs Parker and the plaintiff. He must say that he believed Mrs Parker, and was sorry that the plaintiff had disgraced herself by swearing falsely; but the main question was whether Mrs Parker was right in summarily dismissing the plaintiff. He did not for a moment want to take an extremely prudish view of the case, and such a thing as persistent misconduct he did not recognise. If a servant in a place misbehaved herself, and was still retained in service, he must consider that all past offences were condoned. He had heard the evidence of Miss Parker and he must say it was unseemly conduct on the part of the girl. The plaintiff's conduct had been light: she had been light in the box that day, and he was entitled to take that into account in deciding the great question whether the conduct of the girl justified Mrs Parker in summarily dismissing her. He did not want to set up or require any extraordinary standard of virtue for plaintiff, or for any other servant, or hired female servant, but in the present case he thought the offence was aggravated by the warnings given to plaintiff after misbehaving herself; and, notwithstanding such warnings she, in spite of them, repeated the offence. In the box she had sworn falsely and deliberately on a number of points and her behaviour was highly disgraceful; and his conclusion was, looking at all the circumstances of the case, looking at the special warnings, the evidence of Miss Parker, which was not denied or palliated in any way, and also looking at plaintiff's behaviour in the box, he had to say expressly so, that Mrs Parker was within her legal right in summarily dismissing the girl, and therefore he gave judgement for the defendant. The next time he hoped Mrs Parker would, by not considering a few shillings avoid another case like this.
Ref: Farnham Herald August 12, 1899. (Roy Waight)

Julius Mary Anne of Woodcroft the Common Redhill Surrey Widow died 27 Mar 1893 Probate London 13 May 1893 to Alexander Kaye Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth Solicitors. Effects L661-7s-10d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Mary is recorded as a wife aged 35 born MDX

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Clifton House Clifton, GLS. Mary Ann is shown at her mothers home in Clifton aged 55 wife of a clergyman born London.

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Mary is described as a wife aged 65 born MDX London

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Woodcroft Red Hill Reigate SRY. Mary is described as head of house a widow aged 75 living on her own means born London

Children from this marriage were:

+ 160 F    i. Mary Isabel JULIUS [1032] was born on 13 Sep 1841 in Farnham Road Farnham, was baptised on 17 Oct 1841 in Farnham SRY, and died on 3 Mar 1898 in Windsor BRK at age 56.

+ 161 F    ii. Harriet Emily JULIUS [1033] was born on 28 Dec 1842 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 25 Jan 1843 in Farnham SRY, and died on 13 Jan 1933 in Tunbridge Wells KEN at age 90.

+ 162 F    iii. Maria Louisa JULIUS [1034] was born on 7 Dec 1844 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 3 Jan 1845 in Farnham SRY, and died on 19 May 1933 in Twickenham at age 88.

+ 163 F    iv. Florence JULIUS [1035] was born on 8 Jun 1846 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 12 Jul 1846 in Farnham SRY, and died on 3 Feb 1937 at age 90.

+ 164 F    v. Ellen Georgina JULIUS [1036] was born on 17 Sep 1848 in Wrecclesham SRY, died on 27 Feb 1941 in Ashfield Leamington Spa WAR at age 92, and was buried in Leamington Cemetery WAR.

+ 165 F    vi. Edith Katherine JULIUS [1037] was born on 28 Oct 1850 in Wrecclesham SRY and died on 4 Nov 1937 in Redhill at age 87.

+ 166 F    vii. Constance Marion JULIUS [1038] was born on 14 Sep 1852 in Farnham SRY and died on 21 Apr 1945 in Tunbridge Wells KEN at age 92.

+ 167 F    viii. Octavia JULIUS [1048] was born on 13 Jun 1854 in Farnham SRY, died on 15 Jul 1942 in Southborough Kent at age 88, and was buried on 18 Jul 1942 in Southborough Kent.

+ 168 F    ix. Madeline JULIUS [1039] was born in 1856 and died in 1870 at age 14.

+ 169 M    x. Henry John JULIUS [1040] was born on 1 Jun 1858 in Farnham SRY and died on 27 Aug 1932 in Townsville Qld. at age 74.


86. Rev Archibald Aeneas JULIUS [847] (George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Jan 1819 in Old Palace Richmond SRY, was baptised on 26 Feb 1819 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 4 Mar 1895 in Southery NFK at age 76, and was buried in Southery Churchyard. The cause of his death was an infection of the heart and secondry peritonitis.

General Notes:
Archibald was educated at Dr. Delafosse's School, Richmond Green, a school of high repute, ref. [1166]. In 1837, he entered St John's College Cambridge. took his B.A. 1841, M.A. 1847. Ordained Deacon by Kaye the Bishop of Lincoln in 1842, he was appointed Curate Collingham, Notts 1842-44; Ordained priest 1843. Archibald worked with Sir Henry Duckingfield at St Martins in the Fields ; then assistant Chaplain at Hampton Court and Curate of Teddington Middlesex 1844-46, and Chaplain at Hampton Court 1845-49; then Curate of Great Staughton, Hunts 1846, and from 1847 he was also domestic chaplain to Viscount Sidmouth. He was made Rector of Myland, Colchester 1850, but in 1855 he, and the then Rector of Southery Norfolk exchanged livings. Archibald took up his duties at Southery on 4 March 1855 and spent the remainder of his life in this village.

Archibald Aeneas Julius. College: ST JOHN'S Entered: Michs. 1837 More Information: Adm. pens. at ST JOHN'S, Jan. 30, 1837. Of Surrey. [S. of George, M.D., physician to King George IV.] B. Jan. 9, 1819 [at Old Palace, Richmond]. Matric. Michs. 1837; B.A. 1841; M.A. 1847. One of five Members of the College Boat Club who took part in the first race for the Colquhoun Sculls, 1837. Ord. deacon (Lincoln) May 22, 1842; priest, June 11, 1843; C. of Collingham, Notts., 1842-4. C. of Teddington, Middlesex, 1844-6. Assistant Chaplain at Hampton Court Palace, where he preached once before three Queens, Victoria, Adelaide and the Queen of the Belgians. C. of Gt Staughton, Hunts., 1846-50. Domestic Chaplain to Viscount Sidmouth, in 1847. R. of Myland, Essex, 1849-55. R. of Southery, Norfolk, 1855-95. Married, Mar. 11, 1847, Charlotte, eldest dau. of the Rev. Joseph Mayor, R. of South Collingham, Notts. Died Mar. 4, 1895, at Southery; buried there. Brother of the next. (Boase, v. 798; P. E. Towell; Crockford; John Bull, Mar. 20, 1847.)
Alumni Cantbrigienses. Ancestry.

