THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS Julius Family History

Descendants of John Julius of Nth Yarmouth & St Kitts


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101. Augusta Louisa LOADER [1394] (Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Feb 1822 in Madras India, was baptised on 29 Jul 1822 in Madras India, died on 9 May 1899 in Talford St Rockhampton QLD at age 77, and was buried on 9 May 1899 in Rockhampton Cemetery. The cause of her death was influenza.

General Notes:
India, Births and Baptisms
Name: Augustus Louisa Loader
Gender: Female
Christening Date: 29 Jul 1822
Christening Place: Madras, Madras, India
Birth Date: 13 Feb 1822
Father's Name: William Loader
Mother's Name: Louisa
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C00067-1 , System Origin: India-EASy , GS Film number: 521837 LDS
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FG4Z-PVJ
Ref: J Aitken 2015

On her marriage certificate Augusta was described as a spinster of full age living at Ty Mawr, her father, William Augustus Loader was described as a soldier, a Lieut in the 12 Regt. Madras Native Infantry.
Ref: Marriage Certificate Brecknock 26 367

Augusta is recorded on her death certificate as aged 68 years, the daughter of Augustus Loader Army & Louisa Caroline Dare, born in India, married in England & lived 30 years in Queensland. She was buried with a Roman Catholic ceremony.
Children living at her death were Digby aged 46, Henry 44, Arthur 41, Augusta 36, Julius 39. One male & one female child predeceased her.

Research Notes:
Alternative Birth date 1829 Madras.

Image courtesy of Steven Wilder

Augusta married Lieut Digby GERAHTY [1396], son of James GERAHTY Barrister of Dublin [12906] and Frances MARSH [12907], on 30 Jan 1851 in Llanfrynach WLS. Digby was born on 10 Apr 1822 in Dublin Ireland and died on 28 Sep 1885 in Sailors Home Sydney NSW at age 63. The cause of his death was serous apoplexy.

General Notes:
Digby was an Army officer he was ranked Ensign in the 86th Regiment 11 Aug 1843; Lieut 86th 13 Mar 1846; Lieut 17th Regiment 13 Jan 1847; Lieut 15th Regiment 12 May 1848. He served abroad in East India between 2 Dec 1844 and 26 May 1847. Digby retired by sale of his commision 17 Jan 1857.

On his marriage certificate Digby was described as an unmarried gentleman of full age living at Llanfrynach, Brecon. He was married by licence, his father, James was described as a barrister. Witness's were Maria & Ellen Pell and Mrs Pearce of Llanfrynach.

Digby arrived in Australia with his family on the Young Australian 12 Aug 1862.
He was at various times a policeman, in 1866 a gaoler in Rockhampton (QLD.Public Servants Series I.D.13273 Gaoler), and in 1884 a Tide Waiter HMS Customs.

28th Sept 1885
Digby Gerahty 66 Ireland Customs House Officer.
The Louden Hotel Autopsey made.
We find that the said Digby Geraghty at the Sailors Home in the City of Sydney, in the colony of New South Wales on the 26th day of September AD1885 died from natural causes to wit from Serous Apoplexy.
Digby possessed no cash or property.
Ref: Sydney City Coroner: Registers of Inquests and Inquiries, 1862-1926


Children from this marriage were:

+ 187 M    i. Digby Augustus Edward GERAHTY [1397] was born on 6 Mar 1852 in Tymawr Brecknockshire Wales.

+ 188 M    ii. Henry Mildmay GERAHTY [1398] was born in 1853 in Breconshire Powys, was baptised on 18 Apr 1862 in St Mildred Poultry LON, and died on 23 Jun 1934 in Queensland Aust. at age 81.

+ 189 F    iii. Augusta Louisa Caroline GERAHTY [1399] was born in 1854 in Breconshire Powys and died in 1929 in Rockhampton QLD at age 75.

+ 190 M    iv. George Julius GERAHTY [12855] was born in Apr 1856 in Brecknock Brecknockshire WLS and died in Jul 1856 in Brecknock Brecknockshire WLS.

+ 191 M    v. Arthur Francis GERAHTY [12856] was born in 1858 and died on 30 Aug 1942 in Queensland Aust. at age 84.

+ 192 M    vi. Julius Frederick GERAHTY [12857] was born in 1860 in Sth Wales and died in 1925 in Sydney NSW Australia at age 65.

+ 193 F    vii. Florence Eleanor GERAHTY [12858] was born on 9 Aug 1864 in Queensland Aust. and died on 10 Dec 1865 in Queensland Aust. at age 1.

102. Mary Geraldine DARE [1402] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1841 and died in 1848 at age 7.

103. Nina Sarah Louisa DARE [1407] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1842 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 16 May 1918 in Teignmouth DEV at age 76.

General Notes:
Sarah may have been born in Berbice British Guiana

Deaths
Dare - On 16 May at Teignmouth Nina Sarah Louisa eldest daughter of the late J J Dare M.D. of Berbice British Columbia. No flowers

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Hampstead LND MDX. Nina is recorded as Sarah M Dare a daughter unmarried aged 38 born Jamaica

104. Jane Anna DARE [1403] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1843 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 19 Dec 1882 in 119 Adelaide Rd Hampstead LON NW at age 39.

General Notes:
Dare - On the 19th inst., at 119 Adelaide Rd., N.W., Jane Anna second surviving daughter of of the late John Julius Dare Surgeon of Berbice, British Guiana
Times 1882

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Hampstead LND MDX. Jane is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 37 born Jamaica

105. Hon. John Julius DARE E.C. [1404] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1846 in George Town British Guiana and died on 12 Mar 1896 in Duncairn Manor Rd Bournmouth at age 50.

General Notes:
John is described as a gentleman of Hampstead at his daughter Sybil's baptism in 1887. His address at daughter Millicent's baptism was Osborne House Holland Park Terrace.

Downing Street, September 12, 1891.
The Queen has been pleased to give directions for the appointment of . . . . . John Julius Dare, Esq., to be a member of the Executive Council of the Colony of British Guiana.
Ref: The London Gazette September 15, 1891 page 4893.

Dare John Julius of Georgetown British Guiana and of Duncairn Manor Rd Bournmouth merchant died 12 March at Duncairn. Probate London 23 Apr 1896 to Caroline May Dare widow Effects L1633 13s 7d
National Probate Calendars.

In Memoriam
Dare. In loving memory of John Julius Dare late of Demerara who passed away at Bournemouth, the 12th March 1896
Ref: The Standard (London, England), Friday, March 12, 1897; pg. [1];

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, St Pancras London. John is described as a son aged 15 a scholar born West Indies.
This entry is damaged cannot find parents

John married Caroline Mary TAYLOR [2212] on 9 Apr 1874 in Christchurch. Caroline was born in 1857 in Hong Kong.

Marriage Notes:
Ref http://www.vc.id.au/tb/bgcolonistsD.html

General Notes:
Ref http://www.vc.id.au/tb/bgcolonistsD.html


Children from this marriage were:

+ 194 M    i. Antoinette Geraldine DARE [11099] was born on 23 Jan 1875 in British Guiana and died after 1891.

+ 195 M    ii. Arthur St Felix DARE [1408] was born on 1 Jun 1876 in George Town British Guiana, died on 4 Jun 1927 in Marylebone London MDX at age 51, and was cremated on 8 Jun 1927 in Golders Green Crematoria.

+ 196 F    iii. Edith Mabel DARE [20611] was born in 1884 in George Town British Guiana.

+ 197 F    iv. Sybil Marguerite DARE [11105] was baptised on 22 Jun 1887 in Holy Trinity Hampstead MDX.

+ 198 F    v. May DARE [15520] was born on 3 Feb 1879.

+ 199 F    vi. Florence DARE [15531] was born about 1881 in Demerara British Guiana and died after 1891.

+ 200 F    vii. Millicent DARE [11106] was born on 20 Apr 1889 in Osborne Hse Holland Park Tce Lnd and was baptised on 17 Jun 1889 in St John the Evangelist Ladbrook Grove MDX.

+ 201 M    viii. John DARE [1410] was born about 1893 in George Town British Guiana.

+ 202 F    ix. Violet Edna DARE [20616] was born about 1895 in Bournmouth DOR.

106. Louisa Antoinette DARE [1405] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1847 in Jamaica West Indies and died on 22 Nov 1917 in Teignmouth at age 70.

General Notes:
Times 1917
Dare - On the 22nd Nov at Teignmouth, Louisa Antoinette, youngest daughter of the late John Julius Dare M.D. of Berbice, British Guiana. No flowers

BDM D 4th Qtr 1917 - Dare Louisa A aged 70 Newton A 5b 121

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, St Pancras London. Louisa is described as a daughter aged 13 a scholar born West Indies

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Hampstead LND MDX. Louisa is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 33 born Jamaica

107. Capt George Julius DARE [1406] (John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1849 in Jamaica West Indies and died between 1901 and 1934.

General Notes:
It is uncertain where George was born, there being references to both Jamica and British Guiana, but is safe to assume it was in the West Indies.

George was a Commander in the Merchant Service trading in the Far East.

They had two children

At his son's baptism he is described as a Clerk to Corporation of London of 13 Kingdon Rd MDX

Dare Geo Julius 39 Mt Ararat Rd Richmond
Kellys 1902 Directory of the Southern Districts of London

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, St Pancras London. George is recorded as a son aged 11 a scholar born West Indies

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Hampstead LND MDX. George is recorded as a son unmarried aged 31 a clerk born Jamaica

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Mt Ararat Richmond SRY. George is recorded as head of house married aged 51 a Cin.... Service Clerk Mines BG born British Guiana

George married Edith Mary DIXEY [2213] on 8 Mar 1884 in St John Notting Hill LND. Edith was born about 1857 in Holyhead Wales, died on 8 Jun 1934 in 88 Kings Rd Richmond SRY aged about 77, and was cremated on 11 Jun 1934 in Golders Green Crematoria.

Marriage Notes:
Refhttp://www.vc.id.au/tb/bgcolonistsD.html

Banns read: Feb 3, 10 17 1884 at St John Ladbrook Grove between George Julius Dare of St Saviours Hampstead batchelor, and Edith Mary Dixey of 20 Lansdown (sic) Crescent spinster.
Ancestry.

General Notes:
Marriages
Dare - Dixey. On the 8th Inst., at St Johns Nottinghill by the Rev R Thornton D.D. Vicar George Julius Dare, youngest son of the late John Julius Dare of Berbice British Guiana to Edith Mary second daughter of Charles Dixey of 110 Elgin Cres Kensington Park.
Times 1884
The Standard (London, England), Friday, March 21, 1884; pg. [1];

Refer to earlier entry in husbands notes. They had two Children.

Deaths
Dare - On June 8 1934 at 88 Kings Rd., Richmond, Edith Mary Dare widow of George Julius Dare of British Guiana. Funeral at Golders Green Crematorium today Mon at 3.30 pm No flowers
Times 1934

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Mt Ararat Richmond SRY. Edith is recorded as a wife aged 44 born Holyhead Wales

Children from this marriage were:

+ 203 M    i. Geoffrey St Felix DARE [11090] was born on 17 Feb 1885 in 13 Kingdon Rd Hampstead LND, was baptised on 13 May 1885 in Emmanuel Hampstead MDX, and died on 16 Mar 1957 in Royal Hospital Richmond SRY at age 72.

+ 204 F    ii. Phyllis Mary DARE [11091] was born about 1888 in Hampstead LND MDX.

108. George Mildmay DARE [1448] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 22 Mar 1840 in Peckham LND, was baptised on 19 Jun 1840 in St Giles Camberwell LON, and died on 15 Dec 1907 in The Lake Singapore at age 67.

General Notes:
George in a short history of his Dare family describes himself: I, George Mildmay Dare, the eldest son went to Japan in 1864, and after my father's death my mother and my brothers and sisters joined me there.

His hobbies as described in Sir George Julius's notes were sailing and collecting orchids.

England BDM Birth 1840 2nd Qtr Camberwell George Mildmay Julius IV 54

Baptism.
S Giles Camberwell Southwark LON born 18 Mar 1840; Bap. 19 Jun 1840 George Mildmay Dare son of George Julius Dare Master Mariner & Sarah Shrieve Dare of Elm Grove Peckham by HWC Hyde Curate.

England BDM Marriage 1877 2nd Qtr George Mildmay Dare Knaresbrough YKS 9a 175

Tigers Roamed Singapore in the mid-50s.
Historical Corner by Donald Davies.
On December 15, 1907 old timer G. M. Dare passed away and was the first person to be buried in the new Bidadara Cemetery. Prior to this, Bukit Timah Road cemetery was the main place of burial. G. M. Dare took an active part in the social and sporting life of the Colony. He kept a diary and left behind an entertaining and informative collection of material relating to the early days of Singapore.
George Mildmay Dare was born at sea in 1840. He was brought to Singapore in his father's barque, Marsden, in the year 1841. The father, Captain George Julius Dare, continued his voyage to China and Mrs Dare remained behind in Singapore to await the arrival of a second son John Julius Dare.

On Christmas day 1841, Mrs Dare set off again, this time on board the ship Viscount Melbourne to rejoin her husband in China. On New Year's day the ship was wrecked on the Laconia Shoal and the crew and passengers escaped in the long boats. Then they were attacked by Illanun pirates from whom they got away by cutting the rope and escaping in the dead of night, and reached Singapore after 13 days at sea in an open boat.
Dr Little of the John Little family, helped Mrs Dare out of the boat with the youngest child in her arms apparently dead. Dr Little, however was able to resuscitate him. But George Mildmay was quite lively, having eaten all the bananas while hidden under the sail at the bottom of the boat. In 1845 the family returned to England on leave and the two boys remained behind to be educated at Cheltenham.
George Mildmay's next appearance in Singapore was in March 1854. He had grown so tremendously on the six months voyage out that his clothes no longer fitted him, and he landed in a suit of sailcloth made by the sailors on board.
Captain G. J. Dare lived in a house on the corner of Beach Road, now part of Raffles Hotel property. In those days, Beach Road was Singapore's principal residential quarter and the houses stood well back in the large gardens. A sandy beach ran down to the sea from the road in front. G. M. Dare joined the commercial firm of Syme and Co. with whom he remained for five years. In October 1857 he joined the ranks of the Singapore Amateur Actors and in December he wrote: "Since last writing I have joined the Corps Dramatique, which consists of gentleman amateurs: young men like myself in business. I came out as Lucy in the farce, John Dobbs, under the name of Miss Flora Macfungus, which has since been changed at my request to Miss Brani, the Malay for Dare. It was a difficult part, but they say I performed it to everyone's satisfaction and made what they called a stunning girl. There are a great many tigers about at present; a lady, Mrs Bernard, when driving out with her husband to a grant of land which he had recently bought, was within 100 yards of an immense brute only 2 miles from town.
Deaths from tigers became so frequent in the middle 50s in Singapore that the price for killing a tiger was raised from $50 to $100 and there was constant agitation for a further increase to encourage hunters to go out after them. Large pits and traps where rigged up outside the town-ship, but of little avail the large mortality is still continued." The contention in the press at the time that an average of one death a day occurred as a result of attack by tigers was frequently corroborated by responsible persons. It wasn't easy to gage the exact numbers however as the inland pepper and gambier planters in the jungle were loath to report any death by tigers for fear that it would frighten off their labour. In the Kranji district in 1852, no less than 10 persons were killed by tigers in the course of two days.
In 1858 G. M. Dare became secretary of the Cricket Club and joined the Volunteer Rifles Corps as a private. After a period in China, he returned to Singapore again where he resided until his death in 1907.
His wife a talented musician and singer, became Singapore's first lady motorist. The Malays in the Federated Malay States used to call her car the "devil wind carriage"
Ref: The Straits Times, 23 December 1956, Page 12. http://newspapers.nl.sg/

THE LATE MR GEORGE MILDMAY DARE
The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Adviser (1884-1942) 16 December 1907, page 5.
It is with deep regret that a large number of European community here, as well as numerous friends in Japan, will learn that Mr. George Mildmay Dare1, one of the oldest residents of Singapore, and connected with this place from his early infancy, died yesterday morning at his residence, "The Lake", at five minutes to nine o'clock, after a long and exhausting illness. Of a strong constitution and fond of energetic exercise all his life, it was not until at Christmas, 1901, that an attack of partial paralysis laid him aside from the active pursuits he so much enjoyed, although for a time he still continued to take short harbour cruises in his yacht. On the occasion of his last health trip home to Europe, while staying at Monte Carlo serious heart trouble declared itself, and as a result Mr. Dare had to abandon any occupation that would cause even the slightest exertion or excitement. Since then, with some brief hopeful intervals, his strength gradually failed until the end.
Born at Peckham on March 22, 1840, the late George Dare was a son of George Julius Dare2, commander of the ship Medwas, trading to the Far East. He came out from England round the Cape in 1841, as a young child of just over a year old, in his father's ship, his mother, Mrs. Dare, who was a Miss Parks of Cape Town, being also on board. The ship proceeded to Bombay, Calcutta, and Singapore, Mrs. Dare remaining here to await the birth of her second child, and Capt. Dare proceeding with the ship to Whampoa. After the birth of Julius Dare, Mrs. Dare and her children took passage in the East Indiaman "Viscount Melbourne" for Whampoa to join Capt. Dare. Unfortunately the ship was wrecked on the Lauconia Shoal in the Palawan Passage, and the passengers and crew had to take to their boats and make for Singapore. Mrs. Dare and her two children were in the Capt.'s boat which was the first to reach Singapore. An exciting incident occurred during the fortnight they were in an open boat. Off the Borneo Post they were overhauled by two large boats full of Lanun pirates, and Mrs. Dare and the two little ones were concealed beneath a sail in the bottom of the boat. Seeing the genuine distressed condition of the crew, the Pirates did no harm to them and sheared off, the boat continuing its voyage to the Singapore Straits. Messrs. A. L. Johnston's godown then stood near the river where the Master Attendant's older office now stands, and it was from the veranda of that godown that Mr. W.H. Read, who is still alive at a venerable age, described the boat approaching the mouth of the river. On arrival at the Master Attendant steps Dr. Little helped Mrs. Dare and infant to land, while Mr. W.H. Reid carried young George out of the boat.
The Dare family resided here for years thereafter, the boys being taken home to England for education at Brecon and at Cheltenham. When about 15 years of age, George Dare returned to Singapore and presently joined the firm of Syme and Co. After five years there, he had two years experience of business in Bangkok, when he proceeded to Hongkong, being at once given an appointment in Rusden Phipps and Co. Foochow. Some time afterwards Mr. Dare began his long connection with Japan by joining the well-known firm of Glover3 in Nagasaki, subsequently becoming a partner in the firm of McDonald and Dare, brokers, Yokohama, doing a large business also in silk.
The main part of Mr. George Dare's business career was associated with Japan, where in Yokohama, he spent altogether eighteen years, and was during that time a prominent and popular member of the European community there. It was there that he lost brother Julius4 and his mother5 within two or three days of each other, of cholera. Julius Dare was a great athlete, and a brilliant horsemen, and his sudden death was a shock to the various clubs in which he was a member. Capt. Dare6 who'd been in business for years in Singapore had died long before that, and Mr. George Dare looked after his sisters until their marriage. One of these is Mrs. W.R. Scott7, formerly of Singapore, another is Lady Jackson8, wife of Sir Thomas Jackson, lately manager of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, a third is Mrs. Whitworth Alan9 formerly of Penang, a fourth is Mrs. Hartigan10 wife of Dr. Hartigan formerly of Hong Kong, and another is Mrs. Abell11 of Kobe, who passed through Singapore a few days ago and spent a short time with her invalid brother.
While on a visit to England Mr. George Dare, in June 1877, married Miss Earnshaw12 of Knaresborough, Yorkshire, Mr. and Mrs. Dare subsequently spending some years in Japan. About 1885 Mr. Dare retired from business in Japan returning to England, and then coming out again to Singapore and finally settling down here in the scenes of his early boyhood. He resided first at Carrington House, Mount Sophia, then at Abbotsford, and then for number of years past at "The Lake", his own property on the banks of the Impounding Reservoir. It was owing to chronic asthma of long standing that his wintering and Singapore was necessary, but the alternate summers were invariably spent in trips to Europe and Japan, thus enabling Mr. and Mrs. Dare to maintain constant touch with many old friends both in England and in Japan.
Though Mr. Dare took an active part in public life he was a keen observer of all that went on in local or general politics. He was happy in the multiplicity of his pursuits, and his love of open air at life. Both in Japan and here he devoted much time to yachting, and he was up till his death a member of the Corinthian yacht club. He made several cycling tours through the Malay Peninsula, accompanied for the most part by Mrs. Dare, and it was only his illness that compelled him to abandon motoring.
Sketching, photography and the organ were all pleasant occupations. In his younger days Mr. Dare was an active and frequent participator in local theatricals, and for many years he assisted Mr. Buckley in the annual Children's Treats in scene painting and otherwise. And at "The Lake" there were many pleasant social evenings with intimate friends.
There will be on the part of the many friends of Mr. Mrs. Dare and Singapore the deepest sympathy with Mrs. Dare in her great loss.
The funeral was arranged to take place at the new Cemetery at Bidadari13, by the express repeated wish of the late Mr. Dare. It is the very first internment there, as officially the present cemetery in Bukit Timah Road is not closed, until the end of the year.
In accordance with the often expressed desires of the late Mr. Dare the interment of his remains took place yesterday afternoon at 5 PM at Bidadari, New Cemetery, the very first internment in that place. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. F.G. Swindell, Colonial Chaplain. Those present included Mrs. G.M. Dare, Mr. Geoffrey Dare14, nephew of the deceased, the Honourable John Anderson, the Honourable T.S. Baker, and Messrs. C.B. Buckley, A Gentle, F.M. Elliott, E.C. Ellis, W.G.S. Clair, A. Knight, Mr. and Mrs. G.C. Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Banks, Mrs. Howard Newton, Miss Martin, W.E. Cooper, C. Crane, L. Dunman, Capt. Burton R.G.A, T.O. Mahew.
The afternoon which had been threatening fortunately cleared. There would have been a very large gathering, but that was rendered impossible by the difficulty of notification on a Sunday, and also because it could not at once be decided where the interment was to take place.
Sincere sympathy will be felt with Mr. Alfred Dare15 of Kobe the surviving brother of deceased and also with the surviving sisters.

1George Mildmay DARE. He was born March 18, 1840 in Peckham, England (a district in South London) and married Annie Dorothea Caroline EARNSHAW of Knaresborough, Yorkshire, on June 1877 in England. He was a brother-in-law of Sir Thomas JACKSON of HSBC.
2George Julius DARE (1807-1856),
3Thomas Blake GLOVER <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Blake_Glover> Glover was alleged to be the first non-Japanese to receive the Order of the Rising Sun SEE: <http://www.rampantscotland.com/famous/blfamglover.htm> , but David JACKSON, younger brother of ir Thomas JACKSON received one 5 years earlier.
4John Julius DARE died September 5, 1879
5Sarah Shrieve DARE nee PARKE died September 10, 1879
6George Julius DARE (1807-1856), father of George Mildmay DARE.
7Blanche Emily DARE wife of William Ramsay SCOTT.
8Amelia Lydia DARE
9Anna Maria DARE, wife of Whitworth ALLEN
10Florence Gertrude DARE, wife of Dr. William HARTIGAN, physician for HSBC amongst other responsibilities.
11Sarah Elizabeth DARE, wife of John Catto ABELL.
12Annie Dorothea Caroline EARNSHAW of Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England, daughter of Edward EARNSHAW & Caroline Sophie DEACON.
13<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bidadari_Cemetery> Interestingly, Augustine Podmore Williams, the sailor that Conrad based Lord Jim on was also buried here.
14This was probably Geoffrey St. Felix DARE, son of George Julius DARE and Edith Mary DIXY.
15Alfred Henry DARE (1853-1924). He was a junior at HSBC Yokohama in 1878 - recruited in the East.
The last junior to be recruited in the East was A.H. Dare, a relative of Thomas Jackson's wife, and his entire career (with the exception of a year in Amoy in 1883) was spent in Japan, although he received leave to England and was on the Eastern, not the "Local British Staff". He resigned in 1893; the Court subsequently learned that the reason had been health and consequently voted him a gratuity of 1,000 pounds. SOURCE: History of Hongkong Shanghai Bank, Frank H.H. King p232
Ref The Silver Bowl & http://newspapers.nl.sg/Digitised/Article/singfreepressb19071216.2.28.aspx

Research Notes:
Many of these tales are unproven family lore:

COPY OF NOTES WRITTEN BY GEORGE MILDMAY DARE1 (WHO DIED IN SINGAPORE IN 1907)
The Dares of Ares
Originally belonged to the noblesse of France. My Great Great-grandfather William Dare2, fled to England with 40,000 immigrants in the year 1685, when the Edict of Nantes's was revoked and the dreadful persecutions against the Hugenots ensued. Our ancestors brought their monies with them and settled and became one of the leading county families in Dorsetshire. My great grandfather, Thomas Dare, born 1733, married about 1759 or 1760 a Miss. Ross3, niece of the late Duke of Bedford4. (The late Earl Russell5 and my Great Grandfather, Thomas Dare, were married on the same day and at the same church.) On the birth of my Grandfather (third son of the foregoing marriage) the late Duke6 stood sponsor and gave him the delectable name of Phocian.7 In those days politics ran very high, our people were high Tories and the Dukes were red-hot Whigs. This alone severed the connexion and so matters have remained to this day. My grandfather Phocian Dare, had no profession and resided on his estate, Woodford Park, near Weymouth in Dorsetshire. He married in 1784, Louisa Caroline Julius8, by whom he had a family of three sons and three daughters. My father was the second son, George Julius Dare9. He was in the Royal Navy but resigned and became the owner of a sailing ship, the "John Bagshaw"10 (of course having been in command of other people's vessels previously for many years). He married Sarah Shrieve Parke11 at the Cape, and after making many voyages they finally settled in Singapore. I, George Mildmay, the eldest son, went to Japan in 1864, and after the death of my father, my mother and all my brothers and sisters join me there. My uncle, John Julius Dare, eldest son of Phocian Dare, and his family settled in the West Indies. I now come to my grandmother's side, the Julius. My grandmother, Louisa Caroline Julius, was a sister of the late Dr. Charles Julius, M.D.,12 of the Palace Richmond13. (It was he who brought the late Duke of Cambridge14 into the world.) My grandmother was a daughter of the late William Julius15, a considerable landed proprietor (Mansion and Killiekrankie Estates) in the island of St. Christopher or St. Kitts, West Indies. His brother John Julius, was then the governor of the same island, and my Grandmothers uncle, William Hamilton16, was the Attorney General. My great grandfather, William Julius17, was considered one of the proudest and most extravagant men in England. He never drove out without his four horses and outriders and live fully up to his income which was L30,000 per annum. He married an equally proud Welsh lady, a Miss Edwards18, first cousin of the late Sir Charles Morgan19 of Tredegar Park, whose son was afterwards Lord Tredegar. My grandmother's uncle, the late William Hamilton (before alluded to) married Lady Isabel Erskine20 and resided Osborne (one of Queen Victoria's residences). My grandmother's first cousin, Mrs. Nesbitt21, lived at Nevis, an island in the West Indies, where Lord Nelson, then Capt. Royal Navy after making my grandmother an offer of marriage and receiving refusal from her (Louisa Caroline Julius22), married Mrs. Nesbitt then a widow, my grandmother acting as one of her bridesmaids. King William the fourth, then Duke of Clarence, who was then with the fleet anchored at Nevis, gave the bride away. There is a monument to our Grand Uncle (Grandfather (?)) William Julius in Westminster Abby23. Near this place lies the body of . . . . . [Captain William Julius24 late Commander of His Majesty's Ship "Colchester" who departed this life 3rd October 1698 aged 33 years25."
1George Mildmay DARE (1840-1907)
2Aka Guillaume de Ayres. It seems that he may have landed in England in 1685.
3I know nothing more about "Miss ROSS".
4NOTE: I am not sure which Earl of Bedford this might be.
5NOTE: This does not line up Francis RUSSELL, son of John RUSSELL (1710-1771), and the 4th Duke of Beford married in 1764 while Thomas DARE married in 1759. Nor does it line up with his father, who married twice, but much earlier.
6Presumably, this is Lt. Gen John RUSSELL (1710-1771) 4th Duke of Bedford.
7Phocian DARE ( 1763-1834)
8Louisa Caroline JULIUS (1764-1845), daughter of William JULIUS and Jane Smith EDWARDS.
9George Julius DARE ( 1807-1856) was not only the second son, but also the youngest child of six.
10A brig of 260 tons built in Essex in 1842. SOURCE: The Essex Review.
11Sarah Shrieve PARKE, daughter of William Tollemach PARKE & Elizabeth BUSHE.
12Dr. Charles Julius, M.D., A confusion arises here. There are two brothers, Charles Smith JULIUS b 1765 and George Charles JULIUS b 1775. The latter is referred to as a doctor in Louisa Caroline DARE's will. Amy Oliver LLOYD's notes say: He lived at the Old Palace Richmond and was physician to George IV. Before living at Richmond he served in India. This fits with an email from Judy Whittaker in 2001: I know that after George Julius and his wife Isabella Gilder were married they travelled to India.Five of their children were born there.They returned to England in 1810 and settled in Bristol and in 1814 they moved to the Old Palace,Richmond where they lived for 41 years. They retired to St Leonards where at Maze Hill House they died. George at the age of 91 in the year 1866 and Isabella in 1867 in her 93rd year. They were buried in the churchyard at Hollington.
13Palace Richmond \endash see: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Palace>
14If this story is true, then it would have to be the 2nd Duke of Cambridge, who was born in Hanover Germany in 1819. The 1st Duke of Cambridge was born 1774, so it couldn't be him. Depending on which Charles Julius is the correct one, the future Dr. Charles Julius would have been only nine years old at the time, or else about to be born himself at the time of the birth of the 1st Duke of Cambridge.
15William JULIUS (1726-1780)
16William HAMILTON. A William Hamilton was the English Deputy Governor of St. Christopher 1704-1706. SO far, I have found no mention of a John JULIUS. SOURCE: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colonial_heads_of_Saint_Christopher> 17William JULIUS (1726-1780)
18Jane Smith EDWARDS
19Sir Charles MORGAN (1760-1846)
20Lady Isabel ERSKINE
21Mrs Frances "Fanny" NESBITT (1761-4 May 1831),born Frances Herbert WOOLWARD daughter of Mary HERBERT and William WOOLWARD (d 1779), a senior judge at Nevis. She was a young widow of Dr. Josiah NESBET (he died c 1781) who was from a Nevis plantation family. After his death, she was helped by her uncle John HERBERT of Montpellier. She married NELSON at Montpelier Estate on the Island of Nexis on 11 March 1787. The marriage was registered at Fig Tree Church, St, John's Parish, Nevis. She had been orphaned at a young age. There is a lot of detail on her at: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Nisbet> I do not know how she fits in as a cousin, but William HAMILTON may be the link. <http://www.twogreens.co.uk/wakeup/people/frances.htm>
22Louisa Caroline JULIUS (1764-1845) married Phocian DARE.
23It is in the north aisle of the Nave. There is a description that matches this at: <http://www.agbfinebooks.com/Publications/Memorials/Naval%20Memorials%20in%20London.htm>
24William JULIUS (1665-1698) married an unnamed HAMILTON. He was the great-great grandfather of George Mildmay DARE. NOTE: It is likely that there is another generation to be inserted between the two, since the William JULIUS that I have as his son is born in 1726 \endash a generation after the first William JULIUS' death. More work is needed here.
25NOTE: This was cropped from the copy of his notes, but was found in the version compiled by Amy Oliver LLOYD, his niece. SEE: Amy LLOYD's history - part 3 <http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/Amy_Lloyd_History_p3.htm>
Ref: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/history/DARE-GeorgeM-Notes.html

Death Ref: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=AHN&db=silverbowl&id=I6675

George married Annie Dorothea Caroline EARNSHAW [1449], daughter of Edward EARNSHAW [11092] and Caroline Sophia DEACON [11093], 2nd Qtr 1877 in Yorkshire. Annie was born on 23 Jan 1857 and died on 28 Jan 1927 in Singapore at age 70.

General Notes:
England BDM M 2nd Qtr 1877 Annie Dorothea C Knaresbrough YKS 9a 175

The Straits Times, 29 January 1927, Page 9
Death of Mrs G. P. Owen.
Well-known Figure In Singapore Society.
We deeply regret to announce the death of Mrs G. P. Owen, which occurred at her husband's beautiful residence, The Lake, yesterday afternoon. Mrs Owen who returned from Europe with Mr Owen some weeks ago, had been ill for some years, and the sad news was not unexpected by her friends, who knew the cheerfulness, courage and lively interest with which she met the trying conditions of illness and her inability to take the active part in local affairs which she had enjoyed for so many years.
Mrs Owen's memories of Singapore went back a very long time, and she was a popular and prominent leader of social life here in the days before Singapore had become the busy, modern port and city that it is today, and when the small European community lived much closer to town than they do now.
As Miss Earnshaw the deceased married Mr George Mildmay Dare, who was well known here for a long time, and whose experiences as a child show how real were the perils of navigation in local waters in the early days. When Mr Dare was a baby his parents embarked upon the vessel Viscount Melbourne bound for China but the vessel was wrecked on the the Laconia Shoal, and the unhappy parents, with two very young children, had to spend thirteen days in an open boat before they reached Singapore. During that time they were captured by Lanun pirates, but escaped by cutting the tow rope at night.
Mr Dare subsequently lived in a house at the corner of Beach Road and Bras Basah Road, on the site of the present Raffles Hotel. Some years after Mr Dare's death his widow married Mr G. P. Owen to whom the warm sympathies of very many friends in Singapore and throughout the country will be extended.
First Lady in Singapore.
Mrs Owen was one of the founders of the Ladies Lawn Tennis Club, which was started in 1884 when the club was still very much in the country, the museum and houses around Dhoby Ghaunt being non-existent, and the stream running along Orchard Road between natural banks.
All ways a leading figure in musical and amateur dramatic circles, and in the social life of Singapore generally, Mrs Owen is particularly remembered as the first lady to drive a motor car in Singapore, and she also taught the first Malay chauffeur who obtained a driving licence here. Her first car was a 12hp Star, but in the following year she bought out to Adams cars, and one of those cars received the first registration number in Singapore. It is a historic vehicle, and a wonderful testimony to the thoroughness of British manufacturing, for Mrs Owen's claimed to have covered 69,000 miles with it in Singapore, the Malay Peninsular, Java, England and Scotland.
The funeral takes place today at Bidadari Cemetery, at 4:30 p.m.
Ref: http://newspapers.nl.sg/Digitised/Article/straitstimes19270129.2.61.aspx

Research Notes:
A full account of the loss of he Viscount Melbourne and survival of passengers and crew is to be found in a seris of articles headed a Perilous Voyage in the The Straits Times, starting 3 August 1950, Page 9 Also further articles in the Straits Times over the years.
http://newspapers.nl.sg/Digitised/Article.aspx?articleid=straitstimes19500803-1.2.133&sessionid=988f4607e16a403f90e597cab29458df&keyword=George+Mildmay+dare&token=dare%2cmildmay%2cgeorge

109. John Julius DARE [1450] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Sep 1841 in North Bridge Rd Singapore and died on 5 Sep 1879 in Yokohama Japan at age 37. The cause of his death was cholera.

General Notes:
DARE. Sept. 5, at Yokohama, Japan John Julius Dare, second son of the late George Julius Dare of Singapore, aged 38 years: also on Sept. 10 at the same place, Sarah Shrieve, relict of the late George Julius dare of Singapore, aged 62 years; both of cholera.
Ref: The Standard (London, England), Friday, November 07, 1879; pg. [1];

Julius was unmarried.

Medical Notes:
JOHN JULIUS DARE: Died of cholera.
SOURCE: An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore.

John married someone.

110. Blanch Emily DARE [1414] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 24 Sep 1843 in Singapore and died on 18 Mar 1920 in Raeburn Tadworth SRY at age 76.

Blanch married William Ramsay SCOTT [1415], son of Robert SCOTT Esq [11094] and Catherine MAUGHAN [20660], on 27 Nov 1863 in Singapore. William was born in 1838 in Java East Indies and died in 1908 in England. at age 70.

General Notes:
Dare Blanch - M27/11/1863 - At Singapore on the 27th Nov last William Ramsay, sixth son of the late Robert Scott Esq., Secretary General, Java, to Blanch, eldest daughter of the late George Julius Dare Esq., of Singapore.
Ref: http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com~leighann/wfp/marriages/4.html

There were nine children in this family.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 205 F    i. Emily Louisa SCOTT [1416] was born on 19 Jun 1864 in Straits Settlements and died on 14 May 1940 in Eastborne SSX at age 75.

+ 206 F    ii. Blanche Sarah Waller SCOTT [1417] was born in 1865 in Singapore and was baptised on 31 Jan 1866.

+ 207 M    iii. William Robert SCOTT [2209] was born in 1867 in London.

+ 208 M    iv. Percival Ramsay SCOTT [20644] was born on 6 Aug 1871 in Yokohama Japan.

+ 209 M    v. Walter Dare SCOTT [5044] was born in 1872 in Straits Settlements and died on 16 Nov 1935 in Cap D'ail France at age 63.

+ 210 F    vi. Lilian Catherine SCOTT [20649] was born about 1875 in Marylebone London MDX.

+ 211 M    vii. Cecil Julius SCOTT [20651] was born about 1877 in Hampstead MDX and died on 4 May 1961 in Walberswick SFK aged about 84.

+ 212 F    viii. Hilda Florence SCOTT [20658] was born about 1879 in Hampstead MDX.

+ 213 F    ix. Mary Evelyn SCOTT [20659] was born about 1880 in Hampstead MDX.

111. Louisa Caroline DARE [1419] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1845 in West Indies, died on 1 Jul 1870 on Board "S S Mooltan" aged about 25, and was buried at Sea.

General Notes:
DEATHS - BOLTON \endash On the 1st July, on board the P. and O. steamer Mooltan, on her way to Calcutta, Louisa Caroline, the wife of Charles James Bolton Esq., commander of the Glenartney steamer.
Ref: London & China Telegraph 15 Aug 1870

Louisa married Capt Charles James BOLTON [1420] on 23 Feb 1864 in Singapore. Charles was born in 1829 in Hull YKS and was baptised on 27 Jun 1829 in Sculcoates Dist England.

General Notes:
1869 Oct 30
The British Steamer Glenartney, Capt Bolton, from Calcutta 19th en route to Panang and Calcutta anchored in the harbor last night.
1884 Nov 15
John Bolton, an Englishman, settled in the Marianne islands where he has a wife ….
Straits Times Weekly Issue
Ref: The Silver Bowl. http://www.thesilverbowl.com/ http://sharonoddiebrown.blogspot.ca/2014/09/discovering-captain-bolton.html

Charles retired to Bocking Hall Bocking Essex (1901 Census)


Children from this marriage were:

+ 214 F    i. Mary Louisa BOLTON [20618] was born on 27 Aug 1865 in Singapore, was baptised on 4 Oct 1865 in Singapore, and died on 11 Mar 1866 in Hong Kong.

+ 215 M    ii. Lieut Charles George BOLTON [1421] was born on 14 Nov 1866 in Singapore, was baptised on 25 Dec 1866 in Singapore, and died on 28 Oct 1900 in Greenock RFW at age 33.

+ 216 F    iii. Violet BOLTON [1422] was born on 7 Jan 1869 in London, was baptised on 12 Feb 1869 in St Luke West Kilburn MDX, and died between May and Jun 1870 at sea enroute to Calcutta.

112. Sarah Elizabeth DARE [1423] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Apr 1847 in Bombay India.

General Notes:
Birth Ref: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=AHN&db=silverbowl&id=I6675

Abell - Dare On 19th April at HBM's Legation Tokyo in the presence of H S Parkes KCB and by the Rev W J H Garratt MA John Catto Abell of Kobe Japan to Sarah Elizabeth third daughter of the late George Julius Dare of Singapore.
Ref: Trove

Other Records

1. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Bromley Kent by Bow. Sarah is recorded as a lodger married aged 43 born Bombay India.

Sarah married John Catto ABELL [1424], son of John ABELL [11095], on 19 Apr 1879 in Tokyo Japan. John was born in 1840 in Kintore Aberdeen Scotland, died on 16 Aug 1903 in Kobe Japan at age 63, and was buried in Old Kobe Cemetery Ono.

General Notes:
John Catto Abell
His obituary informs that he resided at Shanghai for several years before he came to Kobe in 1868, establishing himself as a bill and bullion broker although he is only listed in 1871 for the first time according to the Japan Directory in partnership with Otto Herhausen, operating under <meiji_firms_a.html>Abell & Herhausen <meiji_firms_a.html>, Brokers and Public Accountants, Hy # 35. This business partnership lasted only until 1873, Otto Herhausen moved to Osaka and the connection resolved itself.
In 1873 <meiji_firms_a.html>J. C. Abell <meiji_firms_a.html>is listed as independent Merchant in Kobe # 35, in the following years he acted especially as Bill and Bullion Broker.
About in 1879, after his marriage, he moved to Kobe # 29 and in 1884 to Kobe # 27 establishing there his office and residence.
From 1886 on he enlarged his scope of business by insurances, he became agent for E. B. Watson (Agent for the Chinese Insurance Co.) and from 1888 additionally sole agent for the Union Assurance Society, Fire and Life.
This enlargement of business required a partnership and from 1890 on James Ralston became his partner operating under <meiji_firms_a.html>Abell & Ralston <meiji_firms_a.html>, Bill and Bullion Brokers, Insurance Agency and from 1891 additionally Agents for J. P. Bisset (later Bisset & Ure), Stock and Share Brokers.
The brokerage required much power and especially time and for this reason the insurance agency was abondaned in 1893.
About in 1900, on the death of J. Ralston, J. C. Abell again took over the business, under his own name it has since been conducted until about 1902 when he could not realize it any more for health reasons.
The last period he had been confined to his bed upwards of five months, but for some weeks his medical attendants held out no hope of recovery, and his death in 1903 was therefore not unexpected. He was buried in the Old Kobe Cemetery at Ono.
He was a gentleman of high business integrity, respected by all with whom he was in contact, both foreigners and Japanese alike.
His name is always connected with the Hyogo and Osaka Chamber of Commerce, which was formed on September 11th, 1868. From the outset the Chamber proved a very efficient body, in large part owing to the untiring exertions of H. St. J. Browne, the first secretary and Mr. J. C. Abell, his successor.
From 1871 until 1888 John Catto Abell occupied the position of secretary continuously and he was honoured for his successful and unfailing work.
In its early days the Chamber had to deal with very many difficult questions affecting commerce, and especially with the obstructions thrown in the way of the foreign traders by the Japanese authorities by giving Japanese preferential treatment. By carefully watching over the interests of foreign merchants and defending them from injustice, also the secretary rendered valuable service to the community.
He was one of the oldest members of the K.R. & A.C. (Kobe Regatta & Athletic Club) and for some years he was also a member of the Trustee of the Club, in 1897 - 1899 he was even elected its president but had to resign due to his deteriorating health.