The Times, Thursday, Jan 28, 1847; pg. 7; Issue 19458; col A
University Intelligence. Cambridge, Jan. 27. - Degree conferred to
Rev Archibald Aeneas Julius, St John's College

Julius Archibald Aeneas, Southery Rectory, Downham, Norfolk. St John's College, Cambridge BA 1842, MA 1848. Deacon 1842 Priest 1844 by Bishop of Lincoln, rector of Southery Diocese Norwich 1855 (Patron Rev Edmund Hall tithe 650L 10s 6d; Glebe, 104 acres; R.'s Inc. 804L and Ho; Pop 1164)
Ref Page 380 Crockfords 1868

Julius Jottings. January 1900. No 1.
We give a few particulars of the life of the late Rev A. E. Julius.
One of the most remarkable things is that he exactly completed his fortieth year as rector, having entered on the living of Southery on 4th March, 1855, and died the same day, 1895.
In personal appearance he was about the average height, but had great strength, especially in his arms, which, no doubt, had been brought out in his school and college days, during which period he was much given to athletics as then practiced. He held the important post of Captain of the Lady Margaret Boat Club in St. John's College, Cambridge, at the time when that boat was head of the river.
To that club we are indebted for the word "blazer" as now applied to the garment worn by gentlemen at lawn tennis and other games. They introduced an outside jersey of an intensely red or scarlet colour, and were nicknamed "The Blazers." Hence, some years afterwards, the word came into general use to describe the garment I have alluded to, no matter what its colour may be, but the word has not at present found a place in the Webster's Dictionary. Before he left college there was an entry made in the minute book of the club, that when the boat went out of use, Mr. Julius should hJuliusJuliusArchibaldave the rudder sent to him, and about thirty years ago he received it as a memento of the proud position which the
eight-oared occupied in his captaincy
He was born (details as above of his early life & education as above) he removed to Hampton Court, and became Chaplain to the Palace there. Whilst occupying this position, he had three Queens on one occasion present at the service; Her Majesty Queen Victoria; Adelaide, the Queen Dowager; and the Queen of the Belgians. The Duke of Wellington was also a regular attendant.
In 1850. Lady Cowper presented him to the living of Myland, Colchester, here he built a Church capable of holding 400 people. Finally the Rev Edmund Hall, who was then Rector of Southery, exchanged with him for Myland. On his arrival here, he had all the Church building to do over again. The Church was a most wretched barn-like structure, and Mr. Julius. who had been used to better things, could not put up with it, and at once began to look about him for ways and means, He was successful, and raised about L1,700 (see final cost below). With this sum, under the advice of Mr. Robinson, the architect, he built a far better church than could have been hoped for with the money at his disposal. It consists of a nice chancel, nave and south aisle, and holds 400 people. The carr-stone of the district was used with stone dressings, columns and windows in the Early English style.
The writer of this notice was present at the consecration in 1858 (Laying of the Foundation Stone) and remembers the village band playing all the music at the service, and very effective it was. It is almost a pity that all this has disappeared, although we see a revival of the full band at High Mass in some of the advanced churches in London. Mr Julius gave the site (part of the Glebe) for the Church, and also for a Sunday School. . . . . . reference to his marriage date and details of his wife and family. . . . . One other thing connected with his family is worthy of record. Dr Julius, his father, was an only child, (not correct) and inherited property in the island of St Kitts, near Jamaica; on coming into possession of it (no record of George Julius returning to St Kitts) he liberated all the slaves (no record of this - unlikely)
Mr Julius had several other livings offered to him, but he declined them. If his character is to be spoken of, I should sum it up in a very few words: he was a Churchman and an Englishman, very kind to all, and always ready to help anyone when it lay in his power to do so.
Particulars submitted by Fanny Maria Hull (his daughter) the author is unknown.

The Foundation Stone reads:
This Stone as the Foundation Stone of
the Church of St Mary Southery was laid
by the Right Rev. John Thomas the Lord Bishop of Norwich
on the 7th Day of September MDGGGLVIII in the presence of the
Rev A.E. Julius M.A. Rector
Mr F Robinson, Mr J Sayle,
Churchwardens and many others
with prayer to the Almighty God for His Blessing
on the work thus begun.

E L Fenn visited Southery on 18 May 2002, and was shown the Church Wardens Books, in the possession of Mr David Starling Church Warden:
Minutes recorded notice of a meeting in the church, on the 6th Oct 1857 to consider a proposal to provide a new burial ground and build a new church in Southery.
This meeting was held over to a further meeting on the 14th of October 1857 where the proposal, and a rate on Parishioners of 2/6d for 5years to finance it, was carried unanimously. A committee was formed of the Clergy, Churchwardens (John Sayle & Frederick Robinson), and Mr Frederick Robinson Jnr., to give effect to the decision.
The Foundation Stone was laid in 1858 and reads: " This stone as the Foundation Stone of the Church of St Mary Southery was laid by the Right Rev John Thomas the Lord Bishop of Norwich on the 7th day of September in the year of our Lord MDGGGLVIII (1858) in the presence of the Rev A E Julius MA Rector, Mr F Robinson and Mr J Sayle, Churchwardens and many others. With prayer to Almighty God for His Blessing on the work thus begun"
At a meeting of Parishioners on the 24th April 1862 the accounts were presented for the completed works as follows:
Mr Bennett builder paid L1710-0-0
Detailed other expenses totaled L 173-17-3
Total L1883-17-3

Cash received included:
General subscription L 1149-14-6
Parish rate L 254-11-8
Plus Teas, Bazaar's, Donations etc. L 479-11-1
Total L1883-17-3
These were signed by the vestry and A E Julius as Chairman.
Archibald last signed off Vestry minutes in the Church Wardens Books in 1892.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Norfolk
Rev A. E. Julius Southery 107a 0r 18p. gross estimated rental value. L157/0/0/

ROWING :
Spurred on no doubt, by his brothers example, he became a member, of the Lady Margaret Boat Club and rowed No 2 in the college's first boat 1838 and 1839
The secretary of the Lady Margaret Boat Club [St. John's College Boat Club] gave me information she held about Archibald as a member of the club but unfortunately the minute books of the club for some years when he was a member, are lost. He was renowned in most of the Lent-May races at Cambridge during his time at the University.
As regards the Colquhoun Sculls the secretary says "In 1837 a sculling Competition for the Colquhoun Sculls took place for the first time on the Thames from Westminster to Putney, organised by L.M.B.C. [In 1842 the venue was changed to Cambridge, where it still takes place]. He took the lead, but was overtaken by a Mr Bernay [?], also L.M.B.C, and then Mr Shadwell [L.M.B.C.and Captain]. In the May Term 1840 Mr. Julius gets a mention in the Colquhoun Sculls, where he was beaten by Mr. Shadwell and capsized in the process.
The list of captains is incomplete between 1839 - 1942 but it is likely that Mr. Julius was captain in part of this period.

Extracts from Boase.
Julius Archibald Aeneas b.1818; educ St John's Coll. Cambridge, one of five members of College boat club who took part in the first race for Colquhoun sculls on the Cam 1837; rowed No. 2 in the college's first boat 1838 and 1839; B.A.1841, M.A.1847; ordained by Bishop of Lincoln, deacon 1842, priest 1844; C of Collingham near Newark 1842-5; C of Teddington, MDX 1845-9; Chaplain at Hampton Court Palace, preached once before three Queens, Victoria, Adelaide, and Queen of the Belgians; C of Great Staunton, Hunts, 1849-50; V of Myland near Colchester 1850-5; R of Southery, NFK 4 Mar 1855 to death. Died Southery rectory 4 March 1895.
The Eagle June 1895 p 608.

OBITUARY DOWNHAM GAZETTE :
Death of Rev A.E. Julius.
We regret to record the death of Rev. A.E.Julius who breathed his last at the Rectory on Monday. Although he had been convalescent for some time, it was not thought his end was so near until within a few hours of his death. The sad news caused a deep impression in and around the village.
As recently as Sunday last he was in his usual good humour and chatted with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr and Mrs. T.J.Thompson of Peterborough who are staying at the rectory and even went so far as to remark to the Rev. V. W. Peake that he thought he should conduct a burial service on the following day [Monday] but fate willed otherwise.
He retired to rest at his usual time on Sunday night when all went well until his housekeeper's attention was called to an unusual noise preceding from his bedroom. This was about 6 o'clock. She went to his assistance and found him in great pain. Dr. Todd, as the nearest medical man, was at once called in, and Dr. Mackintosh [of Downham] his regular physician, was telegraphed for, but on his arrival pronounced little hope for his patient. The news proved only too true, as death occurred a few hours afterwards.
The primary cause of death was affection of the heart and secondary peritonitis. The Reverend gentleman was born 19th January 1819 and was therefore in his 76th year of age. He was the youngest son of Dr George Julius of the Palace Richmond, late physician to King George IV. He graduated at St John's College Cambridge where he was for many years Captain of Lady Mary Boat Club. His first curacy was at Collingham near Newark under the Rev Joseph Mayor, whose eldest daughter he afterwards married. He then became curate of St Martin in the Fields London and afterwards chaplain at Hampton Court Palace. His first living was Myland near Colchester, which was presented to him by Lady Cowper and for the last 40 years he had been Rector of Southery.
On the formation of the first school board in the parish, Mr Julius was elected a member and the position he held for several years until he resigned. When the Institute and Library was first started, he became its President. An office he filled up to his death. He was the President of Southery Cricket Club and was a great admirer of the game. In his younger days he was as exceptionally good cricketer and up to the very last he never allowed a match by his village team to pass unnoticed, but he would support it both with his purse and presence. He was an exceptionally good preacher and was always sure of a good congregation. A short time after his death a great change must unavoidably take place at the rectory as at his decease, the living passes from the family. The coffin was of pure oak. There were many wreaths. Children Jack and Lucy Grandchildren of Oakleigh Park. Grandson Trevor Hull. In affectionate remembrance and true sympathy - Eve Sayle.
Funeral Service by Rev Stephen Reed of Barton Bendish.
Mourners: Mr & Mrs C. Hull, Mr & Mrs J. Clarke, Mr & Mrs J.T. Thompson, Miss Jecking Housekeeper and Servants. Also among other mourners Miss Sayle. Deceased interred in Family Vault in the churchyard.
He is buried in Southery Churchyard where a cross with an anchor was erected to his memory and to that of his wife and infant daughter. It is no wonder that after such along ministry his death was felt to be the end of an era for Southery. (Grave not found 2002)
Ref: Downham Market Gazette 9 March 1895.

Downham Market Gazette.
Archibald Aneas Julius.
The late Rector entered living on 4 March 1855 and died exactly 40 years later. In personal appearance he was about average height but had great strength especially in his arms - during school and college days much given to athletics. Captain of Lady Mary Boating Club before he left college there was an entry in the minute book of the club that when his boat went out of use, Mr Julius should have the rudder sent to him and about 30 years ago he received it as a memento off the proud position the eight oar occupied in his captaincy. Educated Richmond by Dr Dellafosse and afterwards with private tutors. Ordained by Kaye Bishop of Lincoln, having read for orders with Dr Oldnow. Mention of three Queens at Hampton Court Palace. 1850 to Myland, which he then exchanged for Southery with Rev Edmund Hall in 1855. On his arrival he had all the church building to do over again. The church was a most wretched barnlike structure and Mr Julius who was used to better things could not put up with it and at once began to look about him for ways and means. He was successful and raised L1700. With this sum, under the advice of Mr Robinson the architect he built a far better church than could have been hoped for with the money at his disposal. It consists of a nice chancel, nave and south aisle and holds 400 people. Consecration in 1858 when the village band played. Mr Julius gave the site for the church and also for a Sunday school. They had a large family, four sons and three daughters are still alive. The sons (one of whom is ordained) are in Australia but the daughters are settled in England. Mrs Julius died suddenly aged few years ago.
Ref: Downham Market Gazette 16 March 1895.

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900.
A choir screen of carved oak has recently been erected in Southery Church by members of the family in memory of the Reverend Archibald Julius, the late rector.
(A visit to the Church by E L Fenn on the 18th May 2002 revealed the present choir screen was erected in the 1940's in memory of a war death. There was no record or memory of a Julius screen. Archibald's grave was not traced in the churchyard.)

Extracts: THE WILL of ARCHIBALD AENEAS JULIUS.
Dated 13 Sept 1894.
Last will and testament of Archibald Aeneas JULIUS of Southery Rectory
Mention of settlement, dated 10th March 1847, made on marriage with late wife, Charlotte Mayor, eldest daughter of Rev Joseph Mayor, Rector of Collingham.
To be paid from settlement L1,500 to daughter Lucy Adelaide Clark wife of J.L.Clark.
L3,000 to daughter Blanche Emily Thompson wife of Thomas J. Thompson
Mentions also son Charles Archibald Julius, son Alfred Henry Julius, son Stanford Percy Julius, Daughter Fanny Marie Hull wife of E.C.P.Hull, Daughter in law Alice Julius wife of son Arthur Cowper Julius, grandson Ford Clark.
Mentions also china basket given to late wife by late Lady Palmerston, Chippendale chairs, portrait of late Chief Justice Willis, covered oak armchair formerly belonging to one of the Earls of Warwick.
Executors: Son-in-law Edmund Charles Pendelton Hull of Earlwood Common, Red Hill, Surrey. & John Lockie Clarke Gent of Southampton Lodge, Oakley Park, Middx
Made 13 Sept 1894.
Witnesses. Harold Archer Solicitor Ely and his Clerk.
Probate London 2 July 1895. Estate L1,027 12s 1d .