On April 19, 1879 he married Sarah Elizabeth Dare, sister of <meiji_portraits_d.html>Alfred Henry Dare <meiji_portraits_d.html> (see also <meiji_portraits_d.html>DARE-Family <meiji_portraits_d.html>), in the British Legation in Tokyo. Sarah Elizabeth was born on April 17, 1847 in Bombay.
They had two children: son <meiji_portraits_a.html>John Julius Dare Abell <meiji_portraits_a.html> (*04.02.1880 in Japan) who married Vesta Atkinson (* 17.06.1880 in Kobe), daughter of John Laidlaw Atkinson, on April 17, 1909 in Kobe
and daughter Blanche Mary Abell, born about 1885 in Japan who had, however, never been recorded in the Japan Directories.
In 1904 Sarah Elizabeth Dare Abell is listed in her residence at Kobe # 27.
Ref: http://www.meiji-portraits.de/meiji_portraits_a.html#20090527093143250_1_2_1_22_1

Other Records

1. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Bromley Kent by Bow. John Catto is recorded as a lodger married aged 50 and exchange and bullion broker born Aberdeen SCT

Children from this marriage were:

+ 217 M    i. John Julius Dare ABELL [1425] was born on 4 Feb 1880 in Hiogo Japan, was baptised on 4 Apr 1880 in Kobe Japan, and died on 22 Jun 1950 in England at age 70.

+ 218 F    ii. Blanche Mary ABELL [1427] was born in 1884 in Hiogo Japan.

113. Annie Maria DARE [1429] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Jul 1849 in Singapore, was baptised on 19 Sep 1849 in Singapore, and died on 14 Jun 1931 in Bexhill-on-Sea SSX at age 81.

General Notes:
Annie was living in 1902. They had 6 children

Annie married Whitworth ALLEN [1430] on 8 Jan 1870 in St Andrew Singapore. Whitworth was born on 5 Nov 1835 in Gt Tower St MDX and died in 1899 at age 64.

General Notes:
"Whitworth Allen" Source: An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 219 M    i. George Edward ALLEN [1431] was born on 5 Feb 1871 in Orange Grove Singapore and died in 1967 at age 96.

+ 220 F    ii. Winifred Maud ALLEN [1432] was born on 10 Nov 1872 in Hurricane Cottage Singapore and died in 1961 at age 89.


114. Amelia Lydia DARE [1438] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Feb 1851 in Singapore and died on 10 Apr 1944 in Herringfleet Hall Lowestoft at age 93.

General Notes:
In 1882, Eliza Jackson wrote to her daughter-in-law, Amelia Lydia Dare: In my simplicity, I thought that Tom was a Bank Manager, but it seems he is also a hotel keeper. At the time, her son, Thomas Jackson, was the Chief Manager at HSBC in Hong Kong, and his wife Amelia had recently been suffering from some kind of illness. Both Thomas and Amelia were renowned for their entertaining, first in Yokohama, and later in Hong Kong at Creggan, their home on The Peak. A few years earlier, the London Manager David McLean had written to Thomas Jackson:
I hear you have been entertaining all Hongkong with dancing parties almost weekly. Save your coin is my advice. You will find the dollars useful when you come Home.
March 8, 1878. David McLean Papers (SOAS MS 380401).
Ref: The Silver Bowl http://sharonoddiebrown.blogspot.ca/2015_08_01_archive.html

Research Notes:
Images Courtesy: The Silver Bowl



Amelia married Sir Thomas JACKSON Bart [1439], son of David JACKSON [11096] and Elizabeth OLIVER [11097], on 18 Sep 1871 in H M B Legation Yokohama Japan. Thomas was born on 4 Jun 1841 in Carrigallen, Co Leitrim, died on 21 Dec 1915 in Bank of Hong Kong 9 Gracechurch St LON at age 74, and was buried in Jackson Family Plot Creggan Graveyard.

General Notes:
Sir Thomas was one time Chairman of Directors of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, Chairman of Imperial Bank of Persia, Director of the London County and Westminister Bank.

Sir Thomas Jackson.
Funeral at Stansted
The funeral of Sir Thomas Jackson took place at the Stansted Parish Church on December the 24th, the interior having many flowers and the Coffin being covered with many wreaths and other floral mementos. The Coffin was born by the butler and other employees of the estate. The service, which was conducted by the vicar, the Reverend E. Goodchild, was choral. Those who had arrived by the train from Liverpool Street were met at the village station by motors and taken to the church. The company included:
Captain Julius Jackson (son), who was severely wounded in September 1914, and Mrs Julius Jackson, Lieutenant Russell Jackson RGA (son), Major A. M. Tabor, 3rd. Hussars, and Mrs Tabor (daughter); Mrs Lloyd, wife of Lieutenant Colonel Lloyd, Lancashire Fusiliers; Mrs Raymond Marker, widow of Lieutenant Colonel R. J. Marker DSO., Coldstream Guards, who was killed in action in November, 1914; and Miss P. St. F. Jackson (daughters), Sir Thomas's eldest son, the new Baronet, Major Thomas Dare Jackson, MVO DSO, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (now temporary Brigadier General), and his youngest son, Lieutenant C. S. Jackson Coldstream Guards, who has also been wounded, were unable to attend, both being on active service in France.
Others present were: Mr G. Brown, Mr B. Gilmour, Mr G. F. Wright, and Mr Jack McCullagh (nephews), Mr JRM Smith, Sir Walter Gilbey, Lord Blyth, Hon Herbert Blyth, Lady Cameron, Sir Fielding Clarke, Mr Gershom Stewart MP, Mr Murray Stuart, Mr J. Annan Bryce M. P. Mr A. M. Townsend, Sir Carl and Lady Meyer, Sir Charles Addis, Mr H. E. R. Hunter, Mr J Lyall, Sir John McLeavy Brown, Mr J C Peter, Mr W. Irvine Rowell, CMG, Mr P. Hendry, and Mr G. Little.
A memorial service was held at the Parish Church of All Hallows, Lombard Street, EC at 12 noon. The service was choral, the hymns and 90th Psalm being finely rendered by the choir . At the close of the service the Dead March in Saul was impressively rendered by the organist. The service was well attended by old friends of Sir Thomas, the company present including:
Lady Addis, Lieutenant T. Addis, Miss Addis, Mr A. G. Angier, Lord Inchcape, Mr G. W. Jamieson, CMG, Mr E. M. Janion, Mr and Mrs H D C Jones, Mr M. C. Kirkpatrick, Mr J MacLennan, H. E. the Persian Minister, Viscount St Aldwyn, Admiral of the Fleet Sir Edward Seymour, Mr T. H. Whitehead, Mr H. C. Wilcox (representing China Association) and Mr A. G. Wood.
In addition to the particulars given in our last issue, we (L. and C Express) may note that Sir Thomas went to the East in 1864 to Agra and Mastermans Bank. Two years later he joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai bank of which he became successively accountant at Shanghai, manager at Hankow and Yokohama, and sub-manager at head office in 1870. Two other appointments took place in Yokohama, and then he came home on short leave, being acting manager in the London office. On returning to Hong Kong he became chief manager in 1876. It may be noted that the reserve fund of the bank then stood at $100,000; today it is $33,000,000. In 1884 Sir Thomas was instrumental in founding the Savings Bank in the Colony, the Hongkong Bank carrying out the work and receiving deposits. Although he retired from the East in 1889 and again in 1891, and became London manager, he was induced on both occasions to return to China to assist the bank in tiding over a financial crisis. It was not until some years later that he came home finally and took up the post of chairman of the London Committee.
Ref: The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884-1942), 31 January 1916, Page 10

Research Notes:
For more on Sir Thomas and his family:
http://www.thesilverbowl.com/biographies/JacksonThomas_DareLydia.htm

Images Courtesy: The Silver Bowl


Children from this marriage were:

+ 221 F    i. Kathleen McCullagh JACKSON [7730] was born on 7 Jul 1872 and died on 2 Jun 1959 in Marks Barn Braintree ESS at age 86.

+ 222 F    ii. Edith Bradford JACKSON [7732] was born in 1873 and died on 7 Sep 1874 at age 1.

+ 223 F    iii. Amy Oliver JACKSON [1440] was born on 27 May 1874 and died in 1962 at age 88.

+ 224 M    iv. Sir Thomas Dare JACKSON Bart [1444] was born on 14 Jun 1876 in Japan and died on 2 Feb 1954 at age 77.

+ 225 F    v. Beatrice Minnie Shrieve JACKSON [7734] was born on 19 Dec 1879 in Hong Kong and died on 19 May 1972 in Beech Walk Honiton at age 92.

+ 226 M    vi. Sir George Julius JACKSON [7736] was born on 4 Jun 1883 and died on 21 Feb 1956 at age 72.

+ 227 F    vii. Dorothy St Felix JACKSON [7741] was born on 26 Jul 1887 in Chislehurst KEN.

+ 228 M    viii. Walter David Russell JACKSON [7742] was born on 8 Mar 1890 in Chislehurst KEN and died on 15 Dec 1956 at age 66.

+ 229 M    ix. Capt Claude Stewart JACKSON [1442] was born on 30 Jan 1892 in Chiselhurst KEN and died on 9 Oct 1917 in Ypres Belgium at age 25.

115. Alfred Henry DARE [1445] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 May 1853 in Singapore and died on 23 May 1924 in Newdigate House Nursing Home Bexhill SSX at age 70.

General Notes:
ALFRED HENRY DARE: An A.H. Dare was a junior at HSBC Yokohama in 1878, recruited in the East p232 History of Hongkong Shanghai Bank, Frank H.H. King "The last junior to be recruited in the East was A.H. Dare, a relative of Thomas Jackson's wife, and his entire career (with the exception of a year in Amoy in 1883) was spent in Japan, although he received leave to England and was on the Eastern, not the "Local British Staff". He resigned in 1893; the Court subsequently learned that the reason had been health and consequently voted him a gratuity of 1,000 pounds."

Dare Alfred Henry of Beach Haven Hotel Bexhill Sussex died 23 May 1924 at Newdigate House Nursing Home Bexhill Probate London 2 September to Alfred Julius Dare civil engineer and Charles Augustus Pead solicitor.
Effects L841 11s 10d
Ref: National Probate Calendars

Alfred married Lena Mary FIELDEN [7729], daughter of William Sutcliffe H FIELDEN [11098], on 3 Oct 1885 in Christ Church Yokohama Japan. Lena was born in Melbourne Aust and died in 1906 in Japan.

General Notes:
MARRIAGES.
On the third October at Christ Church Yokohama, by the Reverend E. C. Irwine, Alfred Henry Dare of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, youngest son of the late George Julius Dare, of Singapore, to Lena Mary Fielden, eldest daughter of the Reverend WSH Fielden, of Forestdean Walthamstow.
Ref: The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Nov 11, 1885; pg. 1; Issue 31601.

This family had three sons and one daughter.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 230 M    i. Alfred Julius DARE [1446] was born on 16 Jul 1886 and died about 1970 in Folkstone KEN aged about 84.

+ 231 M    ii. Norman Fielden DARE [1447] was born on 19 Mar 1888 in Walthamstow ESS.

+ 232 M    iii. Harold DARE [20613] was born on 30 Jan 1890 in Japan and died about Feb 1973 in Chapala Mexico aged about 83.

+ 233 F    iv. Marjorie Fielden DARE [20623] was born 1st Qtr 1900 in Hertford District.

116. Florence Gertrude DARE [1413] (George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Jan 1855 and died on 28 Jun 1938 in Oatlands Park Hotel Weybridge SRY at age 83. She was usually called Florina.

General Notes:
FLORENCE GERTRUDE DARE: Transcription of Miss McCready's news clippings saved in a diary at Gilford Castle. HARTIGAN - June 28, 1938, at Oatlands Park Hotel, Weybridge Surrey, Florence Gertrude Hartigan, widow of William Hartigan.

Florina married Dr William HARTIGAN [2211]. William was born about 1852 in Limerick Ireland and died on 11 Sep 1936 in Oatlands Weybridge SRY aged about 84.

General Notes:
Dr William Hartigan born about 1852, Limerick, Ireland died 11 September 1936, Oatlands, Weybridge, England, aged about 84, he was a physician for the Hongkong Shanghai Banking Corporation, co-founder of the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese and a brother-in-law of Sir Thomas Jackson.
He was born in Limerick in Ireland and educated at the Catholic University School and the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. He went to Hong Kong where he was a physician to the Alice Memorial Hospital.
Dr Hartigan with Dr Patrick Manson and Dr Gregory Paul Jordan formed the Hong Kong Medical Society in September 1886. The Society established the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese in 1887 which later transformed into the University of Hong Kong. Hartigan was also a professor at the school. Dr. Sun Yat-sen, graduate of the school, mentioned him as one of his significant teachers.
Dr Hartigan married Florence Gertrude Dare, whose older sister had married Thomas Jackson, the chief manager of the HSBC.
Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hartigan_(doctor)

DR. WILLIAM HARTIGAN: NOTE: From History of Hongkong Shanghai Banking Corporation by Frank HH King:
p 243 "Dr. Hartigan of Hong Kong who was (at least in 1890) doctor for the Hongkong Bank - his recommendation that European staff be provided summer accomodation on the Peak is on record."
p 579 "Dr. William Hartigan, Bank Doctor, Hong Kong then London" but not a member of bank staff. See: Charles B. Buckley "An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore, 1819-1867", Singapore 1902. Rpt Kuala Lampur 1965.

They had two children.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 234 F    i. Mary HARTIGAN [15525] .

+ 235 M    ii. Dermot HARTIGAN [15526] .

117. Archdale Julius QUILTER [1175] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Jul 1819 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 29 Aug 1819 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 30 Apr 1853 in Calcutta India at age 33.

General Notes:
Archdale never married.

118. Arabella Emily QUILTER [1176] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 May 1821 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 17 Jun 1821 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 12 Dec 1904 in Paignton Devonshire at age 83.

General Notes:
Arabella baptism is also recorded on the 28 Sep 1821 at St Mary Magdaline Richmond.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, South St Bishops Tawton DEV. Arabella is recorded as head of house a widow aged 58 an anuitant born Canwick LIN

2. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Paignton Devonshire. Arabella is recorded as a widow head of house aged 79 living on her own means born Canwick Lincolnshire

Arabella married Rev Abraham Dunlin PARKINSON [1177] on 17 May 1841 in Canwick Lincolnshire. Abraham was baptised on 26 May 1809 in Horncastle and died on 2 Dec 1859 at age 50.

General Notes:
Abraham Dunlin. Parkinson College: TRINITY Entered: Michs. 1828 pens. (age 18) at TRINITY, Mar. 8, 1828. S. of Abraham Dunlin. B. at Horncastle, Lincs. [May 23, 1809]. School, Louth Grammar. Matric Michs. 1828; B.A. 1832. Ord. deacon (Chester) 1833; priest, 1833; C. of Wellingore, Lincs., -1841. C. of Harrington, 1842-8. R. of Utterby, 1849-52. P.C. of Thornes, Yorks., 1856-9. Married, 1841, Arabella Emily, dau. of the Rev. George Quilter, V. of Canwick, Lincs. Died Dec. 2, 1859. (Clergy Lists; G. Mag., 1860, I. 189, which calls him Abraham 'Burlin'; P. B. G. Binnall.)
Ref: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900


Children from this marriage were:

+ 236 F    i. Jessie PARKINSON [1178] was born in 1842 and died in 1927 at age 85.

+ 237 F    ii. Emily Margaret PARKINSON [1180] was born in 1847 in Hanington Lincs and died in 1930 at age 83.

+ 238 M    iii. George Edward PARKINSON [1181] was born in 1858 and died on 8 Jan 1880 in Africa at age 22.

119. Julia Henrietta QUILTER [1182] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Dec 1822 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 19 Jan 1823 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died in 1881 at age 59.

General Notes:
John Hill puts Julia's birth date at 8 Dec 1822

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Julia is recorded as a daughter aged 28 single born Canwick

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Farnham Road Farnham. Julia is recorded as a neice aged 38 unmarried born Canwick Lincolnshire fundholder.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 42 Black Lake Tilford Farnham SRY. Julia is shown at this address of her Uncle William M Julius, she is aged 48 unmarried a fundholder born Canwick.

120. Mary Anne QUILTER [1183] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Jul 1824 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 9 Aug 1824 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 27 Mar 1915 at age 90.

General Notes:
Mary-Anne and her sister Katherine had a double wedding, performed by their father.

Julius Jottings April 1900 No 2
Ivy Lodge, Saffron Walden.
5 January 1900
Dear Mr Brewin,
I have received the first number of Julius Jottings, and find it very pleasant and instructive. In such a numerous family it is not easy for the elder members to keep up with the flowing tide - there is so much new life - we get a little puzzled as to who's who. Your book is the very thing we want. However, we can look back a long way and remember our grandparents distinctly - a beautiful couple they were. I can also recall my great aunt Hodgson, and my grandfather's sister, Mrs Dare. I wonder if there are any Dare's living now? Your brother thinks we should all write about ourselves. So I will mention that I am a widow, and have two sons; the elder, Robert Carey, is a master at Harrow School; the younger, Julius Parnell, is in the Manuscript Department of the British Museum. I enclose my subscription for the present year, hoping you will be able to continue your interesting magazine, for which accept the thanks of your unknown cousin.
M.A. Gilson.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 27 single born Canwick


Mary married Henry Robert GILSON [1184] on 4 Aug 1859 in Canwick Lincolnshire. Henry was born on 25 Jan 1812 in Boston LIN and died on 25 Dec 1887 in Worksop NTT at age 75.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 239 M    i. Robert Cary GILSON [1185] was born on 2 Apr 1863 in Boston LIN and died on 18 Feb 1939 in Quilters West ChiltingtonPulborough SSX at age 75.

+ 240 M    ii. Julius Parnell GILSON [1189] was born on 23 Jun 1868 in Worksop NTT and died on 16 Jun 1929 in Chertsey SRY at age 60.

121. George QUILTER [1191] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Mar 1826, was baptised on 11 May 1826 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 8 Feb 1849 at age 22.

General Notes:
George first attended St Pauls School London.

George. Quilter College: Entered: Michs pens. at ST CATHARINE'S, June 6, 1846. S. of the Rev. George (above), R. of Canwick, Lincs. B. there. [School, St Paul's.] Matric. Michs. 1846. Brother of Henry K. (1857). (St Paul's Sch. Reg.) Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900

122. Cameron Aeneas QUILTER [1192] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Aug 1827, was baptised on 10 Sep 1827 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 23 Feb 1853 in Birr IRL at age 25.

General Notes:
Cameron was a solicitor, he was drowned in the river Shannon while skating.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Camden Town St Pancras MDX. Cameron is recorded as Cameron E unmarried a visitor aged 23 attorney & solicitor born Canwick LIN

123. Katherine Ansilla QUILTER [1193] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 31 Jul 1829 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 4 Sep 1829 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 17 Apr 1917 at age 87.

General Notes:
Katherine was aged 87 at her death

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, New Walk Beverly YKS. Catherine is recorded as a daughter married aged 51 a merchants wife born Canwick LIN

Katherine married John Mason KNOWLES [1194] on 4 Aug 1859 in Canwick Lincolnshire. John was baptised about 7 Mar 1835 in Kirton-in-Holland LIN and died on 17 Apr 1917 aged about 82.

General Notes:
Death date year 1917 England BMD. John Hill makes the bap 7 Mar 1813 which cannot be as age at death 87.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 241 M    i. George Herbert KNOWLES [1195] was born on 2 May 1860 in Boston LIN and died on 20 Jul 1888 at age 28.

+ 242 M    ii. Rev Cameron Quilter KNOWLES [1196] was born on 8 Jul 1861 in Boston LIN.

+ 243 M    iii. Rev Maurice Mason KNOWLES [1197] was born in May 1864.

124. Sarah Connington QUILTER [1198] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Mar 1831, was baptised on 18 May 1831 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 4 Jun 1832 at age 1.

General Notes:
John Hill puts Sarah's death at 14 Jun 1842 but there is no confirmation on the English BMD, to prove. Source for 1832 may be Valmai Julius?



125. Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD [1199] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Jun 1832 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 27 Jul 1832 in Canwick Lincolnshire, died on 6 Feb 1911 in Waddington at age 78, and was buried in Canwick Lincolnshire. The cause of his death was accidental explosion.

General Notes:
Quilter Frederick William, 4s George of Canwick, co Lincoln, cler. Lincoln Coll., matric. 26 June 1851, aged 19; BA 1855, MA 1859; B. & DD 1872, incumbent of New Town, Tasmania, 1864-67 etc., chaplain at Geneva 1873-75, vicar of Shirebrook, Notts., 1876-78, rector of Nth Piddle, co. Worcester, 1878-85
Oxford University Alumni, 1500-1886

Frederick William QUILTER was ordained as Deacon in 1856 by the Bishop of Oxford, and as a Priest in that year by the Bishop of Peterborough, for the Bishop of Oxford. He became curate of Benson, Oxford in 1856. When he was 25 years old he got an appointment as deputy headmaster of the High School in Hobart, Tasmania. He was then appointed as headmaster of Launceston Grammar School in 1860. In 1864 he took up duties as the vicar for New Town, a parish near Hobart. In 1867 the family returned to England, where he took the Curacy of West Wycombe, BKM. 1868 -1873; Curate of Leyton, ESD 1873-1876; Chaplain Geneva, Switzerland 1876-1878; Vicar of Shirebrook, NTT 1878 -1885; Rector of North Piddle, WOR 1885-1888; Rector of Martin Hussingtree, WOR. 1892-1904; Vicar of Kempsey, WOR. 1904 -1911; Rector of Waddington, LIN.
Frederick owned a large house in Monken Hadley called "Gladsmuir" now named "Lemons" ref. Monken Hadley by F.C. Cass MA., pg 170:

The Kempsey Collection, a 1952 publication about St Mary's church in Kempsey records the May 1892 copy of the parish magazine : "On the afternoon of Wednesday 6th April, a large congregation assembled to witness the induction Dr Frederick Quilter to the temporalities of the living of Kempsey, the Bishop of Worcester having instituted him to the spiritual oversight during the previous week."
Ref. John R Hill

Frederick was a Head master of Launceston School Tasmania and Vicar of various parishes. (Including St Marys Kempsey WOR - Google 2009)

Oxford June 10.
In a Congregation. . . . . the following gentlemen were admitted ad eundem Master of Arts: . . . . . Rev Frederick William Quilter, Lincoln College, being absent in Hobart's Town.
Daily News 11 June 1859.

Oxford March 7.
In a Congregation holden this morning the following degrees were conferred:
Batchelor and Doctor of Divinity, by Accumulation. The Rev Frederick William Quilter, Lincoln College.
Daily News 8 March 1872.

Frederick killed himself conducting a chemistry "experiment" at the vicarage at Waddinton, he is buried alongside his father at All Saints Canwick.

Rev Dr Quilter, Waddington.
The death occurred at 11:15 on Thursday night of the Rev Dr Frederick William Quilter, the esteemed Rector of Waddington, near Lincoln. Dr Quilter, who was 79 years of age, met with a serious accident with an acetylene gas plant on January 14, and he never completely recovered from the effects.
The deceased was a DD of Lincoln College, Oxford. He was ordained in 1856, and has had a very varied clerical and scholastic career.
Ref: Sheffield Daily Telegraph 18 February 1911.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Old Vicarage Leyton ESS. Frederick is recorded as head of house married aged 38 a curate of Leyton and private tutor born Canwick LIN

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 55 London Rd Worcester WOR. Frederick is recorded as head of house married aged 49 Rector of Nth Piddle D.D. Oxon born Canwick. Also in the house were 3 servants and a tutor.

Frederick married Anna Maria Poulett HARRIS [1200], daughter of Capt Charles Poulett HARRIS [23472], 12 Nov1856 in St Andrew Clifton Bristol GLOS. Anna was born in 1827 in Saunton DEV, died on 26 Oct 1857 in Tasmania Aust. at age 30, and was buried in St Davids Hobart TAS.

General Notes:
Marriages.
12th inst, at the parish church, Clifton, by the Rev RD Harris, brother of the bride, the Rev Frederick William Quilter, BA second master of the High School of Hobart-town Tasmania, to Anna Maria Poulett, second daughter of Capt Charles Poulett Harris, Hotwells, Bristol.
Ref: North Devon Journal 20 November 1856.

Quilter Anna Maria 31 May 1877. Administration of the effects of Anna Maria Quilter (Wife of the Rev Frederick William Quilter, Clerk) formerly of Clifton in the City and County of Bristol but late of Hobart Town in Tasmania who died 28 October 1857 at Hobart Town was granted at the Principal Registry to the said Rev Frederick William Quilter Of Shirebrook Vicarage in the parish of Pleasingley in the County of Derby D.D. Effects under L450.
National Probate Calendar


The child from this marriage was:

+ 244 M    i. Archdale Vere QUILTER [1201] was born on 21 Sep 1857 in Hobart Tasmania, was baptised on 4 Oct 1857, and died on 31 Jan 1937 in Los Angeles CA USA at age 79.


Frederick next married Mary Anne Parry NIXON [1202], daughter of Rt Rev Dr Francis Russell NIXON [1203] and Anna Maria WOODCOCK [10972], on 2 Jul 1859 in St David Cathedral Hobart Tasmania. Mary was born on 19 Jan 1839 in Ash Kent and died about 1920 in Guernsey aged about 81.

General Notes:
Mary is described by her mother in a letter from Hobart: "As for Mary she is by far the happiest child I ever beheld, and often jumps and laughs from simple lightness of heart, and her little eyes sparkle with happiness".
The governess Mary (now a Mrs Wedge) writes of Mary aged 5 "Dear little Mary is the same bright joyous child as ever full of spirits and very interesting. She has not yet lost her pretty imperfect way of speaking, which I think is so taking". . . . . "Neither can I say much as to Mary's improvement in reading and spelling. . . . . she has forgotten her letters, and I taught them to her on the voyage. I really begin to despair of teaching her anything, except from memory, and this she answered very well . . . . . she can now repeat numbers of little hymns and nursery rhymes. She takes much to her needle, and works quite nicely. . . . . . I think one great drawback to Mary's improvement in reading is a total deficiency in ear . . . . . she seems to have no idea of the sounds of vowels

Mary is said to have lived with her youngest son Walter on Guernsey, some time after her husbands death

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Old Vicarage Leyton ESS. Mary is recorded as a wife aged 31 born Ash KEN

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 55 London Rd Worcester WOR. Mary is recorded as a wife aged 42 born Ash KEN

Children from this marriage were:

+ 245 F    i. Frances Julius QUILTER [1204] was born on 18 Dec 1859 in Hobart Tasmania and died on 9 Dec 1860 in Launceston Tasmania.

+ 246 M    ii. George Julius QUILTER [1205] was born on 28 Sep 1861 in Launceston Tasmania and died in 1898 in Africa at age 37.

+ 247 M    iii. Frederic Rowland Russell QUILTER [1206] was born on 3 Aug 1863 in Launceston Tasmania and died on 28 Aug 1938 in Winchester HAM at age 75.

+ 248 F    iv. QUILTER [10900] was born on 8 Jul 1865 and died on 8 Jul 1865.

+ 249 M    v. Rev Rowland Palmer QUILTER [1209] was born on 28 Aug 1866 in Tasmania Aust. and died on 2 Apr 1930 in Portree Isle of Skye SCT at age 63.

+ 250 M    vi. Herbert Rumball QUILTER [1210] was born on 20 Apr 1868 in Wycombe BKM and died on 20 Aug 1868 in Wycombe BKM.

+ 251 M    vii. Charles Parry QUILTER [1211] was born on 20 Apr 1868 in Wycombe BKM and died on 20 Jul 1868 in Wycombe BKM.

+ 252 M    viii. Cyril Nixon QUILTER [1213] was born on 21 Feb 1870 in Leyton ESS and died on 12 Oct 1881 at age 11.

+ 253 M    ix. Hugh Henry QUILTER [1212] was born on 2 Nov 1871 in Leyton ESS, was baptised on 30 Nov 1871 in Leyton ESS, and died on 4 Mar 1948 in Grantham LIN at age 76.

+ 254 F    x. Mary Agnes QUILTER [1220] was born on 17 Apr 1873 in Leyton SSX, died on 30 Jan 1947 in Crowborough, SSX at age 73, and was buried in St John Crowborough, SSX.

+ 255 M    xi. Walter Vernet QUILTER [1214] was born on 26 Jul 1874 in Geneva Switzland (Brit. Sub) and died on 25 Apr 1948 in Guernsey Channel Is. at age 73.

126. Charlotte Sophia QUILTER [5049] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jul 1833, was baptised on 25 Aug 1833 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 8 Feb 1843 in Harrington at age 9.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Islington St Michael London. Charlotte is shown born 1834 Ipswich SFK daughter of George Ann Quilter

127. Agnes Amelia QUILTER [5050] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 18 May 1835, was baptised on 28 Jul 1835 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 3 Jun 1925 at age 90.

General Notes:
Agnes did not marry she lived in Petersfield HAM, and is said to have been very puritanical. She died aged 90.

John Hill writes of his fathers memories of a visit to Agnes. "My father said that he and his mother stayed there once in 1916, and, as a concession he was allowed to read Pilgrims Progress instead of the Bible. House work on Sundays was forbidden, and even on the coldest days only bread and cold meats could be eaten. He also said that on one Sunday his mother, Mary got out her knitting and was given a severe reprimand and told to put it away".

She was said to be very rich, was fond of cats, and rarely wore any colour but black. Her days were passed reading "good books" seated in an uncomfortable chair.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Agnes is recorded as a daughter aged 25 single born Canwick


128. Emma Theresa QUILTER [5051] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Jul 1836 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 20 Sep 1836 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 1 Nov 1857 in Canwick Lincolnshire at age 21.

129. Rev Henry King QUILTER [5052] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Mar 1839 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 27 May 1839 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died on 29 Sep 1905 in Thirsk YKS at age 66.

General Notes:
Henry King Quilter: College: PETERHOUSE Entered: Michs. 1857; pens. July 2, 1857. S. of the Rev. George (1810), V. of Canwick, Lincs. Matric. Michs. 1857; Scholar, 1859; B.A. 1861; M.A. 1866. Ord. deacon (Lincoln, for York) 1862; priest (York) 1863; C. of Topcliffe, Yorks., 1862-4. V. of Bilton-in-Holderness, 1864-1901. V. of Topcliffe, 1901-5. Disappears from Crockford, 1906. Brother of George (1846). (T. A. Walker, 513.)
Ref: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900

Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901.
The Rev Henry King Quilter, Vicar of Bilton-in-Holderness, has been appointed by the Archbishop of York to the prebend of Barnby, in York Minster, in succession to the late Rev H. E. Maddock, Rector of Patrington.

Julius Jottings. No 7 April 1902.
The Rev H. K. Quilter, Vicar of Bilton-in-Holderness, has been appointed vicar of Topclyffe, Thirsk. The patrons of the living the Dean and Chapter of York.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Henry is recorded as a son aged 12 a scholar born Canwick


2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, St Mary Cambridge CAM. Henry is recorded as a pupil unmarried aged 22 a private tutor born Canwick


130. Nona QUILTER [5053] (Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Feb 1842 in Canwick Lincolnshire, was baptised on 30 May 1842 in Canwick Lincolnshire, and died in 1936 at age 94.

General Notes:
Nona was aged 94 at her death

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Canwick Vicarage LIN. Nona is recorded as a daughter aged 9 scholar born Canwick


2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Canwick Vicarage LIN. nona is recorded as a daughter aged 19 single born Canwick


3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, New Walk Beverly YKS. Nona is recorded as a clergymans daughter unmarried aged 39 born Canwick LIK

131. Herbert Amelius JULIUS [785] (George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 4 Nov 1830 in Ireland, was baptised on 19 Jan 1831 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 31 May 1868 in New Zealand at age 37, and was buried in Oamaru Cemetery NZ. The cause of his death was Inflamation of the bowels.

General Notes:
Herbert was baptised by George Quilter.

Qualified as a Solicitor, he practiced with his brother Edric in Maidstone and Holt Norfolk. They then both left to join their brother Reginald in New Zealand.

A Herbert Julius aged 29 arrived in Victoria April 1858 aboard the Essex from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

Settlers to Otago, Pre 1861 - Val Maxwell 1989 (Hocken Library)
H. Julius departed Melbourne 4 June 1859 for NZ on the ship "Pirate", he is described as a single Gent aged 30 yrs. Arrived 16 Jun 1859.

Herbert is registered on the NZ Electoral Rolls, 1865/66 to 1867/68 the electorates varied between Hampden, Lindis and Oamaru, his address was Rugged Ridge, Waitaki.

Early North Otago Runs.
By Robert Pinney.
When Herbert appeared in Oamaru, he lived up to the family reputation for witty speaking. In 1867 he was induced to represent Oamaru in the Provincial Council, but the next year became insolvent and resigned with a shortness of notice that was severely criticised; by the end of May he died.

The Julius brothers in Oamaru were given nicknames, Herbert's was "the Talking Julius"

Herbert's land holdings in Oamaru in the 1860's
Citizens Roll.
Town of Oamaru
1867-68
Julius Herbert: Res - Waitaki. Ward - Jetty. Qual - Freehold.
North Otago Times, Volume VIII, Issue 216, 18 June 1867, Page 3
Oamaru Citizens Roll - 1867/68
Julius Herbert: Residence-Waitaki; Ward-Jetty; Section 6; Block 27.
Tees St between Arun & Wansbeck Streets. (photo A)

Otago Provincial Government Gazette:
11th Dec 1867 pg 261 - Herbert applied for an Auctioneers Licence.

Herbert Amelius Julius was a run holder in North Otago (not correct?), and prominant figure on the Turf being Clerk of the Course at the Oamaru Jockey Club. In 1867 he was elected to represent Oamaru Town in the Otago Provincial Council. His death occured on 31 May 1868.
Ref NZ Biographies NZSOG Auckland.

The Oamaru Times, and Waitaki Reporter Friday, June 21, 1867.
A meeting of the members of the Oamaru Jockey Club took place in the Star and Garter Hotel, on Tuesday afternoon last, Capt. Godfrey in the chair. The object was to consider what action should be taken relative to the fencing and leasing of the Reserve. . . . . Proposed by Mr H. A. Julius, and seconded by Mr Luke, " That tenders be called for immediately for fencing the Oamaru Race Course Reserve, . . . . . "Proposed by Mr Edric A. Julius, and seconded by Mr Connell, "That immediately upon the Club being in a position to give a good title, tenders be called for leasing the Race Course"
North Otago Times, Volume VIII, Issue 217, 21 June 1867, Page 2

Dunedin Bankrupcy Files. 1868.
Herbert Amelius - Oamaru - Stock Dealer 1868 - 1868
agency: DAAC. Series: 18116. Accession. D256. Box/item. 525. Record 47.

Herbert Amelius Julius was elected Member of the Otago Provincial Council for the District of Oamaru (Town District) 1867, return of writs was published by the Colonial Secretary's Office Wellington the 26th April 1867.
Ref NZ Gazette 1867 Index Vol Pg 204, Otago Provincial Government Gazette April 1868 Pg 143

Otago Provincial Government Gazette.
Dunedin Friday, April 24, 1868. Vol XII No. 539
In the Supreme Court of New Zealand Otago and Southland District.
In Bankruptcy.
It Is Hereby Notified to all to whom it may concern that Herbert Amelius Julius, of Oamaru, in the Province of Otago, and Colony of New Zealand, has this day caused to be filed in the Office of the Registrar, a Declaration of Insolvency.
Dated this 24th day of April one thousand eight hundred and sixty eight.
Kenyon and Maddock,
Solicitors for the said Herbert Amelius Julius.

Herberts statements of his affairs record him with debts of L527.12, mostly to small creditors, and assets (shares) valued at L95.

Dunedin Bankrupcy Files. 1868.
Herbert Amelius - Oamaru - Stock Dealer 1868 - 1868
agency: DAAC. Series: 18116. Accession. D256. Box/item. 525. Record 47.

OTAGO PROVINCIAL COUNCIL - Votes & Proceedings
ROLL OF PROVINCIAL COUNCILLORS
Session XXIII 1867
Julius Herbert Amelius - Oamaru (Town)

Session XXIV 1868
Julius Herbert Amelius - Oamaru (Town)
With the note: Resigned April 24; was re-elected, May 6; took his seat, May 8; Died May 31.
Herbert resigned presumably because of his bankruptcy, but retained the confidence of his Oamaru Town electorate before dying of peritonitis.

Friday April 24 (2 O,Clock PM) Message No 1
The Superintendant has to intimate to the Provincial Council that he has this day issued a writ for the election of a member of the Council for Oamaru Town, in the room of Herbert Amelius Julius, Esquire, resigned, returnable in fourteen days.
James Macandrew
Superintendant
Government Offices, Dunedin, April 24 1868

Friday May 8 Message No. 2
The Superintendant forwards herewith for the information of the Provincial Council a writ issued by him upon the 24th Day of April last for the election of a person to serve as Member for the Town of Oamaru District in place of Herbert Amelius Julius Esq., resigned, with an endorsement thereon by the Returning Officer, dated 6th May 1868 to the effect that the said Herbert Amelius Julius has been duly elected to serve as Member of the Provincial Council for the said District.
James Macandrew
Superintendant
Dunedin 8th May 1862

Oamaru Citizens Roll 1867/68
Julius Herbert: Residence-Waitaki; Ward-Jetty; Section 6; Block 27.
Area. Cnr of Arun & Tees St Oamaru. (Picture A not built on 2011)

Monday June 1 (2 O'Clock PM)
Mr Speaker read and laid on the Table letter from Mr P Barker as follows:
Criterion Hotel June 1 1868
The Speaker of the Provincial Council
Sir, I have to inform you that Mr Herbert Amelius Julius died here last evening,
And remain, Sir,
Yours respectfully
P.Barker.

On motion of the Provincial Secretary and Treasurer, the House adjourned till seven oclock pm the following day.
The letter above in the Minutes was edged in black.
Ref Hocken Library Dunedin 2008.

Herbert's grave Ref. in Oamaru Cemetery:
Plan Block 9 Plot 35 (also plots 36, 9, 10?)
Inscription: In memory of Herbert Amelius Julius eldest son of George Charles Julius of Richmond Surrey born 4 Nov 1830 died 31 May 1868.
An arched headstone in Oamaru stone.
Ref NZSOG SO1.15 211

Letters of Administration were filed for Probate in Dunedin 3 August 1869 for Herbert Amelius Julius Gent of Waitaki and Dunedin.
NZSG Index.

Dunedin Letters of Administration.
JULIUS Herbert Amelius - Waitaki and Dunedin - Gentleman 1869 - 1869
Agency: DAAC. Series: 9074. Accession: D239. Box/item. 243 Record. A714.

Herbert never married.

Research Notes:
Image of Herbert by courtesy of Oamaru Archives NZ

Medical Notes: Herbert's death certificate (NZ BDM folio 1868/599 Ref 80059869) described him as a "Flock owner" aged 37yrs. The cause of death was, what is now termed an appendicitis, no cure was available in 1868. The first successful surgery for the condition, took place in England in 1885.
ELF 2008

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. Herbert is recorded as a son unmarried aged 20 a solicitor articled clerk born Richmond Surrey.

Herbert may have married spouse unknown.

132. Edric Adolphus JULIUS [786] (George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Apr 1833 in Ireland, was baptised on 15 Apr 1834 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 13 Jul 1890 in Farnham SRY at age 57, and was buried in Tilford SRY. The cause of his death was a stroke.

General Notes:
Edric was baptised by George Quilter

Qualified as a Solicitor he practiced with his brother Herbert before leaving to join his brother Reginald in NZ. He may have practiced in the North Island before coming to Oamaru in 1861.

E A Julius - ship, Sebastian 1859 single - source Otago Witness
Settlers to Otago Pre. 1861 - Val Maxwell 1989 Hocken Library

Early North Otago Runs.
By Robert Pinney.
Edric and his brothers were given nicknames, Edric was rather Irish and excitable and had a genuine tendency to utter an involuntary sound like that of a barking dog, so he was known as "the Barking Julius". He had a reputation as an advocate that could prove black to be blue. For instance, in defence of a run holder accused of crossing sheep over the Waitaki without inspection, Edric pleaded that there was no proof that the sheep had not been sent round by sea. He was probably the writer of long argumentative letters to the Otago Daily Times in support of the quality of Rugged Ridges sheep. W.A. Low of Galloway Station wrote in reply "I have always heard him talked of as a solicitor of great abilities and Machiavellian subtlety and acuteness, yet I would be very sorry to give
6s 8d for his opinion on sheep"

Edric was active in civic and political matters in Oamaru chairing meetings etc and appearing in Court.
Ref: Papers Past.

Oamaru Directory December 1864 also 1865.
Page 150.
E. A. Julius is shown as the Solicitor for the Building Society.
Page 152.
Solicitor - Edric Adolphus Julius.

Oamaru Directory December 1871.
Page 242/3.
Hospital: E. A. Julius, Vice-President . . . . .
Racecourse Trustees: . . . . . E. A. Julius . . . . .
Lawyers: E. A. Julius and a further three persons.

Edric is registered on the Electoral Roll for Otago for 1865/66 to 1871/72 his address was Rugged Ridge Waitaki and the electorate name varied between Hampden, Lindis and Kawerau. He is also shown registered for the years from 1866/67 to 1875/76 with Oamaru as an address the electorate name varied from Oamaru Town, Oamaru to Waitaki.
NZSG Index

IMPORTANT SHEEP CASE.
Cargill & Others V. Julius & Another.
The following most important case was heard in the Supreme Court, Dunedin, on the 14th and 15th instant, before His Honor Mr Justice Chapman . . . . . The Attorney-General (the Hon. James Prendergast ) and Mr James Smith appeared for the plaintiffs, William Walter Cargill, John Cargill, and Edward Bowes Cargill, (Cargill and Co.); and Messrs T. B. Gillies, G. E. Barton, and James Macassey for the defendants, Edric Adolphus Julius and Reginald Julius.
The declaration alleged that the defendants, in January, 1865, converted to their own use 150 lambs and 580 sheep, the property of the plaintiffs, and had since detained them; wherefore, the plaintiffs sought to recover L1000, or have the lambs and sheep returned and to recover L250 damages in detention.
The Julius's denied the allegation submitting they had purchased the stock from a Christian Hille, who had purchased them from a William Dansey. Dansey who was a friend of Julius's was in financial difficulty owing Cargill & Co several thousand pounds under a Bill of Sale secured in part by his livestock.
It appears Cargill & Co being unable to obtain satisfaction from Dansey were seeking to make good some of their losses from the Julius's?
However after lengthy argument, and testamony by the various parties and a complex summing up by the Judge:-
"The jury were absent from court about 25 minutes, and then returned with a verdict for the defendants"
The hearing can be found On-line on Papers Past in a Supplement to the:
North Otago Times, Volume VI, Issue 109, 22 March 1866, Page 1

THE LINDIS ELECTION.
The election of a member to represent the Lindis District in the Provincial Council, in the room of Mr F. Walker, deceased, took place at the Messrs Julius' station, on Wednesday at noon.
The Returning Officer, T. W. Parker, Esq., read the Writ, and the advertisement appointing the place day, and hour, for the nomination, and then called upon the electors present to propose candidates.
Mr E. A. Julius thereupon proposed Henry France, Esq., as a fit and proper person to represent the District. Mr. Reginald Julius seconded the nomination.
No other candidate being proposed, the Returning Officer declared Mr France duly elected.
We may state that several queries were put to Mr France, who satisfactorily answered them.
North Otago Times, Volume VII, Issue 137, 14 September 1866, Page 2

NZ Government Gazette:
Mon 6th July 1868 Notice of appointment of Edric as a J.P. Same again in 1870.

MAGISTRATES IN OTAGO.
The New Zealand Gazette of the 6th inst. contains, a Commission signed by the Governor, Sir G. F. Bowen and appointing the Magistracy of the Colony. The following are the Magistrates residing in Otago : . . . . . Julius, Edric Adolphus, Waitaki . . . . .
Otago Witness, Issue 868, 18 July 1868, Page 4

Edric's land holdings in Oamaru in the 1860's
CITIZENS ROLL
Town of Oamaru
1867-68
Julius E A: Res - Waitaki. Ward - Severn. Qual - Freehold.
Julius E A: Res - Waitaki. Ward - High. Qual - Freehold.
Julius E A: Res - Oamaru. Ward - Thames. Qual - Freehold.
North Otago Times, Volume VIII, Issue 216, 18 June 1867, Page 3
Oamaru Citizens Roll - 1867/68
Julius E. A. :Residence-Waitaki; Ward-Severn; Sections 1&2; Block 81,
No block 81 in Severn Ward, Jan 1879 map.
Julius E. A. :Residence-Oamaru; Ward-Thames; Pt section 7; Block 4.
Thames St., between Wear & Itchen Streets (picture A)
Julius E. A. :Residence-Waitaki; Ward-High; Sections 1&2; Block 81.
Area. 0:2:23 Cnr Severn & Till St Oamaru (picture B)

Edric was a shareholder (1 share) in "The Ben Lomond Water-Race and Mining Company.
North Otago Times, Volume XIV, Issue 529, 10 June 1870, Page 3

North Otago Times
New Advertisements.
Electoral District of Waitaki. The following persons are objected to as not being entitled to have their names retained or placed on the List of Voters for the Electoral District of Oamaru . . . . . Julius, Edric A. Waitaki No. 1 freehold, not possessing qualification. Oamaru No. 2 joint household claimant must elect which qualification parted with . . . . .
North Otago Times, Volume XVL, Issue 623, 9 May 1871, Page 5

Partnership Dissolved.
Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership existing between us, Edric Adolphus Julius and Joseph O'Meagher, carrying on business at Oamaru in the Province of Otago as Solicitors, under the style or firm of "Julius and O'Meagher" will from Monday next, the 3rd proximo, be dissolved by mutual consent, and that all debts owing to and by the said Partnership are to be received and paid by either of the said Partners on account of the said firm in liquidation.
Dated this twenty nineth day of June , 1871.
E A Julius
J O'Meagher
Witness to the signatures of the abovenamed parties - James Gardiner, articled Clerk to the above named Joseph O'Meagher.
Ref NZ Gazette June 1871 Pg. 377


Dunedin Bankrupcy Files. 1871
JULIUS Edric Adolphus and JULIUS Reginald - Rugged Ridge Station Waitaki - Runholders 1871 - 1871
Agency: DAAC. Series: 18116. Accession: D256. Box/item. 536. Record: 596.

The Oamaru Times. TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1871.
New Insolvents: The following have been gazetted bankrupts since our last, viz. : Edric A. Julius, and Reginald Julius, runholders, Waitaki. Filed, 10th August.
North Otago Times, 15 August 1871, Page 2
The Partnership accounts at 25 Aug 1871 recorded debts of L25744 and assets of L23357 The value of Rugged Ridges was recorded as L21000

Otago Provincial Council Gazette:
Oamaru 13th Dec 1871, Notice that Edric was elected Vice President of the Oamaru Hospital.

In the Supreme Court of New Zealand
Otago and the Southland District
In the matter of the Bankruptcy Act 1867 and of the Bankruptcy Act Amendment 1868 and of the Bankruptcy Act Amendment 1870 and in the matter of Edric Adolphus Julius and Reginald Julius late of the Rugged Ridges in the province of Otago runholders and sheep farmers.
I Robert Campbell Junior the trustee in the above estate have the honour to report to the court as follows:
I have examined a Edric Adolphus Julius the surviving Bankrupt who has willingly afforded me every information as to the affairs of Bankrupts.
The Bankrupts carried on all their monetary transactions solely through the merchants, Messes Dalgety Rattray and Company and kept no books of such transactions. The merchants accounts disclosing a complete statement of all their accounts up to the time their station was taken possession of by the mortgagees.
I have examined such accounts, and believe that insolvency of the Bankrupts arose through no extravagance or fault on their part, but from the fact of their having to pay high interest and commissions, and also very large sums annually for wool money on a large number of sheep held by them on terms; and from the suddern depreciation which took place previous to their bankruptcy in the value of station properties sheep and wool.
I believe that the property of the Bankrupts will realise 20 shillings in the pound or nearly that sum.
I find that after the Mortgagees took possession of the station and sheep the Bankrupts opened a banking account and realised on horses and cattle, not mortgaged; the bankrupt Edric Adolphus Julius has produced to me their bank book, which shows that the moneys realised were fairly expended in paying debts, he appears also to have paid monies into the account, from his private business as a Solicitor, to enable such debts to be discharged.
Robert Campbell
Otekaike (Kurow)
28th Nov /71
(Robert Campbell Jnr was about this time the "wool king" of NZ owning a flock of 170,000 sheep. Ref: Vile Crimes - The Timaru poisonings by Peter Graham)

The NZ Gazette (Supplement) dated 15 Jul 1872 page 12 - report of Otago and Southland bankrupts show: 54 - Julius Edric Adolphus and Julius Reginald, runholders, adjudged bankrupt 30 Aug 1871, not reported.

The details of the brothers bankruptcy are recorded at the Hocken Library and N.Z. Archives, Dunedin, a number of the documents are included in the pictures section of this file.

Notice of Partnership.
Oamaru 12 July 1875.
We have this day entered into Partnership together as Barristers, Solicitors, Conveyancers etc under the style or firm of Julius & Balmer.
E.A. Julius. B Balmer.
Ref: Papers Past. North Otago Times 13 July 1875 Pg.3.

Papers Past.
. . . . . It will be remembered that Balmer levanted some time ago with a large amount of money belonging to clients. . . . .
Ref: West Coast Times 26 March 1886 Pg.2.

The Early Years of an Unregulated Profession: Lawyers in the South Island 1850-1869 (1995) 6 Canterbury LR 56-68 - J.N.Finn.
Page 11. There are cases where lawers decamped ahead of their creditors and no disciplinary proceedings were brought, though they may well have been justified, as with E. A. Julius and Benjamin Balmer in Oamaru.
Ref: Smith, op cit, p. 64.
Page 5. It may be that Edric practised in the Nth Island on arrival in NZ: "In 1861 . . . . . E.A. Julius . . . . . came from the North Island."
Ref:http://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/10092/1829/1/12610869_EARLY%20YEARS%20OF%20AN%20UNREGULATED%20PROFESSION.pdf Pg.11.

Early North Otago Runs.
By Robert Pinney.
"At the end of 1875, Edric, who was by then an invalid left Oamaru after loudly cheered speeches about his yarn spinning, and his generous unselfish nature; he took with him Reginald's widow and family".

Deaths.
Julius. On the 13th inst at Claremont House, Tilford, Surrey, Edric Adolphus Julius, formally of Oamaru, New Zealand, solicitor, son of the late George Charles Julius, Esq, MD, aged 57 years.
Ref: Sussex Agricultural Express Saturday, 19 July 1890.

DEATHS.
Julius: On the 13th July, at Claremont House, Tilford, Surrey, England, Edric Adolphus Julius, formerly of Oamaru , seond and only surviving son of the late George Charles Julius. M.D. ; aged 57.
Otago Witness, Issue 1911, 25 September 1890, Page 22

Edric did not marry.

Research Notes:
BANKRUPTCY IN NEW ZEALAND.
The following is the fourth Annual Report of the Accountant in Bankruptcy, Mr George Brodie, to their Honours the Chief Justice and Judges of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. The Accountant in Bankruptcy begs respectfully to lay before the Court his fourth Annual Report, applicable to the year ending 30th November, 1871. . . . . . From the returns attached, it will be seen that there has been a considerable decrease ! in the number of bankruptcies for the past year. It is with satisfaction that the Accountant draws attention to this desirable result ; at the same time he has to regret that two of the producing classes, namely "Farmers and Settlers" and " Miners " still continue to furnish a large proportion of the number of persons who seek the protection of the Court. - continues . . . . .
Otago Witness, Issue 1080, 10 August 1872, Page 7

Medical Notes: Edric was paralysed by a stroke in NZ, he returned to live with his father in England until his death.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. Edric is recorded as a son unmarried aged 17 a solicitor articled clerk born Richmond Surrey

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Sands Seale Farnham. Edric is recorded as a son unmarried aged 47 solicitor born Richmond SRY

133. Reginald JULIUS [787] (George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Nov 1835 in Ireland, was baptised on 8 Feb 1836 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 2 Sep 1871 in Oamaru New Zealand at age 35. The cause of his death was haematemesis and epileptic convulsions.

General Notes:
Reginald was baptised by George Quilter

As a young man he went to seek his fortune in New Zealand, his first arrival date in NZ is uncertain.

Early North Otago Runs.
By Robert Pinney.
Rugged Ridges (Run 243) was first granted to "Julius & Robison" for 14 years from 5 September 1858. Harrie Carr Robison the next year transferred his interest to his partner Julius. In the Rugged Ridges stock returns Reginald was named from 1859, and Edric from 1863 as a partner. Herbert does not appear in the record's of Rugged Ridges. The Rugged Ridges flock increased from 2000 in 1859 to 13,000 in 1866. By that time the slump was setting in, and the values of stock were declining. In 1866 the station was very lucky to benefit from a sale of 1200 fat wethers at 16s 6d for the goldfield population of Whakatipu.
There was a strike at the Rugged Ridges shearing of 1869-70, and a shearer named Redpath brought a suit against E.A. and R. Julius for unpaid wages. The shearers were engaged at 15s a hundred, but said at the start that they wanted 17s 6d. At midday 22 January 1869 they refused to go on shearing. The Rugged Ridges sheep were the worst to shear "on the river" and a pair of shears would last only two days. A notice was posted on the shed door, signed by E.A. and R. Julius saying that all shearers who did not start at 1 p.m. would be dismissed and forfeit their wages. Many squatter and merchant witnesses gave evidence that it was customary not to pay shearers who did not finish the flock. However Redpath won the case for the amount claimed, and costs; a rehearing was refused. By early 1870 the Rugged Ridges stud Merinos were offered for sale; by 1871 bus station was listed in the name of a stock firm (Dalgety). By August 1871 E.A. and R Julius had filed their insolvency. At this low ebb Reginald Julius died on 2 September 1871. D.C. Gordon was managing Rugged Ridges, though possibly for the stock firm. By January 1872 the station was reported to be sold to Charles Nichols a partner of F. G. Dalgety. The area was 60,000 acres running 26,438 sheep. By the next year the station was in the hands of the Sutton brothers.

Settlers to Otago, Pre 1861 - Val Maxwell 1989 (Hocken Library)
R Julius, ship Armin, 24 Mar 1860, single passenger ship from Australia. To Oamaru 30 Oct 1860 - Oamaru Witness.

The History of Oamaru,
1853 to 1889,
By W.H.S. Roberts.
Printed in Oamaru by Andrew Fraser - 1890
Oamaru in 1860:
Page 62.
. . . . . The town of Oamaru, though small, was at this time a very lively place; the run holders on the Waitaki, a jovial lot of fellows and thorough gentleman - such as the brothers Julius, Harry Robinson, W. H. Dansey, Edmund Gibson, and others - were frequently in town.
Oamaru in 1861:
Page 66.
. . . . . The coming Oamaru horse races were now the talk of the day; the brothers Julius being the principal competitors south of the Waitaki . . . . . Mr Noble was asked by Mr Reginald Julius to ride the celebrated "Kauri Gum" for the Oamaru Plate, which he did, and won the race.

The Julius brothers in Oamaru were given nicknames Reginald's was "the Walking Julius"

White Stone Country.
The Story of North Otago.
By K. C. McDonald.
Page 83:
. . . . . The first race meeting held at the racecourse reserve seems to have been that of 19 and 20 March 1861, when large numbers gathered, mainly from the runs on both sides of the Waitaki. The principal event was the Oamaru Cup, of the value of 50 sovereigns, with a sweepstake of three sovereigns. The winner, Venison, was owned by R. Julius and ridden by Mark Noble.
Precis from page 46:
. . . . . The Rev J. C. Andrew held the run Otematata north of Rugged Ridges. After the Julius brothers Rugged Ridges was occupied by Dalgety, Nichols & Co, Sutton Brothers, and the Mount Ida pastoral company.

To Stand This Season
At the Station Of the Undersigned
The thoroughbred horse "MELEAGER"
Meleager, by Riddlesworth, dam Althea; grand dam Alice Gray, the dam of Cassandra, see No 2 of New South Wales magazine, November, 1845.
Riddlesworth, by Mullins, out of Bee-in-a-Bonnet, imported by the Hon. W. Petrie, from England.
REGINALD JULIUS
Rugged Ridges, Waitaki.
Ref. Otago Witness, 28 December 1861.

History of North Otago.
From 1853.
Page 12/13:
Rugged Ridges: (Run No. 243)
Just beyond Kurow, in what was called the gorge, "Little" John Maclean had Run 23. Rugged Ridges belonged to the Messrs Julius Brothers (Reginald, Edric Adolphus, and Herbert Amelius), distinguished as Walking, Talking, and Barking Julius. Mr Reginald Julius was a splendid man among horses, and could generally make them do whatever he wished. He broke in a pair of trotters to run in double harness , and got a handsome carriage up from Dunedin. But alas he was too enterprising for the circumstances. There were no roads, so when he got up the Papakaio track as far as the turn off to the Waitaki Ferry, the track proved to rough for the daintily built carriage, and it broke down and remained there for some weeks. The point close to Mr Thomas Hartley's was consequently known as "Carriage Point."

Otago Nominal Index - Record Details
Person Surname JULIUS
Forenames Reginald
Address Waitangi
Sex M
Occupation runholder
Event Description Crime victim; stealing, horse
Event Place Waitangi
Date about end Dec
Source Title Otago Police Gazette
Page No 26
Publication Date 20 Jan 1862
Comments Brown horse stolen
Ref http://marvin.otago.ac.nz/oni/details.php?recid=359922.10

Otago Nominal Index - Record Details
Person Surname JULIUS
Forenames Reginald
Address Waitangi
Sex M
Occupation run holder
Event Description Crime victim; stealing, horse
Event Place Waitangi
Date about end Dec 1861
Source Title Otago Police Gazette
Page No 30
Publication Date 3 Feb 1862
Comments Brown horse stolen from his run
Ref http://marvin.otago.ac.nz/oni/details.php?recid=364252.11
(Was one of these horses Meleanger?)

Otago Nominal Index - Record Details
Person Surname JULIUS
Forenames Reginald
Address tent, Arrow River Diggings
Event Description Crime victim; stealing
Event Place tent, Arrow River Diggings
Date 4 Jan 1863
Source Source Title Otago Police Gazette
Page No 6 Publication Date 19 Jan 1863
Comments Saddles, bridles, revolver, a leather valise and clothing stolen
Ref http://marvin.otago.ac.nz/oni/details.php?recid=360698.10

News of the Week.
Crown grants are ready for issue in favor of . . . . . Reginald Julius, . . . . .
Otago Witness, Issue 638, 20 February 1864, Page 14
It is assumed this was for Rugged Ridges Station, Waitangi, nr Aviemore on the Waitaki River.

Otago Provincial Government Gazette (Return of sheep Otago):
30th Sept 1865, Run 243, Julius EA & R 12,000 clean sheep.
13 Nov 1867, Run 243, Julius EA & R 15,000 clean sheep.
30 Sept 1870, Run 243, Julius EA & R 19300 clean sheep.

Otago Provincial Government Gazette:
3 Aug 1866, Lindis Dist. Messrs Julius Rugged Ridges, Waitaki, selected as a Polling Place.

MARRIED.
On the 12th instant, at the residence of E Gibson, Esq, by the Rev A Gifford, Reginald Julius Esq to Catherine R Cameron
The Oamaru Times and Waitaki reporter Vol 2 Issue 35 20th October 1864 Pg 2.

MARRIED.
On the 12th inst., at the residence of E Gibson, Esq., Waitangi, Reginald Julius, Esq., to Catherine, daughter of Robert Cameron, Esq., late of Perth, Scotland.
Otago Witness, Issue 673, 22 October 1864, Page 13

Reginald and his brothers immersed themselves in North Otago business, life, and politics.

Resident Magistrates Court
Thursday August 18th
Before T W Parker, Esq., R.M.; and W. G.Filleul, Esq., J. P.
H. Waymouth v G Taylor.
Present the plaintiff; and Mr R Julius for defendant.
This was a summary action, brought under 11 and 12 Victoria, in which the summons stated that the defendant, on the 16th inst., at Oamaru, did unlawfully detain from the plaintiff one bank note of the value of L5. The following witnesses were examined.
Henry Waymouth, swore - on the evening of Tuesday the 16th inst, at Baker's Hotel, myself, the defendant, and several others were present. One of the said parties, Julius, proposed to lay down on the floor of the room a piece of paper, against which, or at which, I was to stand, and that the other party (Julius) should come up and stand with his hands behind his back, and that I could not strike him in the face. I said that it was absurd to suppose that I could not do it, if there were no trick or "sell" in the matter. The party (Julius) then offered to bet L5, or any sum, that it could not be done, and turned to me, offering to bet me that amount - namely L5. I stipulated that there should be no "sell", which was agreed to on behalf of Julius, and it was finally proposed that the trial should come off there and then. I took the sum of L5 in a bank note, from my pocket, and the note, I believe, was taken out of my hand by Julius. I have made a formal application for the money but it has been refused. I made the application because I suspect it that there was a particular way of standing on the paper which rendered the proposed act of striking an impossible one. . . . . . Plaintiff said that he would put it to the company present in the room as to whether he had lost or not, and they declared that he had lost, . . . . .
Reginald Julius, swore - I was at Baker's Hotel on the evening of the 16th inst. The plaintiff and defendant were there. The plaintiff was very much intoxicated. I was sober. I refuse to answer that the paper trial was a "sell". I appear on the behalf of the defendant who informed me that he had business that would prevent his attendance.
George Taylor, swore - I was at Baker's Hotel . . . . . I heard a proposition made by Mr Julius . . . . . that he would lay a piece of paper on the floor, and that another party should put his foot upon the paper, and that such second party should not be able to strike him (Julius) in the face. Julius bet L5 that no one could do it, plaintiff agreed to bet that sum that he could do it. The L5 was laid on the table by the plaintiff, and I lent L5 to Mr Julius. Mr Julius then went up to the paper, but the plaintiff rose from his chair and sat down again, and he said that he wouldn't have it. . . . . . Mr Julius claimed the stakes, to which plaintiff gave in, . . . . . I think that the two parties, plaintiff and Julius, where in a muddled state.
Francis Orlando Shipton swore . . . . . Mr Julius bet that plaintiff could not hit him in 23 seconds. They were to stand toe to toe in the room about 8 inches apart, with a piece of paper between them. Both parties went up to the paper, but the trial was not made, as the plaintiff said there was some "sell" or another. . . . . .
The Court ordered the money to be returned to the plaintiff, which was accordingly done, and awarded him 2s.6d. costs. . . . . .
Ref. North Otago Times 25 August 1864.
("Sell" to cheat, dupe, hoax. (Slang) Websters Dictionary.)

White Stone Country.
The Story of North Otago.
By K. C. McDonald.
Precis from page 98/99/100:
About the middle of June 1865, two men Davis and Evereste were released from Dunedin jail and went on a criminal rampage through Otago. After a succession of armed robberies the two men came upon employees of the Julius Brothers droving sheep at Doctor's Creek near Otekaieke, who recognized one of the robbers was riding a horse belonging to Julius. Warned the Julius brothers defended themselves in the house of Reginald Julius rather than the main station where the robbers were able to change the amounts unmolested. Police who had been alerted arrived at Rugged Ridges, and with Reginald Julius rode out in pursuit of the robbers, where they were captured at Otematata.
See full article in media file.

Reginald's land holdings in Oamaru in the 1860's
Oamaru Town Grants c1865.
Julius Reginald: Sections 1&2; Block 81. Area. 0:2:23 Cnr Severn & Till St Oamaru Area Section 2; 0:1:15 - owned by Edric by 1868.
Julius Reginald: Section 5; Block 27. Area. 0:1:0 Cnr of Arun & Tees St Oamaru. (Picture D)
Julius Reginald: Section II; Block 28. Area. 0:1:0 Cnr. Tees & Arun St Oamaru. (Picture B)
Julius Reginald & William H Dansey: Sections 6&7; Block 2. Area. 0:2:0 Tyne St Oamaru (Picture C)
Oamaru Citizens Roll - 1867/68
Julius Reginald: Residence-Waitaki; Ward-Jetty; Section 5; Block 27.
Area. 0:1:0 Cnr of Arun & Tees St Oamaru. (Picture D)
Julius Reginald: Residence-Waitaki; Ward-Jetty; Section II; Block 28.
Area. 0:1:0 Cnr. Tee & Arun St Oamaru. (Picture B)

Election Notice.
REQUISITION TO ROBERT CAMPBELL, JUN., ESQ. OIR, \emdash We, the undersigned Electors of the OAMARU DISTRICT, respectfully request that you will allow yourself to be put in nomination as a candidate for the representation of the District in the General Assembly at the ensuing General Election. . . . . . Reginald Julius . . . . . Herbert A. Julius . . . . .
GENTLEMEN. It gives me great pleasure to comply with your request . . . . . THE following Gentlemen have consented to act on Mr CAMPBELL'S COMMITTEE, . . . . . REGINALD JULIUS . . . . .
North Otago Times, Volume VI, Issue 107, 8 March 1866, Page 2

IMPORTANT NOTICE.
The inhabitants of the Electoral District of OAMARU are invited to meet the under-signed at the Northern Hotel Assembly Room, On WEDNESDAY NEXT, 4th APRIL, At 7.30 p.m., for the purpose of drawing up a Petition to be presented at the next session of the Goneral Assembly. S. GIBBS. M. GRENFELL. J. CLENDINNEN. M. R. MILLER. R. M. PAYNE. J. WADDELL. ROBERT MACKAY. REGINALD JULIUS. W. F. INGRAM. JAMES HASSELL. Oamaru, 28th March, 1866.
North Otago Times, Volume VI, Issue 110, 29 March 1866, Page 3

THE OAMARU ELECTION.
Friday last was undoubtedly one of the most exciting days ever experienced in Oamaru . . . . . "Vehicles for conveying voters to the polling-place here were in much request . . . . . Two or three "spills" occurred during the day. A buggy and four, driven by Mr Reginald Julius, suffered a capsize at Boundary Creek, resulting in Mr Luke's sustaining a dislocation of his elbow . . . . . the Returning Officer, Mr Parker, appeared, and announced the polling at Oamaru to be as follows. For Mr Campbell 48, Mr Ingram 32 . . . . .
North Otago Times, Volume VI, Issue 110, 29 March 1866, Page 2

Reginald is registered on the Electoral Rolls between 1865/66 and 1871/72, his address is variously given as Waitaki, Waitangi, Oamaru Electorate. Ahuriri, Hampden or Lindis Electorate.
NZSG Index.

CITIZENS ROLL
Town of Oamaru
1867-68
Julius Reginald: Res - Waitaki. Ward - Jetty. Qual - Freehold.
North Otago Times, Volume VIII, Issue 216, 18 June 1867, Page 3

ATTEMPTED STICKING-UP AT RUGGED RIDGES STATION.
On the 7th ultimo a very extraordinary affair occurred at the Messrs Julius' station, Rugged Ridges, from which there can be little doubt that the parties implicated intended to have stuck-up the station, but were either unable to carry out their purpose, or finding that the household were roused and prepared to meet fire-arms with fire-arms, thought it the better part of valor to make off.
The circumstances of the case were these:
About 10 p.m. on the night referred to Mr Reginald Julius was seated in the kitchen of his own house, when the servant called his attention to the circumstance that two mounted men were riding about the premises. Not imagining mischief, Mr Julius went round the house but could see no one; thinking this circumstance suspicious he returned, and taking up an old revolver which had been loaded for months, went out into the garden, the servant locking the door behind him. While going down the path two pistol-shots were fired at him from behind some willow trees growing a few yards to his right, but fortunately without taking effect. Convinced now that there was real ground for alarm, he bethought himself that in all probability the revolver he held would be useless in a hand to hand encounter, in consequence of the likelihood that it would miss fire, having been kept loaded for to long. He therefore deemed it prudent to return for another. Reaching the house door he found it locked, and knocked for admittance for some time in vain. At length being admitted, he loaded three chambers of a clean revolver (one of them, as he afterwards found, with a bullet only), and again went out. Just beyond the fence he saw one man mounted and another with his foot in the stirrup, and immediately afterwards both rode away. He fired the contents of one barrel after the retreating men, but would scarcelv be likely to have touched either, as they were almost, if not quite out of range. He then returned to the house, and after ordering the doora to be locked, hastened to the men's houses, situated some distance from his own house, and gave the alarm. Several of them sallied forth, and on reaching one of the paddocks it was plainly to be seen by the action of a mare which was tethered there, and was galloping round and round and neighing loudly, that other horses were either then, or had recently been in the immediate vicinity, but nothing further was seen of the bushrangers. Suspicion has fallen upon two men, who have been described to the police, but we have not yet heard whether there is any probability of the perpetrators of the outrage being identified and captured. The footmarks of one of the men were plainly seen in the garden on the following morning, and the place where the horses had been tied up was also discovered.
North Otago Times, Volume X, Issue 290, 3 March 1868, Page 6

North Otago Times
Advertisments
LOST: A Red Poley Cow - branded with Mr Hassell's brand on the off rump. Very near calving. Supposed to have gone towards Mr Hassell's, as the was purchased at his sale. TEN SHILLINGS reward will be paid to anyone giving notice as to where she is, or L1 on delivery to the undersigned, within TEN DAYS from date. REGINALD JULIUS. Oamaru, 30th May, 1871.
North Otago Times, 30 May 1871, Page 3

North Otago Times
New Advertisements.
Electoral District of Waitaki. The following persons are objected to as not being entitled to have their names retained or placed on the List of Voters for the Electoral District of Oamaru . . . . . Julius Reginald freehold Waitaki freehold qualification parted with . . . . .
North Otago Times, Volume XVL, Issue 623, 9 May 1871, Page 5

Dunedin Bankrupcy Files. 1871
JULIUS Edric Adolphus and JULIUS Reginald - Rugged Ridge Station Waitaki - Runholders 1871 - 1871
Agency: DAAC. Series: 18116. Accession: D256. Box/item. 536. Record: 596.

Reginald was adjudged bankrupt 30 Aug 1871, he met a premature death

DEATH.
On the 2nd September, at his residence, Oamaru, Reginald Julius, youngest son of George Charles Julius, Richmond, Surrey, aged 35 years.
North Otago Times, Volume XVII, Issue 657, 5 September 1871, Page 2.

Medical Notes: Reginald's death certificate (NZ BDM folio 1871/517 Ref 80059869) described him as a "Runholder" aged 35yrs. Heamatemesis is vomiting of blood. Was Reginald suffering from a peptic ulcer?

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. Reginald is recorded as a son aged 15 scholar born Richmond Surrey.

Reginald married Katherine Robertson CAMERON [788], daughter of Robert CAMERON of Perth Scotland [8360] and Christina TODD [8359], on 12 Oct 1864 in Waitangi Station Otago New Zealand. Katherine was born on 17 Jul 1844 in Perthshire Scotland and died on 9 Dec 1906 in Claremont House Tilford SRY at age 62.

General Notes:
Catherine returned to England after her husbands death and looked after her father-in-law Dr Geo C Julius, her brother-in-law Edric, cousin Julia Quilter and Ella.

PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON.
(From Our Own Correspondent.) LONDON, 15th December. . . . . . The death was announced the day before yesterday of Mrs. Katherine Robertson Julius, relict of the late Mr. Reginald Julius, of Rugged Ridges, New Zealand. The deceased lady passed away on the 9th inst. at Claremont House, Tilford, Surrey. She was in her 63rd year.
Evening Post, Volume LXXIII, Issue 19, 23 January 1907, Page

Katherine has a memorial in Tilford Church b. 17 Jul 1844 d. 9 Dec 1906.

Julius Katharine Robertson of Claremont House Tilford Surrey widow died 9 December 1906 Probate London 12 February 1907 to Arthur Onslow Julius Solicitor and Ethel Kate Julius spinster. Effects L1792 17s 0d
Ref: National Probate Calendars

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, The Sands Seale Farnham. Catherine is recorded as a widowed daughter-in-law aged 36 born Perth Scotland

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Claremont House Frensham Churt. Catherine is recorded as head of house a widow aged 46 born Perth Scotland

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Claremont House Frensham Churt. Catherine is recorded as head of house a widow aged 56 born in Scotland

Children from this marriage were:

+ 256 F    i. Ethel Kate JULIUS [789] was born on 18 Feb 1866 in Oamaru Otago New Zealand and died on 2 Sep 1939 in Guildford SRY at age 73.

+ 257 M    ii. Dr Herbert Amelius JULIUS [790] was born on 4 Jul 1868 in Oamaru New Zealand and died on 13 May 1940 in Yorkshire. at age 71.

+ 258 F    iii. Edith Ella Maud JULIUS [792] was born on 12 Feb 1870 in Oamaru New Zealand and died on 2 Feb 1950 in Chichester SSX at age 79.

134. Ethel JULIUS [794] (George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in Sep 1840 and died in 1889 at age 49.

General Notes:
Marriages.
On the 23rd alt, at the Cathedral, Killaloe, by the Rev John Bowles, rector of Shinrone, Augustus Vivian, Lt 3rd (The Buffs) Regiment, youngest son of the late Rev Charles Paisley Vivian of Hatton Hall, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, to Ethel, eldest daughter of George Charles Julius, Jr, Esq, and granddaughter of the late Francis Spaight Esq of Derry Castle, Co Tipperary.
Ref: Northampton Mercury Saturday, 3 May 1862. also Wexford Constitution Wed 30 Apr 1862 who put the date of marriage at 25 April.

Research Notes:
Alternative death Jun 1912 Lancashire

Ethel married John Augustus VIVIAN [795], son of Charles Pasley VIVIAN [9910] and Grace AYLMER [11074], on 23 Apr 1862 in Cathedral Killaloe Clare Ireland. John was born circa 1840 in Haddon Hall NTH and died in Jun 1885 in Plympton St Mary Cornwall aged about 45.

General Notes:
IGI Marriage FHL Film 101441 - to search 2009

Death date uncertain


Children from this marriage were:

+ 259 M    i. Aylmer Edric VIVIAN [1327] was born in Feb 1863 in Ireland and died in Oct 1924 in Cuba at age 61.

+ 260 F    ii. Ethel Maud VIVIAN [1328] was born in 1864 in Cornwall, UK.

+ 261 F    iii. Ella Violet Blanch VIVIAN [1335] was born in 1865 and died in 1933 at age 68.

+ 262 M    iv. Herbert Augustus VIVIAN [1336] was born in 1866 in Ireland and died on 1 Nov 1924 in Orlando Florida USA at age 58.

Ethel next married Radulfh Lennox LAMBARD [796] in 1874. Radulfh died in 1906.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 263 M    i. Radulfe Robert Lennox LAMBARD [1323] was born in 1874.

+ 264 F    ii. Ethel Grace Madeline LAMBARD [1324] was born in 1876.


135. Ella JULIUS [784] (George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 22 Sep 1845 in Petersham SRY, was baptised on 27 Oct 1845 in St Peter Petersham SRY, died on 29 Oct 1870 in The Parsonage Wrecclesham SRY at age 25, and was buried on 1 Nov 1870 in Wreccclesham SRY. The cause of her death was typhoid.

General Notes:

Julius, Ella Birth December Quarter: Year: 1845 District: Richmond Sry County: Surrey Volume: 4 Page: 374.

Ellen Julius
Birth Date:22 Sep 1845
Baptism Date:29 Nov 1845
Archive Provided Parish:Petersham, St Peter
Father:George Charles Julius
Mother:Susan Julius
Reference Number:P48/1/6

Deaths.
On the 29th ult, at the residence of her uncle, the Parsonage, Wrecclesham, Ella, the beloved daughter of Dr George Charles Julius, of Brecon, aged 24 years.
Ref: Surrey Advertiser Saturday, 5 November 1870

Ella Julius
Age:25
Birth Date:1845
Burial Date:1 Nov 1870
Burial Place:Wrecclesham, Surrey, England
FHL Film Number:1278932
Reference ID:P 75

Julius Ella 3 March 1871
Administration of the Effects of Ella Julius late of Brecon in co Brecknock spinster who died 29 Oct 1870 at Wrecclesham SRY granted 3 Apr 1871 at the Principle Registry to George Charles Julius Old Palace Richmond SRY M.D. the father and next of Kin.
Effects under L1500
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Wakefield Yorkshire. Ella is recorded as Ellen a daughter aged five born Richmond Surrey.

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Willey Mill London/ Southampton Rd Farnham SRY. Ella is recorded as a daughter aged 15 born Petersham SRY.

136. Dr George Frederick Heaton JULIUS [1976] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 7 Jul 1842 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 17 Jul 1842 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 29 Sep 1865 in Heidelberg Melbourne Aust. at age 23. The cause of his death was consumption.

General Notes:
George Frederic Julius Heaton Julius born July 7th 1842 at Richmond Surrey about half past six in the morning. Baptised the same day by Edward Hoare curate of the Old Church Richmond.

George Frederic Heaton Julius was christened at the Old Church Richmond (having been baptised at home previously not expecting the child could live) Rev. Edward Hoare, Dr Julius and Lady Shaftesbury sponsors Mr Hodgson and Frederick Gilder Julius stood proxy.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901.
George Frederick Heaton Julius, who was always very delicate, studied at Kings College London, and took his degree at Edinburgh. He was threatened there with consumption and sent to Australia where he died September 29, 1865 aged 23, unmarried.

Royal College of Surgeons of England.
The following gentlemen having undergone the necessary examinations for the diploma were admitted members of the College at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 19th inst, viz: . . . . . George Frederick Heaton Julius, Richmond (student of Kings College).. . . . .
Ref: London Daily News 20 November 1863.


Medical Board of Victoria:
1868 G F H Julius Victoria Australia - named erased uner prov. sect. 7

A Mr G F Julius aged 20 sailed on the Alexandra l to Sydney from Melbourne in May 1875.
PROV - Victoria Outward Passengers

Julius George Frederick Heaton 2 June 1886
Administration of the effects of George Frederick Heaton Julius late of Richmond Surrey, Surgeon a batchelor who died 29 Sept 1865 at Heidelberg Melbourne Vic Australia was granted to Arthur Onslow Julius of 15 Finsbury Circus solicitor next of kin and one of the exors of the Will of Frederick Guilder Julius the father at L1148 2s 7d.
Ref: National Probate Calendars

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. George is recorded as a son aged 8 born Richmond

2. Letter from George: to his brother Arthur, Cir 1860. Edinburgh
Sat 19th
My Dear Arthur
It was with great pleasure I received your letter this morning informing me of the welfare of Sally and of your success at school. It was very kind of Mr McEwan giving you so many holiday tasks I suppose he knows your propensity for mischief and the difficulty you experience of finding employment during your holidays.
I should think you are very sorry that Philip is not coming back again he was such a cheerful companion for you to play with and took such care of you when at school. I hope you have not been fighting anymore with your schoolfellows and got another black eye or scratched cheek.
As that worthy divine the Rev Watts M.A. when writing on that subject says:
How doth the little Busy Bee
Improve each shining hour
By gathering honey all the day
And eating all the night

And again I believe he says in another place:
Let dogs delight to bark and bite
For tis their nature too
But little children should let not
Such angry passions grow

So that you see you have very good authority for living peaceably with your fellow creatures. I am not answerable for the correctness of the quotations.
And as perhaps I shall not have another opportunity of writing to you before Christmas Day let me warn you against the danger of eating too much plum pudding on that day lest you should the the unpleasant sensation of the boa constrictor after having eaten his blanket for dinner you will generally find at least I have found it to be my own experience that it is always time to leave off eating when the upper buttons of your waistcoat give way or at least when it feels as if it was buttoned and it is a dangerous practise to endeavour to eat a little more by unbuttoning it or by standing up and if by accident you do burst dont say it was my fault.
Hoping you will profit by these few hints and with kind regards
to Sally and yourself
Believe me
Your affectionate and hungry Brother
George F H Julius
It is luncheon time.

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. George is recorded as a son unmarried aged 18 medical pupil born Richmond SRY

137. Annie Ellen JULIUS [54] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Jul 1843 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 30 Aug 1843 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 12 Mar 1927 in Durdans St Margarets at age 83.

General Notes:
Annie was born about 20 minutes past six o'clock in the morning July 29, 1843. Baptised at Richmond Old Church August 30, 1843. Lady Shaftesbury, Mrs Edward Hoare and Frederic Gilder Julius sponsors.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

FUNERAL OF MRS BATEMAN:
We regret to record the death, which took place on Saturday at her residence the Durdans, St. Margaret's, in her 84th year, of Mrs. Annie Ellen Bateman, widow of the late Dr. W. A. F. Batsman, of Richmond Hill, and eldest daughter of the late Dr. F. G. Julius. Mrs Batsman had been for many years a devoted member of Richmond Parish Church, and took a deep interest in the various parochial organisations.
Many friends attended the funeral, which took place on Thursday at Richmond Cemetery. The officiating clergy were the Rev. J. F. Kendall (vicar of Richmond), the Vicar of Teddington, and the Rev. Duncan Pearce. The first part of the service was held at Richmond Parish Church. Amongst those present were Mrs. Max Binney, Dr. J Williamson, Mrs. S. J. Burn, Miss Cookson, Mrs. Metzner, Miss Mason, Mrs Kendall, Councillor and Mrs. Bashford, Miss Wrigley, Miss Sparkes; Miss Firth, Mrs. Veal.
The chief mourners were: Dr. A. St. John Bateman, the Misses Batsman, Mrs. Watts (sister), Mr. and Mrs. Julius, Mrs. Hunt, Dr. and Mrs. G. Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. D Julius, Mrs. and Miss Stanley Julius, Dr. and Mrs. Fenn, Miss Foley, and Miss Fullegar.
Flowers. There was a large number of floral tributes from relatives and friends. The contributors were: Dr. and Mrs. George Hunt; Dr, and Mrs. Fenn; Mrs. and Miss Stanley Julius; the Misses Woodifield; Miss Fullegar; Mrs. Anderson; Miss Noverre ; Mrs. Ransoms ; Mrs. Alfred Mason; Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Julius Mr, and Mrs. Driver; Miss, FitzGerald Pritchard; the Misses Roberts; Miss Crookes; Mrs. Shuttleworth; Mrs. Minton; Mrs. Brewin; Mrs. Jackson Clarks; Miss Hemmings ; Mr. and Mrs. Munby ; Mr. and MrCundall ; Mrs. Simpson; Mr. and Mrs. Garfit; Miss Gordon; Mrs. Morrison ; Miss Pownall: the Misses Todd; Mrs. Burn; Mrs. Hunt; Dr. and Mrs. Williamson; Mr. and Mrs Julius; Dr. St. John Batsman; the Misses Bateman: Miss Cookson: Mr. and Mrs. Rutter ; Mrs. Binney and Mrs. Lindsay ; Miss Foley; Mrs Stanley .lulius; members of St Mary Magdalene mothers Meeting ; St Ursula's Club and Sunday School.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Annie is recorded as a daughter aged 7 scholar born Richmond

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Anne is recorded as a daughter aged 17 unmarried born Richmond SRY, scholar.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rothsay House Richmond. Annie is recorded as a wife aged 27 born Richmond

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rothsay House Richmond. Annie is recorded as a wife aged 37 born Richmond

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Rothsay Lodge Richmond. Annie is described as a wife aged 47 born Richmond

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Bridge House Richmond SRY. Annie is described as a wife aged 58 born Richmond

Annie married Dr William Adolphus Frederick BATEMAN MCRS [559] on 23 Jun 1863 in Richmond SRY. William was born in 1835 in Selsey SSX and died on 11 Mar 1907 in Richmond SRY at age 72. The cause of his death was a malignant tumor of the bowel.

General Notes:
Royal College of Surgeons of England.
The following gentlemen, having undergone the necessary examinations for the diploma, were admitted members of the College at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 8th inst. . . . . . William Adolphus Frederick Bateman LSA . . . . .
London Daily News 9 May 1863.

9th Surrey Rifle Volunteer Corps.
William Adolphus Frederick Bateman , Gent, to be Assistant-Surgeon . Dated 15 June, 1872.

William with Dr E L Fenn carried on the Richmond Practice started by George Charles Julius in 1809, until 19 ?. (Sir Geo Julius records the date as 1912?).

William is said to have rather discouraged suitors for his daughters, as they were accomplished musicians and had a family quartet which he greatly enjoyed!

Bateman William Adolphus Frederick of Bridge House Richmond Surrey died 11 March 1907. Probate London 26 March 1907 to Annie Ellen Bateman widow. Effects L8461 2s 7d National Probate Calendar

Research Notes:
E L Fenn in a letter to E V Fenn 30 Nov 1897 mentions "I was very sorry to see the death of Archdeacon James Bateman at Zanzibar, he was a pillar in the Central Africa Mission"

Medical Notes: 56 Williams death after surgery is mentioned in a letter dated 14 Mar 1907 from E L Fenn to H L Fenn.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rothsay House Richmond. William is described as head of house aged 37 married a surgeon MRCS LSA LM born Selsey SSX
Additional to the family in the house was Louisa Pilcher described as a boarder a widow aged 53 and a lunatic, plus six staff including an attendant on the lunatic and a wet nurse.

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rothsey House Richmond. William is described as head of house aged 47 general practitioner born Selsey SSX

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Rothsay Lodge Richmond. William is described as head of house aged 57 married a surgeon born Selsey SSX

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Bridge House Richmond SRY. William is described as head of house aged 67 married a surgeon born Selsea SSX

Children from this marriage were:

+ 265 M    i. Frederick William BATEMAN [560] was born on 20 Mar 1864, was baptised on 23 Apr 1864 in Richmond SRY, and died in 1912 in Scotland at age 48.