Julius Archibald Aeneas
The Rev Archibald Aeneas Julius of Southery Rectory near Downham Market Norfolk Clerk died 4 Mar 1895 Probate London 2 Jul 1895 to Edmund Charles Pendalton Hull and John Lockie Clark Gentlemen Effects L1027 12s 1p
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

JULIUS Reverend Archibald Aeneas of Southery rectory near Downham Markets, Norfolk. Clerk died 4th March 1895. Probate London 2nd July 1895 to Edmund Charles Pendleton Hull and John Lockie Clarke Gentleman.
Owners of Land 1873: Julius Rev. A.E. Southery 107 acres 18 perches.

Research Notes:
Southery Rectory,
Downhall Market.
October 27, 1894.
My very dear Percy,
It is only quite recently that I have been told of Arthur's most disgraceful conduct poor Alice was a good and most excellent wife to him, so that he has not a shadow of excuse for his disgusting conduct.
I think that in one of your letters to Lucy you say that you do not think that it would be just that Arthur at my death should have anything left to him but that something should be done for Alice and her children; now in all this I perfectly agree, but there are difficulties in the way, for as I have often told you the whole of my insurances and your dear mothers property are all settled upon her children in what proportion I please so that I cannot in my Will leave anything to Alice or my grandchildren I have consulted my Lawyer about the matter and the only thing that I can do is this [that is if you will agree to it] that you will of course have your share absolutely, i.e. you can do what you like with it; I will leave you an additional sum which I wish you to invest in your own name and to give the interest to Alice and her children, I have such perfect confidence in you that I know you will carry out my wishes.
I fear that Arthur even after all that has occured will persuade Alice to give the money to him he will I know get hold of it if he can, so if you find she does give it, or part of it to Arthur tell her that, in that case you will not pay her the interest and then keep it yourself and if things go well with her and that she has sufficient for herself and the children to live comfortably upon then you may take the money for yourself, I am quite sure you will act justly and honestly towards them.
I shall be glad to hear what you think of this plan as soon as you can; also can you let me know where and what Arthur is doing, and if he is still living with that woman, why does Alice not get a divorce? He will if possible keep a hold upon her I cannot possibly send her any money at present as every thing is very bad in the old country at present my living this year is only L.311 and next year L.95 it will be still less; dear old Jane sends her fond love to "her boy" and all your party.
I cannot write more now and will only add my fondest love to yourself and your dear wife and all the dear children.
Yours most affectionately,
A.E. Julius.

Letter to Stanford Percy Julius from his brother-in-law, E.C.P. Hull concerning the above.
My Dear Percy,
I daresay you have been thinking we have been [Clark and I] somewhat dilatory in settling up the affairs of the Executorship under your late Father's Will.
These, however, are matters which occupy a good deal of time and labour, and cannot well be hurried. I am bound to say that Jack Clark, who is a first rate man of business as well as one of the kindest and best of fellows, has been doing most of the work. This has been a great relief to me, as my partner has been absent since the end of June, and I have had almost too much work on hand.
I have to-day the pleasure to advise that we have paid into the Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., here, the sum of L4,000. Branches to be paid as follows:
To you at the Rockhampton Branch L2,000
To Charles at the Maryborough Branch L1,000.
To Alfred at the Rockhampton Branch L1,000.
These remittances are on account of the amounts which will be due to you each out of the Estate. In exchange for these payments you will each have to sign the forms on receipt which we have handed the Bank here, and these receipts when signed the Banks will send home to be delivered to us.
You will, of course, understand why the L2,000 has been remitted to you, as against L1000 only to Charles and Alfred.
We have also invested the L3,000 left to Blanche as her Trustees, and paid the L1,500 pounds left to Lucy for the purpose you no doubt understand about. Clark is now away for his month's holiday at the sea-side, and I shall be going away for mine towards the latter part of this month, and it will therefore probably be a month or two yet before we shall be able to get this matter finally closed.
Fanny and her children have been spending four weeks by the seaside at Brighton which has done them all much good, and they have returned home in the best of health.
Good-bye, my dear Brother, for the present, and believe me always,
Yours affectionally,
E.C.P. Hull.
See Archibald's estate accounts on pictures file.

Photo reference:
Norfolk Record Office: Parish records of SOUTHERY
Catalogue Ref. PD 314 Church and Benefice
FILE - Photographs of former rectors - ref. PD J14/52 - date: nd
Revd A. E. Julius (1855-1895)
Ref A2A

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Archibald is recorded as aged 20 a student at Cambridge born SRY

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, High Rd Mile End Colchester ESS. Archibald is recorded as head of house aged 30 married Rector of Myland born SRY Also in the house was Emma Boucher aged 36 born Bramfield Herts.

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Archibald is recorded as head of house married aged 41 Rectory of Southery born Richmond SRY

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Archibald is recorded as head of house married aged 52 Rector of Southery born Richmond SRY

5. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Rectory Church St Southery. Archibald is recorded as aged 62 head of house born Richmond SRY. Also in the house were four servants.

6. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Southampton Lodge Friern Barnet MDX. Archibald was a guest in his daughter Lucy and son-in-law John Clarke, he is recorded as a widower aged 72 Vicar of Southery NFK born Richmond


Archibald married Charlotte MAYOR [848], daughter of Rev Joseph MAYOR [1485] and Charlotte PRATT [1486], on 11 Mar 1847 in Collingham NTT. Charlotte was born on 27 Mar 1819 in Collingham NTT, died on 2 Nov 1885 in Southery NFK at age 66, and was buried on 6 Nov 1885 in Southery Churchyard..

General Notes:
Charlotte was related to the Cowper family and William the poet. She spent many years with her uncle, Henry Cowper at Tuimwater, later he held a position at Court, and Mrs Julius was fond of telling how she sent a bunch of violets by him to Queen Victoria, which the Queen wore that night. Lady Cowper was god-mother to her eldest child Florence Charlotte.

The Times, Tuesday, Mar 16, 1847; pg. 9; Issue 19498; col A
Marriages - On 11th inst, the Rev Archibald E Julius, curate of Gt
Straughton Hants & domestic chaplain to Viscount Sidmouth, to Charlotte eld. Daur of Rev Joseph Mayor, rector S. Colingham, Notts.

Marriages.
The Rev Archibald E. Julius, to Charlotte, eldest daughter of the Rev Joseph Mayor.
Ref: Illustrated London News Vol X 20 Mar 1847 Pg 190.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, High Rd Mile End Colchester ESS. Charlotte is recorded as a wife aged 30 born Cottingham NTT

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Charlotte is recorded as a wife aged 41 born Collingham Nottinghamshire.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Charlotte is recorded as a wife aged 52 born Collingham NTT

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Church St Southery NFK. Charlotte is recorded as a Rectors wife aged 62 born Collingham NTT

Children from this marriage were:

+ 170 F    i. Florence Charlotte JULIUS [849] was born on 5 Jan 1848 in Great Staughton HUN, was baptised on 15 Jan 1848, and died in 1874 in Canada at age 26.

+ 171 M    ii. Charles Archibald JULIUS [851] was born on 2 Jul 1849 in Great Staughton HUN and died on 20 Nov 1924 in Ryde Isle Of Wight at age 75.

+ 172 M    iii. Canon Alfred Henry JULIUS [862] was born on 25 May 1851 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 11 Apr 1934 in Akaroa NZ at age 82, and was buried in Akaroa NZ.

+ 173 M    iv. Rev Arthur Cowper JULIUS [877] was born on 11 Nov 1852 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 12 Nov 1918 in NSW Aust at age 66, and was buried in St Thomas Enfield NSW.

+ 174 M    v. Stanford Percy JULIUS [898] was born on 11 Nov 1854 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 11 Sep 1929 in Gympie Queensland at age 74, and was buried on 19 Sep 1929 in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 175 F    vi. Fanny Maria JULIUS [934] was born on 2 May 1856 in Southery NFK and died on 23 Dec 1931 in Richmond SRY at age 75.

+ 176 F    vii. Blanche Emily JULIUS [1977] was born in 1858 in Southery NFK, was baptised on 25 Dec 1858 in Southery NFK, and died in 1938 at age 80.

+ 177 F    viii. Lucy Adelaide JULIUS [938] was born in 1864 in Southery NFK, was baptised on 15 May 1864 in Southery NFK, died on 30 Jan 1936 in Hatch End MDX at age 72, and was buried on 3 Feb 1936 in St Mary Churchyard Hunstanton NFK.

+ 178 F    ix. Henriada Evilyn JULIUS [940] was born in Apr 1865 in Southery NFK, died in May 1865, and was buried on 27 May 1865 in Southery Churchyard.

87. Rev John Julius ESTRIDGE [5209] (Ann Mary Wharton (Polly) JULIUS51, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) died in 1883.

General Notes:
Sutton Veny - British History.
In 1804 Sutton Farm belonged to Francis Dugdale Astley, who had married William Buckler's daughter. But not long after it was acquired by Worthy Beaven, described as the late owner in 1837. Towards the end of the 19th century, by which time it was called Church Farm, the property was acquired by William Henry Laverton of Westbury. Laverton sold it in 1889 to John Julius Estridge (Ref: W.A.S. Libr., Devizes, Everett MSS. Large Folder.), who sold it in 1901 to the Hon. Walter Philip Alexander.
Ref: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/wilts/vol8/pp61-74

John was living in Dorset and is mentioned as having died "last year" in a letter from his cousin G Estridge to Dr E L Fenn c1884, copy on file Legatee by his Grandfathers Will 29 May 1812.

88. Aretas William ESTRIDGE [318] (Ann Mary Wharton (Polly) JULIUS51, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1805 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died in 1870 at age 65.

General Notes:
Legatee by his Grandfathers will 29 May 1812

Birth & Death date from IGI and unproven

Aretas married Catherine BARNSTABLE [11150].

General Notes:
Unproven relationship


The child from this marriage was:

+ 179 M    i. Aretas ESTRIDGE [11151] was born in 1839 and died in 1882 at age 43.

89. Mary Wharton ESTRIDGE [319] (Ann Mary Wharton (Polly) JULIUS51, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Legatee by her grandfathers will 29 May 1812

90. William KERIE [313] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Legatee by his Grandfathers will.

William was also a Legatee of L100 from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805.


.

91. Marie KERIE [314] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) died in Oct 1836.

General Notes:
Legatee by her Grandfathers will.

Maria was also a Legatee of L100 from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805.

Her will on file to be transcribed.

92. Elizabeth KERIE [315] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Legatee by her Grandfathers will.

Elizabeth (Eliza) was also a Legatee of L100 from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805.

93. Frances Calfe KERIE [316] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Legatee by her Grandfathers will.

Elizabeth was also a Legatee from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805. All of his plate and L250.

94. Rev. John Julius KERIE [317] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1785 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died about 1847 aged about 62.

General Notes:
John was born 1785 matric University College Oxford 18 Oct 1806 aged 21, BA 1810, MA 1815. Almanac.

Kerie John Julius, s. Jedediah, Isle of St Christopher, West Indies, arm, University College, matric 18 Oct 1806, aged 21 BA 1810, MA 1815.
Ref: Oxford University Ulumni.

John was a Legatee from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805.
All of Calfe's books and L100.

He was Rector of Christ Church Nicola Town and of St John St Kitts 1826. He conducted a funeral in October 1820 at St George Basseterre.

Origional Return of Slaves Pg 528 30 June 1817
Records John Julius Kerie as having 3 slaves:
Mary . . . . . female 22yrs Creole St Martins house servant.
Ann Johanna black female 22yrs Creole St Martins house servant
John Julius black male 46yrs African Mandingo field Negro.

Triennial Return of Slaves St Christopher Pg 254 8 Jan 1834.
John is recorded as having no slaves. However he is attorney for his father Jedediah who recorded 3 slaves.
Ref: Ancestry

Legatee by his Grandfathers Will, Johns Will

John's Will was signed 9 Dec 1816 proved 11 Aug 1847 by Julius Samuel Kerie one of the natural and lawful children of the deceased was latterly of Philadelphia USA.
Will on this file to be transcribed

John married Jane Thurlow [18776].

Children from this marriage were:

+ 180 F    i. Mary Estridge KERIE [18778] .

+ 181 F    ii. Elizabeth Mary Fauntleroy KERIE [18777] was born circa 1814 and died on 21 Mar 1841 in St Kitts aged about 27.

95. Jedediah KERIE [312] (Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born circa 1790 in West Indies and died on 30 Oct 1875 in Marylebone London MDX aged about 85.

General Notes:
JEDEDIAH KERIE
Birth year1790
Age85
Death quarter4
Death year1875
DistrictMARYLEBONE
CountyLondon
Volume1A
Page391
England & Wales deaths 1837-2007

Legatee by his Grandfathers will.

Jedediah was also a Legatee of L100 from the Estate of John Calfe, of St Kitts, whose Will was dated 12 Nov 1807. Proved PCC 13 Apr 1805.