+ 266 F    ii. Ellen Annie BATEMAN [561] was born on 8 Mar 1865 and died on 8 Sep 1865.

+ 267 F    iii. Lucie BATEMAN [562] was born on 22 Jun 1866 and died in 1950 at age 84.

+ 268 F    iv. Jessie BATEMAN [563] was born on 23 Dec 1867 in Richmond SRY and died before 1945.

+ 269 F    v. Laura Annie BATEMAN [564] was born on 16 Feb 1869 in Richmond SRY and died in 1946 at age 77.

+ 270 M    vi. Charles Julius BATEMAN [565] was born on 30 Jun 1870 in Richmond SRY.

+ 271 F    vii. Caroline Edward BATEMAN [566] was born on 29 Oct 1871 in Richmond SRY and died in 1888 at age 17.

+ 272 M    viii. Dr Arthur St John (Jack) BATEMAN [567] was born on 2 Mar 1873 in Richmond SRY.

+ 273 F    ix. Ida Muriel BATEMAN [568] was born on 1 Nov 1874 in Richmond SRY.

+ 274 F    x. Dorothy Mary BATEMAN [569] was born on 22 Feb 1877 in Richmond SRY.

+ 275 F    xi. Margaret Winifred BATEMAN [571] was born on 11 Jul 1878 in Richmond SRY.

+ 276 M    xii. Guy Vivian BATEMAN [570] was born on 26 Sep 1882 in Richmond SRY.

138. William JULIUS [55] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jul 1845 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 5 Sep 1845 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 20 Feb 1854 at age 8, and was buried in Swinton Churchyard Nr Nottingham.

General Notes:
William was born about 10 o'clock in the morning July 23, 1845. Christened by Mr Edward Hoare at Richmond Old Church. Capt Deverill, Archibald Aeneas Julius and Mrs Deverill sponsors. Frederick Gilder Julius stood proxy, September 5, 1845. Died February 20, 1854. Buried at Swindon in his Grandpapa Smith's vault.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 9 Short Hill Nottingham. William is recorded as a grandson of Peggy Smith aged 5 born Richmond SRY

139. Archbishop Churchill JULIUS D D [56] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 15 Oct 1847 in The Old Palace Richmond SRY, was baptised on 19 Nov 1847 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 1 Sep 1938 in Cloudesley Christchurch N.Z. at age 90, and was buried in Linwood Cemetery Christchurch.

General Notes:
Churchill Julius was born about quarter past 10 in the evening Oct 15 1847. Baptised Nov 19 1847 by Mr Dumergue at Old Church Richmond. Dr Julius, Henry Julius and Miss Julius stood sponsor's.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Educated at Blackheath, Kings College, The Strand 1861, London and Worcester College, Oxford. Mat. Oct. 16 1866. Aged 19 years. He took his B. A. degree in 1869 and M. A. in 1873. He was ordained deacon by Bishop of Norwich in 1871, and appointed Curate of St. Giles Norwich.
In 1873, he became Curate of South Brent, Somerset and in 1875-78, Vicar of Shapwick-cum-Ascott, Somerset. While there he was appointed assistant Diocesan Inspector of schools for the Diocese of Bath and Wells.
In 1878 he was inducted as Vicar of Islington, Holy Trinity, Cloudesley, a well known London church capable of seating 3,000 people. In 1884 he was appointed Archdeacon of Ballarat Victoria Aust.
In 1889 appointed Bishop of Christchurch New Zealand, consecrated 1890. Primate and Archbishop of New Zealand 1922 to 1925. Instrumental in the funding and completion of Christchurch Cathedral N.Z, begun by Bishop Patterson in the 1870's. Retired 1925.
Ref: Unattributed.

Illness of Archdeacon Julius.
Melbourne, This Day.
Archdeacon Julius, of Ballarat, is seriously ill from jaundlce and overwork.
Ref: The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW) Mon 21 May 1888

Muscular Christianity.
A Clergyman Catches a Wife Beater.
A singular scene was recently witnessed in the streets of Ballarat. The Ven Churchill Julius, Archdeacon of that golden city, previously a famous Oxford athlete and a hard-working Liverpool clergyman, while doing his rounds caught a rough hulking wife-beater red-handed. He seized the brute, overpowered him after a struggle, and personally marched him off to the lock-up without bothering the police.
Ref: Leicester Daily Mercury 5 June 1889.

South Brent.
Presentation. On the occasion of the Rev Churchill Julius leaving this parish, where, during his ministry as curate to the Rev J Ditcher, he has gained the love and esteem of all, he was presented with addresses, in which the appreciation of the parishioners of the seal displayed by him in the discharge of his duties was set forth. . . . . .
Ref: Western Gazette 21 May 1875

Shapwick.
The trustees of Trinity Church, Islington, have appointed the Rev Churchill Julius MA, vicar of Shapwick, to succeed the Rev R C Billing who has been appointed to the Rectory of Spitalfields.
Ref: Somerset County Gazette 6 April 1878

A Churchill Julius aged 36 arrived in Victoria September 1884 aboard the South Australian from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

JULIUS Churchill : Alum Ox.
Worcester Call Mat 16 Oct 1866 age 19 B.A. 1869 M.A. 1873.
Vicar of Shapwick, Somerset 1875-78, of Holy Trinity Islington 1878-84. Archdeacon and Vicar of Christ Church, Ballarat; Australia since 1884.

HIS GRACE THE LORD ARCHBISHOP, PRIMATE OF NZ.
CHURCHILL JULIUS : Although a man of the cloth, he was a colourful figure who would not have had much time for the slavish use of the honorific's above, as his story below will convey. Known as the "Radical Bishop" he is described as one of the most remarkable men who ever donned apron and gaiters. Wise, outspoken, and intensely human, he was one of the master builders of the Anglican Church in N.Z.
Reared in a strictly evangelical household "Our Sundays were rather dreary" he tells us, but the household, other than that, was full of life, bustle, and interest.
When he was 10 years of age (1857) Churchill was sent to a private day school at the back of Richmond Old Church, he had no recollection of learning anything there! then after some years went to Blackheath Proprietary School, but; "a few happy years came to a close through breaking my arm at football. I was sent home for recovery and then developed a serious nervous disorder which confined me to a darkened room for six months, and which had a lasting effect upon my after career."
At about the end of this time, being quite unfitted for school or any close study, I was sent to a country village in Norfolk [Buckenham], whence I made daily visits to Norwich for some sort of study under a tutor.
The Vicar of the Parish was a well known missioner" (The Rev Haslam a controversial "Billy Graham" figure of his day). "Under his guidance I learnt something of mission and even parish work, which was to serve me in after days. It was no particular credit to either of us that I preached my first sermon [in his absence] at the age of 14 years. Here it was that I came to know and love the grand old city of Norwich, connected with my life in later years."
Following his years at Oxford Churchill returned to Norwich as Curate of St Giles, then to South Brent and Shapwick in Somerset and Holy Trinity Islington London. He made a profound impression in these Parish's and also became very involved with children's education, he was gifted in his ability to communicate with young people.
In 1883 Churchill invited the visiting Bishop of Ballarat Australia to preach at a festival at Holy Trinity, the occasion was a great success and some months later he received a "call" from the Bishop to become the Archdeacon of Ballarat. Asked "Will you go" Churchill replied "I've got to go" in a way that perhaps he sensed his future would be better served in the New World.
After many tributes and greatly to the regret of the large congregation to whom he ministered, he left for Melbourne in 1884 on the "South Australian" and became Vicar of Christ Church, Ballarat, Archdeacon of a diocese half the size of England, and a Canon of the Cathedral.
Here was ample scope for exhibiting the energy and unique ability of his character, Christ Church Pro Cathedral was plain and inadequate, and the Parish neglected. Working through his rapport with the young people he revitalised the Parish and got work started on a new Cathedral, construction however ceased after he left, never to be restarted. Entrusted with the origination of a far flung Archdeaconry, he travelled extensively to support more than 80 churches.
In 1889, he was elected Bishop of Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand, and was consecrated in 1890. He became Primate and Archbishop of New Zealand in 1922 a position he held until he resigned all his official ministry in 1925. During his retirement he travelled to Australia and England, suffering some ill-health, but he remained active in church work until 90 years of age.
The extent of Churchill's work in NZ stands alone as a topic and is well detailed in the publication "A Power in the Land" an inspiring and amusing read.
Details, and quotes by Churchill Julius from "A Power in the Land" by Gertrude & Anthony Elworthy, Whitcombe & Tombs 1971.

Julius Churchill. 1s of Frederick of Richmond SRY., M.D.; Worcester Coll. Matric 16 Oct 1866 aged 19; BA 1869; MA 1873; V of Shapwick SOM, 1875-8; of Holy Trinity Islington, 1878-84; Archdeacon and Vicar of Christ Church, Ballarat, Aust., since 1884.
Alumni Oxonienses 1715-1886. NZSOG.

BISHOP JULIUS ON TRADES UNIONISM.
Bishop Julius, of Christchurch (N.Z.), preached a sermon on a recent Sunday to trades-unionists. He declared that the tendency of the present age was to abandon individualism in favor of socialism. He deslared himself a socialist because he was a Christian, and socialism was taught in the New Testament. Trades-unions had done good in the past, despite their faulty methods, but he did not think trades union would cure the evil of the present system. Sin was at the root of the present system, and no system of socialism, however complete, would bring happiness without righteousness. Reform must be brought about slowly, and he did not therefore believe in suddenly nationalising the land or of confiscating other people's property, as was proposed by those who advocated the prohibition of the liquor traffic. He deplored the fact that the working cldsses did not pay sufficient attention to the education of their ohildren to fit them for the changed condition steadily approaching.
Ref: Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong) Tue 26 May 1891

Plucky, If Rash.
There is probably not another Church of England Bishop in the world who would have the nerve to do what Dr Churchill Julius, Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand, did the other day. He laid the top brick of his cathedral spire at a height of 270 feet from the ground, having been hauled up seated in a chair fixed at the end of a rope. Dr Julius was a Norwich curate and an Islington vicar before he went to the Antipodes.
Ref: Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail 18 September 1891

And Unconventional Bishop.
There is at least one Anglican Bishop who makes no concealment of his possession of a meerschaum. Dr Churchill Julius, late Norwich curate and Islington vicar, now Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand, recently concluded an episcopal speech with the unconventional observation "That's all for the present; I want to go home and have a smoke." Dr Julius is the same prelate who not long ago was hauled up at the end of a rope to a height of 290 feet to lay the top brick of his Cathedral spire. He is also prone to administering personal chastisement to wife beaters, to going on visitation tours in the ordinary two wheeled cart of commerce, to espousing the cause of labour and preaching strong sermons against heartless capitalism, and to doing various other things that would shock the average Anglican prelate
Ref: Dundee Evening Telegraph 18 November 1891

University Intelligence.
Oxford.
At a special Convocation of Oxford University held on Thursday, the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon the Right Rev Churchill Julius, Worcester College, Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand. . . . . The Provost of Queen's presided, and there was a crowded attendance. The Bishop of Christchurch was presented by the Regius Prof of Divinity. The recipients of the degrees met with a very hearty reception.
Ref: Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser 25 March 1893.

A Bishop on Wheels.
A Bishop on a bicycle has not yet been seen in the streets of London, but he is coming. One of the latest interesting items of news from New Zealand, the land of the lady mayor, female suffrage, and the incipient prohibition of intoxicants, is the announcement that the Rev Dr Churchill Julius, Bishop of Christchurch, has been seen propelling a tricycle. No doubt, by the time the next Pan Anglican conference assembles at Lambeth, his Lordship will be in a position to dispense with the superfluous wheel.
Ref: The Star (Guernsey) 11 February 1896

"The Grace of God - And Three Months."
Dr Churchill Julius, the Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand, has been visiting his diocese on a tricycle. In a sermon during this visitation, he found occasion to denounce the contribution of bad coins to the offertory. He said "to offer to the church, to the cause of God, money that the Baker or the Butcher would not accept shocks me. The man who would do that wants the Grace of God badly - and three months"
Ref: Lancashire Evening Post 7 April 1896

Bishops Court
Christchurch NZ
Jan 23 1908
My dear Harold
We have just heard from the girls with great sorrow of your Father's death. Aunt Alice is writing to your mother and I am sending a few lines to assure you of our loving sympathy. I know how hard these sorrows are to bear when we are far from home. God comfort you dear boy. It is so much better for him to have passed without the lingering helplessness which another stroke might have brought, and he was a good man living always in the fear of God, for whom we sorrow with good Hope. I am so glad that my girls saw and stayed with him before the end. God bless you dear Harold and give you a grace to walk in your Father's steps.
Your loving uncle
C. Christchurch
Letter to Harold L Fenn.

Bishops Court
Christchurch NZ
August 7 1908
My Dear Vandy,
It is much on my conscience that I have a letter of yours of January 8 as yet unanswered.
You wrote very kindly to tell me of your father's death, and I ought to have written to you as well as to your mother.
Harold gives me reports of you all when I run down to Pareora but my visits are not very frequent. Next week he comes up to Christchurch for the annual dissipation known as race week, and we shall see something of him.
You will like to know that Arthur Elworthy thinks very highly of him, he is . . . . . he seems to me a very good person and I should clearly like to get hold of him for work in this diocese. But since then I have been laid up with an accident, then I went off to Sydney, and have just . . . . . and don't know where to find him. Bertha is to be married in October and Ada will be the small . . . . . of our big family
A section has been cut from this letter to Ernest V Fenn.

EXTRACT FROM CHRISTCHURCH PRESS
The Archbishop used to recall how his father bought for him one of the first seven mechanically propelled bicycles, invented in France, to come into London. Propulsion was through the front wheel as in a boy's tricycle today. It was a tremendous advance on the clumsy velocipede which its rider be-strode and propelled with feet on the ground. Later he rode a 'penny-farthing,' and for using it on Sunday to give his horse a rest was called to solemn account by the local clergy. His defence about the horse's rest disarmed the deputation, but its members murmured something about the wicked 'pleasure' he got out of it on the Sabbath. "In Christchurch Archbishop Julius was in earlier days a familiar figure as he moved about the city on his modern pneumatic-tyred cycle."
When motor-cycles came in, he bought one of the early machines to travel the diocese with, because it was speedier when going if less reliable than buggy or coach: but at last disaster befell him. It was then he bought the famous 'one-lunger' Rover with its solitary Cyclops-eye lamp projecting ahead of the radiator, but with a windscreen and pneumatic tyres. In that vehicle he chugged his way to every part of the diocese. After that he had several cars each more modern than the last, and fitted with many efficient 'gadgets' of his own devising.
Only in the last year or two did he give up driving personally his modern 10 h.p., after someone ran into it broadside on and gently tipped it over, happily without material damage to either Archbishop or car. After the spill he drove it off under its own power. "Perhaps the toughest vehicle he ever drove was the lever-propelled 'jigger' lent him by the Public Works Department when the line to Arthur's Pass was being laid down." . . . . .

Churchill is reported as constantly getting into trouble with the Christchurch police, for speeding, finally at 86 they refused to renew his licence.

THE LYTTLETON TIMES - 9 March 1893 pg 3.
Reports that Bishop Julius was attacked (in his absence) at a meeting of the Christchurch Presbytery by a particular reverend gentleman concerned about the sanctity of the Lord's Day. " The Bishop had stated that he could conceive circumstances under which fishing and mountaineering would be justified on a Sunday, and the public interpretation of that utterance would do immense harm"

Churchill, his wife and daughters Alice Ethel & Mary Ellen sailed from London to Auckland in 1893 on the Ruahine.
Also Churchill and Alice sailed the 24 Oct 1912 on the Orama, London to Auckland.
Ref: findmypast.co.uk

CHRISTCHURCH PRESS - INTEREST IN HOBBIES
"A contributing cause to his longevity and the retention of his faculties, in spite of the natural loneliness which is inseparable from old age, when most of one's contemporaries have passed on, was undoubtedly to be attributed to his interest in useful hobbies. It is well known that he was a mechanical genius and that he specialised in mending clocks.
His "clock hospital" was always a feature of Bishopscourt, and his visits to country parishes were eagerly anticipated by those whose clocks had gone back on them. After the session of General Synod in Auckland in 1922, the year in which Bishop Julius was unanimously chosen as Primate and Archbishop, I invited him to spend a week at Paihia in order that have a rest after his strenuous labour's but he devoted the whole of his resting time to renovating the old organ in the Paihia Church and mending 'bellows,' which had suffered extensively by the incursion of rats into the church.

FURTHER EXTRACTS FROM "A POWER IN THE LAND" :
In Churchill's own words. 'Just before my examination for Priest Orders my Vicar broke down, and I was left with the services, the schools and the parish generally in my hands, together with such reading as I could manage at night. Early rising was not as easy as I could wish. I therefore attached a little alarm clock to my gas bracket which turning on the gas at the appointed hour, boiled some water in the kettle, blew a loud whistle and fetched me out of bed. On the night before my examination I placed a new heavy and expensive book on the gas in place of the kettle, and was roused in the morning by volumes of dense smoke. I showed the mutilated fragments to the Canon who murmured something about the lunatic asylum, and left it at that. Happily my spell of hard labour was drawing to a close.'
Of all Churchill Julius's special gifts, of which there are so many, surely the art of clock-mending will always be one of the most readily remembered. It was at South Brent that we first hear of his natural bent in this direction. The clock in the church tower is one of the oldest in the country which is still in perfect order. Concerning it the Rev. A. C.Schofield, vicar of the parish 1923-1947, wrote in the local magazine: 'More than 50 years ago, after several of centuries of service, our ancient clock stopped. The professional clock-doctors operated without success.
The vicar's young curate then tried his hand. He took the clock home, boiled it in his copper, dried and oiled it, and his dramatic treatment proved a lasting success. Hearing the story, I remarked [before learning his name] that a young man of such resourcefulness and courage was assuredly destined for big things. He died a month ago
Dr Churchill Julius, retired Archbishop of New Zealand.'

CHURCHILL'S OWN STORIES OF OTHER INCIDENTS :
It happened one day that, walking along the road, I met an old lady carrying a heavy American clock. 'Why, mother, where are you going?' 'I be going to Highbridge', she said, 'to get my clock mended.' Highbridge was three miles distance, the lady was old and the clock was heavy. . 'Take it to my room,' I said. 'I will mend it for you.' There was a distant corner of the parish where, in a farmhouse, I was accustomed to hold a service once a fortnight.
As I walked in that direction a woman of no very good character came out of the house. 'Please, sir, would you be good enough to look at my clock for me?' she said. I went in and fell a-talking about matters which required much more urgent mending. The clock was on the mantel shelf, and as I talked I quite unconsciously opened the door, set the pendulum going, heard it was out of beat; put my hand in and adjusted the escapement and then said, 'Well, when I have time I will come in and see your clock.'
A week later I went to my farmhouse and was quite staggered when the good farmer's wife assured me that it was no use my coming as there wouldn't be a soul at the service. But why not?' said I. 'What happened?' 'Oh, Mary Curtis has been around the place telling everyone that you bewitched her clock, that you just looked at it and it has been going ever since.' She was quite right, no one came to the service, explanations were quite useless and with many other sins of my life, I had to live it down.
Complaint was made to me after a while that the boys of the village, after evening service, were so noisy and troublesome that the people begged me to secure the help of a constable. Of course, the constable was out of the question, but having a large kitchen I opened it and invited the boys to come in for a social after evening service. They came and almost crowded me out. Dear lads, there was no harm in them.
On one Sunday, having urged each boy present to bring another on the Sunday following, promising to supply a bigger room and forgetting all about it, I found my room crammed to suffocation. Among those present was one, Dickey Williams, a notable fighter and cock of the village. There he was hemmed in by a couple of chairs in the corner of the room. 'What brings you here, Dickey?' said I. Please, sir.' said a quiet lad I brought him in by the hair on his head.' So Dickey became a regular attendant, maintained order and discipline in the company and when I was gone, became Superintendent of the Sunday School.
Before the end of my first year, my second son Awdry was born. He always carried weight, or at least I did when I carried him to Burnham and back through the fields, a matter of four miles.
There were lighter touches even amid the anxiety and privation of the war years. The bishop found himself urging people to give up alcohol for the duration of the war and in return was challenged by a professor friend to give up smoking, a luxury he dearly loved to indulge. He agreed to do so if his friend would give up drinking whisky. The bargain was sealed, but unfortunately the professor substituted brandy for his accustomed tipple, while the bishop suffered the consequences of keeping his word.
His depriving himself in this way soon became public knowledge and even prompted clever sketch by F.H. Cumberworth, entitled 'His Dream Pipe', which appeared in the local papers at the time. Julius, incidentally, must have lost no time in resuming his pipe once the war was over. The habit, in fact, continued to get him into scrapes with some of the elderly female parishioners, and there is a story of his lunching with one old lady who even drove him from the verandah of her house with the words:' My lord, the diocese may be yours but the house is mine. Kindly smoke on the lawn.' many years later the doctor restricted himself to one pipe a day, he bought the largest pipe he could find and somehow contrived to keep filling it without ever relighting it.
In the first decade of the 20th Century means of transport and modes of travel were improving rapidly, and as regards these changes Churchill Julius was the last person not to keep up with the times. From his undergraduate,days, he had shown a keen interest in cycling, and all through the early years of his Christchurch episcopate he was still gaining much of his exercise as a 'pedal-pusher. When the motor-cycle appeared on the scene, the bishop immediately bought one and traversed his diocese on it.
In 1907 he became the proud possessor of his first motor car, the famous 'one lung' Rover, which had one enormous brass gas headlamp and an engine with only one cylinder; the metal to metal clutch ran on oil and three gears, with a reverse, gave speeds of up to 30 m.p.h. This eight horsepower car took the bishop to nearly every part of his diocese. Needless to say he spent many hours of his leisure time greasing and maintaining his mechanical equipment - more than this he designed and all sorts of improvements and modifications to his vehicles. These included a safety door-checking device, still to be seen on one of his later acquisitions, and early English three-seater 'Cabriolet,' now owned by a veteran car enthusiast in South Canterbury who maintains it in perfect working order.
Bishop Julius also experimented with an automatic, mechanical gramophone record stop. He built test models which worked without fail, using the now familiar run-off track from the inside grove. The early Julius system had a run-off track only, the present oscillating groove an improvement on the original method. Long before electric clocks were on the market commercially the bishop made up a number of them, turning all the parts up on a lathe. There was a 'master clock' controlling all the others.
In retirement, however, Julius's most happy hours were without doubt spent in his beloved workshop at Cloudesley. Here he was frequently found, wearing an old pair of 'blues', oil to the elbows and loathe to be disturbed. His grand-daughter has vivid memories of being driven into Christchurch by him, with cyclists diving in all directions for cover, and then being taken to some incredible junkyard, where he browsed through a heap of unpromising bits and pieces until he found what he needed for something he was constructing. He once made an automatic hen-feeding machine, which scattered the grain for the birds in the afternoons, thus releasing Ada from her daily chore.

CHURCHILL writes to his daughter Bertha, about the "Four Legged Club" while travelling his Diocese on the West Coast of NZ in 1899 ;
Madam,
The Yellow Lamb, a corresponding member of the Club, desires me to send you a few extracts from our monthly report.
I am etc.,
Cruso (Dog)
Sec; "Four Legged Club"

July 14 1899 Brother Turpin (Horse)
Yes that is my name. I was so called after a famous missionary Bishop Julius on the box seat. I was instructed by the Club to take note of him. He is much like other men only his fur is rather different. He is heavy - very heavy. Says he is cold. Why doesn't he get down and pull? He smokes. So do I when I am hot. I like smoking, drivers never whip hard when they are smoking.

July 14 Tabitha (Cat)
I am the cat at the Bealey - THE cat, mind. Of course there are other cats. I sit in front of the Bealey fire . That is my place. I don't like the Bishop. He turned me out. Men are so selfish. Poor Turpin seems very tired tonight. He says it is the Bishop. But the Bishop isn't so heavy. I have found out what it is. He opened his bag and I saw he had six of his sermons inside. No wonder the handle gives way.

July 15
I am a spider at the vicarage Kumara. You will wonder how I come to be a member of the "Four Legged Club". Well two of my legs were cut off by a traction engine, so they admitted me to the Club. And I have eyes; - Oh, yes. I saw the Bishop go to bed in his clothes. Well not all his clothes. Dirty habit, I call it. Then he reads in bed just when I want to walk about. There is a blue bottle on his pillow, asleep I think, I mean to have it.

July 16 Snap (Dog)
I am Snap, a Dog, and I belong to Waimea. At least, Waimea belongs to me. I went to church with two other dogs to hear the Bishop. We joined in the singing. Then the Bishop preached. It was very dull; so we got up a fight, and they turned us out. I don't think much of the Bishop.

Christchurch May 1899.
At the conversazione for the completion of the Cathedral, held at the Art Gallery last night, Bishop Julius read an unpublished letter from the late Mr Edward Gibbon Wakefield to the mother of Sister Francis. The letter ran as follows: "I am still bent on New Zealand, and think I shall surely go. Tell Charles (Torlesse) that we have reason to hope that a Bishop will be appointed. We project, therefore, not a wooden church merely, but a cathedral of stone, fitted as the chief religious edifice of the Polynesian Archipelago. He may smile, but I am in earnest."
Ref: Star , Issue 6495, 26 May 1899, Page 4

Bishop Julius on New Zealanders.
According to Bishop Julius, of Christchurch, there are signs of change in the working of the human mind. Speaking at Palmerston North, the Bishop said everybody was talking about socialism. Some hoped it would come, others feared it. When it did come would there be absolute revolution. Was there not in this a definite sign that something was to come which must imperil every existing order. Were we prepared, or were we like other nations who had turned tbeir back and faded into nothingness beoause of tbeir unbelief. He believed in the old saying tbat the nation that was prepared for war was the nation that could best afford to dwell in peace. And how about the Dominion of New Zealand. We were simply playing with the question of defence. The volunteers had done what they could, aud he believed they were animated by a real desire to serve their country. But what could such a small number do ? Every man in the Dominion ought to learn how to hold a rifle and how to use it. We had a great idea of building an empire, and were always talking about it, as if mere bigness were better than power. We went about in hysterical fashion, crying "Rule Britannia'' and playing our little tin trumpets, and saying what a great nation we were. Now Zealandors were the narrowest people on earth. There might be people who had an horizon, but they were not in New Zealand. We thought tbat New Zealand was the hub of the universe, and that Great Britain was dependent upon us; but bless your hearts, he continued, we are dependent on England for the very breath we breathe. Let her close her markets and we are done. Tbe fact is, we are very little and we talk big. The New Zealander was not even as big as his country. With him it was a question of his class or his party, and that was what he called his horizon. Men might say there was not much to do, and that an individual could do nothing, but the Empire had been built up by individuals, and everything depended upon what each man was going to do, whether be was going to live a noble life or, live a life of ease and pleasure, that would eventually bring decay upon the nation. It was essential that every man of the Empire should recognise the necessity for this sacrifice, and help forward tbe life of the Empire with a little less bragging, a little less boastfulness, a little less big talking, and a great deal more earnest, honest, faithful service.
Ref: The Scrutineer and Berrima District Press (NSW) Sat 4 Jul 1908


Honorary Degrees
Next Friday's Ceremony.
Honorary degrees will be conferred on Friday next on the Archbishop of York and six bishops. A procession will be formed in the Library Arcade at 3.5 PM, pass round Senate House Yard and enter the Senate House by the south door. The degrees will be conferred in the following order: . . . . .
Doctors of Law . . . . . The Right Rev Churchill Julius, Hon. D.D., Oxford (Lord Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand). . . . .
Ref: Cambridge Daily News 10 July 1920.

Churchill and daughter Ada, sailed from London to Sydney the 16 Oct 1920, on the Orontes. They also sailed 28 Jan 1927 on the Cathy from London to Lyttleton. Their London address was recorded as 72 Kensington Rd W11.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

A Zealous Prelate.
Extracts from an unattributed English newspaper cutting - Sept 1938
Churchill was brought up in an early Victorian, strict and spartan regime.
"He and his three brothers were noted watermen, and their swimming was acquired by the alarming method of throwing themselves into the river to find their own way to the bank, while another male relative only came to the rescue if things were looking really serious for the water baby"
As the new vicar of Islington. " After early weeks of poor congregations he lost patience and one Sunday evening, armed with his dinner bell, he went into the streets of Islington. As the wondering inhabitants ran out of their houses he invited them to follow him to the church. And they came and stayed"
He was not one to be drawn into arguments on churchmanship.
"Once before preaching at Teddington, he asked . . . . . do they have incense there? No said a layman . . . . . don't you like it? With a twinkling eye, came the diplomatic and sincere answer, I prefer baccy"

Ever interested in technology Churchill had his first flight with Francis Chichester in 1930 aged 83. He was accompanied by his daughter Ada.
Ref: Brian Conlon http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bconlon/adder.htm#top <http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bconlon/adder.htm

FUNERAL:
Death came peacefully for Churchill Julius shortly before nine o'clock on 1 September 1938 at Cloudesley, during the later stages of a long illness. His body lay in Christchurch Cathedral for one day, under a watch kept by sisters of the Community of the Sacred Name.
A choral service in the cathedral preceded the funeral at Linwood Cemetery. St Margaret's College was given the great privilege of providing the only flowers on the coffin the white cross which he had asked for from the children. A tablet commemorating Julius was set up on the outside wall of the cathedral chancel. It was unveiled by the Governor General, Lord Galway, on 7 October 1940.
I approach this address,' he said,' with a sense of deep humility because I feel inadequate to express all that I know you would like me to say about such a well loved man as the Archbishop.
In the Cathedral at Christchurch there is a memorial to him at the Altar Rail and a screen.

The Times 3 September 1938 pg 12 col D.
Obituary.
Dr Churchill Julius.
Former Primate of New Zealand.
The Most Rev Churchill Julius, D.D., who was Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand from 1922 to 1925 died on Thursday at the age of 90, states Reuter message from Wellington. Born at Richmond, Surrey, on October 15, 1847, he was the son of Frederick Julius, MD., who at one time was the chairman of the Church Association. Like his father he was formerly a staunch Evangelical, but in later life developed on Broad High Church lines. After graduating from Worcester College Oxford, and having served curacies at St Giles Norwich, and South Brent Somerset, he became vicar of Shapwick, and then of Holy Trinity, Islington, where he left an unmistakable mark, his preaching being both vigorous and luminous, his tone fervent and rousing, and the social condition of the people receiving his wholehearted sympathy. The congregation speedily increased, and the various departments of church life and work were carried on with great energy.
When on a visit to the parish Dr Thornton, then Bishop of Ballarat, was so impressed with the work and the personality of the vicar that in due course he invited Julius to be Archdeacon of Ballarat and vicar of Christ Church pro Cathedral. For seven years Dr Julius filled this double position to the satisfaction of Diocesan and people, and there was great regret when the parting came on his election as Bishop of Christchurch in succession to Dr Harper. In his own Cathedral at Christchurch he was consecrated on May 1, 1890, by the Primate of New Zealand (Dr Hadfield) and the other bishops of the Province.
The new Bishop's first aim was to add the transepts and the chancel to the already existing nave and temporary choir, and was to finish what Bishop Harper had so well begun. Few Cathedrals outside the Mother Country surpass in beauty and design the noble building which stands in the centre of the city of Christchurch. In spite of delicate health Bishop Julius threw himself with zeal into his various duties; he was an ardent but restrained advocate of temperance, and a devoted champion of religious education, while as a lecturer he was everywhere welcomed. He was acting Primate from 1920 to 1922, when he was elected Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand. In 1925 he resigned, and continued to live in Christchurch. Dr Julius was hon D.D. of Oxford and hon D.D. of Cambridge and Select Preacher at Cambridge in 1897 and 1912.
In 1872 he married Alice Frances daughter of Col M. J. Rowlandson, and she died in 1918. There were seven children, two sons and five daughters. The elder son is Sir George Julius of Sydney NSW., chairman of the Commonwealth Council for Scientific and Industrial Research; the younger son, the very Rev J. A. Julius has been Dean of Christ Church New Zealand, since 1927; and one of the daughters is the wife of the Right Reverend Dr Cecil Wilson, of South Perth, Western Australia, who was Bishop of Bunbury from 1917 to 1937.

The Times 15 September 1938 pg 12 col D.
Dr Churchill Julius
The Rev E. C. Crosse, the headmaster of Ardingly writes:
all who were privileged to know Dr Churchill Julius, formerly Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand, will agree that by his death that the Anglican Church has lost one of its foremost personality is and one of the most lovable of men.
Julius a magno demissum nomen Julo,
Triginta magnos volvendis mensibusorbes,
Imperio explebit.
For 34 years, exactly the same time as his great predecessor, Bishop Harper, he served the Church as Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand and though he retired in 1924 he continued to work almost until the day of his death. As an orator he had few equals whether in the pulpit or on the platform, and there was about him a wonderful dignity which none could forget. In the rugged life of the Dominions there is no room for anything which savours of ecclesiasticism. Dr Julius spoken language which all men could understand, but somehow he always left his audience with an abiding sense of his vocation. As an actor, as a musician, above all as a mechanic, he possessed gifts of the very highest order. When it came to mending a clock there was hardly anyone in New Zealand who could compete with him, and everything mechanical was to him a delight. He was, I think, the first person in New Zealand to ride a motorbicycle.
But it was mainly for his inimitable remarks that he will be remembered by those who knew him. When he interviewed me for a post in New Zealand his first remark as I came into the room was "Are you married Mr X.?" and when I replied "No" he added "any hope of salvation?". Later on when I became engaged I sent him a telegram "Saved" to which he immediately replied "Halleluia Primate". In the same spirit, when shortly before his death he recovered from a serious illness, he sent a cable to his son in Australia, "No hurry, funeral postponed". Remarks of this nature fell from his lips every day, and as he was quite fearless in what he said his conversation and speeches were a continual delight. Wise, out spoken, generous, and intensely human, he assured lea deserves to be reckoned with Selwyn and Harper as one of the Master builders of the Church in New Zealand.

Churchill's son-in-law Percy Elworthy writes of him in his memoir "Of him I can say very little that has not been said or written by so many but I can tell of my great affection for him and of his and Mrs Julius's unfailing kindness to me. He was a man of outstanding ability who could have been a great engineer and inventor (and was), musician, barrister and actor, but who took no pride in his gifts.

Churchill's will was filed for Probate Christchurch 12 Sept 1938 No.19638
NZSG Index.

Julius Churchill of Claudesley 39 Mac Millan Ave off Hackthorne Rd Cashmere near Christchurch Canterbury New Zealand died 1 September 1938 Probate Christchurch to Arthur Stanley Elworthy and Percy Ashton Elworthy sheep farmers.
Effects L2348 15s 11d in England. Sealed London 29 November.
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars.

Buried in the Julius Grave, marked by a cross in Linwood Cemetery
K J Kitto 2005.

DICTIONARY of NZ BIOGRAPHY.
Churchill Julius was born at Richmond, Surrey, England, on 15 October 1847, the son of Frederic Gilder Julius, a surgeon, and his wife, Ellen Hannah Smith. He first attended a private day school in Richmond, then the Blackheath Proprietary School, and finally the junior department of King's College, London. He graduated BA from Worcester College, Oxford, in 1869 and MA in 1873. The University of Oxford conferred a doctorate of divinity on Julius in 1893 and the University of Cambridge a doctor of laws degree in 1920. Julius was ordained deacon in 1871 and priest in 1872. He was curate of St Giles, Norwich (1871--73), and South Brent, Somersetshire (1873--75), before becoming vicar of Shapwick (1875--78), and Holy Trinity, Islington (1878--84). From 1884 to 1890 he was vicar of the cathedral parish in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, and archdeacon of Ballarat. Julius was consecrated Anglican bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand, on 1 May 1890. The predominant early religious influences on Churchill Julius were evangelical and low church in character, although he had some contact with the Oxford movement in his student years. His appointment to Holy Trinity, Islington, suggests that he continued to be well regarded in evangelical circles. Increasingly, however, he came to sympathise with liberal high church views, and once described himself as 'Perhaps . . . . . an evangelical Broad Churchman with High Church views, or perhap . . . . . a Broad High Churchman with loving sympathy for everybody who differs with me.' Generosity of spirit, informed by first-hand experience of slum conditions in London, helped shape and sharpen Julius's views on social issues. While in Ballarat his defence of London dock strikers gained him notoriety. 'I am a Socialist', he said in 1891, 'because I find Socialism in every page of the New Testament.' This aptly suggests the content and emphasis of his social message. Julius avoided recommending specific changes in economic and social arrangements but urged the abandonment of individualism, and the co-operation of capital and labour. Despite some vagueness Julius was, nevertheless, a staunch defender of trade unions and a ready critic of poor working conditions at a time when such views were not fashionable among Anglican church leaders. Early in his episcopate Julius criticised attempts to legislate for prohibition, believing that moral persuasion would be more effective. Later, influenced by the abuses of the liquor trade and impressed by the enactment of prohibition in the United States, Julius came to support this cause. However, education was the issue on which Julius was most persistently vocal. Early in 1892 he appointed a commission to consider the work of the church in this area. Addressing his diocesan synod in 1899 Julius remarked that 'We regard the secularization of education as not merely indifferent, but actively hostile to religion.' He fostered the work of existing denominational schools such as Christ's College and the Cathedral School and was instrumental in the foundation (in 1910) of St Margaret's College for girls; he was less successful in his efforts to encourage the development of parochial day schools. In 1916 a permanent Sunday school organiser was appointed; two years later the Christchurch Diocesan Board of Education was created. Julius was a strong supporter of moves to inject some form of religious teaching into the public schools and urged co-operation with non-Anglicans in such moves. He had hopes of establishing both an institution for training teachers and an Anglican teaching order. These schemes came to nothing, but assisted by funds from the bishop's own income The Bishop's Hostel (Bishop Julius Hostel) provided accommodation for female students at the nearby teachers' training college and university from 1917. He was a member of the board of governors of Canterbury College from 1891 to 1904 and from 1905 to 1919. Churchill Julius left several enduring legacies from his episcopate. He played an active role in the moves which led to the completion of Christchurch cathedral, consecrated in 1904. Toleration was extended to Anglo-Catholicism in the diocese. Bishop Henry Harper's ruling in the Carlyon case in 1877 had helped to open the way to this, but Julius seems to have been even more positive in his attitudes. He gave a ruling favourable to C. E. Perry, vicar of the Church of St Michael and All Angels, over the introduction of Anglo-Catholic ritual. Julius had been impressed, while curate at South Brent, by the social service work of women in religious orders. On a visit to England in 1893 he obtained the services of Sister Edith Mellish to found what was at first envisaged as an order of deaconesses, but which became, in 1912, the Community of the Sacred Name. The duties that Julius performed were not solely diocesan. He attended the Lambeth Conference of bishops in 1897 and 1920, and was the principal instigator of moves which led to the creation of the Standing Committee of the General Synod in 1916. He was, however, unsuccessful both in attempts to establish the primatial see in Wellington and also in his opposition to the adoption of the title archbishop. In 1922 the General Synod elected him primate and archbishop but he held the office only until his retirement in 1925. Julius married Alice Frances Rowlandson at Bournemouth, Hampshire, England, on 18 June 1872; they had five daughters and three sons. By comparison with her husband, Alice Julius remains a shadowy figure. She was active in a variety of organisations, but seems to have been, perhaps because of ill health, a reserved person. Although she managed her household effectively she was, in public, overshadowed by her voluble and extroverted husband. She predeceased him by some 20 years. Churchill Julius died in Christchurch on 1 September 1938 aged 90. He was a gifted speaker, tolerant in many respects, and forward looking. He was a long-time advocate of the right of women to participate in the Anglican church's governing bodies and reacted positively to biblical criticism. He did not altogether transcend the limitations of his time and opposed contraception partly on the ground that it would diminish the English-speaking population. But he quickly, and on the whole deservedly, became respected for his wide sympathies, liberality and eloquence. He was noted, too, for his mechanical ingenuity. While a student he devised a tea-making machine; in old age he built a grain feeder for hens, and was an expert clock maker. Regrettably his election as primate came late in his episcopate and diminished what might have been a more decisive impact on the national scene.
COLIN BROWN
Bowron, H. M. 'Anglo Catholicism in the diocese of Christchurch, 1850--1920'. MA thesis, Canterbury, 1975 Elworthy, G. & A. Elworthy. A power in the land. Christchurch, 1971
HOW TO CITE THIS BIOGRAPHY: Brown, Colin. 'Julius, Churchill 1847 - 1938'. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, updated 7 July 2005 URL: http://www.dnzb.govt.nz/ The original version of this biography was published in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography Volume Two (1870-1900), 1993 Crown Copyright 1993-2005. Published by the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Julius (Churchill). Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand. Seal 1890. Seals. CXLIV 36
Ref British Library 2007

Research Notes:
KINDER LIBRARY
New Zealand
JULIUS, Churchill
Born 15 Oct 1847 Wardrobe Court, Old Palace of Sheen Richmond Surrey
baptized 19 Nov 1847 S Mary Magdalen Richmond
died 01 Sept 1938 Christchurch buried Linwood cemetery;
third son (among eight children) of Frederic Gilder JULIUS MD of Richmond a surgeon, president Church Association and anti-Ritualist campaigner, who latterly lived mostly in Egypt born 28 Feb 1811 Bristol Gloucestershire died 04 Jan 1886 Richmond buried Richmond cemetery
married 1839 S Mary Magdalen, Richmond son of George Charles JULIUS of East India Company, physician to king George IV born 06 Jun 1775 at Nichola Town St Kitts West Indies died 1867 married 1795
and Isabella Maria GILDER born 1774 baptized 08 May 1774 Aspeden Hertford died 1867 Hastings fifth daughter of the Revd Jonathan GILDER
and Mary; and Ellen Hannah SMITH
born 1813 died 20 Aug 1869 Hastings daughter of William [or James?] SMITH of Nottingham; married 18 Jun 1872 Holy Trinity Bournemouth Hampshire by ELIOT later dean of Windsor,
Alice Frances ROWLANDSON of Bournemouth
born 1845 Madras India died 30 Sep 1918 Christchurch buried Linwood cemetery youngest daughter (of nine children) of Colonel Michael John ROWLANDSON
medical officer Indian army, Madras
born 1804 died Jun Qtr. 1894 aged 89 registered Christchurch Hampshire
and Mary Catherine AWDRY born c1805 died Dec Qtr. 1896 aged 91 Christchurch Hampshire daughter of the Revd Jeremiah AWDRY (vicar Felsted Essex) of Bath co Somerset and Maria Emelia MAY first daughter of H MAY of Hale House Hampshire (249;113;150;287)
Education
1857 private day school Richmond Old Church (113)
Blackheath proprietary school (headmaster SELWYN EJ)
21 Oct 1862-King College school The Strand London
16 Oct 1866 matriculated Worcester College Oxford
1869 BA Oxford
1871 MA Oxford
23 Mar 1893 DD (honorary) University of Oxford
1920 LLD (honorary) University of Cambridge
04 Jun 1871 deacon Norwich
26 May 1872 priest Norwich
01 May 1890 bishop (in Christ Church cathedral) Wellington (HADFIELD primate), Nelson (SUTER), Dunedin (NEVILL), Waiapu (STUART), and HARPER (113;150)
Positions
1869 private tutor Bushey Heath (113)
05 Jun 1871 assistant (to RIPLEY) curate S Giles city and diocese Norwich
02 Aug 1873 assistant (to DITCHER Joseph) curate S Michael South Brent Somerset diocese Bath and Wells
05 May 1875-30 Apr 1878 vicar Shapwick with Ashcott Somerset
22 May 1878-23 May 1884 vicar Holy Trinity Cloudesley Square Islington Middlesex diocese London
31 Mar 1881 residing with wife five children four servants 44 Milner Square Middlesex London
17 Sept 1884 incumbent Christ Church cathedral parish Victoria diocese Ballarat
17 Sep 1884 archdeacon Ballarat (111)
24 Mar 1890 arrived Bluff ROTAMAHANA (113)
01 May 1890-20 Apr 1925 bishop (2nd ) of Christchurch New Zealand
1890-Dec 1924 warden Christ's College (19)
1891-1904, 1905-1919 member board of governors Canterbury University College
10 Apr 1891-11 April 1891 baptisms on Chatham Islands (diocesan archives)
05 Jan 1893 departed Lyttelton DORIC for England
Apr 1893 vice president CMS (113)
17 Aug 1893 arrived Lyttelton TAKAPUNA
1893-1929 founder and visitor Sisters of Bethany later Community of the Sacred Name (79)
18 Jan 1894 departed Lyttelton TE ANAU to Hobart Church Congress (89)
Feb 1897 attended Lambeth conference of bishops
05 Oct 1897 from Melbourne arrived Lyttelton WAIKARE
11 Jun 1904 breakdown in health, departed Lyttelton TONGARIRO to England
16 Apr 1909 to Hobart for re-opening of cathedral
09 May 1912-Dec 1912 departed Lyttelton MAORI on leave to England (69)

1917- residing own home 'Cloudesley' 39 Macmillan Avenue Cashmere Hills
1920 attended Lambeth conference of bishops (22)
1922-20 Apr 1925 primate and (1st ) archbishop of New Zealand (150;113;69)
04 May 1924 departed with JULIUS Miss MAUNGANUI for England (140)
30 Mar 1927 arrived Lyttelton CATHAY (69)
Other
youthful photograph (6)
Oct 1937 an appreciation, and photograph in car with pekingese (69)
02 Sep 1938 p10 obituary (41)
09 Sep 1938 obituary Church Standard (111)
Oct 1938 obituary and in memoriam (69) (15;167)
http://www.kinderlibrary.ac.nz/resources/bishop/J.htm
Some statements in this account of Churchill are not accurate.