Kerie Jedediah. Esq. 24 November 1875. The Will of Jedediah Kerie formally of York place but late of 8 a Gloucester Place both in Portman Square in the County of Middlesex Esq who died 30 October 1875 at 8 a Gloucester Place was proved at the Principal Registry by Emma Kerie widow the relict and Julia Kerie spinster the daughter both of 8 day Gloucester Place the executrixes.
Effects under L50,000.
National Probate Calendar

Research Notes:
Burnell Nisbett of St Kitts writes in 2016
A few years ago I was speaking to a client of mine from Tabernacle, and he told me that his great grandfather told him that all Keries on island are decedents of two white men who were spreading their Wild oats all over the area. I figure they had to be William and his younger brother Jedidiah Kerie born 1790. They were both sons of the Hon Jedidiah Kerie, There was a third brother Rev John Kerie 1785 -1847. This information I got from the Kings Candlesticks Pedigree. Only in a few cases from oral history could any children be assigned to these Men but with no verification. For example oral history tells that my mother's cousin Jedidiah Kerie Bowry was named after his grandfather or great grandfather Jedidiah Kerie, so I deduce that my ancestor is Jedidiah and not William. This I have been unable to verify.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, 36 York Plc St Marylebone LND MDX. Jedediah is recorded as aged 50 of independent means not born in London

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 36 York Plc St Marylebone LND MDX. Jedidiah is recorded as head of house married aged 61 a fund holder born West Indies British Subject

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 36 York Plc Marylebone London MDX. Jedidiah is recorded as head of house married aged 81 born West Indies will stop

Jedediah married Emma BARROW [24162] on 11 Jun 1816 in Walcot Bath SOM. Emma was born circa 1793 in West Indies and died on 23 Dec 1877 in Lawn House The Square Hampstead MDX aged about 84.

General Notes:
JEDEDIAH KERIE
Marriage year1816
Marriage date11 Jun 1816
PlaceWALCOT
Groom's first name(s)Jedediah
Groom's last nameKerie
Groom's marital statusjnr
Groom's parishBathwick
Bride's first name(s)Emma
Bride's last nameBarrow
By licence or bannsLic
CountySomerset
CountryEngland
Record setSomerset Marriages (post-1754)

EMMA KERIE
Birth year1792
Age85
Death quarter4
Death year1877
DistrictHAMPSTEAD LONDON
Volume1A
Page444
England & Wales deaths 1837-2007

Kerie Emma. 18 January 1878 the Will of Emma Kerie late of Lawn House The Square Hampstead in the County of Middlesex widow who died 23 December 1877 at Lawn House was proved at the Principal Registry by Julia Kerie of Lawn House spinster the daughter and John Francis Weymouth of 30 Essex Street Strand in the said County gentleman the executors. Personal estate under L50,000
National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, 36 York Plc St Marylebone LND MDX. Emma is recorded as aged 55 not born in London

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 36 York Plc St Marylebone LND MDX. Emma is recorded as a wife aged 58 born West Indies British Subject

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 36 York Plc Marylebone London MDX. Emma is recorded as a wife aged 78 board West Indies

The child from this marriage was:

+ 182 F    i. Julia KERIE [24163] was born circa 1818 in Bart SOM.

96. William JULIUS [716] (Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born circa 1795.

General Notes:
Baptisms
Register of St George and St Peter Basseterre 1747-1800 SOG London.
1800 6 Jul Wm s of Rd JULIUS Esq.,
Ref: Communication from George H King, Historic Sites & Records Committee, St Kitts, dated 6 Apr 1936

William was illegitimate and lived at Sandy Point St Kitts, according to a letter from Sarah Ann Julius [760] dated 23 Nov 1906. He is said to have settled in Northern Rivers District of NSW Australia in the 1840's.

This link to the many Julius family's in the Northern Rivers area of Australia has not been proven beyond the above memory - 2003.

Research Notes:
That this William Julius is one and the same as William [716] is most unlikely, but again not impossible?

John Maddox Titley to William Julius - Manumission
Dated 16 April 1799
St. Christopher Register Volume I, Series 3
Document Number 13508

Saint Christopher's

To all to whom these presents shall come or be concern I John Maddox Titley of the aforesaid Island of St. Christopher Esquire send Greeting.

Know Ye that I the said John Maddox Titley for divers other good causes and considerations me hereunto moving

Have Manumitted released and forever set Free and by these presents Do manumit release and forever set Free from Servitude and Slavery my Mulatto Boy Slave called or known by the name of William Julius being the son of my Negro Woman Slave named Mary

So that I the said John Maddox Titley my Heirs Executors or Administrators shall not at any Time or Times hereafter have claim challenge or demand any property or interest in or Right or Title to the said Mulatto Boy William Julius or to his Work Labour or Service or to any Estate real or personal which at any Time or Times hereafter shall belong to him

But the said Mulatto Boy shall from henceforth forever hereafter be and remain Free to all Intents and Purposes whatsoever and have retain and keep all such real and personal Estate as he shall or may at any Time or Times hereafter acquire without being accountable to me my Heirs Executors or administrators for the same or any part thereof

In Witness whereof I the said John Maddox Titley have hereunto set my Hand and Seal in Saint Christopher's aforesaid the sixteenth day of April in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and ninety nine.
[signed] J. M. TITLEY

Sealed and Delivered in the presence of
[signed[ W. F. BURROUGHS

Saint Christopher. Personally appeared before me William Freddie Burroughs who being sworn maketh Oath that he was present and did see John Maddox Tittley within named Sign, Seal, and as his Act and Deed deliver the within instrument of writing and that the name or signature of J. M. Tittley appearing to be hereunto subscribed is the proper hand writing of the said Jno Maddox Tittley and that he this deponent did subscribe his name as a witness to the due Execution of the said paper writing
[signed] W. F. BURROUGHS


Sworn before me this 9th day of May 1799
[signed] JOHN GARNETT

Typed March 24, 2014 by Ruth Case, Perry, Utah, USA, from a photograph taken of the original document on file at the St. Kitts National Archives, Basseterre, St. Kitts, West Indies.


















Medical Notes:

William married Eliza FERNHEAD [4528] on 26 May 1812 in St George Basseterre St Kitts.

General Notes:
Register of St George and St Peter Basseterre 1747-1800
Weddings 1812 May 26 Wm Julius & Eliza Fernhead

Eliza's placement is conjectural, William is the only prospect in this tree, however dubious.
E L Fenn 2011


The child from this marriage was:

+ 183 M    i. Edward JULIUS [718] was born about 1813 and died about 1870 aged about 57.


97. Charles James Fox JULIUS [757] (Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Jul 1797 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean, died on 5 Jul 1872 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean at age 74, and was buried in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean.

General Notes:
When Charles was about 13, his father Richard died and his grandfather [Julius Caesar] sent him to England to be educated. Unfortunately, the politician Charles James Fox (pictured) had already died 1806, so his godson did not profit by his influence.

Charles was known in St. Kitts as " Fox Julius", he kept a school in Basseterre, and is generally believed to have unwittingly set fire to the town? which was then the capital of the island. Whilst the destruction of much of the old town was welcomed as it was then rebuilt on better lines, the result of the fire was a destruction of many of the early historical records.
This is family lore, Charles is not mentioned in the two newspaper reports of the fire.