The Anglican Gradual and Sacramentary.
Fixed Holy Days in September
23 September
Linus
Richard Rolle
Thecla
Adamnan, Abbot of Iona, 704
Dedication of Raphoe Cathedral
Grito de Lares, 1868
Churchill Julius, First Archbishop of New Zealand, 1938 NZ
Eunan
http://www.anglicangradual.stsams.org/FTP/Acrobat/0710-Sep.pdf
2005

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Churchill is recorded as a son aged 3 born Richmond

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Churchill is recorded as a son aged 13 scholar born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Churchill is shown at his fathers home aged 23 single born Richmond

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 44 Milner Sq Islington London. Churchill is described as head of house married aged 33 Vicar of Holy Trinity Islington - MA has been added as rank

5. Churchill Julius: was very interested in the mechanical world.

Churchill married Alice Frances ROWLANDSON [576], daughter of Col Michael John ROWLANDSON [1495] and Mary Catherine AWDRY [1496], on 18 Jun 1872 in Holy Trinity Church, Bournemouth, UK. Alice was born on 15 Feb 1845 in Old Fort Madras India, was baptised on 7 May 1845 in Old Fort Madras India, died on 2 Oct 1918 at age 73, and was buried in Linwood Cemetery Christchurch.

General Notes:
Madras Registers Baptisms.
7 May 1845 Alice Frances dau of Michael John Rowlandson residing Capt MNI and Mary his wife. St Thome Madras (Chennai) in the presence of us M J Rowlandson, H C Shortland, H Moberly Lt. Col.
IOL N/2 fol. 91

An Alice Francis Julius aged 37 arrived in Victoria September 1884 aboard the South Australian from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

Alice is registered on the 1893 North Belt Christchurch, Electoral Roll for Women No 6242. Her occupation was shown as Lady.
NZSG Index.

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900.
Alice wrote a long letter dated 4 January 1900, about a Christmas spent
on Norfolk Island at the Melanesian Mission. She reflects on the bright happy islanders who she finds "genial, hospitable people . . . . . as one watches these Melanesian people, it is difficult to realise that they, or, at any rate, their parents, were savages". She remarks on the loveliness of the island and its flowers and fruits. "The beauty of the chapel, a memorial of Bishop Paterson, with its fine proportions, Burne-Jones Windows, inlaid marbles etc"

Alice Julius: The Julius's lost all their private means in disastrous investments in Australia, Alice, as wife and mother, was obliged to make much personal saving in order to run her household and bring up a large family. The same applied to some extent in N.Z., where she had to study the expense involved in entertaining at Bishopcourt and enabling Churchill to give generously to endless charities [which he loved to do] as well as providing their children with the best education possible.
Alice herself gave much encouragement to art and music, the latter being an essential in the Julius family, which produced 2 pianists, 2 good voices, 2 violinists and a cellist. The burden of finding the money fell mostly on Alice's shoulders, though it was a matter never discussed, probably being considered rather a vulgar subject.
Alice is described by her daughter Bertha as a 'Grande Dame' in the true sense of the phrase She was introvert, reserved, and of strong character and great dignity. But no words of criticism of others, were ever heard in the house.
Bertha Elworthy.

By 1917 the bishop's last residence, Cloudesley on the Cashmere Hills, was built and ready for occupation. Up until then, as mentioned, the Julius's had lived at Bishopcourt, but wishing materially to assist the work of the Church Property Trustees, they decided to give up the episcopal residence. Originally, Cloudesley was a lone shack on the hills containing bunks, and the bishop used it as a refuge from his city life when time could be spared. The existing house was built along what became his workshop.
Unfortunately Alice did not live long to enjoy the move to the new house on the hills. She died in 1918. Churchill Julius paid his own tribute to the wife he loved so well. ' For some time past, the dear mother had shows signs of failing health. She was an extraordinary woman, an ideal bishop's wife, had many social gifts, and astonishing knowledge of everyone she met, a huge correspondence, supplementing in a dozen ways my own deficiencies. To my great distress, they gave me warning that she could not last another week, and in less than a week's time she was gone'.
A Power in the Land.

Alice's son-in-law Percy Elworthy writes of her in his memoir "she was a reserved woman of great strength of character, self-effacing and very gentle, whom I have always loved and admired"

OBITUARY.
(Special to tbe Herald.)
Mrs Julius (wife of Bishop Julius) who died yesterday, was the youngest daughter of Colonel Rowlandson, Bournemouth, Hants, England. She was married to the Rev. Churchill Julius in 1872, and lived in Norwich until 1878, in which year, she accompanied her husband to Ballarat. The bishop was appointed to the Christchurch diocese in 1889, and in this city they have lived ever since. In the innumerable church activities Mrs Julius had always taken keen personal interest. The family consists of, five daughters and two son, all of whom survive. A few months ago the only unmarried daughter, Miss Ada Julius, returned to Christchurch after an absence of several years in England, where she was nursing in one of the military hospitals. The married daughters are Mrs Wilson (wife of Bishop Wilson), whose home is in Australia; Mrs Arthur Elworthy. Holme station, Pareroa; Mrs Percy- Elworthy, now in England; and Mrs Arthur Hansell, wife of the Rev. Mr Hansell, Wellington. The sons are the Rev. Audrey Julius, of Waimate, and Mr George Julius, of Sydney.
Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLV, Issue 14724, 2 October 1918, Page 7

Alice died intestate, letters of Administration were filed for Probate 24 June 1919 Probate No. 10549.
NZSG Index.

EXTRACTS FROM A LETTER TO MARJORIE SEATON, FROM NELLIE BARNETT : dated 11 Mar 1985.
Now you wanted to know about the Julius family. I can't tell you much about her except she was GENTRY. She didn't like the NZ servants, they were too outspoken etc., that is why when she went to England she engaged your mother. Mrs J always wore a bonnet and was the perfect lady. The Bishop fitted into colonial life more easily.

Research Notes:
Alice's birth date is not 1846, see Mary L Julius's birthday book dated 1870.

The names of the 22 persons in the Julius family group c1914 were confirmed by Diana Wilson nee Elworthy, 2003.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Croydon. Alice is recorded as a daughter aged 16 unmarried born Madras East Indies.

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 44 Milner Sq Islington London. Alice is described as a wife aged 36 born Madras India

Children from this marriage were:

+ 277 M    i. Dr Sir George Alfred JULIUS [577] was born on 29 Apr 1873 in Bethal St. Norwich NFK, was baptised on 1 Jun 1873 in St Giles Norwich NFK, died on 28 Jun 1946 in "Killara" Sydney Aust. at age 73, and was cremated on 29 Jun 1946 in Northern Suburbs Crematorium Sydney.

+ 278 M    ii. Rev John Awdry JULIUS [591] was born on 26 Jul 1874 in South Brent Somerset Eng., died on 18 Jul 1956 in Christchurch NZ at age 81, and was buried in Christchurch Cathedral N.Z.

+ 279 F    iii. Mary (Polly) Ellen JULIUS [593] was born on 22 Nov 1875 in Shapwick SOM., died on 14 Oct 1942 at age 66, and was buried in Christ Church Taita Wellington NZ.

+ 280 F    iv. Alice Ethel JULIUS [556] was born on 6 Feb 1877 in Shapwick SOM, died on 28 Dec 1957 in N Z at age 80, and was buried in Karrakatta Cemetery.

+ 281 F    v. Ella Caroline JULIUS [541] was born on 3 Jun 1879 in Islington MDX London and died on 15 Jun 1967 in Christchurch NZ at age 88.

+ 282 F    vi. Ada Catherine JULIUS [611] was born on 29 Jan 1882 in London and died on 11 Jan 1949 in Havelock North NZ at age 66.

+ 283 M    vii. Arthur Cloudesley JULIUS [621] was born on 19 Jan 1884 in Islington MDX London, died on 15 Mar 1885 in Ballarat Australia. at age 1, and was buried on 17 Mar 1885 in New Cemetery Balarat Victoria.

+ 284 F    viii. Bertha Victoria JULIUS [542] was born on 12 Jul 1886 in Ballarat Australia., died on 4 Dec 1974 in Taupo NZ at age 88, and was buried in Hastings NZ.


140. Ada Frances JULIUS [57] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 May 1849 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 29 Jun 1849 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 9 Apr 1942 in London. at age 92, and was buried in Richmond Cemetery.

General Notes:
Ada was born at half past seven o'clock in the afternoon May 29 1849. Baptised June 29, 1849 in Richmond Old Church, Mrs Dumergue, Mrs Jennings and Dr Francis Smith sponsors. Ellen Hannah Julius stood proxy for Mrs Jennings.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Ada was aged 19 at her marriage

Richmond
July 14 (1890)
My darling Harry,
I was thinking of you just now, and it suddenly came upon me, that although Father had written, you might like to have a few words from me. You will be sorrowful, as we are all at the loss of dear Aunt Polly, and I wish I could be with you dear Harry even for half an hour just to comfort you, and help you to see the bright side of this trial, for there is a very bright side dear Harry, when we think of the heavenly house she has gone to, and though her place to you can never be filled up, yet you must try to picture her with Mother and all the other dear ones safe and happy for ever with their Saviour. And you too my boy must go to the same loving Saviour and tell him all your trouble. He alone can fill up the blank in your heart. Dear auntie passed away so gently and peacefully - she has often talked of her Harry during this illness. She loved you so dearly God bless and comfort you my boy
Your loving aunt
Ada F Hunt
Written on three sides of notepaper.
Sheen House
Harrogate
Feby 24th (1891)
My dearest Harry,
You are a good boy to write to me so often, and I believe I have two letters to answer, which isn't fair on you. I have been very busy just lately, for Catharine has gone away for a three-week holiday and so I have to help a little in house work & etc . . . . .
We have had work people in the house papering the spare room and bathroom, which are now finished I am glad to say. The little boy in the hospital is going on very well, he is so bright and cheerful they say, and his one ambition now, is to be in the Station Master's office, when he gets well. That poor boy you went to see with me, is much worse now, and never comes downstairs, he sits up in his little room and seems quite contented and happy. I think what makes him so, is that he loves the Lord Jesus and though he knows how very ill he is I do not think he fears to go when God calls him - and it may be so with us all dear Harry - however awful and unworthy we feel ourselves to be, yet if we trust Jesus we are safe in life or in death - and to trust him, we must know him as our friend and oh how willing he is to be our friend - I hope he is yours my boy. To have Jesus as our friend is the only safeguard against temptations or rather in temptation - I am glad you like your watch, and certainly if it saves you from getting 50 lines this is a most useful gift - it will be nice to give Vandy a stamp album - I did not know he collected them. Has he gone back to school yet? Auntie Bessie who has been ill for so long is going if all's well to New Zealand, the beginning of April, and will stay for about a fortnight with uncle Churchill. I wonder what poor uncle Arthur will do without her, but he will have the baby to comfort him. Miss Veitch has been away visiting friends all the winter - Mrs Smith still remains in doors wearing her shawl, and pretty cloak when she does go out, I should think she would want a few blankets round her - now dear Harry, I must "shut up"
Fond love from
Your loving aunt
Ada Hunt
Written on four sides of notepaper with an additional inserted sheet front page edged in black. With its original envelope addressed Master H L Fenn Malvern House, River, Dover. Franked Harrogate FT 25 91. Stamp ripped off.
The black edged notepaper refers to mourning the death of Mary Caroline Julius in July 1890.

4 Portland Terrace
Richmond
March 18 (1891)
My dearest Harry,
First of all, forgive this (a blot) very ugly blot, which I would have got bad marks for, if I had been at school. You see I am now staying with Aunt Bessie and have been here since last Wednesday. Poor father is ill in bed with erysipelas and has been very poorly indeed, but I hope he is improving. I go in to see him every morning and have a talk, and read, and write his notes for him - he was rather extra miserable this morning, for he had hardly had any sleep all night. I read your letter to him on Monday morning, and I know you will write to him again on Sunday - don't mind me, as now he is ill, he will like to have letters from his boys. For some things, I am sorry I must leave on Friday, for before I left I should like to have seen father quite better as they say in Yorkshire which means well. Aunt Bessie is going in about a fortnight and next week I expect she will be going to choose her birth in the steamer. We are having rather dismal weather in Richmond but it is better than the cold and snow. Cyril and Edgar look well Cyril and I went up to the cemetery on Sunday afternoon, but it was too wet, we could not linger long.
Goodbye my dear old Harry.
Fond love from your loving aunt
Ada F Hunt
Written on four sides of notepaper front page edged in black.

Sheen House
Harrogate
Septr 25th (c1891)
My dearest Harry,
You will have thought me a long time in writing but what with one thing and another, I have been very busy since you left. I often think of my bright little Harry, and at first I missed you very much especially when I went out, and most especially when I went to the market, and Mr Berry chose me a melon, with his usual accompaniment of finger and thumb. Miss Veitch is away at Bridlington now and Mrs Luuth? Alone in her glory. She often asks after you.
Dear Harry, I have got you a little case for the photos: though it is not the colour I should have liked, but I had no choice. I will send it tomorrow with the two photos. Aunt Bessie and Uncle Arthur are coming tomorrow DV I hope they won't lose the train at Holbeck as poor Mrs Duncan did - I was sorry you did not see her, before going to school - we had fine weather here after you left and she went out a good deal, but her time was chiefly taken up with baths and drinks of sulphur water. I hope the hands are still usable; if you should be tempted again, remember the glove, and remember to, what will in able you dear Harry to overcome temptation of all kinds - you know what I mean - thanks for your postcard my boy - I hope to write to you from time to time, and if ever you are in trouble and feel you want an Auntie to advise or help you or be sympathetic with you in any way don't forget Aunt Ada, and send her a line. I love you dear Harry for your own sake, and I love you too for the sake of the dear ones who are gone.
Fond love from your loving
Auntie Ada
Written on four sides of notepaper front page edged in black.

Sheen House
Harrogate
October 16 (1891)
My dearest Harry,
I believe I have two letters to thank you for, and I have been a most unkind Aunt to neglect you so long; it is very good of you dear Harry to write me a letter now & then, and you cannot think how pleased I am when I see your handwriting. You always have something very exciting to tell me, and this time the accidents you mentioned were most harrowing to my tender feelings. Uncle Arthur and Aunt B were only here a week, but we had pretty good weather, and they were able to get about. Aunt B rode on horseback one day, and we went on another occasion to the Harlow Woods, also to Kuaresbro. Do you remember the poor old woman I used to visit in Union Street (Mrs Howard) she was found last Saturday in her bedroom burnt to death. I hope the poor old thing had a fit and was unconscious but it was a bad ending wasn't it. Winnie Bateman has broken her arm again lately; she is coming to me in November I hope with Aunt Annie for these breakages have made her weak - I believe Aunt Annie and all of them will soon be moving from Rothesay House, they are thinking of taking that old house near the bridge (I think it is called Bridge House) but of course it is not yet decided. I am so glad my boy you find your nails useful. I hope you will keep them so, but try the glove if you begin to get tempted again - I hope you are getting on nicely with work - try and put your whole might into what you do, and remember always dear Harry that you have an unseen friend near you at all times who will help and comfort you in trouble, and counsel you in difficulties "in all thy ways acknowledge him and he shall direct thy paths"
Fond love my boy from
Your loving Auntie
Ada F Hunt
I told Mrs Smith yesterday that you send everybody your love, and I understand you included her and Miss Veitch, so she says everybody sends their love to you.
Written on four sides of notepaper front page edged in black.

Sheen House
Harrogate
Novr 18th (1891)
My dearest Harry,
You have been such a dear boy in writing to me, that it makes me all the more ashamed that I have been so bad. But you must forgive your poor old Auntie who is not good at letterwriting and believe that she often thinks of her dear little boy Harry. Aunt Annie and Winnie have been staying with us, the latter has almost recovered the use of her twice broken arm, but I think she is rather afraid of it - I am sure I always felt afraid of touching her in case something should break. We had rather wet weather all the time they were here and Winnie only had three regular walks. Once to the Knaresborough and another time to Burke Craig. I believe Jack has also broken his arm again lately.
Harrogate is very quiet now and not nearly so many people about as when you were here - the Niggers and Punch and Judy have quite disappeared. If you come again to me, as I hope you will do, I must hunt up a companion for you, for there would be no Miss Babbington another time, and no Sequah - one poor man whom Sequah professed to cure and whose crutches he took away is now so bad, that he has to beg for new ones. I often wish I had you to help me water my plants as you used to do, they are looking very fresh still and we have the house heated now most days with the hot water, so I hope they will not feel the cold. I want to try and send a letter today to Vandy, so will not write much more - I was so glad to hear that you were second in your examination because I think it shows that you work and try to do your best - I thought you would be sure to have something dreadful to tell, and I think the mad dog was very dreadful, I hope the poor children recovered.
Goodbye dearest Harry
Fondest love
From your loving Auntie
Written on four sides of notepaper front page edged in black, over written on the front with the Closing.


83 Church Road
Richmond
Sep 21st 1938
My dearest Ha-Wa,
I can't tell you how very much I loved your visit yesterday, but oh! dear it had left me with a sore heart - these partings are bad to bear, and they pull me down physically and mentally - I can't write what I want to say, but you know how I love my Ha-watoo - that is all I can say today and I have had a very happy glimpse of you - God bless you my boy - I shall try and write again before you go, but if you don't get a letter forgive me dear, everything is an effort now - I can always think of you and pray for you which I do and I know you will have strength. Given you for uncle Doret partings than the one with your always loving
Auntie Da
I hated giving you that money as I did, but you will forgive - you see I had wanted to buy you something myself but couldn't manage it - I am too old and stupid - get what you like with it and also a prayer book with or without hymns - later on I will send a little card to put in.

A letter from Lucie Bateman to E V Fenn 21 Apr 1941 describes Ada's funeral and that she was buried close to he father mother son and sisters.

An unidentified news clipping reports Ada's death, she was in her 93rd year and of Church Rd. The article repeats details of her Grandfather's life as a physician to George IV.

Hunt Ada Francis of 83 Church Rd Richmond Surrey widow died 9 April 1942 probate Llandudo to June to Arthur Dudley Julius Solicitor Anne Lucie Bateman spinster. Effects L3743 10s 7d
National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Ada is recorded as a daughter aged 1 born Richmond

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Ada is recorded as a daughter aged 11 scholar born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Ada, now Mrs Hunt, is shown at her fathers house aged 21 born Richmond

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Beech Lodge Bilton cum Harrogate YKS. Ada is described as a wife of a GP aged 31 born Richmond SRY

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Kemp Town Brighton SSX. Ada is recorded as a wife aged 41 born Richmond

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Devonshire Plc Brighton Sussex. Ada is recorded as a wife aged 51 born Richmond SRY

Ada married Dr Henry John HUNT J.P. M.R.C.S. L.R.C.P. [622], son of John HUNT [6813] and Elizabeth [10830], on 29 Jul 1868 in St Helens HAM. Henry was born on 19 Jan 1841 in Melksham WIL and died in 1909 in London. at age 68.

General Notes:
Henry practiced at Richmond Surrey and Harrogate Yorkshire. He retired to Brighton in 1897 after distinguished service to his community.

Henry was aged 27 at his marriage

MR. H. J. HUNT, J.P.
A link has been severed from the chain of social and political life in Harrogate by the retirement of Mr. H. J. Hunt, J.P., from any farther participation in the town's affairs. The step taken by Mr. Hunt-wbilst a great loss to the borough-will, we trust, prove to be of lasting benefit to that, gentleman. Though Mr. Hunt has not taken his indefatigable part in public matters during the past few months, it is only within the last day or two that definite intimation has been received as to his early proposals.
A short time ago Mr. Hunt, we regret to say, did not enjoy that robust health which his many friends would have liked; but, after a short rest, he returned to Harrogate, a few days ago, to complete certain necessary business matters, and has now left Harrogate for a tour throughout the summer. It is his intention to return in the autumn, but only, we regret to say, to take the opportunity of saying good-bye to his many friends and admirers.
During this gentleman's residence amongst us-extending over 20 years he has associated himself with everything that has been for the benefit of the town, and has always been willing with his purse and eloquence to further any worthy object of individual, local, or national character. It is not our intention to refer to the many parts Mr. Hunt has played in Harrogate, but there are one or two which we should like to refer to. As a medical gentleman he was one of the leading doctors in the town, and early in his connection with Harrogate was associated with Dr. Short, an old Harrogate resident. The partnership, however, did not last long owing to the death of the later gentleman, but Mr. Hunt soon built for himself a reputation that will linger in the memory of a large number of our visitors and residents for many years to come. Latterly Hr. Hunt bas been associated with Dr. F. N. Ozanne.
As a politician Mr. Hunt was always a Staunch Conservative loyal supporter of the Government ; and the local Primrose League (of which organization he was for some time Ruling Councillor) has lost, let us hope only temporarily, a true and trusted friend. He was also a prominent member;of the Ripon Division Central Conservative Association ; and, whenever the opportunity presented itself, he was found on the political platform supporting our worthy and respected Member, the Right Hon. John Lloyd Wharton. In his retirement the Church has also lost a devoted son and he, for some years, was president of the Harrogate Church Institute. He was also associated with the Harrogate Nursing Association, was a vice-president of the Harrogate Cricket Club, for many years president of the La- Club, and a supporter of all outdoor sports. He was also & County and a Borough Justice.
As an educationist, it was not until a year ago that Mr. Hunt allowed himself to be nominated on the School Board; though, prior to this, as a Churchman, he took a deep interest in the welfare of the Church day schools in the town. At the School Board election, a year ago, the general public had an opportunity of showing their respect for our worthy townsmen, and the members of the Board added to this by appointing him their chairman-an action that met with universal satisfaction; and Mr. Hunt's conduct in the chair, and his fair and impartial dealing at a time when it was never more needed, has proved that the selection was a wise and entirely satisfactory one. This vacancy will have to be filled sooner or later, and we believe that it is in the power of the Board to co-opt a member to fill the vacancy; the usual custom being to fill it by a gentleman of the same party as the one who retires. From what we can gather this course will, be adopted.
But this is by the way. We trust that the change Mr. Hunt is seeking will be of permaneut benefit to him ; and when we say we regret that he has found it necessary to sever his is connection with a community which honours and respects him, we are but voicing the unanimous feeling of the whole of the people of Harrogate.
Ref HA/541/11253 Bury R.O.

Julius Jottings. No 2 April 1900.
We are sorry to hear of the serious illness of Mr Hunt, of Harrogate, but hope that, as he is on the mend, he may soon be able to get away for change.

OBITUARY 1909:
The residents of Harrogate and a large number of visitors received with deep regret. the intelligence that Mr. Henry James Hunt, J.P., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., passed away an Sunday. During a residence of some 30 years in Harrogate he gained the confidence and the highest respect, of all whose privilege it was to become acquainted with him ; it could with all truth be said of him " He was one of nature's gentlemen." His urbanity of manner, his genial nature, generous disposition, and broadmindedness made him ode of the most popular men of his day and Harrogate was the poorer when he decided to sever his connection with the town some short time age, but his memory will live for many years to come
Mr. Hunt came to reside in Harrogate about the year 1879, and entered into partnership with Dr. Short, who, however, was taken seriously ill at the time, and he died a few days after his partner's arrival in the town. Mr. Hunt at that time lived at Beech Lodge, and some years later resided at Sheen house, and took Dr Ozanne into partnership. This continued up to a short time ago, when falling health compelled the deceased gentleman to relinquish his work.
During his later years in Harrogate he resided in Beech Grove. No one took a keener interest in matters affecting the welfare of Harrogate than the deceased gentle man, and he was never appealed to in vain to give of his talents, time, and money to further the interests of the town of his adoption. He was an ornament to his profession, and naturally filled the post of president to the Harrogate Medical Association with dignity ; in fact, he added prestige to any matter he took in hard. He was president of the West Riding Medical Charitable Society when its meeting was held here 10 years ago.
He was a Churchman and attended regularly the services held in the old St Mary's Church, and was a liberal contributor to Church funds,taking a particular interest in the choir at that time. The Church Institute in those days had no loyal supporter; he was one of the founders and was elected to the presidential chair in succession to the Rev T. Sheepshanks.
As a member of the Conservative Party he did not take any extreme view, and the only office of importance he filled was that of Ruling Councilor of the local branch of the Primrose League in succession to the late Mr Richard Carter, an office he filled to the entire satisfaction of the officials and associates.
As an educationist he was a supporter of the Church schools naturally, and when a School Board was formed he was approached and eventually acceded to the request of numerous friends and was elected a member of the Harrogate School Board in September, 1899, and was appointed chairman. Here he displayed considerable tact, and discharged his duties without prejudice. Unfortunately he felt it his duty to resign in Jun , 1900, and Mr. H.Milling J.P. was appointed to the post.
The deceased gentleman was a lover of sport, and was for many years a vice-president of the Harrogate Cricket Club. He was also for some time president of the Harrogate Lacrosse Club, and the junior cricket, football, swimming, and other clubs could always count upon Mr. Hunt figuring in their subscription list.
As a platform speaker he had few equals ; he was eloquent and when necessity demanded he could be racy. He had a remarkably clever grasp of a variety of subjects, and on more than one occasion it was due to his good offices, that several local difficulties were solved and friction in local matters averted. Some short time ago when it was known he was leaving Harrogate his intimate friends made him a small presentation as a slight memento of the association of one who has been justly termed a fine English gentleman.
Mr. Hunt, who was in the 69th year of his age, leaves a widow and one son (Dr. George Hunt) to mourn his loss, Mr Hunt had been in poor health for the last three or four years, and had not settled down in any particular district since leaving Harrogate. Lately, having got worse, specialists were called in, and an operation decided upon. This took place in London ten days ago, and, though he appeared to be doing well at first, he took a bad turn on Sunday, and died at midnight.
The deceased was buried in Richmond (Surrey) Cemetery Thursday, his nephew, the Rev. E. V. Form, officiating. Many beautiful wreaths were sent from Harrogate and district, including those from Lord Faber, Louisa, Lady Walker of Sandhutton ; the Harrogate Medical Society, Col, and Mrs. Wood, of Newton -le-Willows ; Dr, Gibson. Dr, and Mrs. Ozanne, Miss Carnochan Miss Allen, Mr and Mrs. Garnett , Mrs. Richtering, Mrs Cecil Jones, Mrs and Miss Woodhouse, Miss Savory.

Research Notes:
A further obituary to Henry is on file 2001. Bury ref HA541/11253

Marriage FHL Film 1470890

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bath Buildings Melksham Wiltshire. Henry is recorded as a son aged 10 a scholar born Melksham

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, High St Melksham Wiltshire. Henry is recorded as a son aged 20 a medical student born Melksham

3. Census: Engalnd, 2 Ape 1871, Petworth Sussex. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 30 a member of the college of surgeons born Melksham

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Beech Lodge Bilton cum Harrogate YKS. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 40 a general practitioner born Melksham

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Kemp Town Brighton SSX. Henry is recorded as a boarder married aged 50 a surgeon and JP of Harrogate born Melksham

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Devonshire Plc Brighton Sussex. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 60 a retired physician born Melksham WIL

The child from this marriage was:

+ 285 M    i. Dr George Henry HUNT M.A. M.B. [623] was born on 17 Aug 1869 in Richmond SRY and died in 1929 at age 60.


141. Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Nov 1850 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 15 Apr 1886 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 35, and was buried on 20 Apr 1886 in Richmond. The cause of her death was T.B.

General Notes:
Katherine was born about a quarter before 10 o'clock in the evening November 27, 1850. Baptised December 27, 1850 at Richmond Old Church by Henry R Julius. Alfred A Julius, Miss Clifton, and Miss Julia Quilter sponsors. Ellen Hannah Julius stood proxy for Miss J. Quilter.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Wedding Notice:
Fenn - Julius : 12 inst., at West Molesey, by the Rev Churchill Julius, brother of the bride, assisted by the Rev G Nicholas vicar, Edward Liveing Fenn Esq., M.B. the Old Palace Richmond, Surrey, eldest son of the late T Harrold Fenn Nayland Suffolk, to Katherine Pauline, third daughter of F G Julius Esq., M.D. The Grove West Molesey Surrey.
Ref Ipswich Journal Sat Nov 16 1872

Katherine is mentioned in a scrap of an undated letter to "Jemmy" signed by an elderly woman, Katherine Clifton(?):
"I forgot to say that I saw Katie Julius now Mrs Fenn looking very well and happy; they dined with us at Annie Bateman's and I thought her husband a very pleasant and superior man. It seems so odd to see Katie mistrefs of her old home. Dr Julius came up to see me, and spent a few hours with us; he is not as well and strong as he used to be"

Tour in Switzerland.
7 August Monday. (1876)
Edward, Mary, Arthur and I started a most jovial party at 6 pm en-route for Switzerland Ernest came to bid adieu at Charing Cross - Our first journey proved long and tedious, owing to the Bank Holiday and we only arrived at Folkestone in time for the boat 10 pm two hours late. The first hour on the sea was lovely by moonlight - but a fog came on when we were half across and we beat about for two hours before getting into the harbour, we went to the Hotel de Louise and got to bed at 3.
Up again at nine when we had a long hot dusty journey to Paris, a nice dinner at the Palais Royale revived us, and we started at 8 pm on our long journey arriving at Geneva at 10.30 on Wednesday morning. We slept pretty well all night and enjoyed the view in the morning the scenery from Culoz along the banks of the Rhone was very beautiful.
At Geneva we went to the Hotel du Lac, and after a wash and breakfast went in a steamer on the lake for three hours to a small town (Nyon) with an old tower and fortifications. After Table d'Hote we strolled out again round the town and had cafe in the street Ed and A smoking.
Thursday, August 10 we started at 7 in the diligence (coach) for Chamonix gradually we ascended towards the mountains and the last half of the way was most beautiful with most lovely views of Mont Blanc especially from Sallanches where we made a halt at 1 pm for lunch it was a long hot drive and we reached Chamonix at 3.30, it is in a lovely valley, just under the Mont Blanc chain - a bath and table d'hote revived our party except myself who knocked up had a shivering fit, and was sent to bed with champagne.
Friday, August 11 at half past 8 we set out for the Mer de Glace I had a mule who assisted Mary with his tail, passing through a pinewood to Montanvert we came on the glacier which we crossed with a guide, and much enjoyed walking on the ice and the fine air on the glacier, we then descended the rocks on the other side by the Mauvais Pas to the Chapeau where we lunched and the mule meeting us took me back to Chamonix After table d'hote E & I sat talking on the balcony with the two Miss Giles who arrived in evening from Lausanne.
Saturday - the weather is still continuing warm and fine, we made another delightful excursion starting early we got over the zig zags on the lower part of the Flegere before the sun became powerful and a nice wood was then entered with numerous refreshing streams & after a three hours climb we reached the summit the view quite repaid the long walk Mont Blanc towering above all the Aiguilles the true monarch of the Alps which it scarcely appeared to be in the valley - after luncheon and a rest Ed & A crossed the ridge towards the Brevent and came home down part of that mountain - Mary & I sat in a lovely wood enjoying the views until 3 when we slowly strolled back taking short cuts and climbing rocks with the aid of our trusty Alpine stocks. The Giles came to our hotel & sat with us in the evening watching signals made from a party up Mont Blanc.
Sunday, August 13 there is a pretty little English church at Chamonix where we went for Morning Service we saw Lady A Onslow there and had a few words with her coming out, after an early dinner we took a walk with the Giles half way up the Brevent it was a long walk and we did not reach home till after dark, we liked our companions very much.
Monday much to our regret at 7 am we left Chamonix and started in a carriage finis
Ref: This unfinished account was written by Catherine in her Mr Punch's Pocket Book dated 1876.

The Mount Dore
Bournemouth
Nov 3 1885
My darling Boy
I ought to have written to you last week, for I am afraid you have lost my address, I am sorry I did not do so - Did you write home on Sunday - I hope you will write to me here as soon as you can - Poor Mother feels very lonely, in the grand big house, and very tired too, for I have, every morning to go into some very hot rooms, have a bath in one & sit for a long time in steam in another, I am so tired after it, that I can scarcely walk, and am very glad that there is a lift, to get upstairs to my bedroom again, where I have do go back to bed again.
Bournemouth is a very beautiful place, I wish I could get out and see more of it, & go down to the sea but it rains nearly every day- it is pouring now - I have only once been to the sea, it is a long walk for me, but all through beautiful gardens, so pretty a stream runs through them for 2 miles with pretty little bridges crossing it - I have been out for two drives, in a health chair drawn by a pony, it rained each time, & the window had to be put up & I felt as if I was packed up in a box.
I do hope my darling Wags that I shall really get better soon, & come home with enough to have really happy Christmas holiday with you all.
Father tells me that Harry came home on Saturday quite well again.
Goodbye dearest boy so much love to you from your ever loving
Mother
K P Fenn
Letter to Ernest "Van" Fenn the only letter to survive from Katherine Fenn

THE TIMES:
On the 15th April at 1 Portland Terrace Richmond Surrey KATHERINE PAULINE wife of EDWARD LIVEING FENN Esq. M.D. Aged 35.
Buried Apr 20 1886
OBITUARY: April 1886.
Death of Mrs Fenn : With great regret we have to report the death of Mrs Fenn the wife of Dr E L Fenn, which took place on Thursday at no 1 Portland-place Richmond at the early age of 35. The deceased lady was the third daughter of Dr Frederick G Julius, who died in the early part of the present year. She was married to Dr Fenn in 1872 and has left a family of five sons. Her death has occurred after a long illness from chronic inflammation of the lungs. Dr Fenn and his family may be assured that they have the sincere sympathy of very many residents in Richmond and its neighbourhood.

Extract from a letter by Dr E L Fenn to their son Van on his Ordination.
Grey Friars
June 3, 1903
My dear Van
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . You are much in our thoughts this Ember-tide week of course and I often think what a pleasure it would have been to your mother to see you consecrated for the work of the church. At one time she hoped very much Charlie would have entered the ministry, so I know what her feeling would have been about you. Her early death has been an untold loss to you boys, for she possessed a rare and holy mind, with much good judgement and dislike to all exaggeration about sacred subjects. If those who are passed away can follow our earthly actions be assured that her loving spirit will not be far from you next Sunday. With much love and good wishes for your happiness and usefulness in your sacred career
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Upon Katherine's death her sister Mary Caroline Julius (Aunt Polly) looked after the Fenn children. Portrait of Katherine in Possession of E L Fenn Auckland 1998.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, The Green Richmond. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 4mths born Richmond

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 10 scholar born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Katherine is shown at her fathers home aged 20 single born Richmond

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Katherine is recorded as a wife aged 30yrs, born Richmond SRY


5. Pictures: Katherine P Fenn, Richmond Green Surrey.

6. Pictures: Letter by Katherine Fenn & Diary. Richmond Green Surrey.

Katharine married Dr Edward Liveing FENN M.D. [3], son of Dr Thomas Harrold FENN M.R.C.S. [1] and Maria ALSTON [2], on 12 Nov 1872 in West Molesey SRY. Edward was born on 20 Aug 1843 in Stourbank Nayland SFK, was baptised on 6 Oct 1843 in Nayland SFK, died on 8 Dec 1907 in Nayland SFK at age 64, and was buried in Nayland Burial Ground. The cause of his death was heart failure.

General Notes:
Sponsors at Edward's christening, were Sam Alston, Frederick Hand, Mary K Liveing. Edward was educated at Sherborne School (Head Boy, Capt 1st Eleven) MRCS Kings London 22 Apr 1865, Vienna, MD Edin 1873, MRCP London 1892.

The Sherborne Register 1823-1892.
Entries Aug-Dec 1853.
Fenn Edward Liveing, son of T.H. Fenn, Nayland, Colchester; born 1843; (S.H.), vi, xi, 1860-61; Captain of the Games; left 1861; Warneford Scholar Kings College, London; Physician at Kings College Hospital 1865-67; M.B. 1865; M.D. 1873; Edinburgh University; studied in Berlin & Vienna; Surgeon to Richmond Hospital since 1875.
The Green Richmond Surrey.

University of Edinburgh
Medical Degrees.
Degree of Bachelor of Medicine. Fenn Edward Liveing, England.
Ref: The Caledonian Mercury 2 August 1865.

Edward was a well qualified and published physician, the Medical Times and Gazette of July 4th 1863 Pg 24 records: KING'S COLLEGE, LONDON, Medical Department: Warneford Prizes : Edward Liveing Fenn, 1st Prize.
Ref: Internet 2008

Royal College of Surgeons.
The following gentlemen having undergone the necessary examination for the diploma were admitted members of the college at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 28th. inst., viz . . . . . Edward Liveing Fenn, Nayland, of Kings College.
Ref Ipswich Journal, Saturday May 6 1865.

Nayland
Appointment - Mr Edward Liveing Fenn, who was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons on the 28th ult., has since been elected Resident Physician at Kings College Hospital for Midwifery and the diseases of women and children.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday May 13 1865

In 1868 he returned to assist in his fathers practice at Stourbank Nayland. After his fathers death he sold Stourbank (1873) and moved to Richmond (1872 -74 to the Wardrobe Court until the lease expired*, then 1 Portland Tce.) where he married and practiced for 20 years. His Nayland practice was sold to Dr H D Palmer.
Edward in a letter to his son E V Fenn 30 Jan 1898 mentions seeing Raphael's Transfiguration in the Vatican Gallery in Rome.

Concealment of Birth at Stoke by Nayland.
This article reports on the inquest into the death of a newborn infant, the mother was a patient of Edwards, and his lengthy testimony on the matter is reported verbatim.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 3 April 1869.

Court of Probate
Cook and Goldsmith v Goddard and others.
This is a report of litigation over the disputed Will of the late Dennis Goddard of Stoke by Nayland. Many residents of Nayland gave evidence including Edward, Sam Alston, Reverent Torlesse, etc.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 17 January 1871.

Fenn Edward Liveing M.D. 1 Portland Terrace, The Green, Richmond.
Kelly's Directory of Sussex 1891

A small Hall house, No 16 Fen St Nayland dating from abt 1400 was owned by Edward Fenn by a conveyance dated 7 Mar 1889, he then may have sold it to Prof Liveing?.

At the death of Katherine Fenn, they were living at 1 Portland Tce Richmond. In poor health he left after his second marriage to live at Grey Friars East Hill Colchester. In 1902 he obtained possession of the property "Grooms" he inherited, in Nayland, returning to live there he restored the house renaming it Alston Court. Obituary Alstonania pg 403. Ref article A Julius book one E L Fenn 1998. Will proved at L30,000.