Origional Returns of Slaves.
Charles James Fox Julius. Proprietor 25 Jun. 1817
William-male Colour-sambo Age-40 Creole-St Kitts. House servant
Ref: Ancestry Pg. 289

Triennial Return of Slaves B.
Charles James Fox Julius. Proprietor 9 Jan. 1822
William male Sambo 45yrs Creole of St Kitts House servant manumitted.
Kitty female mulatto 40yrs Creole of St Kitts seamstress purchased of Mr Haugher.
Catharine female mulatto 8yrs Creole of St Kitts seamstress purchased of Mr Haugher
Ancestry Page 221

His daughter Sarah Ann writing to Florence Stevens 25 Mar 1906 :
"I have heard my father speak with much feeling of his being at the bedside of his father just before he died and his telling him to be a good boy, he was 8 years old then he said, if so then Richard must have died in 1805; it must have been the grandfather Caesar who sent the boy (my father) to school in England almost immediately.
My father was named Charles James Fox after the Statesman who died in 1806; Mr Fox and my fathers father were intimate friends and he wished the boy to be his Godson; it was done by proxy. Mr Fox died before the child was sent on. . . . .
He came back to St Kitts from England in his 20 something. . . . . but he never looked after any property left by his father who died intestate; I suppose all that went to the Crown. . . . . . about my fathers family; he had spoken of trying to find them out, but never did. . . . . He was an affectionate father and he made of me more a companion than anything else ; he spoke to me as if I was equal to him in knowledge ; he was of a lively disposition and had a keen sense of the ludicrous . . . . . I have sent Mrs Brewin by this mail a photo of my father. . . . . taken in 1866 when he was 69 years old"

Sarah Ann writing to Florence 8 April 1906 :
"when you see it (the photo of her father) . . . . . he was very stout. . . . . his mind was troubled ; rather I should say his heart was heavy and the poor fellow does not look cheerful he had just lost his wife and the year following the town was destroyed by fire; and we lost everything ; we could not save anything as the fire began in the house in front of us and we could just escape with our lives ; that was the beginning of our great poverty for we could never replace the furniture we lost and among that a piano that was my greatest delight".

Sarah Ann writing to Louisa (Brewin) 25 May 1906 :
. . . . . I am glad to hear that you got my dear fathers photo all right it was taken not long after the death of my mother and my only brother - the latter died four months before my mother - he died suddenly of heart disease, and all that depressed the dear old parent whom I loved more than I can express . . . . . "when I was about 16 my father went to New York thinking he might get on well in the States with his family but the winter was too severe for my mother and he returned so I have some experience of what winter is when you write me of the cold and snow I know what it all means". . . . .

Research Notes:
There is a suggestion that Fox was also a solicitor which needs to be verified as it may come from the tale of the "Duel" wrongly attributed to him.

NEWSPAPER REPORTS of the FIRE at BASSETERRE 1867
Tremendous Conflagration In St Kitts
the following letter describing the destruction by fire of the town of Basseterre, St Kitts, has been received in Glasgow:
St Kitts July 11, 1867.
Our town of Basseterre is burned to the ground; over 1400 houses are consumed, and in fact the town is totally and entirely destroyed. Not a single store or remains, or indeed any place of business whatever, and it is difficult even to recognize what were once the streets of the town. Other great fires have occurred in different islands, but I doubt if it is possible, comparatively speaking, for any fire to effect more total destruction than that we have just experienced. The terrible work of destruction was accomplished in the short space of about eight hours.
The alarm of fire was given about 11.30 on the night of the 3rd July, and was found to have broken out in an unoccupied house in an alley at the back of Fort Street, and close to the Gazette newspaper office. The house was undergoing repairs, and was full of shavings and wood. The cry of fire was hardly given before the house was in a complete blaze, giving the occupants barely time to escape. Before any material assistance could be got the large warehouses of Messrs Wade and Abbott were discovered to be on fire. These comprised a dry goods establishment, provision store, and lumber yard. During the burning of Messrs Wade and Abbott's store the fire engines came on the spot, but sad to relate, they proved utterly useless, and the fire brigade worse than useless. The engines would not work, and the hose was found to be out of order. The men were most incomplete accoutred. Not a hatchet, or rope, or a bucket was to be found amongst them and everything was in the utmost confusion and disorder. . . . . . although the town is abundantly supplied with water, it was found in the hour of need that no water was to be had, as it was locked off at the reservoir, about 2 miles out of town. During the burning of Messrs Wade and Abbott's store, the stores and dwelling houses of Mr Udale and Mr Palmer the other side of the same street were discovered to be on fire. These buildings burned with the most astonishing rapidity and the flames now spread in one direction towards the Public Library and Reading Room, and the stores in Liverpool Row, and in another direction towards the officers of Messrs Wigley and Burt and the houses in Pall Mall Square. The utmost panic now prevailed; the terrified people from all quarters of the town rushing from their houses with what furniture and valuables they were able to collect, as it was now pretty well apparent that all efforts to check the fire in its course would be unavailing. In the first place, the wind was blowing almost a gale, and besides acting as a bellows of the flame, it carried pieces of burning shingle to all parts of the town. Then the houses of the town for the most part were almost entirely built of wood, and, in some cases the shingles were old and acted like tinder when the slightest spark fell on them, and was proved by many houses in different parts of the town taking fire before the body of the flame had reached them. My father and I and others from the country came into town as soon as we were aware of the fire, and we all did our utmost to save the town by pulling down some houses in the flanks of the fire. But the people in town seemed panic stricken and could render little or no assistance; and the negroes behaved excessively badly. By 2.30 on the morning of the 4th July the fire was general all over the town, and little effectually was done to check it. Here and there are few energetic men would be working, trying to save a solitary house, but there was the most lamentable absence of all plan of action by the town authorities, and everyone acted as he thought best. By this time the Colonial Bank and all the houses in Bank Street, in colluding with us for of Messrs Phillip and Watson, were burning, as well as all the stores along the beach; in fact, the mercantile part of the town was entirely destroyed, and the fire was quickly finding its way to the dwelling houses in the upper part of the town and at Cazoy Street, towards the houses of Miss Clifton and Mr Hart. These two last mentioned houses escaped, but how they did so is a wonder to everybody. Up to this time no one had thought that the church was in any danger, and numbers of people had put what they had saved in it, in fancied security. About 4.30 this beautiful edifice, the pride of the colony, and I might say of the West Indies, was reported on fire, and this was the last work of the destroyer. The clock on the town struck seven, and at two minutes past the body of the tower fell in, leaving the hands ominously pointing at two minutes past seven as an indication of the end of the terrible work.
The dawning day brought fearful sight to view, and one, perhaps, more appalling then the fire itself. Thousands of houseless, homeless, and in some cases utterly ruined people, were scattered about the fields adjoining the town, with what few articles they had managed to save; some but partially clad, and all looking the picture of despair and misery. The cry is for food of these people soon became heartrending, and a grave consideration came upon us as to how are these people were to be fed, as every barrel of flour had been consumed and likewise every other kind of provision. The Lieutenant Governor very promptly sent off to Nevis for flour and bread, which they generously supplied, and a dispatch was sent to Antigua soliciting aid.
Nothing that I can write will give you anything like an approximate idea of the terrible scene on the night of the 3rd inst. and the following day. The fire itself was the grandest sight I have ever seen, and the glare was so great that a gentleman assured me that at Charlestown, in Nevis, 12 miles distant, he could see to read a paper in the street.
There is no doubt the island has received a blow from which it will not recover for generations to come. The Government have already proposed a scheme to borrow money on Government security, to lend the merchants, to enable them to rebuild their houses, but the scheme is not matured, and the details are not yet known.
The Liverpool Mercury Thurs 1 August 1867