Portrait in possession of E L Fenn Auckland NZ 1998. Pastel at age 8 by Sydney Buck 1854 in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

MY FATHER, EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Adria Margaret Fenn. 1962.
The eldest son of Dr. Thomas Fenn was born on August 20th, 1843 at Stourbank, Nayland, Suffolk. If today you visited Stourbank garden you would see a tall tree on the lawn, which he used to climb when a little boy. Next door to the house there is a grocer's shop, with the name "Faiers", written over the door. It is kept by a man named, Alec Faiers. My father used to climb over the fence which separated Stourbank and the Faier's yard! to play with Alec Faier's father.
Father must have been a very nice little boy. There is a story that one day he was playing ball with one of his sisters, when her ball went through the window of a cottage, and broke the glass. Instead of running away he knocked at the door of the cottage, explained about the breakage and offered to pay for new glass out of his own pocket money. Father had a very happy childhood with delightful parents. He was number three out of a large family of boys and girls.
When he was old enough he was sent to school at Sherborne a very long way from Suffolk. When he first went there, the railroad was not built all the way and he had to travel partly there by coach. He did very well at School and became Head Boy, Captain of the lst Cricket Eleven, and the winner of a pewter tankard at Fives. There is an old photograph, still in existence of Father in the Sherborne cricket eleven.
At the age of eighteen he went to King's College Hospital to train as a medical student. He took the M.R.C.S. diploma in 1865 and afterwards studied at Vienna and Edinburgh, becoming an M.D. of the latter place. At a much later date he took the Chair at the Annual Dinner of the British Medical Association. He became a physician of King's College Hospital, was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London, and a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London. But he resigned his good appointment at King's College to come home to his native village to help his father, who had been stricken with a serious illness. Father stayed in Nayland four years and took great interest in the social life of the place.
He and his sisters got up penny readings for the villagers, and these were extremely popular. Even in my day they were still spoken about, especially the occasion when the young actors illustrated the tale of "The four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie". And twenty-four real birds flew about the village school over the heads of the delighted audience when the pie was cut.
On the death of my Grandfather my Father left Nayland and went to live in Richmond, selling the village practice. In Richmond, he became a partner to Dr. Julius, in his extensive practice and married Dr. Julius's pretty daughter, Katie.
They had nine children, five of whom lived to be grown up. When Dr. Julius died, Father and Mr. Bateman (Father's brother-in-law) became partners. Father took a great interest in Richmond. He was a member of the municipal Vestry and a churchwarden. His young wife died soon after the death of her youngest child., Edgar.
Father was a very good parent to his motherless boys, though in some ways strict, he had a great sense of humour.
There is a story that he once took Harry, then a very small boy, to be fitted for shoes. Pair after pair were tried on but Harry kept a grim silence and would not say if they were comfortable. The stout old lady who kept the shop, went panting on to her knees, trying on one shoe after another. Father added his entreaties to hers. "Now, Harry, you must say if they are comfortable." At long last Harry remarked solemnly, "They are puce:"
This episode held great amusement for my father. He had the gift of being able to tell a joke in a really amusing way, and he used to tell this story, until he was quite weak with laughter.
In 1892 he married Edith Todd, my own mother, and by her he had three children, Dorothy, who died when a baby, Edward Gerald Palmer, who was killed in Palestine during the First War, and myself.
Father's health not being very good, he resigned from his practice in Richmond, soon after his second marriage and went to live at Grey Friars, Colchester. He became consulting Physician at Colchester Hospital. I remember my mother telling me this little anecdote of him. He was one day walking down the Hospital drive when he came on two men violently quarreling with one another. Father went up to them and tried to settle their dispute. An old doctor was watching the scene from the steps of the Hospital. Afterwards he went up to my Father and said "Blessed are the Peacemakers".
I was a very small child at the Colchester house but I well remember the happy home atmosphere there, with parents devoted to one another, five good natured big brothers, and "Beau" a year older than myself to share our nursery. Father used to tell Beau and me an original story about a little girl called Lucy, who fell from a stile and spilt her basket of strawberries. He read aloud to us, often the books of Mrs. Ewing, or the Pilgrims Progress.
Later on when we all went to live at Nayland, he taught us to play Chess, Cribbage, Backgammon, and Whist. He himself was a great reader and had a large library of books. He particularly liked Dickens and Trollope.
At Colchester, and at Nayland he organized Shakespeare readings amongst his friends and relations. He was a good amateur actor and recited very well, and loved to recite from the Suffolk Ballads. He took the part of "Mr. Primrose" in a play called "Popping the Question" acted at Nayland. I was only a small child at the time but I was allowed up to see it acted in the village schoolroom. At the end, Father was called on to make his bow in his kneebreeches, shirt and three cornered hat, and he certainly gained a truly "deafening applause".
He loved Nayland. He liked to talk to the people, to discover old names he remembered from his boyhood alive in a new generation. He was a churchwarden at the 15th century village church, and attended Church services on weekdays as well as Sundays. He was also a local magistrate, and as a consequence "Meggs" (the coachman whom I dearly loved) wore a cockade in his top hat, when driving the brougham or dogcart.
But Father's true memorial is Alston Court, the old family house he inherited from an aunt. He restored the old house, uncovering beams and hidden carving and having the lovely heraldic glass put back into its original places. He only lived four years in this house he loved so dearly. He had a bad illness during the Spring of 190?, and died nine months later, on December 8th.
His body was buried in the little cemetery on the hill, given to the village by Samuel Alston, the uncle from whom he inherited the house. My mother had a stained glass window put up to his memory in the parish church. One of the figures portrayed in this window is St. Luke, the Beloved Physician,
Well, I can only very inadequately write about my Father's life for I was
only twelve years old when he died. My elder brothers knew him when they were grown up and so could have given a far more comprehensive picture of him.
I will end by a remark made by Charlie when the news came from New Zealand, telling us of the birth of "Edward Liveing Fenn the Second". Well, I only hope he will be as good a man as his grandfather.
Compiled by Adria M. Fenn.

DEATH OF DR E.L. FENN OF NAYLAND.
We regret to have to record the death of Dr. Edward Liveing Fenn, which took place at seven o'clock on Sunday morning at his residence, Alston Court, Nayland. The deceased gentleman, who was well known and universally esteemed, not only in Nayland and Colchester, but throughout a far wider district, was son of the late Dr, Fenn of Nayland, and was born at Stourbank in that parish on August 30, 1818. He was educated at Sherborne College,and afterwards went, to King's, College Hospital in 1861. He took the diploma of M.R.C.S. Eng. in 1865, afterwards studies for a year in Vienna, and in 1873 he became an M.D. of Edinburgh. He held the position of Physician at King's College Hospital (where he had been a distinguished student), be was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London (1893), a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London and also of the British Medical Association.
He resigned his position as physician to King's College Hospital to come home to Nayland to assist his father in practice there and he remained at Nayland for four years,when he went to Richmond, Surrey, where he took over the extensive practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. This practice he carried on for some twenty years with great credit and renown and was consulting physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital. During his residence at Richmond he took a great interest in the public life of the place, he was a member of the municipal vestry, and a churchwarden and he married in 1872 Katharine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace.
Owing to ill health he relinquished practice at Richmond, and came and settled down in Colchester in January 1892, residing at Grey Friars, East Hill. He was shortly afterwards appointed physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, and occupied that position until he retired from practice and left Colchester, in July, 1903, when he was appointed Honorary Physician to the Hospital.
In March 1902, Dr. Fenn inherited Alston Court, Nayland on the death of his aunt, Miss Alston The Alston family have lived in this interesting old house for over 150 years, and when Dr. Fenn left Colchester in 1903 to reside there be took a great interest in its restoration. Among the family papers which he discovered at Alston Court was a valuable and interesting record signed by the famous Dr. Gilberd, of Colchester, which Dr. Fenn presented to the Colchester Town Council, and now hangs near the Gilberd picture in the Moot Hall.
In the autumn of 1892 Dr. Fenn was elected Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and he was President of the East Anglian Division of the British Medical Association in 1898. In February, 1892 his first wife being deceased, he married Edith, second daughter, of Mr Chas. Todd, of Wentworth House, Richmond, who survives him.
Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace and Magistrate for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession, and during his connection with the Essex and Colchester Hospital he was held in very high regard, not only by the medical staff and other officials, but by the patients, while he was also extremely popular among all classes in the borough. He was a devoted member of the Church of England, and was, from 1893 till he left the town, churchwarden of All Saints, taking a keen interest in parochial affairs. At Nayland, as formerly at Colchester, be was foremost it, every good and philanthropic work. He was a member of the Parish Council and of the local Education Authority, and also rendered excellent service in regard to the preservation of footpaths and rights-of-way. In the early part of this year he was taken seriously ill, but, thanks to the skill and care of Dr. Syrett he rallied. About a week ago, however, it became evident that his vital power was failing, and on Sunday morning be quietly passed away, to the deep regret of all who knew him. He leaves five sons by his first marriage, and one son and one daughter by the second marriage. His oldest son, Dr Charles E. Fenn was for some time recently House Surgeon at the Essex and Colchester Hospital and is now in practice in London, another son is an engineer, one is in the Navy, and two are in the Church.

OBITUARY.
EDWARD LIVEING FENN, M.D., M.R.C.P., J.P.,
EX-PRESIDENT OF THE EAST ANGLIAN BRANCH.
DR. E. L. FENN, of Alston Court, Nayland, whose death occurred on December 8th, was the son of the late Dr. Fenn of Nayland, and was born In Nayland on August 20th, 1843 He was educated at Sherborne College, afterwards entered King's College, London, and qualified in 1865. A painstaking and hard-working student he was elected to the office of House-Physician at the hospital. From thence he went to Vienna, where he studied for a year, and, returning to Nayland, he joined his father in practice there. On the death of his father he removed to Richmond, Surrey, in 1871, where he took over the practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. Here for twenty years he carried on an extensive and highclass practice, and was Physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital.
In November, 1872, he married Katherine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace. During his residence in Richmond he took great interest in the public life of the place; he was a member of the municipal vestry and a churchwarden at the parish church. Ill health compelled him to relinquish his practice at Richmond, and he settled down in Colchester in Jauusry, 1892, and resided at Grey Friars, East Hill. In February, 1892, he married again, his second wife belng Edith, a daughter of Mr. C. J. Todd, of Richmond, who survives him. ln 1893 he was elected Physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, where he remained for ten years, and also took a prominent part in the general management of that institution. He carried on a practice as a consulting physician in the town and neighbourhood, having taken the diploma of M.R.C.P. in 1892. In 1903 he finally retired from practice, and settled down in his old family residence of Alston Court, Nayland.
In October, 1892, Dr. Fenn was Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and in 1898 he was President of the East Anglian Branch of the British Medical Association. A capital public speaker, he filled both these offices with distinction. Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession. A dignified gentleman, he was universally beloved and esteemed by all who came into contact with him.
British Medical Journal 21 Dec 1907.

THE FUNERAL:
The funeral of the late Dr. Fenn took place at Nayland on Thursday at noon the sad ceremony being attended with every testimony of the great esteem and respect in which the deceased gentleman was held in Nayland and the large district surrounding. All the shops were closed, and the blinds of every house lowered, and the procession was followed to the graveside by a large number of the school children, who had been given a half holiday by the managers, of which body the deceased was chairman. The remains were enclosed in an elm shell within a coffin of polished oak with brass furniture, and on the breast was a heavy brazen cross, on which was inscribed "Edward Liveing Fenn, died 8th December, 1907. Aged 64 years." The coffin was born from Alston Court, which adjoins St. Stephen's Church, on a bier, and was followed by the mourners viz Dr. Charles E. Fenn, Rev. E.V. Fenn, Lieutenant C. D, Fenn, R.N, Mr. E. J. Fenn (sons), Miss Adria Fenn (daughter), Mrs. Hand, Mrs. Cotes, Mrs. Hopkins (sisters), Miss Cotes (niece), Colonel Fenn C.I.E. (brother), Mrs. Harold Fenn, Miss Todd (sisters-in-law) Mr. A. O. Julius, Mr. Gerald Todd; Mr. Algernon Todd (brothers-in-law), Professor Liveing, Mr. W. Liveing (cousins), Captain Smythies R.N, and Miss Johnson. The servants at Alston Court also followed. The large church was quite filled with a sympathetic congregation, among those who attended the service being Dr. Sydney Curl, Dr. Leigh Day, Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Chichester, Dr. Clowes, Dr.E. Worts, Dr. Bassano, Dr. Renny, Mr. A. G. Buck (representing the Essex and Colchester Hospital, Colchester), Dr. Syrett (Nayland), Rev. J. Storr (Little Horkesley), Rev. R. H Wilkinson (Stoke), Capt. Kelso, R.N., Mr. Neville Stud (Great Horkesley), Mr. R. M. B. Otter-Barry (Little Horkesley). Superintendent Peake (Essex County Constabulary Boxford), Rev. E. C. Sawdy (Congregational minister), P S. Bailey, Messrs. Thomas Cuddon, Raymond Cuddon, Wilfred Deaves, A. Y. Littlebury, F. G. Chippington,C. E. Vowing, W. Cook, G. Grimsey, R. Wheeler, T. Webb, P. Biggs, T. Faiers, F. Harding, W. E. Church, A. E. Harvey (Nayland), etc. At the entrance, the cortege was met by the vicar of Nayland, Rev. J. D. Gray, and the surpliced choir in charge I of Mr W. F. Hindes choirmaster, and the service throughout was conducted by the Vicar. At the conclusion of the lesson," blest are the departed " was played, and after the Nunc Dimittis the organist, Mr. G. W. Brooks Mills also played " Now the labourer's task is o'er;" as the recessional. On nearing the graveside the choir sang " On the Resurrection morning," and the scene as the coffin was lowered into the grave, which was lined with white cloth, was most impressive.
The floral tributes, which were very beautiful, bore the following inscriptions : - "In loving memory, from his wife, sons and daughter"; "From the staff at the Essex and Colchester Hospital, with sincere sympathy and kind remembrances of a friend to all, and a much valued colleague " ; " In affectionate remembrances., L., M., and E. "; "In most loving remembrance. of our dear brother Edward, from his sisters" ; With deepest sympathy, from all at Wentworth House"; "In affectionate remembrance, from Arthur and Bessie Julius"; "With sympathy from the maids at Alston Court"; " "With sincere sympathy, from Mr. and Mrs. , W. F. Hindes"," With deepest regret from the groom and gardener at Alston Court"; "With deepest sympathy from Miss E. Johnson " "With heartfelt regret and sympathy, Mr. and Mrs. W. Le G. Gudgeon, Stourbank, Nayland"; "Captain and Mrs. Smythies, The Turrets, Colchester"; "With ;deepest sorrow for the loss of their kind friend, from the teachers and children of the Nayland Council School " ; " With sincere sorrow from the members of the choir", Dr & Mrs. Frank Syrett, Nayland" ; and From Lady Grant Duff, Lexden Park."
The arrangements for the funeral were admirably carried out by Mr. William Deaves, of Nayland.

Managers Minute book for Nayland School in 1907.
Dr. E. L. Fenn was a member of the School Board of Managers at the time of his death. He appears to have been Chairman for up to 3 years, as his signature appears with this title at the end of the minutes for each meeting from July 1904 to Christmas 1906
"1907 December 11th: A special meeting of the Local Managers was held in the school-room this evening. Present W Dudgeon, F. Deane, J. Blyth, W. Norfolk.
Re: Late chairman. Before proceeding to deal with the business of the evening the Vice-Chairman, W Le G. Dudgeon Esq referred in a sympathetic manner to the decease of the chairman (late) Dr. E.L. Fenn. His remarks were very warmly endorsed by the Managers. He moved the following resolution:- that the Managers of the Nayland Council School desire to record their deep sense of the severe loss they have sustained in the death of Dr. E L Fenn, and their heartfelt sympathy with Mrs. Fenn and her family in their heavy sorrow and bitter bereavement. This resolution was seconded by F Deane Esq and supported by Mr. Norfolk and carried by the remainder. That a copy of this resolution be sent to Dr. Chas. Fenn; also that the School be closed on Thursday afternoon, 12th December the date of interment. Agreed.
From:Mary.George Nayland 2003

EXTRACTS from the WILL of EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Dated 13 Jan 1903 at Colchester ESS.
Appoints Charles Edward Fenn & Arthur Onslow Julius Executors & Trustees.
To my wife L500, all household effects, books, paintings etc, including the oil painting of myself, then to pass to the inheritor of Alston Court (Charles E Fenn)
To Charles E Fenn my diamond ring given to me by my father, my proof engraving of John Hunter.
To Harold L Fenn my gold hunter watch.
To Ernest V Fenn my signet ring.
To my wife during her lifetime my house Alston Court, gardens, pastures, & fennages, being partly freehold and partly copyhold, then at her death to my eldest son Charles.
To my Goddaughter Lucy Dorothea Fenn L100
The residue of his estate to be vested in his Trustees to be invested (some instructions are given) to provide income for his wife, then distributed to his surviving family at her death.
A Codicil is attached dated 26 Jan 1906 noting an advance of L1530 at no interest, to Charles Edward Fenn out of his share of his fathers estate.
Handwritten copy on file - E L Fenn
Proved London 15 Jan 1908 for L30,111-2-1. FHL 1894240 1908 Jan A-L

Buried in the old cemetery Bear St Nayland, his tombstone reads "In loving memory of Edward Liveing Fenn eldest son of Thomas Harrold and Maria Fenn. Who entered into rest Sunday Dec 8th 1907 Aged 64. The free gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom 6-23"

Fenn Edward Liveing of Alston Court Nayland Suffolk MD died 8 December 1907. Probate London 15 January 1908 to Charles Edward Fenn MD & Arthur Onslow Julius solicitor
Effects L30111 2s 1d
National Probate Calendar.

Research Notes:
Medical Directories;
Dr Edward Liveing Fenn
Kings College Hospital.
M.B. Edinburgh 1865.
Phys.Accouch's Assistant Kings College Hospital 1866.
H P Kings College Hospital 1867
Nayland Assn Kings Col London.
Late H.P. & R.A. Kings Col Hospital.
Author of "Epilepsy" - prize papers read before the Medical Society Kings Col London.
District M.O. Sudbury, Lexden, & Winstree 1871
The Old Palace Richmond in partnership with Bateman 1872
Contributed "Congestion of the Liver" Medical Times Gazette 1868 (1872).
Surgeon Nat. Orphans Home, Ham, and Royal Female Naval School Isleworth 1873 - 1877, 1883.
1 Portland Tce Richmond 1878, 1879, 1883.
Member Pathology Soc. 1879
Surgeon Richmond Hospital 1882, 1883.
Grey Friars Colchester MRCP London 1892, 1893, 1903.

Colchester Medical Society Records;
Elected to Society 4 Aug 1868.
Resigned 3 Oct 1871.
Re-Elected 18 Oct 1892.
President 1896.
Resigned Nov 1903.
Member of the Ipswich & District Clinical Soc. 1905 - 1907.

Letter to Edward Liveing.
Grey Friars
Colchester
June 13, 1899.
My dear Edward,
I hope you are getting on well, and that the pennance you are undergoing will give you permanent relief.
My wife and I enjoyed our two days in Cambridge very much, the Professor was most kind and showed us a great deal that was interesting - we also went to the races one evening. When we left we spent our last two days at Hunstanton. I went through the pedigree . . . . . a week or two back, and made some corrections; when you are well enough to do the same I think you will find that he is foggy on the following points.
John son of the ancestor by his 1st wife did not die unmarried having 3 children (Chas: Alston's paper wrong).
Jacob the youngest son, of Wrens Polstead b (probably) 1696, died 1760 and therefore was not buried in 1757 we may hope.
His son Jacob died November 28, 1757.
His grandson Jacob born 1758 died 1778 w no portrait of him exists as articled to his Uncle Sam Alston no portrait of him exists.
Mary widow of Sam Alston was buried at Nayland not Edwardstone
Mary Downing died 1842 not 1843.
Sarah Alston died 1837.
Anna Maria Alston born at Nayland not Edwardstone.
Harriett Alston born Nayland not Edwardstone
William Alston died at Norwich February 6, 1839.
Ann widow of George Alston died February 1856 buried in vault at Nayland
These were some of the points I noticed and corrected - you may find others.
Your affectionate cousin
Edw L Fenn

Transcription of letter, Dr Ed. L. Fenn to Rev Edmund Farrer about the restoration of Alston Court:
Grey Frairs Colchester.
7 Feb 1903.
Re. access to Alston Court Nayland under renovation.
You and your friend are quite welcome to look around the old shell, for there has been such a large amount of substantial repair required that we have not yet reached the more decorative stage. e.g. There is no glass and not many floors in yet. Next to the picturesque courtyard with its carved beams, the Hall will be when restored an interesting feature, the north wall has bulged and the iron beams of the ceiling rusting out were so insecure, I have determined to set up again the original open roof, the beam with carved Kingpost and braces still stands and the remains of a shaft leading up to a spandrel may be seen on the north wall.
The Hall also presents an example of what began to take place at the end of the 15th century by the cutting of from the main hall of a private parlour for the use of the Master and his family, when they no longer dined with the household in the Hall. The small doorway at one end of the partition remains, the window in this inner hall which has been building for centurys (?) was completely glazed when we opened it but the lead was so soft I had it all taken out that it might be releaded. The bessemer beam over the fireplace in the inner hall is the original one which we found bricked up in the wall, but the fireplace and chimney were so insecure I had to rebuild them. In the dining room adjoining where there is at present no floor and the fireplace is lumbered up with the oak rafters from the Hall roof you will note the massive ceiling and the fireplace is the original size, tho rebuilt for the same reason as the inner hall one, the bessemer beam here is a new one the old one having been badly burnt some few years back. The paneling of this room is at least 120 years later than the building and was not introduced till 1631. If you strike a match you may be able to see on the beam between the windows on the east side a little oak figure 13 inches high in the habit of a Flemish soldier in the time of Edward IV. The room was I believe originally hung with painted cloth, a good large fragment of which I shall possess. You will remember how Falstaff try's to console Mrs Quickly for the loss of her tapestry by telling her instead she can have the story of the . . . . . or German hunting or . . . . . work to . . . . .
signed
Edw Fenn
Ref: HD526/101/1 Bury RO.

Essex County Standard Office.
Colchester
January 28, 1904
The following letter, and Essex County Standard newspaper article are contained in a small envelope addressed to Dr Fenn dated 28th of January 1904.
Letter File 2007

Essex County Standard Office
Colchester.
Jan 28th 1904
Telegrams: "County Standard" Colchester
TELEPHONE NO. 42A

Dear Sir,
The document which you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of an article to appear in this week's E. CS. It is to be supplemented by some notes, I venture to keep the document in my safe, hoping that you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester, who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted, and framed and placed in the Town Hall.
In great haste,
Yours faithfully,
W Gurlinly Benham

Discovery of an autograph of Dr William Gilbert, of Colchester.
By the courtesy of Dr E. L. Fenn late of Colchester, and now of Alston Court Nayland, we are enabled to publish the following document, which Dr Fenn has discovered amongst some papers in his possession.

To all Christian people to whom this present writinge shall come William Gilbert of London Esq sendeth greetings to our Lord God everlasting.
Whereas Richard Roberts of London, Tanner can now by his deede of bargaine and sale bearing date of the date hereof all the consideracion therein mencioned hath gyven graunted feoffed bargained and released unto the foresaid William Gilbert his heirs and assignes forever, all his right title clayme and interest with (sic) ever he hadd, hath, or by any meanes, may have in the capitall messuage and rents to the said capital messuage on the part of the North and Sowth with all orchardes and gardens thereunto belonginge with thappertanaunces scituat, lying, and beinge in the parish of St Martyn in Colchester, abuttinge as in and by the said deed more att lardge yt doth and maye appeare.
Now Knowe yee me the said William Gilbert to have made an ordayned and thee's presents in my steade and place putt and constituted my welbeloved in Christ Robert Middleton of Colchester, aforesaid, gentlemen, my true and lawfull Attorney to enter for me, and in my name into the said capital, messuage, rents and other the premises with thappurtanaunces or into any partt or parcell thereof, and the full and peceable possession and seizon thereof, for me, and in my name to take according to the forme and effect, of the saide deed and bargaine and sale, GYVINGE and hereby grauntinge under my said Attorney my full power and authoritie in execucion of the premisses as fully as evey thinge is the lawe will the same permit, and as if I were sceft (sic) were there personaly present, ratefienge, confirminge, and allowinge all, and whatsoever my saide Attorney for me and in my name shall, lawfully doe it cawse to be done in about the said premises, by virtue of their presents.

In witness whereof to this my present writinge, I, the saide William Gilbert have sett my hande and seale.
Dated the One and Twentith daie of Aprill in the Eighth and Thirteenth yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of God, Quene of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faithe, scilicet 1596.
W. Gylbert.
Sealed and delivered to the use of the said Robert Myddleton in the presence of me. Ambrose Gilbert, Leonard Wallworth scr.

This document is of great value and interest as bearing the autograph signature of the great scientist and "first electrician" Only one or two other signatures of Dr William Gilbert are known to exist. Further reference to the subject will be found in our "Colchester and County Notes".

Medical Notes: Grey Friars
Colchester
June 13, 1899.
My dear Edward,
I hope you are getting on well, and that the pennance you are undergoing will give you permanent relief.
My wife and I enjoyed our two days in Cambridge very much, the Professor was most kind and showed us a great deal that was interesting - we also went to the races one evening. When we left we spent our last two days at Hunstanton. I went through the pedigree . . . . . a week or two back, and made some corrections; when you are well enough to do the same I think you will find that he is foggy on the following points.
John son of the ancestor by his 1st wife did not die unmarried having 3 children (Chas: Alston's paper wrong).
Jacob the youngest son, of Wrens Polstead b (probably) 1696, died 1760 and therefore was not buried in 1757 we may hope.
His son Jacob died November 28, 1757.
His grandson Jacob born 1758 died 1778 w no portrait of him exists as articled to his Uncle Sam Alston no portrait of him exists.
Mary widow of Sam Alston was buried at Nayland not Edwardstone
Mary Downing died 1842 not 1843.
Sarah Alston died 1837.
Anna Maria Alston born at Nayland not Edwardstone.
Harriett Alston born Nayland not Edwardstone
William Alston died at Norwich February 6, 1839.
Ann widow of George Alston died February 1856 buried in vault at Nayland
These were some of the points I noticed and corrected - you may find others.
Your affectionate cousin
Edw L Fenn

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as a son aged 7 a scholar born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Sherborne School Sherborne DOR. Edward is described as a pupil unmarried aged 17 a scholar born Nayland ESS

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as Head of House aged 27 unmarried general practitioner MB Edin. LRCP Lon. MRSC Eng. born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is described as the head of the house, a Physician MD Edin., married, 37yrs, born Nayland SFK.
Also resident in the home were his wife and family and Mary C Julius his sister-in-law, plus 5 staff:
Maria Satchell, cook, unmarried, 50yrs.
Ada L Saxon, parlormaid, unmarried, 30yrs.
Catherine A Collier, nurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
Amelia Mann, undernurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
George King, page, unmarried, 15yrs.

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is recorded as head of house widower aged 47 medical practitioner/surgeon. Also in the house were 4 children and 4 servants.

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 81 High St Colchester ESS. Edward is recorded as head of house aged 57 married a physician/surgeon born Nayland SFK.
Also in the house were his wife and family, plus a cook, a house maid, parlor maid, and a nurse.

7. Edward L Fenn: Mid 19th C, Sherborne School & Richmond SRY.

8. Edward's Letters 1: To His Son Harry, Dated 27 Mar 1890, 12 Jul 1890. (See original letters on right).
March 27, 1890
My dear Harry.
I have lost the country post so you will not get this very early, but I can not let the day pass without writing to wish you very many happy returns of your birthday, and you shall have a present when
Page 2
you come home If there is anything you want, tell me and I will see if I can manage it.
I expect you and Charlie will come home on the same day, and he wants to know if he may walk home, but I have told him he must let me know first how many miles it is and the exact road, he is thinking of coming by
W. Hammond gives you a good report, and therefore I hope you will have a happy holidays, for it is only when you have worked well, that you can feel you have earned your holidays.
Billy Barton was very excited yesterday
Page 3
because his colour (Oxford) won the boat race.
Goodbye,
From your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.


Richmond
Saturday afternoon.
July 12, 1890
My dear Harry.
Our dear auntie Polly died this afternoon, she became so weak and weary at last that she prayed to be at rest.
You boys have good reason to mourn for her
Page 2
for ever since your own dear mother died. Auntie Polly has done her very best to fill her place and help you one and all that you might miss her as little as possible and we must never forget her.
Goodbye, my dear boy
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This short letter is in a black rimmed envelope addressed; Master H L Fenn, Malvern House, River, North Dover.

9. Edward's Letters 2: To His Sons Harry & Van, Dated 24 and 28 Sept 1890, 28 Oct 1890.
Richmond
September 24, 1890
Wednesday evening.
My dear Harry.
I hope you have recovered from ill effects of both wasps and cricket ball both punishments must have been very unpleasant. It is a pity
Page 2
you had not "Sequah" near at hand to cure you.
Our great excitement here was the thunderstorm yesterday, three houses were struck in Richmond. But the worst was Mrs Brewin's house at Strawberry hill, the children were in the nursery and Mrs Brewin and her friend were in the front drawing-room. When the lightning struck the chimney filled the nursery with sulphurous smoke and threw down the ceiling in the back drawing-room, yet no one was in the least injured. The storm raged for an hour. Cyril, nurse and Baa took refuge at Miss
Page 3
Quirks as Cyril could not come back from school during the storm.
Your portraits have not yet come, you shall have some of them when they are ready.
Vandy is removed into the upper fifth. Tip cut his foot with some glass the other day, he bled a good deal on the terrace that but is well now.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.

Richmond
September 28, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am sending you the proofs of the photographs they are all good, but the two I liked best 5888B and 5889A. You may keep these and give any of them away if he wish to do,
Page 2
when Bertha comes home, she might like one. I think Tip comes out greatly. I hope your back has got quite well: Winnie Bateman fell down in the Park yesterday and broke her arm a second time. They had all come with Cyril and Baa up into the park for tea and games and this was one of the results. Cyril is in the upper school now, which is very nice to him. Billy is going to church tomorrow morning, (it being the feast of St Michael and all Angels), with Miss Annie Proctor, nurse is to sit in another pew.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.

My dear Van
I expect Mr Allen has told you, you are to come home next Saturday for an exeat until Monday at 11. Aunt Annie wants you to dine at her house with Cyril that she may see something
Page 2
of you in the afternoon and you will come down after tea. I am glad to hear you are working well and making the most of your opportunities. Billy goes every day to Miss Proctor for his lessons, Bible reading, saying hymns and catechism etc, he is quite at home at the vicarage: I dare say you will go in there with them next Sunday.
You made one great mistake in your letter you say "he will no what that means" fancy spelling know, no - shocking
Page 3
Goodbye dear boy
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Richmond
October 28, 1890

10. Edward's Letters 3: To Son Harry, Dated 28 Oct 1890, 4 Nov 1890.
My dear Harry
A few lines only to thank you for your letter, and to say I am very pleased to hear you have done well in arithmetic. I have not seen squeak, but I have heard his coach, trumpeting along
Page 2
in the distance: I hope someday you will be a better doctor than he is, for he is only a quack.
Van is coming home on Saturday for the mid-term exeat, and he and Cyril are to dine and spend the afternoon at auntie Annie: I hear that Jack Bateman has broken his arm again. His bones must give very easily.
Billy Barton is wearing a Scotch camp on Sundays, which pleases him mightily.
Page 3
I take Tip for a long run every afternoon, he is miserable if he thinks he is not to go and won't lose sight of me for a moment. He is rather noisy, each time I start from the house, which is not always pleasant.
Goodbye, dear boy
Your affectionate father,
Edward L. Fenn.
October 28, 1890
This letter in a small envelope was addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House, River, Dover and is damaged.

My dear Harry
I hope you have received the hamper safely, cookie was to take it to Victoria this afternoon. I enclose you nine stamps for your letters. Did I tell you that when Dolly went to
Page 2
the dentist a week or so ago he pulled out the wrong tooth by mistake. It was most unfortunate. Yesterday Cyril had his mid-term holiday, and he and nurse and Billy went to the Crystal Palace. They enjoyed their day very much Vandy also ahead his exeat from Saturday to Sunday morning.
Auntie Annie, and Win are going to Harrowgate on Friday, the latter had her arm taken out of the splints yesterday. I do not want you to write to many letters so the week, you write
Page 3
to auntie Ada you need not write home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Richmond
November 4, 1890.

11. Edward's Letters 4: To His Son Harry, Dated 17 Nov 1890, 25 Feb 1891, 4 Mar 1891.
Richmond
November 17, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am glad to hear that you were not bitten by the mad dog, I suppose all the animals it bit have been killed, and the poor children properly treated. Do you recognize
Page 2
the photograph is it the same man you saw at River and Harrogate? I think he must have emptied all our pockets here by this time, and that he will soon be moving somewhere else.
Vandy's mid-term report was quite a good one it said, "a very good worker who has been making good progress, especially of late, his Latin grammar is especially good".
The new Mayor and Corporation are going to the parish church next Sunday morning for a special service. Sir Whitaker Ellis is our Mayor. Now that I have given up my open carriage Tip misses his regular
Page 3
afternoon run and has to be content with a walk with Billy in the morning and up to Thatchers with Robert in the afternoon.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
Wednesday evening.
February 25, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I do not think I have written to you for some time, so must send you a few lines tonight to let you know I have not forgotten you. I hope you have not been having such terrible fogs as we have been
Page 2
enduring here. Last evening I left Ham Common about six o'clock and we crept along to Petersham but near Barnham Corner see nothing and I had to get out of my carriage and lead one of the horses all the way home I had to walk close to the edge of the footpath to find my way.
Baa went today to the vicarage for the first time since his chickenpox. I have no doubt, they made a great fuss of him. He tells me he saw all four Miss Proctors
Tip seems quite to have recovered the loss of his toenail. I think he had bent it backwards in a scuffle with Pickles,
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and we had to send him to the dog doctor who removed it for him.
Work carefully at your mathematics, English and French are very important for examinations.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
March 4, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I enclose you 1/- worth of stamps. Charlie wrote last week to say an enormous hole had appeared in his trousers and he must have a new pair as these were past mending, so I was obliged to say
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he might, as I was afraid otherwise he might be going about like a Highlander in a kilt.
I have just recovered from a sharp attack of asthma, had to keep my bed all Monday but I have been out on my round today.
You will soon be enjoying the pleasant spring walks and lambs, birds nests and flowers, though you will see more of these at the beginning of next term, as we may expect plenty of cold wind yet.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

12. Edward's Letters 5: To His Sons Harry & Van, Dated 27 Mar 1891, 10 Mar 1893.
Richmond
March 27, 1891.
My dear Harry.
Very many happy returns of your birthday to you - I am still up in my bedroom but getting on gradually and I hope next week to be able to get away to the south of France for two or three weeks and I may see
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you before I start.
Goodbye, dear boy.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is in a small envelope and addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House River, Nr Dover

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 10 1893
My dear Van
You will be glad to hear that baby is better, I think I may say that today is the first day we have felt at all happy about her
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since she was taken ill last Wednesday week. I had your report last week and was very much pleased with it, you were top for the month and doing well in all your subjects so I hope you will get into the first class for one term before you leave.
Uncle George Hand has been appointed captain of the Shannon lying in Bantry Bay, he is not at all pleased as he wanted another ship which is stationed at Harwich near his
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house at Dedham. I am afraid you will not see much of Cyril at Easter he breaks up so late, it is very unfortunate.
With Mater's love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

13. Edward's Letters 6: To His Son Van, Dated 21 Sep 1893, 7 May 1895, 12 May 1895.
Grey Friars
Colchester
September 21, 1893
My dear Van
I am sending off today the following books:
1 Hamilton - algebra
2 Pendleburgh - arithmetic
3 Bradley - composition
4 Creighton - history
5 Stedmans - French exams
A classical atlas which will I daresay do as well as the . . . .
So you
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must order revisers Greek Testament, Benrose(?) Latin verse book, Baureres(?) French grammar.
Glad to get your letter and to know you are comfortably settled. Tell us next about your journey did you go through the Box tunnel? How long did you wait at Taunton etc? Is there a Mrs Thornton?
Would love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn
You ought to get the books on Saturday

Grey Friars
May 7, 1895
My dear Van
I quite meant to have written to you yesterday to tell you we have neither of the books you want so you must get them. Harry and Cyril took away Hall and Knight algebra one of which was doubtless yours.
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I am glad you like your new study and that you will make good use of it I have no doubt. When Harry last wrote he and two friends were going to make the ascent of the Roche de Naye mountain, 6430 feet high and he says he has been catching some beautiful fish in the lake.
Mr and Mrs Brown have gone away for three weeks and they are going to stay at Oxford with Mrs B's sister.
I drove Edgar over to Dedham last Friday in the dogcart and we had tea with Aunt Annie it was very dusty and windy on the road. As I am writing now in the study clouds
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of dust continue to roll by, we very much want some beautiful showers of rain to lay the dust and make the vegetables grow.
Edgar is delighted with Miss Peachey
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
May 12, 1895
My dear Van
You are doubtless enjoying the real summer weather, but here we very much want rain, for nothing will grow in the kitchen garden until we get some reviving showers. Charlie Todd bought Miss Winch down here on Friday
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they stayed one night she seemed to be very pleasant and good-natured but does not talk much. Next Friday (DV) Mr Todd comes down and stays over the Sunday.
Have you heard of Harry's near escape on the mountain? As I do not think you have I will quote his words:
"I and some other chaps began to go up the Rocke de Naye all went well until we got up about 5000 feet then we had to go up steep slopes covered with frozen snow the snow was very hard and it was also freezing hard, well we ascended by dint of hard work cutting our way up them, after we had gone up about 100 yards (I forgot to tell you these slopes were covered with huge rocks) we walked along the top of the slope under a huge set of rocks, after a bit we had to get round one, three of the boys got round and then I came I got half way when just as I was bringing my right
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foot round to another step my left foot and the step gave way, immediately I began to go down these tremendous slopes at a terrific pace, I crashed through between two trees and then down I went getting faster and faster if it was possible. I pressed my alpine stock head hard down on the snow it made no difference except to keep my head from going down head foremost well at last I crashed on to a rock and rolled over 6 feet to the ground on the other side and would you believe it I was none the worse for it except very much bruised cut and shaken. I went down quite 80 feet it was steeper than the slope in front of the drawing-room window"
He says if he had fallen a little further he would have been dashed to pieces over the precipice.
Thank God for preserving him I say
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

14. Edward's Letters 7: To His Son Van, Dated 26 June 1895, 27 Apr 1896, 8 May 1896.
Littlehampton
June 26, 1895
My dear Van
We have reached the end of our very pleasant holiday and return home tomorrow (DV). I see the Saijemans(?) still flourish on the beach both Mr and Ben. Last Saturday Charlie came down and stayed until Monday morning going back
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by the 7:42. Sunday afternoon he and I went for a long walk through Arundel Park, we were very hurried returning to the station and after walking along 5 miles an hour for the last half hour (downhill most of the way) we got into the station just in time to see the train steam out; so we sat an hour and cooled ourselves. C goes in for his examination tomorrow, he is rather anxious but I am very hopeful he will pass all right this time. Your report has come and is satisfactory as you are top in form, but bad in French and still improving in mathematics, you must stick close to the latter as mathematics help to make the mind clear and logical.
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I should think you are old enough now to enjoy some of Prescott's histories e.g. The Conquest of Mexico or Peru or The History of Columbus by Sir Arthur Helps.
I enclose you six stamps which will last you to the end of the term. Harry sent me a good group of Mr Masson and his pupils this morning, He comes home on the 20th.
Love from Mater Edgar and Bobo
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
April 27, 1896
My dear Van
I do not think you have been vaccinated since you were a baby so it will be safer for you to take this opportunity to be done again, the smallpox epidemic
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seems to be spreading in different parts of England owing to the culpable neglect of vaccination.
Mr Brown came back from Oldham later on Saturday evening to take the duty yesterday - we gave him some supper on his arrival but he slept at the Rectory - he came in again last evening and left early this morning on his return to Oldham, they expect to be away three weeks
I missed your help very much with the Easter offering book and am getting on very slowly I'm afraid.
Edgar went with me to the evening service yesterday as there was no one to go with him to St Botolph's in the afternoon. I think he likes Miss Collings as well as he did Miss
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Peachy. We are having the windows on the garden side of the house painted for the woodwork was beginning to decay from want of paint to keep out the wet.
Bo and Adria are very well, they have what used to be our bedroom for their night nursery now
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
May 8, 1896
My dear Van
I suppose you have by this time settled down to the regular routine of work. I see you left Jason behind you I do not know whether it was intentional or not but keep up your reading of all kinds of literature. I hope the shirts arrived in Tiverton in safety
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Charlie's shoes never reached him, I am afraid you must have tied the address label on carelessly and that it got pulled off in transit. I wrote to the P.O. about it but they wanted to know what day and hour you posted it and that I could not tell them - I suppose you do not remember.
The old house at Nayland had a narrow escape of being burned down yesterday Aunt Margaret happened by chance to go into the kitchen about three o'clock in the afternoon and saw the beam just above the fireplace in a blaze, she quickly called Wisby(?) and they ran for Mr Deaves and his men and with buckets of water they fortunately put it out, if it had gone on for another 10 minutes I believe all the old part of the house would
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have been burnt to the ground - I was at Nayland yesterday and saw the burnt beam and the kitchen was in a frightful mess from soot and dirt and water. Mary gets slowly weaker and weaker and has at times a good deal of pain but she is very patient. Adria is rather fretty with Tish coming
All here send their love to you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

15. Edward's Letters 8: To His Son Van, Dated 20 May 1896, 15 July 1896, 13 Sept 1896.
Grey Friars
Colchester
May 20, 1896
My dear Van
I was going to send you a paper giving an account of the great fire at Richmond but Linnie has frustrated me - it must have been a terrific affair. You will be sorry to
Page 2
hear that poor Mary died in the hospital last Saturday after much sad suffering born with great patience and resignation. We buried her yesterday just at the foot of little Dorothy's grave. The Webbs at the cemetery two your servants (sic), and two nurses from the hospital and myself followed her to the grave. We shall greatly miss her for she was a good faithful friend and servant of the old school.
I am glad you have moved into a better bedroom, I hope you
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are going to have a try for the prose or verse prize it is always good practice to go in and even if you do not win.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Wentworth House
Richmond Green S. W.
July 15, 1896
My dear Van
We have had a very warm week at Richmond and the heat has been rather too much for Bow who has been very poorly for two days - we have seen a good many old friends since we arrived. The opening of
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the new ward at the hospital brought together a great many, and yesterday there was a diocesan missionary gathering at Sir Whitaker Ellis's house where I saw others.
Florence takes the children by the waterside generally as it is cooler there than anywhere else and Bow delights in seeing the trains go over the bridge.
Charlie dined here on Monday, he rode over from Thames Ditton on his bicycle and as he was entering Richmond he ran into a dustcart owing to some mutual dodging and bent his machine which he had to leave behind and return by train.
I have been to the Sherborne commemoration this year so cannot go to Tiverton
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tho Mr Thornton sent me a card of invitation to luncheon; I hope you all have a good day.
I am so disappointed at Cyril's complete collapse at his exam; that I feel very hopeless about him - but I must try and get him another nomination for a last chance if I can.
With love to you from Mater and all here
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
September 13, 1896
My dear Van
I enclose the health certificate, if Mr Chase has any reason to suppose you have been exposed to infection during the past week I shall trust to his communicating the fact to Mr Thornton.
I am afraid the weather
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has been very unsettled with you as it has been here but I dare say you have enjoyed the novelty of your surroundings. I attended a luncheon yesterday at the new School recently built by the Roman Catholics here; Cardinal Vaughan presided and made a very sensible speech. I was introduced to him and had a few minutes conversation, later on I drove over to Nayland to see Mr Palmer's patient and managed 10 minutes with Aunt Margaret, but we shall go over and see her again on her birthday next Friday.
There will be a vacancy at Paxman's works before Christmas so I must devise something for Harry to do until then.
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Aunt Isabella is I believe still at Clacton and we rather talk of going over there on Tuesday for the afternoon and so give Grace a blow of fresh air. We went to a concert on Thursday given by Arthur Roberts it was very amusing.
We are I am glad to say all well here - Bo still calls out for Annie sometimes.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn.