The Great Fire in St Kitts
Archdeacon Gibbs gives the following account of the fire which almost entirely destroyed the town of Basseterre, St Kitts, on the night of the 3rd ult. " In a very short time it was apparent that no means within our power (for neither sufficient water nor efficient engines and men were available) could arrest the fury of the fire. From a house after house the poor inhabitants were driven almost naked, and carrying little remnants of their property, which were all they could snatch in their awful haste. The streets became in quick succession lines of flame - Bank Street, Fort Street, Liverpool Row, Church Street, College Street, and at length Cayon Street - leaving in about five hours not one single store remaining, and very few dwelling houses. During this time all the chief people were actively engaged in trying to save their own houses and property and those of their friends, our valued Governor, Capt Mackenzie, taking a leading part. We continued near each other, endeavouring to get houses pulled down, rum shops emptied, furniture rescued, and the latter placed for safety in the churchyard and church.
Rushing into the church I proceeded to save what I could. I reached the vestry, opened the safe, took out a communion plate, the register books and vestments, and gave them to the sexton to be taken to Government House, while I proceeded to do whatever was possible in the church itself. I said the Bible and Prayer Book, but when with an other, I endeavoured to remove the beautiful lectern, we've found it beyond our strength, and were compelled to make a hasty retreat. So that the communion table, altar cloth, chairs, pulpit, lectern, organ, and painted glass windows all were destroyed. About half past 6 a.m. the heavy groined roof began to fall in. As, with the Governor, I passed under the tower at seven, the clock struck for the last time, an end to minutes after stopped and fell to pieces with all the bells. The tower remains with the loss of the wooden beams and floors; the main walls and buttresses apparently sound; the pillars and arches of the aisles in several instances split, calcined, and unsafe; all the monuments on the walls are utterly destroyed or beyond renovation. The loss in the town is variously estimated at a quarter of a million and upwards. From 1000 to 1200 houses destroyed, leaving at least 5000 homeless. The buildings saved, being all on the outskirts, are the jail, the Treasury, and the courthouse, and last, not least, the miniature chapel at Irish Town, where our sacraments will be administered and our weekday services held. The whole town, from the jail in the North East to Miss Clifton's and Mrs Hart's (each barely saved) in the North West, down to the sea on the south side, is, with exception of the Treasury on the beach entirely gone, so that at times one becomes quite bewildered as to the localities lately so familiar.
The Government have appointed a board to administer relief - flour, cornmeal, biscuit, and rice - to thousands of starving people. The people are comparatively quiet, but special constables and troops of militia cavalry are in continual patrol, the latter especially at night.
Glasgow Daily Herald Sat 3 Aug 1867

Several newspaper reports say "Three men are in custody, one of whom confessed to firing a house which led to the destruction of the town"
Pall Mall Gazette 29 Jul 1867

Relief Committees were formed in Britain and elsewhere to help the citizens of Basseterre

A traveller in the area describes Basseterre in 1899.
. . . . . low red and white roofs of Basseterre look well from the sea, and indeed the streets are neither narrow nor dirty when one sees them at close quarters. The thoroughfare in which Basseterre Post Office is situated confuses it self oddly in my recollection with the east end of High Street and Windsor. At any rate it is quite as civilised in externals as the latter, if more exotic. . . . . .
Pall Mall Gazette 23 Aug 1899

Colonial Office and predecessors: Bermuda, Original Correspondence CO 37/18. . . . .
Reports on the conditions surrounding the disposal of a twenty-five acre plot of land in Smiths Parish, formerly the property of Anthony William Somersall who died in St. Kitts in 1811; encloses Minutes of Council for 25 April and 10 May 1862, and copies of letters from Brownlow Gray, Charles James Fox Julius (who writes from St. Kitts on behalf of his wife and other descendants of Ann Somersall), William R W Taylor (who writes from St. Kitts claiming Somersall is his great grandfather), Robert Thompson Peniston, Postmaster at Hamilton William Bennett Perot, and Brownlow Tucker. The governor and council endorsed the petition of Perot who had received the land from his father, who had been appointed Somersall's attorney in Bermuda in 1803.
Harry St. George Ord, Governor of Bermuda, 58, Folios 434-451 Covering dates 1862 May 15 Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years Former reference (Department) 5653/1862 Held by
The National Archives, Kew.

Picture courtesy Caroline Macpherson 2013

Charles married Barbara Louise AMORY [758] in 1835. Barbara died in 1865.

General Notes:
Barbara is described as a "lady of good birth from St Eustatius"

Research Notes:
Did Barbara have a father Benjamin:
President Julius appointed Benjamin Amory to the Council of St Christopher Dec 1809
Caribbeana Vols 1 to 6 - Pg 81


Children from this marriage were:

+ 184 F    i. Ruth JULIUS [759] was born in 1835 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean.

+ 185 F    ii. Sarah Ann JULIUS [760] was born on 23 Nov 1837 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died on 20 Jun 1907 in Basseterre St Kitts. at age 69.

+ 186 M    iii. Abraham Whitehouse JULIUS [761] was born in 1843 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died in 1865 at age 22.


98. William JULIUS [8818] (Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was baptised in 1799 in St George & St Peter Basseterre and was buried on 8 Jun 1800 in St George & St Peter Basseterre.

General Notes:
Register of St George and St Peter Basseterre 1747-1800
Baptisms 1800 Wm s. of Rich. Julius Esq & wife.
SOG London 1884

Register of St George and St Peter Basseterre 1747-1800
Burials 1800 Jun 8 Willm s. Rd Julius & wife.

This placement is unproven

99. Ann Susannah JULIUS [762] (Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Jul 1805 and died in 1867 at age 62.

General Notes:
Ann was said to be handsome, but did not marry.

Origional Returns of Slaves St Christopher Pg 289 25 Jun 1817.
Chas J F Julius for Ann Sussanah Julius reports 2 slaves:
Cinda black female 39yrs African Congo washer.
Moses black male 2yrs Creole st Kitts.
Ref: Ancestry

100. Thomas James WESTCOTT [23730] (James WESTCOTT60, John Julius WESTCOTT26, John WESTCOTT8, Elizabeth JULIUS4, John of St Kitts West Indies1) died on 23 Dec 1807 in St Kitts WI. The cause of his death was of a fever.

Research Notes:
Westcott Thomas James d 23 Dec 1807 of a fever.
Caribbeana Vol 3

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