16. Edward's Letters 9: To His Son Van, Dated 27 Sep 1896, 21 Oct 1896, 15 Nov 1896.
57 Marine Parade
Great Yarmouth
September 27, 1896
My dear Van
Mater and I came down here last Friday and we hope to stay until Tuesday week. Mr and Mrs Todd propose joining us here tomorrow, we are most fortunate in our apartment nice large rooms facing the sea, very clean, cooking good etc. Bo was very sad when
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we left home crying after us "Bobo cab to". Grace and Miss Ethel Auchinclass(?) are staying at Grey Friars to keep house and look after the babys and Harry. The latter has had a bad cold with a bad asthma and inflamed eyes - he was getting better however when we left. He goes up to 45 Great Marlborough St on Wednesday from month and then goes on to Wentworth House until Christmas, as he is going to attend classes at King's College for one term before he begins a course of practical engineering at Paxman's works. We went to St Nicholas Church this morning for a grand thanks-
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giving service for the Queen's long reign, it is you know the largest parish church in England it was quite full - the Mayor and Corporation, the Norfolk Regiment, an artillery contingent, sailors, police, and the general public filled every seat in the church. They say there were about 4000 in the church, we had a grand special service with the band, the Vicar of Yarmouth preached a stirring sermon we both enjoyed it greatly, after the
. . . . congregation had dispersed Mater and I stayed for a quiet celebration of the Holy Communion.
With love from us both
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 21, 1896
My dear Van
I thought the enclosed toast list drawn up my Mr Benham with humorous drawings of ancient and modern Colchester might amuse you. Observe the oysters being offered to Cunbeliuos(?) also the Roman soldiers devouring them and slaves opening them
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in front, then old King Cole etc etc. I enjoyed the banquet yesterday for Lord Roseberry spoke exceedingly well and with great earnestness.
Gilbert who you see on one of the oyster shells was a natural philosopher who live in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I and discovered a good deal in connection with magnetism which has finally developed into the electric light which they talk of introducing into Colchester. Gilbert was buried in Trinity Church here
Cyril tells me that old Foster has retired from school work and that Minnie is now the head, I hope
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all this will not affect his passing.
The babies are very flourishing they are crawling at a tremendous pace now, and will soon walk expect
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 15, 1896
My dear Van
Your report was quite satisfactory though Francis still points out your weak points as I daresay he often does to you. He says your work is well prepar21 Oct 1896ed
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and that composition occasionally shows more life. Your essay writing is weak, that you wander from your subject. Mathematical report that you always try your best, I hope as you read more both prose and verse your powers of composition will develop.
I am afraid Cyril's chances are very small in December Mr Foster says he works steadily but is so dreadfully slow, so in examination he is nowhere.
Mater and I went yesterday to a matinee at the theatre and saw the "Sign of the Cross" it was really very well put on and
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the subject was treated quite reverently; the scene lies in the time of Nero and the catastrophe is brought about by the young Christian girl converting Marcus the Roman prefect who was in love with her to Christianity, and they passed hand-in-hand from the dungeon to the amphitheatre and the lions.
Harry you know is at Wentworth house now, greatly enjoying himself
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

17. Edward's Letters 10: To His Son Van, Dated 29 Nov 1896, 5 Feb 1897, 11 Feb 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
November 29, 1896
My dear Van
How dreadfully soon you break up this term we seem hardly to have settled down quietly from the effects of the summer holidays and here you and Cyril we will be upon us in about a fortnight.
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Cyril passed his medical all safely and now for the real text I hope most on sincerely he may succeed though my hopes are very faint I am afraid. I cannot expect him to do more than his best however.
We had our Shakespeare reading party last Thursday the arrangements much the same as when we had two years ago. The bow window in the drawing room a bank of flowers for the stage, tea in the study, and supper in the dining room. Everyone said it was a most brilliant evening so we were repaid for our trouble.
Harry is teaching Mabel and Adria Todd to ride a bicycle, I believe
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they can both manage it pretty well. Mr Weir of Horksley died last Monday after a short illness, I saw him two or three times with Mr Palmer.
With love from Mater and the family upstairs
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
February 5, 1897
My dear Van
I am afraid you have not had many letters as yet so I will send you a short one this evening. Harry has began his work very well and is I think quite interested in what he has to do - it has been a bad week for him to begin work at 6:30 a.m. wot - wot - wot
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his alarm goes off at six and he makes himself a cup of cocoa before he starts on his bicycle. A paper was given him today to fill up with the other workmen to say how many hours work he had done, I believe he put some 26 hours as he did not begin until after breakfast on Tuesday.
Aunt Lucy has settled Lewis at Stubbington - the Fosters seem to think that Cyril has been dull and slow over his work ever since he had the measles, I think I must make some enquiries about Epsom College for him after Easter, they have a good modern side there, and it seems useless for him to do any more classics. I hope you will do well in your exam and it will be nice clearing off "Little Jo" before you go up to the University
Have you heard that Aunt Lucy has taken a house at Midhurst close to Aunt Margaret and I think she could not have done better - very pretty
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& healthy. Rees is at a private tutor at Bramley near Guildford.
Mater and I went to London on Wednesday to a matinee of "Under the Red Robe" we enjoyed it very much but the roads were like running rivers and we went straight from the station to the theatre and back again
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
February 11 1897?
My dear Van
Harry asked me to enclose some more photos to make yours . . . . . complete.
Edgar is doing more work now and Mr Brown comes to him twice a week - Mr Todd is lending him a leg rest for his plaster of paris leg is very heavy, and his thigh aches at times.
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I have asked Mr Fry the house surgeon and one of Harry's friends Mr Kennedy to dine with us on the 21st and I have taken stalls at the theatre so we shall go there afterwards and see the "The French Maid" which they tell me is very amusing.
I hope to go to London before it is over to see the performance of Julius Caesar at Her Majesty's Theatre.
I hope you are in the minority in the vote on the Civilisation v Barbarism debate you have only to read the accounts given by any traveller in the uncivilised countries to see the squalor misery and suffering endured by the "noble untutored savage" I go with Tennyson, better a year of Europe than a cycle in Cathay or words to that effect.
Harry reads Bardolph next Tuesday, I hope we shall be able to get his hands clean before he goes.
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"Beau" goes with his mother to a children's party at Miss Peachey's tomorrow - a conjurer is expected - I hope Beau will sit still.
Last night he was put to bed but was not asleep so Florence said, shall I take you in my arms and rock you off in the next room, "Oh Nannie says B how can you take a poor little boy out of his warm bed I think you had better go into the next room and do your work" so she did and in a minute or two she heard him snoring.
I hear from Harrogate that Aunt Ada has been very unwell but is getting better.
Love from Mater and babies
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

18. Edward's Letters 11: To His Son Van, Dated 5 Mar 1897, 19 Mar 1897, 17 May 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
March 5, 1897
My dear Van
We were much interested in your budget postcard, quite a little book. I suppose you experienced a very heavy gale last Tuesday, as its chief force seems to have expended itself on the south and west coasts.
We had gone that evening
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to a Shakespeare reading at Miss Lockwood's and at 10:30 when we were about to start it was blowing and raining great guns; three sets of people had come on foot the Hunt's the Curtis's and the Mitchell's so we sent our carriage two journeys before we started ourselves. One gentleman the curate at St Giles in walking down the garden path to the carriage had his hat blown off and of course he saw it no more for it was pitch dark.
I walked over to Nayland this morning and sat for three quarters of an hour with Aunt Margaret who looks wonderfully well, she walks better than she did and has got as far as Mr Rees on the Stoke Road. I had luncheon with the Palmers and came back in the omnibus.
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Cyril had a preliminary test 10 days ago and did much better than he has done before so we must still hope on. Aunt Annie stayed here two night's last week, one night we went to the theatre and saw Arthur Roberts and the next night we had two of Harry's fellow pupils Mr Seeker and Mr Jones - Preece had an engagement and could not come, Dr and Miss Mitchelson and a neice and young Mr Larsen. Our new organist Mr Tyndall came in after dinner and played I had the old piano tuned for the occasion
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
March 19, 1897
My dear Van
Your report arrived a few days ago, good in most respects but poor Mr Francis still groans over your composition tho you have cheered him a little even in this for he says "composition"
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shows a little more vigour multiply this still more and use the great models more and dictionaries less". I daresay he tells you how to try and do this, we used to be told to read a paragraph of Cicero again and again until we knew it by heart or at any rate had fully grasped the method of expression.
Cyril goes to London next Tuesday for the examination returning to Stubbington on Saturday and his holidays begin on April 6, a week before yours unfortunately. We are expecting Mr and Mrs Todd next Thursday to stay with us until the following Tuesday they want to see the grandchildren.
Edgar's leg has been so troublesome the muscles starting when he walked that he has gone back to the irons and gets on more comfortably now.
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There was a long report about the Post Office affairs in the Morning Post a few days after your debate - if it had appeared a little sooner it would have a afforded you material for your speech. Mr Hales from Ardleigh is to take Canon Irvine's place and my old school fellow Mr Ball from Mersea goes to Ardleigh.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
The two men injured on North Hill are getting on well

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Thames Embankment
May 17, 1897
My dear Van
Here we came last Thursday and hope to stay for a week returning home next Friday. The weather meant well for it changed the day we arrived, I am not sure so long as it was fine that I should not have preferred it to be rather cooler. We are making a round of the theatres we have seen Ellen Terry in "Mme St Gene" and we have been to the opera once Faust. Tonight we are going to see "The Physician" on Friday met Simon
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at Wentworth House and met meet Mr and Mrs Gergun and baby - the last pretty little mite, but certainly a mite - on Sunday morning I was not well so we stayed at home and Uncle Harold called and so fortunately we saw him - in the afternoon we went to Richmond, the Mater stopped at Wentworth House while I went on to him to see the Bishop of Christ Church and found him not feeling well but I sat with him in his room for some time - Aunt Alice was staying in London so I only saw Polly and Ethel the latter was very anxious to meet you but I told her that she had no chance of doing so unless she called upon you at Tiverton
Uncle Arthur [59] and Bunt Bessie took me all over the place, all very nice, a long garden plus two pigs, plus horse and pony, plus a chicken run. I thought it all very nice and comfortable especially in the summer. Today we had been looking in the shop windows and then went to the Guildhall, where we met Mr Todd to see the collection of pictures by painters of the Victorian age. We left Harry with a bad cold which became asthmatic after we left so that he had to go on
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the sick list - the babies we hear keep very well.
Cyril tells me they all drew lots as to who should go to see the Jubilee Procession, he lost I am pleased to say for the losers were to go to the Naval Review at Spithead which will be much better for him.
How about the Latin dictionary you must get a new one if you fail to get a second hand one, it's a good plan to get one half bound, it is so much stronger than cloth. With love from Mater who thanks you for your letter
I remain
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.

19. Edward's Letters 12: To His Son Van, Dated 19 May 1897, 16 Jun 1897, 2 Jul 1897.
The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
May 19, 1897
Dear Van
I have just seen a second-hand large White and Riddle Latin English dictionary clean and good order 9/6 - if you have not ordered one I think you had better send me a line by return and I will buy it and send it down to you. I shall just have time as we go home on Friday.
Charlie dines with us tonight and we go to see "Saucy Sally"! Tomorrow Aunt Isabella and Dolly
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dine with us and we go to see "Seats of the Mighty"
Mater is waiting for me
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

White Hart Hotel
Reigate
Surrey
Wednesday, June 16, 1897?
My dear Van
Here came Mater and I last Monday to stay with Mr and Mrs Todd and tomorrow is the wedding day and home we go (DV) on Friday. Bertie and Nellie Evered drove over and paid us a short visit last evening Horley is
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about 4 miles from Reigate.
I believe there is to be a large gathering at this wedding feast. This is a nice old-fashioned country Inn our sitting-room looks into the garden with a French window opening on to the lawn. Yesterday we had a very pretty drive through the lanes to Cheapsted about 5 miles to the north of this. Mater and I propose returning to Grey Friars on Friday Mr Gwyon(?) has not heard of a curacy yet but yesterday we went to see a vicar near Norwood, but I am not sure if Mr G. will take it.
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I hear that Edgar is enjoying his visit at Richmond immensely, he spent three hours at the vicarage one day and is to go again to have tea with the vicar.
With love from Mater and self
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
July 2, 1897
My dear Van
You seem to have had a very spirited celebration on Jubilee day, I should have liked to see the ring of beacons
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handing on the good news from hill to hill.
Cyril wrote us a capital account of the naval review - he seems to have thoroughly enjoyed himself - he went over the "Renown" and the "Eldorado", the Prince of Wales sent word on board for the cadets to splice the mainbrace, and then he ordered them a glass of port wine all round.
Edgar will come home next Tuesday (Mater's writing) he seems to have enjoyed himself in the immensely - he went to see the river fete, they were in a nice garden and saw it very well and to crown all did not get back till 10:30!!
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Your friend Mr Minchin had lunch and tea here last Thursday this Thursday we had a garden party about 35 or 40 people - croquet . . . . . (in abundance) ices and strawberries were the chief attraction with two exceptions viz Bo and Chick who appeared in white from head to foot (E.L.F's writing) and were much admired. Harry is on the sick list today
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Mater and Father

20. Edward's Letters 13: To His Son Van, Dated 22 Jul 1897, 1 Oct 1897, 10 Oct 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
July 22, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I suppose you will not know the result of your examination for some time - I trust you have passed - at any rate I am sure that you have done your best. Have you heard from Aunt Ada at all about going to Harrowgate this year she mentioned it to me some months back but not lately.
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Today we have the National School Festival at the Holly Trees I think it will be fine - yesterday for about two hours we had a big thunderstorm and deluge of rain; though not so badly as Ipswich where much damage was done and two boys and a pony killed
The Swimming Match day here is fixed at August 12 Harry is rather excited about it as he hopes to win the plates under water, Cyril I hear swam his test distance but his style was not so inelegant that they would not pass him. Florence is away for two weeks one of which has expired I am thankful to say for we have both babies in our room
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and our nights owing to Beau's company are, to put it mildly, lively, Chick is very good until 6 a.m. when she wakes up for sports and pastimes
I took the chair last Monday at a SPG Missionary meeting, after it we received the Bishop of . . . . . and about a dozen of our friends had tea in the garden
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

7 Cavendish Place
Eastbourne
October 1, 1897
My dear Van
I hope you had a comfortable journey with no mishaps on Tuesday. We enjoyed rather a tedious one for the 12:42 was very slow and tiresome up to Chelmsford and then we had 11/2 hours to wait at London Bridge, so first of all we had some luncheon and then walked across to the
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Southwark pro Cathedral i.e. St Saviour's Church which has been lately so beautifully restored. We had a carriage to ourselves most of the way down here, our rooms are very comfortable and close to the sea. Eastbourne is a much larger place than I thought it was they have built so many fine private houses at the west end. We amuse ourselves chiefly in walking and sitting about by the seafront. This morning Mater declining the treat, I rode on one of the Char-a-bangs (motorised transport) to Beachy Head. I enjoyed it all very much as you wind up the hillside you get a very good bird's eye view of the place and when you get to the top the precipitous chalk cliffs are very grand.
I expect you escaped the thunderstorm of Wednesday night, Harry said it was heavy at Colchester, one very sharp clap even waking up Beau but he was not at all alarmed.
We propose going to Wentworth House next Thursday and so home on Friday in time for Chicks
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Happy Tea
With love from the Mater
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
October 10, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I enclose 2/6 so that you can put your name down for 5/- for the bookcase.
When your turn for reading the lessons comes round, try and get away somewhere where it you can read them out aloud, it makes such a difference
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when you come to read them out in Chapel - the verses sound so much more familiar if you have heard the sound of the words before - merely running your eye over the chapter is of little help compared with the previous recital aloud - remember it is almost impossible to be too slow - slowness, distinctness and proper emphasis are the points for a beginner to cultivate.
We enjoyed our two visits very much and we enjoyed lovely weather both at Eastbourne and Richmond. Mr Todd, Mater, Mabel and I went to the Victorian era exhibition at Earls Court and enjoyed it very much - the animated photographs are very wonderful - you see
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the horses in the (diamond) Jubilee procession (22 June 1897) walking along and tossing their heads and the people waving hats and handkerchiefs - the only thing as thrown on the screen is an exact representation of what took place(sic).
Charlie has settled down comfortably at:
6 Alexandra Place
Jesmond
Newcastle on Tyne
With love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

21. Edward's Letters 14: To His Son Van, Dated 5 Nov 1897, 30 Nov 1897, 16 Dec 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
November 5, 1897
My dear Van
We are enjoying? dull cold north-east winds and skies - I expect you are warmer or wetter in Devon.
Yesterday Mater and I with Florence and the two babies drove to Nayland for them to plant their
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Jubilee trees in Aunt Margaret's garden. The gardener had prepared two get capacious holes into which they descended with their little spades and with his help they soon securely planted two apple trees, they then adjourned to the ancient kitchen and enjoyed a hearty and substantial tea. Aunt M was I thought very lame. Tomorrow Harry goes to the Macandrews for a bicycle "Hare and Hounds" Mary Macandrew and he to be the hares.
I have obtained your certificate of birth if you should want it for Cambridge, I have
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heard nothing from Mr Francis as yet - ought I to write to him or do you think he has settled the matter? Mr Brown thinks Edgar might begin Greek soon
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
I do not think I ever congratulated you on getting full marks for your holiday prep. You deserved your Tennyson.

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 30 1897
My dear Van
I suppose you are now in the midst of the exam; I hope the papers will suit you and that you will make a fair show. You will return, I presume, by the same route as you went on Friday so we shall not see anything of
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you, but you will get a whiff of East Anglian air.
I do not think you remember your cousin Launcelot Giles he entered Christchurch last October. When you go into residence you will make his acquaintance. I believe his father is to be the new Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, curiously the professorship of Chinese at Oxford fell vacant yesterday; I expect Uncle Herbert would rather have gone there if he had known it was so soon to be vacant, for his wife's relations live there and his father was an Oxford man; still having Lance at Christ's may be an attraction though on the other hand Lionel is at Wadham.
Beau is much better now and has gone for his first walk today - he has had two drives
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already. Mr Tanner from St John's College, Cambridge lectures here tonight upon "The Dissolution of the Monasteries" with Limelight illustrations.
Edgar has not begun Greek yet so now I suppose it will be postponed until next term.
I am very sorry to see the death of Archdeacon Jones-Bateman at Zanzibar, he was a pillar in the central African mission
Love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
P. S. you will remember to give the porter who let you lodgings a tip, 1/- ? Ask Chase what.

address defaced
December 16, 1897
My dear Van
I enclose 25/- for your travelling expenses I think you come back on the 20th?
We are expecting Cyril this evening. Mater and I enjoyed our
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two days at Richmond we spent the major part of Tuesday in London roaming through the shops.
I was sorry to miss Lionel Giles who was coming to stay with Aunt Isabella last evening, he took a first on Monday at Oxford - he is at Dedham. Charlie comes down by boat from Newcastle on the 22nd he talks of going to Richmond on the 28th
With love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

22. Edward's Letters 15: To His Son Van, Dated 30 Jan 1898, 19 Feb 1898, 2 Mar 1898.
Grey Friday's
Colchester
January 30, 1898
My dear Van
Many thanks for sending us the "Navy and Army" it is an interesting number, I could not however recognize Cyril amongst those splicing the mainbrace though the cadet on the left hand of the picture looked like him.
Edgar is carried down to the playroom every day now and is getting on happily I
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hope. Harry took a spin around Dedham, Stoke and Nayland and used yesterday afternoon and he(?) saw and had a little talk with Aunt Annie in Dedham Street and Ann Margaret gave him some tea before he left Nayland.
The Bishop of Colchester preached at our church this morning a quiet thoughtful sermon on the Transfiguration; the picture of this by Raphael, engraving of which you are familiar with, struck me when I saw it in the Vatican Gallery at Rome as one of the most beautiful pictures in Italy the colouring of our Lord's face was so wonderful.
I have nearly got to the last page of Tennyson's life and the more one reads him the more one is astonished at
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his great genius and what a mine of philosophy and religion is buried in his poems only to be dug out by careful study. I advise you to continue to read him and to commit pages which strike you as beautiful to memory. Those who knew him say that he is - far and away - the only English poet to be ranked alongside Shakespeare
With love from us all at home
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 19, 1898
My dear Van
Many happy returns of your birthday and may you ever grow in grace and wisdom and usefulness as the years recur.
I hope you are fairly
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well again but do not use your eyes to soon if they show any sign of weakness. I am sending you a watch chain and spade guinea attached I thought your watch would last a short time longer you have taken good care of it and will deserve another someday. Grace is staying here and Mr Todd comes (DV) next Friday for four or five days and he will escort her back.
Next Monday Mr Fry H S at the hospital
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and Mr Kennedy a fellow pupil of Harry's dine with us and we are going to the theatre afterwards to see the "French Maid"
I had a long day in London on Wednesday and saw Uncle Ernest in his room at the Guards Hospital
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 2, 1898
My dear Van
I have been hoping to hear from you as you ought to be fairly convalescent by this time but perhaps your eyes are weak and the doctor thinks you had better not use them.
The Britannia is quite disorganised, 180 cases
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of either measles mumps or whooping cough fortunately he is not down with either, I fancy indeed that he has had all three.
Mr Todd and Grace left us yesterday the Grand Papa was pleased with Beau and Chick who were very good friends especially when he shook his box of sweets at them.
I have bought a bath chair and a carrying chair for Edgar, as he will probably not be able to use his foot in walking for another year nearly, I think they will be very useful and helpful for him.
What a snowstorm you seem to have had at Tiverton and indeed in all the west and south of England, here we have not had a flake. Cyril and two other cadets won a prize for modelling a Sphinx in snow - the other prize was won by some cadets who modelled a Man of War
Mr Minchin and Mr Ingram
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had luncheon with us on Monday, the former as usual wanted to hear about you and Tiverton.
With love from Mater and boys
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

23. Edward's Letters 16: To His Son Van, Dated 20 Mar 1898, 16 Nov 1898, 4 Feb 1898.
Grey Friars
Colchester
March 20, 1898
My dear Van
I suppose you have quite shaken down into regular work again, I hope to some extent you will be able to make up for lost time. Cyril has migrated to "Sick Quarters" Ford Hill Dartmouth a victim to mumps and I am sorry he has had this
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interference with his regular work but I hope particularly it may not prevent his being confirmed as I had an idea it was fixed for the end of this month.
Harry is better but will not go back to work for a few more days in fact he may go to Richmond on Friday for the boat race and come back on Sunday night and then return to the workshop on Monday he looks thin and pulled own - Fancy that great baby's 21st birthday is next Monday week. Today is Dolly's 21st I sent her a pearl ring.
I am just going to take Edgar across to the children's afternoon service in his bath chair.
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5:45 p.m. the babies have just gone to bed. Edgar and I managed very well I went quarter of an hour before service began and placed him in his chair next to the font and I sat in Denton's pew by his side, after the first part of the service was over Mr Brown told the children about some Chinese mission work.
Next Tuesday week Mr Garwood is going to lecture us on his explorations in Spitzbergen illustrated by lantern views - I am in the chair so I am afraid I shall be too near to see well
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 16, 1898
My dear Van
I enclose your certificate of birth if it is returned to you take care of it and bring it home with you. I wrote to Mr Francis 10 days
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ago asking amongst other things what arrangements were made for your lodgings whilst you are in Cambridge I have not however heard from him.
Beau has been very poorly since Saturday with a fever and stomach upset he is however better today and will I have no doubt soon pick up again. Mater and I are going up to London tomorrow (DV) to see
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Hamlet at the Lyceum - I believe Forbes Robertson is particularly good as Hamlet.
Tonight we're going to a lecture in the Corn Exchange by the Very Rev the Dean of Ely "Life in a Benedictine monastery in the 14th century"
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 4, 1899(?)
My dear Van
I see Harry has placed these photos on my table, so I send them on, there are some more to come yet I understand, but the man seems to be very slow in printing them off. We want some cold weather now to keep back the buds and bloom otherwise I am
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afraid the March frosts will do us great damage.
Harry went with us to Shakespeare reading and read a small part very well and he is asked to go to the next at General Montague's where we to read Henry IV Pt 1.
I am reading the life of Jowett just now, late Master of Balliol College he was a great tutor in his day and made his men stick to scholarship translating and re-translating Latin, Greek and English. I believe . . . . . to prose and verse will pay you better than anything else. Work with Mr Tatum? and get all you can out of him. I am very anxious that you should succeed at the University and an hour or more brisk walk every day and a longer stretch on Saturday will greatly
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keep you in health and for the rest - study study study your classical authors - your future position in life depends so much on your work now and a little self-denial in the way of pleasure is in all respects good discipline for you.
I believe you're doing your best but I don't think that all out-of-school hours must be given up to relaxation and amusement, until the June exam is over you ought give up everything to work and so command success.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

24. Edward's Letters 17: Telegram & Letter To His Son Van, Dated 15 Jun 1901.
Post Office Telegraphs.
June 15, 1901
Handed in at Colchester 10:48am
Received Cambridge 11:20am
To - Finn Sydney College Cambridge warmest congratulations on your success
Edward L. Fenn
Telegram is in a brown envelope addressed to: Finn Sidney Coll Cambridge.

Saturday morning
June 15, 1901
My dear Van
Your telegram was most welcome and your success has given me the greatest pleasure. You owe the good class you have taken more to your own diligence and steady perseverance than to any natural brilliant gifts and therefore it is all the more
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to your credit. I have no doubt you will continue to do your best in the future. The training which leads up to the class is invaluable, but it is character and the high standard a man sets before himself in his life's work which makes a man useful and honoured in his generation and brings him peace of mind at the end.
I enclose the bedders tip so that you may have it ready on Tuesday
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
(The term "bedder" is short for "bedmaker" and is a housekeeper in a college of the University of Cambridge).

25. Edward's Letters 18: Two Postcards To His Son Van, Dated 11 Aug 1901, 14 Aug 1901.
Colchester
August 11, 1901
I hope Charlie will find his letter from chief office at Berne safe to poste restante Zermatt tho I daresay my letters would arrive before the letters of advice.
I follow you day by day in my minds eye the scenes visiting very vividly before me as I have gone over all the ground myself, tho when I was last on the Riffel there was only one small wooden hotel on the Riffelberg. Harry Hand is coming to spend the day with Edgar on Tuesday, we all went to St James this morning, I explained to C that I thought you ought to reserve three pounds in your pockets at the time you start from Riffel to see you home. Hope your luggage is safe
ELF
Postcard addressed to:
E. V. Fenn Esq
The Riffel Alp Hotel
Zermatt
Switzerland

Colchester
August 14, 1901
Very pleased to hear good accounts from all as far as Rhone glacier - you have had some good walks and you ought to return refreshed in mind and body. It is 39 years this month since I walked over Firka, we turned off there over Grimsel to meyring(?) on over the Oberland, but you have a finer prospect before you at Zermatt, where I am glad you will be staying the rest of your time, as it is well to avoid the dusty roads as much as possible. Harry Hand has been yesterday with Edgar here is growing a big sturdy fellow. I have opened a letter for you from Northcote(?) asking you to go over next Saturday, I have replied properly. There is a letter for Harry from Mrs Leatham to tell her woes that Agnes has had to lose her leg.
E. L. F.
Postcard addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
Hotel Riffelalp
Zermatt
Switzerland.

26. Edward's Letters 19: To His Son Van, Dated 10 Sep 1902, 3 Jun 1903 at his Ordination.
Colchester
September 10, 1902
My dear Van
I enclose P O O for 5 pounds payable to E V Fenn. Cyril was gated because he did not arrive by 9 a.m. a foolish hour we disregarded for it meant that the lad must sleep in London or Greenwich the night before - I do not think the punishment weighed very
Page 2
heavily on him and it gave him time to study his surroundings in the college and settle himself in his room. These sorts of regulations show an inconsiderate want of common sense on the part of the officials.
Like you I enjoyed reading the life of Walsham, how very much a simple minded earnest man.
We are expecting Mabel and Adria on Friday to pay us a visit they have not been here for more than a day or two at a time for a long while. Mr Todd has been staying with the Routh's in Wiltshire, Donhead St Mary, somewhere between Salisbury and Shaftesbury I believe.
I bought a large basket of most delicious greengages from Nayland yesterday - being alone I use the bus in and out. They are beginning to tile the new wing so I hope the clouds will hold up until the process
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is completed. We shall shortly look more ruinous than ever as the hall roof has to be taken down and renewed. Mr Brown is home again and was told the first day of his arrival the Fenns are going, and Mr Locke has brought Grey Friars and is going to live there, the relief of hearing there was no truth in the last half of the statement partly mitigated his grief about the first I think
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
June 3, 1903
My dear Van
Your two cases were dispatched this afternoon so I hope by Monday at the latest you will hear of their arrival at Rock. I always look forward to being in the church when you were ordained but the fortunes of war have carried you so very far away that I have
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reluctantly abandoned the idea. I am much obliged to Mrs Chase for her kind invitation, but with the strain of the Nayland house business and this house - valuers, auctioneers, architects and lawyers all press upon me just now - I do not feel my mind is sufficiently disengaged to go away for the inside of a week.
You are much in our thoughts this Ember-tide week of course and I often think what a pleasure it would have been to your mother to see you consecrated for the work of the church. At one time she hoped very much Charlie would have entered the ministry, so I know what her feeling would have been
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about you. Her early death has been an untold loss to you boys, for she possessed a rare and holy mind, with much good judgement and dislike to all exaggeration about sacred subjects. If those who are passed away can follow our earthly actions be assured that her loving spirit will not be far from you next Sunday. With much love and good wishes for your happiness and usefulness in your sacred career
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Thursday morning: Many thanks for Wells list and letter
Stamped envelope addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
C/o Archdeacon Cornish
Kenwyn Vicarage
Truro.

27. Edward's Letters 20: To His Sons Van & Harry (in NZ), Dated 25 Mar 1906, 18 Apr 1906, 2 May 1906.
Nayland
March 25, 1906
My dear Van
Charlie and Cyril met Harry Edgar and myself at Fenchurch Street station on Thursday morning and we travelled down to Tilbury Pier whence a tender took us off to the ship moored in mid-river. Harry was . . . . . off to share a cabin with a Mr Morris at 51, who seems likely to prove a fairly agreeable cabin mate if he does not talk too much; he was going out to Wellington with very indefinite views as to his future.
It was a trying ordeal for all of us saying goodbye to the Emmigrant. Personally I felt that my goodbye was likely to be a final one as he must have years of hard work before him before I(sic) can hope to make an assured position for himself.
But we must leave the future and I only hope he may find work to suit him which will enable him to build up a home for himself, as it is in a happy home life that the largest amount of happiness is to be found in this world.
Harry posted a few lines to me at Plymouth - all well
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn.
This letter is on two sides of a sheet folded, stamped, sealed with adhesive flaps and addressed to:
Rev E. Vanderzee Fenn.
Rock
St Minver
Cornwall

Alston Court
Nayland
April 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
We were very thankful to learn that your uncle got safe to land after the accident with the propeller, as on such a stormy rocky coast the vessel may easily have been wrecked. I have not heard anything of the bride yet, I suppose she ought to have arrived in England by this time. Nothing startling has happened here since you left, which would interest you. I have bought a horse, which will I hope turnout well: she is a blue roan, young and too fast at present, not having done any regular work and
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I think she has the makings of a strong useful brougham horse if we are only fairly lucky with her.
Cyril spent Easter with us, on the bank holiday he went over to Shirley and stayed the night. The first Lieutenant sending him home the next morning, in his motor car, which Cyril enjoyed very much, fairly humming along at 30 miles an hour sometimes. After lunch and I drove him and . . . . and Bob to Bures station and he went down to Portsmouth by an evening train. Edgar returns to Oxford the day after tomorrow, W. and Mrs Dudgeon, have presented a pair of large brass pedestal candlesticks to stand in the sanctuary they look exceedingly well and were placed in position for the first time on Easter Sunday. W. Todd has been spending a fortnight at Exmouth, with the Ren . . . They all seem to have enjoyed themselves very much up to yesterday, the weather having been delightful, but the last two days have been just as disagreeable, dull high northwest wind and clouds of dust.
I expect you are at present feeling rather astray, you will of course consult uncle Churchill before coming to any decision, he knows New Zealand now and he is gifted
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with sober judgement and plenty of good common sense. We are looking forward to your next letter to tell us how you got on with your seemed "chum" Your first experience was most unpleasant the fact of a man of 51 emigrating with no definite object in view looked fishy as if in fact, his friends were sending him out in the hope of something turning up for him at a distance from home. I have always understood that life on board a big liner is the worst place for a dipsomaniac and the temptations and opportunities to nip simply endless.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland.
May 2, 1906
My dear Harry.
I expect by the time this reaches you, you will be beginning to feel quite an old New Zealander. News is a very scarce commodity with us in Nayland, and the horse (house?) goes on satisfactorily on the whole, and his daily getting into better condition.
The Dudgeons are going to Germany 10 days or a fortnight and the Grays were
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going to the sea but their son Arthur has reached England from Uganda, where he has been studying the sleeping sickness so they are staying at home to receive him.
Tom Fenn is also expected home in a fortnight on furlough this week. He has been away on the Indian station for five years, I believe, and he has I think qualified for First Mate now. He is a very good steady fellow, though not brilliant.
I opened the enclosed letter as I thought it might be open to misapprehension if the writer waited four months for an answer without knowing the whys or wherefores. . . . . I have written to Ethel and told her of your move, and then I have forded her letter to you.
Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, and the next day Bob returns to his school. Mrs Dudgeon, and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment for the middle of June, but we are at a loss for actors, with all your young man away, and as in the days of Terquin, old men and boys will have to man the walls I suppose.
I have not heard anything of
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Mrs Hansell yet, but very likely when I go to London on Friday, I may see uncle Arthur and hear some news from him. Mrs Knott celebrated her 89th birthday last Monday, and talks are paying us a visit in the summer with Mr Todd.
We're hoping shortly to get a letter from you, posted at Cape Town. We value your letters now very highly, for absence draws the bonds of family affection nearer, I think.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

28. Edward's Letters 22: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 May 1906, 23 May 1906, 6 June 1906.
Alston Court,
Nayland.
May 9th 1906
My Dear Harry.
We were very pleased to receive your letter posted at Cape Town and to know that so far all was well with you, I am particularly glad that ultimately you got a pleasant cabin companion. By the time this starts, you will, I suppose be in sight of New Zealand shores. I hope before long, you may see your way to take up some work and feel your way towards your future career. I am sure you will find your uncle, a wise counsellor in what you ought to do.
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News with us at Nayland is an almost unknown factor, and family news stands in almost the same category. Tom Fenn was expected home a few days back, having been away for five years. He is a very steady good fellow, I believe, and will be sure to rise in due time, to the command of his ship, he hopes his next ship will be one going from London to India and back and not a continuous Indian coaster.
Edgar got up early on the first of May and went to hear the Magdalen choir sing the may hymns is at the top of Magdalen Tower. Bob says they have seven new boys at the school this term, a very happy addition to their numbers. Mrs Dudlen and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment here towards the end of June, with Charlie's help they may finally pull it off. These entertainments are always a source of great anxiety, where you depend upon outside help, which has a way of failing you at the last moment. The most important person writing in the cheerful vein "I have no doubt
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you will have no difficulty in supplying my place" etc I'm pretty certain to have to step into some gap at the last moment, I think I don't ha ha want to do. Our spring cleaning in January, glad to say, is drawing rapidly to a close now, it is an excellent institution, for a show house like this, but a vacation of spirit, while it lasts.
And now good-bye dear boy, and with love from all of us at home.
Believe me.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.

Nayland
May 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I thought you would like to have the enclosed letter as I know you are still interested in the family at Clinton, Lewis's great success will please you.
It will be a long time before we can hope to receive a New Zealand letter from you, but we are anxiously looking forward to hearing that your long voyage has been safely accomplished and of your first impressions, but don't be in a hurry to make up your mind about anything.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying at Bembridge, Isle of Wight and Dolly seems to be gaining strength her mother thinks, but is still very soon tired. Aunt Annie has gone to stay with aunt Lucy at Westgate, Harold's death is ever with her and she is depressed and sleepless. I hope the change of surroundings may do her good as we did ask her here, and she may come later on but I dare say she rather.
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shrinks from the Dedham neighbourhood, where so much of his early life was passed. She and uncle George, have bought a house near Gunnersbury Station, with more rooms and comfort than Brook Green affords them. I hope the move will not be too fatiguing for poor
Uncle Henry has been suffering so much lately that he has just submitted to an exploratory operation on his abdomen and Aunt Ada sent me a card this morning saying that it was over and she believed the result was hopeful for the future outlook but that she would send me more particulars in a few days time. The great success of George's operation, no doubt encouraged your uncle to see what surgery could do for him, as medicine failed to relieve him from the attacks of abdominal pain, which have been occurring so frequently in this past six months. I am anxious to hear what Aunt Ada's first impressions of Miss Pearl Lavinia Mason were, as I believe she and her mother are now in England, and they hoped to meet aunt Ada the beginning of this month.
We had a curious instance before us the other day, how lost things are sometimes found Mr Craig, bought me a letter addressed to the vicarage Nayland from the Secretary of Lloyd's shipping register saying that a piece of plate had been picked up which was part of a presentation to a Captain T G Fenn, who they found from their register was born in Nayland 1846, and could the vicar, tell them if any representative of the family was still living there. It turns out that Aunt Margaret was being driven about the . . . . in a trailer by Dick last month, and after one of his rides she discovered that she had lost her watch chain and locket, the jewellery was probably picked up by some seafaring man who seeing the market was inscribed to Capt T G Fenn, with an address from the passengers of the
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"Waihora", with an engraving of the ship, thought that he can could probably be traced through Lloyd's and so wrote to them with success, you see. Curiously, Tom Fenn, who has just returned from India, saw the old
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"Waihora" in Bombay harbour where she had been sold to a native company.
Tom, Lucy and Frank looked Cyril up last week and had luncheon with him at the Naval barracks. Tom has to stay from a month in London this summer to pass for his captains Certificate and Frank goes in for his second try for Assistant Paymaster on June 19. Lionel and Val Giles are both fathers, the former called his daughter, Sylvia Sarah and the latter his Margaret Saint or at least I presume he did not put Giles in twice.
Mrs Davidson Mater and Miss Gray are trying to arrange a theatrical entertainment for the end of next month. Mrs Davidson's one idea seems to be to introduce to the public's notice, a Denham and a Bunbury in "A Pair of Lunatics" all other pieces seem to be left to chance and, if Charlie does not come down to help there will be a fiasco.
With much love from Mater and Adria.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1906
My dear Harry.
I do not know when we ought to expect a line from Hobart but we are still hoping to hear of you from the port. Algernon Todd spent the Whitsuntide with us and fortunately he had delightful weather which he enjoyed sauntering about the grounds, and on Monday I took him for a nice drive around Boxted and Langham. We were expecting Cyril to come up from Portsmouth yesterday that as he had found he could only get two clear days before joining the 'Barfleur" for the . . . . . he thought it best to postpone his holiday
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they were over (sic). He has been again acting as Master of a Ceremonies the Admiral at Portsmouth sent him out to Spit Head one day to receive the new Japanese man of war Kahima on his behalf. Cyril flew his pendant on the bow of the steam launch, was received on board by a guard of honour presenting arms, piped over the side, bugle sounding attention. The Captain escorted him to his cabin, where they had a long yarn and the Captain spoke English very fluently. In the evening the Japs were entertained onshore Cyril and the Jap Lieutenant next to him got very chummy and exchanged names. The Jap looking very puzzled at Cyril's flourishing signature. Last Friday he delivered his lecture to the Signal School and Officers of the Post on long-distance signalling. He says he got through all right, and was congratulated afterwards on. We began our rehearsals today for the theatricals of the 26th. I play the part of an old beau, because they could not get anyone else to take it. It is against my will, as I find it difficult now to remember the words but with the assistance of Edgar the prompter, I hope to pull through.
I think I told you that Aunt Annie Hand is about to remove into a new house at Chiswick. I am afraid it will be a great effort for her. Your uncle Henry has just undergone an operation in London, and I'm glad to hear from Aunt Ada that he is getting on well. The operation took place about a fortnight ago, so
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we may fairly conclude he will soon be about again.
Van hopes to get a fortnight's holiday towards the end of July and is thinking of paying Holland a visit, especially Delft the home of his ancestor Vanderzee. If Cyril is at home at that time it would be nice for them to go together.
Charles Routh's portrait in pink hunting coat etc is in the Academy this year well placed on the line. It was kept a profound secret until discovered on the walls of the Academy. I hope your uncle and aunt are well give them my love and with love from us all.
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

29. Edward's Letters 23: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 5 Jul 1906, 18 Jul 1906, 26 Jul 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
July 5, 1906
My dear Harry.
We are all very pleased to receive your first New Zealand letter, and to learn your first present impressions of your surroundings. I daresay uncle Churchill thinks it is best for you to see the various sides of New Zealand life before you settle definitely down to one or the other. In many ways, the sheep farmer life is a healthier and perhaps offers a better prospect
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for your future, when having learnt your business, you are able to invest a little money in the concern.
I have great confidence that your uncle's wise experience of New Zealand life and ways and your own fund of common sense will together work out some career, which will lead to your happiness. You must not expect prosperity, will come very quickly, though unfortunately years are slipping away from you, however be patient and hopeful and stick manfully to whatever you begin in.
Our village theatricals on the 26th ult were a great success we had first "A case for eviction" said played by Charlie, Mrs . . . . . . and Miss Williams, I thought it was a capital piece and well performed. Miss K. Lockwood, dying a few days before Miss Lockwood could not of course take any part, but it had been arranged some little time before that Miss W. should be her understudy. Then we had "A pair of lunatics" Mr Bunlay acting Denham from the . . . . . also well done, and we wound up with a dear piece, which I dear say you know, called "Popping the question" Miss Grey, Mrs Dudson , Miss Denham, Miss Johnson, is is a Mr Wilkinson and myself. The afternoon, a first class well behaved audience, but in the evening
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the two rooms were crowded and the fun was fast and furious. Any joke being seized by the audience and roared at we took 19 pounds a record take, and a record audience.
An attack of asthma, on Ree's part and the sudden flight to Canada on the part of Edward (the wherefore of which I have not yet learnt) prevented aunt Lucy and her party coming to us as they had arranged. I have written to Polly Hansell, to try and fit in a short visit here before she and her husband return to New Zealand. Charlie and a friend are going to Norway for two or three weeks hiking at the end of this month. Uncle Henry has gone back to Harrogate, his progress is somewhat slow. Thank aunt Alice you next see her for her letter and say I hope to write to her before long.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
July 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
Before you receive this letter, you will have had a little insight into New Zealand life and I'm wondering how you think you will like it. We have been having Van and Cyril with us lately, but the latter joins the Dido on Friday the 20th, Cyril does not think it is likely to be a long appointment. She is a second-class cruiser in the home waters . . . . he is glad to go on a small ship for a time he will probably be attached to her for signaling duties.
Van is going to Midhurst at the end of the week to stay with aunt Lucy, who has taken a home there
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for two months, and from there he goes on to aunt Ada at Harrowgate for a few days, he expects to meet the Hansell's there and they propose coming on to us for a few days about the 10th of August. I'm glad there is a chance of our seeing Polly before she returns to New Zealand. Uncle Henry is better but still quite an invalid, George Hunt is expected home very soon and will I suppose stay until after his wedding in September. I hear that Edith Giles is engaged to a Mr Bobby Reid, whom Van rather thinks he knew at Tiverton. She is staying with Val in the Punjab. when she met Mr Reid, an army man. I hope he is worthy of her for she is as you know, very sweet girl of a gentle disposition and deserves the best of husbands.
Edgar has been staying at Wentworth house, from whence he visits "Lords" or the "Oval" almost daily according to his letters. He returns today, (the 19th) and will cross Cyril on the railroad. He
I was very pleased to hear this morning, that Frank Fenn has passed for the paymasters . . . , he failed in his first attempt, but passed in 16th out of 20 the successful ones on that occasion so that he now has his life career open before him. We are thinking
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of having the Sunday School treat in our meadow this year. I thought some of the villagers would like to walk around our garden, courtyard etc. It could be a change from the field at the back of Greys house. Van and Beau and Giles would all be home to help entertain. I expect a photographer next week to spend three days in Nayland taking views of the house for publication in the architectural review. The difficulty is to get a proper account written for Blomfield is a very poor hand at descriptive writing.
With best love from everybody at home
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston court.
Nayland
July 26, 1906
My dear Harry.
Your letter of the eighth of June was very welcome, and you have given us an interesting account of your start on the Holme Station. I too am sorry that it turned out to be so difficult to get you into any good position in the engineering world, but in a way I do not at all think you will find the training you have had will be thrown away. There is no knowing even in your present, pastoral life, what useful work, you may yet find falling in your way, which may greatly improve your position. At any rate, if your health keeps
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all right qualify yourself as well as you can to become in your own turn a clever sheep master. I want to see you in the course of a few years able to marry and settle down with a small property of your own. I am very glad that you liked Mr Elworthy, the caravan arrangement will I daresay not be disagreeable for a while and is much pleasanter of view than barrack life with the "omne gatherum"
It is a strange thing how often one is struck with the smallness of the world. Here is your cousin Audrey in New Zealand, engaged to a girl who is through her aunt, Mrs Charles Bowen connected with Great Horksley. I remember Mrs Bowen's father Canon Markham as rector of Great Horksley though I was only a child when he died, but we used to enjoy going to the school feast in his time. Audrey is a lucky fellow to gain the affection of such a nice girl as I hear she is. We are expecting Miss Fanny Torlesse to luncheon here today. She has been staying at Stoke, a few days and leaves tomorrow. I think I told you that Edward Hopkins has gone out with a friend to seek his fortune in Toronto, I expect
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Lewis will follow him out as soon as he is 23, and his own master.
Van is enjoying himself at Midhurst, with his young cousins Lucy, Jo, and Frank. (perhaps Tom, if he is successful in his exam this week) Rees also, and Lewis. He goes on to Harrowgate tomorrow and will pick Bob up at Victoria on Tuesday on his way home. We are having the school treat in our field on the first and I want the villagers to come in between five and seven and give them an opportunity of seeing the house. I am afraid we cannot run to a band, but I am having the flag hoisted and the bells rung to cheer everybody up.
With love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

30. Edward's Letters 24: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 Aug 1906, 16 Aug 1906, 23 Aug 1906.
Alston Court
Nayland
August 9, 1906
My dear Harry
It is difficult to imagine that you are passing through a winter wet and cold . . . . . while we are just dried up with heat as we have not had any rain worth mentioning in the district since the spring. When you write remember I like to hear all the details of your daily life and work nothing is too trivial to interest me. Where expecting the Hansell's tomorrow so I shall learn all about the Holme Station at first hand from Polly when she is here. We are expecting a run of visitors as Mr Todd and Mrs Knott come next Wednesday when they leave Aunt Lucy and Rees follow in September . . . . . . . to come into the country

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in the winter that we have to . . . . . our few visitors in during the summer months. Charlie's fishing trip to Norway was rather marred by wet but on the whole he enjoyed it very much: Dr Drake left for his holiday the day after Charlie's return so probably he became busy immediately and had no time to regret that his holiday was not a longer one. I heard from Cyril a day or two ago from Invergordon near Cromarty the Dido with the Channel fleet is touring round the coast feted and entertained by the various important towns . . . . . . as they progress round the island.
Van is making enquiries about curacy in Surrey which he could take up after Xmas but whether the Vicar . . . wait so long removing remains to be seen, on the other hand curates are very scarce in the market; I know Corbett has been waiting months to . . . . One. The great event here last week has been the school treat which was held in my meadows I tried to liven it up a little by having the flag hoisted in and the bells rung between five and seven, I also let it be known that the house would be on view, I was kept busily employed conducting parties round for about two hours of the afternoon. Roberts and his assistants had a busy time serving tea and light refreshments to all and any who wanted them and his table seemed to be thronged most of the evening
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. . . . . the general opinion was that it was the best treat Nayland has known for many years. Today we are going to the Stoke flower show as usual but I do not intend to stay long we received our invitation to George Hand's wedding yesterday it is fixed for September 5 at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception will be at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Although she is rather a grand young lady according to Aunt Ada's ideas yet she likes her and hopes she will realise that she is marrying a poor man and to be happy must accommodate herself to her surroundings.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
This letter has been badly defaced with punch holes! making it impossible to read fully

Alston Court
Nayland
August 16, 1906
My dear Harry
I'm afraid from what uncle Churchill reported you have experienced an attack of your old enemy, asthma at Pareora, I hope it may only prove to be a passing bout as anything like a frequent occurrence would drive you elsewhere, as there is no comfort in life or ability for exertion when asthma is to the fore. I believe you will not find the work to strenuous, if you are not weighed down by this trouble, but I shall be anxious to hear how you fare in this respect. Polly Hansell and her husband left us two days ago, we enjoyed their
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short visit very much. She is quite unchanged, and as sweet as ever, I was very much taken with him also and I think they may be mutually congratulated on their respective choices. Polly showed us an Elworthy group, they must be a strikingly fine pair she looks very handsome, and he a giant in build with a kind benevolent face.
Mater, and I are going up to George Hunt's wedding (DV) on September 5. He is to be married at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception is to be held at the Grand hotel afterwards. We are giving him a pretty little pair of silver sweetmeat dishes for his dinner table.
Mr Todd and Mrs Knott? arrived yesterday, they both seem very well considering their respective ages, 88 and 89, at any rate they have splendid appetites. Dick and Tom Fenn and making a bicycle tour and hope to reach Nayland tomorrow, I dare say they will stay a night or two here. Tom goes back to India in October. He prefers working altogether on that side of the Suez Canal, and not going from England to Bombay. He unfortunately failed to pass his Masters exam and will have to try again in India. Frank has been appointed to H. M. S. "London" on the Mediterranean station and sails almost immediately. The "Dido" with Cyril on board is cruising round the coast of Scotland just now being
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feted wherever they put in, he thinks the cruise will be prolonged into the New Year. Van is nibbling at curacy at Cuckfield in Sussex, a place, with almost 2500 inhabitants, but I don't know if the vicar will be able to wait for him as he does not want to leave St Nineveh until the end of the year. Hobday? was curate at Cuckfield or near to it for a time I believe, and speaks well of the place.
The Mater tells me that she is writing to you by this mail so I will close with best love to you and all good wishes for your health.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
August 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I have not left myself time to write at any length this week, but send you a few lines to greet you. I shall be anxious until I hear that your asthma has gone its so terribly crippling. You had just commenced an attack when your uncle, Churchill was last in Pareora. We are passing through a second spell of hot weather and the rain holds off, all ponds are empty and I live in constant anxiety about the depth of your well.
Cyril says the "Dido" is being very hospitably entertained round the coast. The last call was Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, very royally entertained them, making the officers free of his grounds and fishing. In return they took him and his Duchess out to the sea for a day and showed them some guns firing. Mr Todd and Mrs Nock? are still with us, and aunt Lucy and Rees come on the fourth prox to be followed like Gerald and then our guest season ends.
I think, very likely Edgar will spend 10 days with Van next month before he returns to Oxford. I think visits away from home are good for his mind. Mater and I go to George Hunt's wedding at St Margaret's Westminster on the first prox and to the reception at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Aunt Isabella and Dudley are going to the hotel in Hindhead shortly to see if the air will help to set up Dolly.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Addressed: H L Fenn Esq C/o A S Elworthy Esq Holme Station Pareora nr Timaru NZ, written on both sides of a sheet, folded and closed with adhesive flaps.

31. Edward's Letters 25: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 29 Aug 1906,13 Sep 1906, 20 Sep 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
August 29, 1906 (to sail on the 31st).
My dear Harold.
I was glad to hear a better account of you in the letter of birthday congratulations which you kindly sent and which arrived punctually on the 26th as you foretold. I was much relieved to hear that your attack of asthma, though sharp was brief.
Mr Todd, and Mrs Knott left us this morning having been with us a fortnight, the weather has been perfect for them, and the walls (sic) provided a fair supply of plums greengages and figs to their great delight as they are both fruit lovers. Our next
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visitors will be aunt Lucy and Rees who come next week, and then Gerald. After that I think Mater and I may go away for the inside of a week and visit Stratford on Avon, Warwick, Kenilworth, Coventry and Leamington, as they all literally a stones throw from one another so to say. Adria has gone back to her grandpa for a week's visit at Richmond, and will return with us (DV) after George Hunts wedding at which Mater and I hope to be present.
We went yesterday to a garden party at Edwardstone Hall, (Colonel Corrie), a most delightful garden of smooth lawns, yew clipped hedges and fine trees. I daresay you remember driving to Edwardstone with Charlie and me and photographing the church soon after we went to Colchester. I forget whether I told you Edgar thought of paying Van a visit in the last half of September. I think it is a very good for him to go about and make new acquaintances, and develop his brainpower. We are getting rather uneasy about the water supply here. We have virtually had no rain for three months. the lawn in the field looks as brown and dusty is the high road and it is difficult to keep things growing without incessant watering. I think both Edgar
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and Beau would take first-class honours if there was an examination on the respective feats and merits of English cricketers, they spend so much time over the accomplishments of these gentlemen, however it is a most useful topic of conversation.
The officers of the Dido had a splendid time at Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, entertained them and made them free of his fishing preserves etc.
Your accounts of the details of your daily routine are full of interest to us.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
September 13, 1906
My dear Harry.
I suppose the Mater gave you an account of George Hunt's wedding last week. I was glad that we were able to go as it gave me an opportunity of meeting scattered members of the Julius family including Ellie Julius from Tilford, Polly Hansel and her husband, Hunts, Bateman's and their party. George rather thinks of following in his father's footsteps and working in Harrogate, during the summer months, I think he might do well here and also keep in touch with his parents and others.
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Edgar has gone down to St Minerva for a fortnight, I think he will find Cyril there for a card from him to Adria tells us that he has got leave for a few days and was going to see Van. It will be nice for the three to meet and visit some of the . . . . . of that coast together. Aunt Lucy and Rees left us yesterday, they stayed with us a little more than a week. Rees is rather a funny they lad, but brighter in his manner than I suspected. He is looking out for a berth, his brother Edward has joined some friends and gone on to Toronto, where as far as I can understand they have started an agency for the sale of patented medicines. To his mother's surprise appeared in England last week on "business" and he meant to have returned within the week, but the boats were full, so he will have perforce to stay until next week. Gerald comes down on a visit tomorrow, and when he goes I think our season for visitors closes. I take Bob up to London next week en-route to school and Mrs Johnson returns on the same day (21st) Rain clouds mock us with great promises, but no rain comes, we have only had a very few showers this May and long for a soaker. I am thankful to say my well continues to give a good supply for if it gave out we should be in a fix. Rumours are flying about, that the Grays
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are again talking of retiring. The last place favoured by them is Westgate. He has not mentioned the subject however, to me. Frank Fenn has joined the "London" at Malta, where he proved himself a good sailor, having only experienced a few hours of "mal-de-mer" wrote altogether very happily about his surroundings.
Tom and Dick on their return ride from Nayland had no mishap until they reached Cowdray Park in the evening when a stag suddenly charged Tom's light, he pulled up dead and Dick ran into him and his bicycle was crumpled up, but Dick only got a shaking himself.
I hope you're keeping well and feel interested in the work of your sheep run.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
September 20, 1906
My dear Harold,
I must certainly get into the way of calling you by your proper name, which is more dignified, and in accordance with your age. I was glad to receive your letter of August the eighth last Sunday (September 16) as it tells us you are a well and that you are able to write in good spirits, both which points are a great comfort to me. If only you enjoy a good health I think this farming life will offer more happiness than the engineering; but you are at any rate qualifying for either as opportunities for advancement offer themselves.
Van has been entertaining both Cyril and
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Edgar lately, they were both anxious to see St Minver before Van left, which as you know, he probably will at Christmas. Whether his overtures in the direction of Cuckfield will come to anything is at present uncertain. Gerald is spending about a fortnight with us, as he had not made any other special plans for his holiday. Since he came the hot weather has broken up, and the much longed for rain has arrived, of course much as we were glad to see it, staying in the house is a little dull for Gerald. However, we have so far, always gone out somewhere, one part of the day.
We had a visit two days ago from Mr Kempe the architect and rather famous stained-glass man. He was delighted with the old house and the stained-glass we could show him; I enjoyed my talk with him. The day after tomorrow, I take Bob to Victoria enroute of the school and Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, so we shall soon settle down to our quiet routine again.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly have gone to Eastbourne for two or three weeks. Dolly picks up her strength, very slowly.
Yesterday Gerald and I drove over in the dogcart to Gifford Hall and called upon old Mr Britain (?) he was very genial and took us over the house, showing us the tapestry room, which I had forgotten and the kitchen in which I never penetrated before.
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The poor old man is very lonely, his chief companion, being as he pathetically said his pipe, his book, and his dog 'Tip". I fancy, his daughter-in-law rather tires of him. The old man said to a lady who was calling upon him. "I have lived too long"
Gerald has cycled to day to East Bergholt and Brantham to see Constable's other alter pieces.
We play bowls every day after tea as a little amusement for Gerald and the children.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

32. Edward's Letters 26: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 27 Sep 1906, 4 Oct 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
September 27, 1906
My dear Harold.
In the first place, led me say that I sincerely hope that Ada Elworthy has recovered from the painful and dangerous affliction of the ear of which you told us in your last letter.
I daresay you will find the riding rather trying and painful at present, that tenderness of skin however will soon pass away, and you will get tough like the rest of your colleagues. I am very glad to hear that you are settling down to the farming life
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as I think when you have gained experience and have flocks of your own you may start a very happy home for yourself and your posterity. People in the old country are always striving after money, and less and less work, whereas the happiness life is the working busy life.
Gerald went home yesterday after paying us a fortnight's visit, the weather was pleasant and I think he enjoyed his country outing.
Edgar stayed a fortnight with Van and proceeded last Tuesday, (1y 25) to Westgate when he proposes staying a week with Aunt Lucy. These little changes of climate and company, are I think good for both his body and brain. Charlie talks of running down for a few days in the first week of October, I think he is getting on very well in his work at Streatham, getting a new patient of his own occasionally, which is all he can expect at present.
The photographs of his old house, done by Mr Brocksee for the architectural review, have turned out as good as could be wished. Now comes my part the letterpress, which
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with such scanty material to hand is no easy task, but I do not know of anyone who could undertake it, I if I shirk the undertaking. Adria does a little preparation, now in the evening, a tray of sustenance being taken in for her and Miss Johnson, when that is over.
I see you're Archbishop, or is he only primate, Neville has just married, a Miss Fines - Clinton, a relation doubtless of W. Fines - Clinton, who used to be at Burlington House School, Richmond.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is enclosed in a small envelope addressed: H L. Fenn Esq c/o A S Elworthy, Pareora, Timaru, New Zealand

Alston Court
Nayland
October 4, 1906
My dear Harold.
The advent of Nayland fair reminds us that the Autumn has well set in again, and the pig killing season commenced in the village. The steam organ with the American galloping horses is fixed, as usual within a few feet of the schoolroom windows but as the business of the day does not commence until the afternoon lessons are nearly over, it does not really
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interfere much with lessons. Edgar returned home last evening, having enjoyed a fortnight with Van and a week at aunt Lucy's very much. Lewis, Rees and Kitty were all at home, Edgar and Lewis went over one Saturday afternoon and took Bob out and divided their time between Ramsgate and Margate and Westgate. We are half expecting Charlie down for a few days, but we feel no certainty in his arrangements until the last moment arrives and he appears. After Edgar has returned to Oxford Mater and I may go up to London for a few days and refresh ourselves with a few plays, as we never go up to a matinee now. Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying in Eastbourne. The latter does not get on very satisfactorily, I believe her powers of digestions are at fault, it must be nearly a year since she began to go downhill. Mr Todd was presented with a handsome piece of plate by the Wax Chandlers company last month to commemorate this connection of 50 years with the company. Gerald selected a
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new kind of American beaten silver work, very artistic I believe, but I think the old gentleman would have preferred something he understood better with an inscription upon it.
I suppose you are living within your income and have not had to touch your nest egg in the bank at Christchurch. Charlie expects to put by 50 pounds his first year. This will not bad as there are always special expenses on first starting a house.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
When you can send us any pictures or photographs of persons or places about you wish your like to see them.
ELF.

33. Edward's Letters 27: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 11 Oct 1906, 25 Oct 1906, 2 Nov 1906.
Alston Court
Nayland
October 11, 1906
My dear Harold.
As week by week rolls by this has I wonder what I can find of any interest to you and I am afraid you will conclude that my stock of news is of the slenderest
Edgar leaves us tomorrow for Oxford, I hope he is deriving some good from it all but I cannot at present see much result in his conversation or interests, some of this however must be ascribed to shyness. I shall be anxious to hear the result of Vans interviews
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with Canon Cooper of Cuckfield. Van was to spend the day there yesterday and sleep at Streatham tonight ready to make an early start for Wadebridge? tomorrow morning. Charlie comes to us tomorrow a few days change, and then next week, all being well Mater and I talk of staying in London for a week before the winter sets in. I feel an inclination to go to a few theatres and see what is going on just now on the boards. Did I tell you that Mr Docksee has sent me copies of the plates he took of this house, I think they are splendidly done and I hope the editor of the architectural review will not keep me very long in suspense before publishing them. I hope to send you a copy of the review when they are published in it.
Uncle Harold talks now of settling some were in Worcestershire, where he can hire 700 acres of shooting with the house,
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Alston's regimental quarters in South Africa were burned down in lately h is is servants pluckily managed to save most of his belongings but lost their own. Do you begin to feel fairly at home in the saddle now. I hope the New Zealand horses are not buck jumpers like the Australian. It must require a world of practice to ride such animals.
Adria had 12 presents on her birthday, her dog goes on very satisfactorily and is a pleasant companion out walking, a great contrast to her predecessor.
Love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Colchester
October 25, 1906
My dear Harold.
I think I told you last week that Charlie spent a few days with us. He was rather tormented with toothache, and in consequence, pain. Dal . . . . . two visits and got rid of some broken stumps and returned home in peace.
Van hopes to begin work at Cuckfield the first Sunday in January, he was favourably impressed with the old vicar Canon Cooper.
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The Dido is floating around Ireland, returning to Portsmouth early in December I believe. Cyril was very pleased with the way the Dido's came out in a recent examination on signaling and wireless telegraphy four Dido's being bracketed first. He has a voluntary class in the evening for instruction in fleet manoeuvres, and he says some of the men are very keen on it. He says Bantry Bay is a wretched place, barren rocks onshore, and nearly always blowing and raining at sea.
Mater and I begin our London visit, the day after tomorrow and if our purse holds out hope to stay a week. We have not been able to begin our Shakespeare readings yet, as our company is rather scattered. Little John Syrett has just been operated on for appendicitis 10 days ago and is I believe going on well The choral class begins its winter course on November the sixth. Having agreed to become an honourable member of the ancient order of Foresters, Stoke by Nayland Lodge, Dudgeon, Gray,
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Carruthers?, Wilkinson, and myself are to be ceremoniously admitted at a special Lodge to be held at the White Heart this evening. No branding with the hot poker I hope.
W. B. Spurling is to be Mayor of Colchester next year. He is rather an old sheep, but will do his best I daresay. I can hardly imagine him presiding on the bench or speaking anywhere. Adria's dancing class has been altered to a Friday, which is very inconvenient for me is that it is my Boxford day; on these two accounts I have declined the Oyster feast, which takes place tomorrow (Friday). Mr Haldane is to be the chief guest.
With love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
Nov 2 1906
My dear Harold.
Mater and I thought we required a week in town, where we might refresh ourselves with a few sights and theatres. We have enjoyed some of the latter very much, especially a fine performance of "A Winter's Tale" One day, we had Grace and Mabel Todd and Mrs Syrett to luncheon here and took them to see the "Man from Blankneys" with Charles Hautrey in the chief role, it was very amusing. We returned after
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the matinee to Richmond and dined there to see the old gentleman, who keeps wonderfully well. Yesterday Aunt Isabella and Dolly lunched with us and went to see a musical piece at the Vaudeville. Mrs Syrett is staying in town, at a surgical home, with little John, who has just been successfully operated on for appendicitis. The only drawback to the enjoyment of our visit has been a very rainy atmosphere at intervals, but often the dry season, but after the dry season, we have had this year, the rain is very acceptable.
We are looking forward to your account of the wedding, I wonder if the Hansells will come down for it. I hope if she does, she will bring her snapshots with her and show these to you. I hear that George Hand and is giving up his curacy at King's Lynn wishing for a change of a Vicar, it only points the moral as we all anticipated, that it was foolish for a young Curate, to take a house and furnish it. At any rate, I should say his father must think so. I hear that Frank Fenn is very happy on his ship in the Mediterranean. Bob wrote the other day, to say he was carrying his arm in a sling, as he had injured the muscles about the shoulder by a heavy fall at football, but it was getting all right again.
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Adria is learning a kind of hornpipe dance at her class and does the club exercise, she has not knocked any other child on the head yet.
Mr Todd was to dine at the Wax Chandlers last night, as it was the anniversary of his jubilee as a member of the Court. He has been on the livery, however, for 63 years.
I hope all is well with you and that you continue happy and interested in your work.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
(Letter written on the Hotel note paper).

34. Edward's Letters 28: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 8 Nov 1906, 16 Nov 1906, 22 Nov 1906.
Nayland
November 8, 1906
My dear Harold.
Your last two letters have been full of interest, the routine of your own life, and the account of the wedding afforded us a good deal of interesting reading. Your meeting with Mrs Acland was curious, I think she must have been one of the younger girls, as I think, the eldest became a nurse, and joined a sisterhood. You would know her because she would have a slight blue scar line under her lower lip, the result of a
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fall on to the top bar of the fireplace. You certainly were in luck about your rig out, first that you found some good Samaritan ready to lend and then that all the articles fitted you so well. As we had not been away since last December, when we went to the birthday dinner party, Mater and I have been spending a week in London, and as I think you know we were neither of us very well, and the weather unsettled, so our chief amusement was theatre going, and this we enjoyed very much managing to see seventh plays in six days! Grace Mabel and Mrs Syrett? lunched with us one day and went to a matinee afterwards and Aunt Isabella and Dolly another day. The latter still looks thin and cannot do much
Mrs Cooper Van's new vicaress to be is a sister of Mrs Buckley-Paget whom I think you have met when they were staying at Gt Horksley rectory. The world is not such a very big place, after all, as you have already experienced. I quite agree with you that as soon as you have regained sufficient experience it will be well to make a start on a small scale on your account if you can find a steady hard-working man like Hobbs to join you. I am sure the Elworthy's would do their best to advise you.
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I sincerely hope the new secretary will turn out to be of a pleasant and hospitable disposition, and show a disposition to help him that he may be drawn to you. The temper of his wife is of almost more importance!
Miss Proctor passed away last week, at the age of 86. Miss Mary will now be moving into a small house, Poor "Gilly" has had an asthmatic bronchial attack, which he does not shake off and talks of coming home for a time to try to get rid of his cough.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland.
November 16, 1906
My dear Harold.
Many members of the family will probably be sending you their Christmas good wishes by this mail, so I too must send you every good wish of the season for your health and happiness. I believe helped by your zeal and steadiness there is every prospect that you will in time carve out of yourself
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a happy and successful career in the young country of your adoption. Communication between us, by letter is after all a very satisfactory means of keeping in touch with one another, for personally, how little we see of each other, who are working in the same country. I see Van or Cyril once, or maybe twice in the year. So I feel that you are not much further removed from us than the rest. I am sure at home in the present day, young men think a great deal too much about sports athletics and having a good time. Whereas in the colony you have to think and apply yourselves a good deal more to work, which brings to you, a much more lasting and satisfactory kind of happiness when the stress of work is over and you can enjoy some leisure. I feel with you a great deal depends on Mr Elworthy's choice of a new secretary as to your personal comfort. I particularly hope he may have a
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nice minded lady for a wife, who will be willing to welcome you to her house as a friend when she gets to know you.
I am sending your wedding letter round to the brothers and shall be always ready to do so as I can quite understand you feel to fatigued at the end of your day to write much. Aunt Ada was much interested in seeing it and your photographs. They have just moved from Harrogate, finally, I have no doubt, and gone into lodging at Brighton for a couple of months (47 Devonshire Place) where they can meditate upon their future plans. Uncle Henry seems to be much better.
A hot Christmas must seem rather unnatural to you brought up as you were on Dicken's descriptions and pictures
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.

Nayland
November 22, 1906
My dear Harold.
My paper looks as if I contemplated along letter, whereas I am writing on this paper, which I do not like because my stock has run out. It seems curious to think of you enjoying? a hot Christmas, with sunshine and roses. It cannot seem quite like Christmas to you, I should think. We now wish you however a happy New Year and I hope it will be a prosperous one to. Edgar went
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back to Oxford, three days ago, and looking much better and with very little cough left. I think his exam begins on Monday week he does not seem at all nervous as to the result. I think he works pretty steadily Bob had his shoulder examined with the Rontegen rays. The injury was found of no import the bruising of the shoulder muscles seemed to be the cause of the partial movement.
The Wentworth house dinner party is fixed for December the 18th. It will be as crowded as ever, I am afraid for the . . . . . . . . be waylaid on the way from school and . . . . to the dinner. Did I tell you, the Rouths are going to lease Wandsworth in the spring and go further into the country a place at Wendover in Bucks. Uncle Hanover has also taken over a house with shooting about 2 miles from Kidderminster. Your letter and card (Timaru) of the 10th has just arrived. It looks a nice clean town. I am sorry you were not able to go in for the service when uncle Churchill.
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preached but duty stands first of course. I was most sad about the new secretarial arrangements, but one never knows what good may perchance come of it like you go up to the Homestead. Do you ever get a chance at the . . . . . well all these pleasures will come again to you by and by I have no doubt.
Mrs Marshal shook her shook her head the other day when I met her about Bertie's prospects - poor she thought.
With much love from all at home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

35. Edward's Letters 29: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 29 Nov 1906, 6 Dec 1906, 20 Dec 1906.
Nayland,
November 29, 1906
My dear Harold,
The week seems to come round very quickly, without bringing any news to send on to you and I daresay to one so busily employed as you fortunately, as they flying still quicker. A rumour reached me recently that your cousin, Bertha was engaged to one of the younger Elworthy's and I am wondering if we shall have as confirmed by you, perhaps it is your clothier?.
Edgar, has had no more trouble with his cough since he returned to Oxford, and he
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is I believe sitting for the first part of his final this week. Did you hear that Bob is to be present at the birthday dinner party this year, which has been fixed for Wednesday the 18th. the dinner that he returns from Broadstairs. He is rather young to begin such festivities, and I only hope he will not be too much upset the next day for us to travel home.
Old Miss Stopford was found dead in her bed last week. She was 86, but looked years younger, being always so upright with a fresh complexion. I expect you remember her for she is sat at one in of your pew in the parish church.
I am glad that this change of secretary into foreman and clerk is taking place in the summer as you will have time to look about and see how you can accommodate yourself to the new arrangement. Keep your head up, however, and do not drop into a lower circle. After all, your present life is not likely to continue very long as you will, I hope soon acquire sufficient experience to venture onto a farm of your own with a good partner to assist. I don't know much about Charlie's
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progress at Streatham, but I hope and believe he is getting on as well as we can expect. It takes a long time to build up a practice, and he has hampered himself for some years to come up with periodic payments of purchase money. At present I think the sailor is the best off as he knows exactly what his monthly payments will be, and there can be no happiness if he does not live within his income.
Good bye
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
December 6, 1906
My dear Harold
By the time you receive this Christmas (your first hot Christmas) will be passed and the New Year at hand so I wish you with all my heart a very happy and successful New Year. Life after all is so short that it does not much matter where we live, if only we can find work congenial to our tastes, and with a fair prospect of offering us a profitable career. Edgar
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comes down tomorrow for the Christmas vacation. He was passed in the first half of his finals, taking up the other half in June of next year when he will be qualified for a BA. But then comes the rub, what next?
I heard this morning that uncle Billy has some serious mischief internally, which will necessitate an immediate operation. He has been looking so very well lately that I am inclined to think there has been some exaggeration as to its impact, but we shall know more about it in the day or two. They are of course very much upset and highly anxious about it at Bridge house.
Tell us a little more about the three Elworthy brothers when you write, their characters and temperament, are they all doing well, like your "Boss" is Ella nice to deal with. I hear that Edward Hopkins is hopeful about his business in Toronto, though I cannot explain it - he seems as he seems to be an agent for the importation of English goods into Canada, it sounds rather a big order, but I dare say, means very little.
Louie Howard was married in the same church at Calcutta, that she was baptised in, her husband, Mr Ede is a tea planter in Assam I believe. Miss Louise Round told me yesterday, when I met her in the street that Mr Brown missed me very much and that she hoped I was going back again
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and did I know they had the nuns there now? so you see, she is very much as you left her.
I think uncle Harold and wife and Olive are going to Monte Carlo or some neighbouring resort for the Christmastide. I suppose he will retire altogether from the Army in February next and settled down as a country gentleman, near Kidderminster for shooting and motor car-ing.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
December 20, 1906
My dear Harry (Harold).
Long ere you will receive these few lines Christmas will have come and gone. We shall all think of you on Tuesday and drink your good health. Wishing you every prosperity in your adopted home, like everything it will require patience and perseverance, and I hope you will not be disheartened by present disagreeables. I presumely (sic) you're not
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saying anything to the contrary, that you are the only gentleman pupil on the run.
Mater, and I returned from our annual Richmond visit last evening. Mr Todd was very happy and well, looking more like a man of 70 and one of 88. The Hooper's and Dolton's were guests as usual. A wet to fog or Scotch mist reigned supreme most of the time we were there, so we could not get about very much.
Uncle Billy has had some sharp attack of obstruction inside but he was better when I saw him, though he was looking thin, and I think there is reason to fear a repetition of his troubles. Charlie had supper on Sunday evening at Wentworth house he was looking well, but confessed it was slow disappointing work building up a practice, but I told him we all have had the same experience. Van and Cyril hope to stay a few days with us early in the New Year. Miss Johnson, left us this morning for the Christmas
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holidays. So Adria now has leisure to follow Beau about like a shadow Aunt Margaret has happy letters from Frank on the Mediterranean station, he seems to have taken quite kindly to the sea, I am thankful to say. Bob has brought back his class prize for classics, I am pleased to say, he has also done better in mathematics than he has done in previous terms.
God bless you my dear boy in the coming year.
Believe me always.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

36. Edward's Letters 30: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 3 Jan 1907, 17 Jan 1907, 24 Jan 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
January 3, 1907
My dear Harold,
We were very pleased and surprised to receive your Christmas greeting on Christmas morning. It was very remarkable that it could be so well hit off from the other side of the world. Your photograph was an excellent one, you look fatter in the face than when you left England, and certainly you seem to have enjoyed good health in New Zealand, barring, the
Page 2
one attack of asthma on your arrival in Timaru, or rather I should say Pareora. Cyril has got three weeks leave after rejoining. We shall in all probability not see much of him for two years as after their cruise on the Spanish coast in February or March, then the payoff, and at once recommission probably for East India or China Station.
He and Charlie are going this evening to the winter dance at the Masonic Hall. I am surprised at Charlie's taking the trouble to come from Streatham for the one night, I hope there is no attraction in that quarter. We expect Van this evening for a week's visit, before taking up his new work in Cuckfield. Our friends all tell us that it is a charming spot, and the church, one of the finest in Sussex, I wish the rector was not so old but I hope Van will be able to stay on there some years. Cyril brought a little fox terrier back with him. Jenie has given him a very friendly welcome and they tear about together. We had a very heavy fall of snow on Boxing Day, and this morning. the floods are rising rapidly our further meadow is covered to a large extent with water and Beau
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is giving his boat a sail on the wide expanse.
The two children with Edgar's assistance, composed and acted a play on Christmas night entitled, "The last of the Highwaymen" It was carried through with great spirit. Uncle Billy has been very unwell with some internal stoppage, but I hear he has weathered the storm this time, but I fear of further trouble by and by
With much love from us all,
Your affectionate father,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court,
Nayland
January 17, 1907
My Dear Harold,
It was a relief to hear that you were to have all your meals in the cottage, instead of the cook-shop, as it sounds quite a decent and comfortable arrangement for you.
I daresay you are not sorry that the very busy shearing time is over, for it must have been a prolonged strain for the workers and an anxious time for the scorer. I am glad you saw George Julius, when he was
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over. I don't suppose you have seen him since he was in shirt and knickers. The day after I had your letter about him and his voting machine, I saw the enclosed account of a similar invention of a voting machine by a Signor Boggiano, was it one of those curious coincidences re matters of invention or did Boggiano hear of Georges invention to patent such a machine: I expect it was just a coincidence, but nevertheless very annoying for George and his company, because Boggiano may have anticipated their patents rights in Europe.
We went to some family theatricals at Little Horksley School, two days since, a W. Brodie, who acted there two years ago was splendid as the cabman as found in a . . . . . . W. Wilkinson is getting up some at Stoke from Shrove Tuesday. Last night, our servants had their party. They numbered about 20 and our young people acted a character to amuse them . . . . . . . the first scene was an excerpt from Box and Cox, Box (Edgar)
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Cox (Bob), Miss Vinder Vox (Adria) was a character added that for Adria's sake, Miss Osmham (maid), Mrs Bouncer (girl) The next scene, had a burglar entering the servant, Miss Denham's room and stealing plated etc, two old ladies were represented by Cyril and Edgar and the last scene was a quack doctor, his patients - they all did well, but Cyril was the life of the whole affair. The servants and their friends were immensely amused, our Christmas gaieties are over now, and schoolwork begins again on Tuesday.
This painful scrawl is owing to my intense desire to go to sleep. I have fallen off several times whilst trying to write what I have done.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
January 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
Bob returned to his school two days ago, and Cyril leaves us today, spending two nights with Charlie before rejoining the Dido, and this exodus makes us feel that the Christmas holidays are over and that we are now fall back once more into our quiet routine country life. I think you heard of our children's party magic lantern and visit of Mother Goose with presents. Since then our servants had there's, they mustered 20 all told. Our young people with Miss Denholm's help acted a charade in three scenes. The first was
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taken from Box and Cox, the second was a burglar piece, Cyril and Edgar were two old ladies, Adria, the next-door neighbour got up wonderfully in coat and artificial nose, and Bob the burglar: Cyril was particularly good at a timid old lady: the third scene was a quack doctor, (Cyril) and his patients, whom he professed to cure of their rheumatic afflictions by means of mesmerism, but he mixed them up and got them all wrong and there was a general rumpus. The word was rheu-matic (room-attic) true to the ear, but quite modern phonetic spelling. I thought they all acted with great spirit. I was Captain Drawer. We went recently to Little Horksley for a matinee theatricals set up by the Alten-Barry's is in aid of their coal club, their friends in the neighbourhood rallied round well and they sold 70 half crown tickets, they also gave two cheap evening performances.
Last night, we had a Shakespeare reading at Mrs Dudgeon's the play being Taming the Shrew. Mr Gray, taking Petruchio and Mrs Dudgeon, Catherine. We are enjoying (?) just now, a second cold snap with a piercing north-east wind. It is this latter, which makes the cold so penetrating, wrap up as you
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may, but I do not suppose it will last long. I have not sent you any paper, because Van told me that he had arranged for your having the Daily Mail, I believe for a year, if you wish for anything else, I shall be pleased however to arrange for its transmission.
I wish you would tell me about what you would like me to give you for your birthday, you have so little room, I imagine, that a hint would be very acceptable.
Uncle Billy is I believe better, but I have not heard very much of him since Christmas. Uncle Henry and aunt Ada remain at Brighton, until spring at any rate, I expect.
I hope you're keeping well and that you continue to be interested in your work, getting, I hope, a grasp of the ins and outs of sheep farming.
Love from all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

37. Edward's Letters 31: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 4 Mar 1907, 14 Mar 1907, 4 Apr 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
March 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
I am too late for your birthday I am sorry to think but the intention is the same viz to wish you very many happy returns of the anniversary and may you in the course of time build up a happy and prosperous family in your new country. Miss Torlesse writing to me the other day and asked me to tell you how pleased she was to hear such good accounts of you and that you were well. I'm getting on, by degrees, I am thankful to say, feel very well in myself and can walk about fairly well. My speech however is still spluttering and difficult
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and eating and drinking are not easy, but I must have patience and am very thankful that I am as well as I am. Do you ever get into Christchurch, I suppose it is beyond a bicycle ride. Your letters are a great pleasure to me. Jack Bateman has given up trying to pass the Edinburgh exams and he is doing locum-tenens work which is very good for him he would never have been happy or successful at Richmond so it is much better for him. Guy is married he was in hospital in Toronto and fell in love with his nurse and she foolishly accepted him. If she is a sensible person it may be a very good thing for Guy to have someone to look after him and keep him straight. Charlie has been getting some patients of his own lately, which has greatly pleased him. I am hoping to see Cyril shortly as he is back in Chatham (from Portugal), he sent a wireless message . . . . . to . . . . . Isle of Wight to say he was coming up channel. Van paid his bishop, a visit at Chichester last week he was in to great a hurry to please Van by the brevity of the visit enabled Van to run up to up to . . . . . Place at Brighton between the incoming and out going trains and see Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada. Uncle Henry has not been so well the last month, I am afraid both he and Mr Bateman suffer a good deal.
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We are rejoicing in the first appearance of spring flowers. I am sitting in my dressing room today for the first time it makes a pleasant change from bed room during the day hours.
With our united love and good wishes for your health and happiness.
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
March 14, 1907
My dear Harold.
You're very welcome bundle of letters arrived yesterday. So glad to hear that you are able to share and stand the hard work of the harvest field. All previous personal experience of farming operations will be of service hereafter, when you have your own hands to direct. I am getting on slowly, but to the doctor's satisfaction, as a matter of fact a stroke like mine leaves you very different to what it found you. The articulation of my words is thick and not ready, but my mind is clear and I am not paralysed in arm or leg. So I have much to be thankful for, but to what extent I am going to recover is I think very doubtful. I heard two days ago of the not unexpected death of Mr Bateman. He had a malignant growth near the bowel, which
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obstructed all passage through it; they operated at first they thought successfully, but two days later, his strength collapsed and he passed away in a few hours. Poor Aunt Annie is nearly heartbroken; they were devoted to one another; but it was a merciful release for him from a life of her helpless suffering. When you write again explain the mystery of your postscript we cannot imagine who Louisa is who has an anecdote to tell about her father; stockings.(sic)
Edgar goes to Wentworth House tomorrow for a fortnight, so he will just be in time to see the boat race. It promises to be a good race, though the Cantab's are rather the favourites; one of Dr Burns sons is rowing in their boat. Van hopes to come and see me in a few days after Easter and Cyril was here last week calling on his way to join the Vernon at Portsmouth where he has gone for a course in wireless telegraphy. I am glad to see my son's in turn when they can come for my time may be very short. Whether you and I will meet again in this world God only knows, nor does it much matter so long as you live soberly and uprightly following in the steps of your saintly mother for a life so spent is the only thing that brings a man happiness at the last.
Goodbye, and God bless you dear boy in the daily prayers of your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Nayland
April 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
We received a capital letter and illustrated sheet from you last week. Uncle Churchill must have had the sun full in his face for him to make such faces as he was doing. Bishop Wilson was good but he seems to be ageing in appearance, the effect no doubt of climate and anxiety.
With the exception of an attack of giddiness and convulsive tremors in the left arm ten days ago I have gone on steadily improving but Syrett is very nervous about giving me leave to do anything in the way of exertion, but I hope to get more rope given me by degrees. I go out in a bath-chair now, the Dudgeons have lent me a very nice one that belonged to Lady Dalhousie.
Van has been here for three days. He is much
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more under vicarial discipline than he was at St Miniva. This is a good thing to him I am sure for a beginner St Miniver ways were to easy-going. Edgar and Bob come home tomorrow, and Grace Todd came down with them. This is Edgar's last term, and what to do for him when he gets his B.A. I don't know. Charlie was going to Richmond last evening to take Willy to a dance organised by old Mrs Ball for her nephew and nieces very spirited for an old lady of 80. Mr and Mrs Gray are just off to Westgate for a fortnight, and the Dudgeons are going to Seton South Devon, Billy has been sleepless and nervous lately owing to the excitement of our parish council elections. Has Bertha given Percy leave to go and hunt in Africa? Corbert goes to his new living at Wanstead next week I believe, he and his family have had various presents given by friends and parishioners are library table, a brooch, a purse with 105 pounds seven shillings etc. The Ma . . . . . are having electric light installation laid in at Westwood, with engine and dynamos, water pumping apparatus and exotic bathroom. They have not been able to let our dell(?) as yet.
I hope to sell my horse and carriage before long for now that I cannot drive myself in the dogcart there is no pleasure in keeping my own. I can hire a variety of close carriages when we require them at much less cost than keeping a man 2 horses of our own. I am only anxious for Megg's future, situations in or near Nayland are scarce. I was very glad to hear that your asthma did not hang about you badly for long this time and I hope you have been able to manage the dipping operations
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without any great fatigue or distress of breathing. Cyril got his certificate all right at the end of his short 3 weeks course A most disastrous one for him as he has two watches, his purse with three pounds in it and sundry details in the way of gloves, tobacco etc, stolen out of his cabin whilst on board - at the same time as you lost your watch and glasses.
Goodbye with love from as all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

38. Edward's Letters 32: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 11 Apr 1907, 18 Apr 1907, 1 May 1907.
Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
April 11, 1907
My dear Harry or Harold (old habits die hard)
I hope the dipping has gone on successfully, I suspect it was better for you than the dusty harvesting, and it was a new experience to. I am going on very well until a week ago, when I had a sudden shaking spasmodic attack of the left side, which has weakened me a bit but I am picking up again. Dr Ferrier has kindly promised to come down one day next week and overhaul me.
I trust you have had some good rains before now, New Zealand and Australian droughts are terrible scourges and must bring ruin to thousands when they come round. Grace is staying here for 10 days and Aunt Isabella and Dolly are in
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lodgings at Gowings for a week or so. They are going on then to Cuckfield for a short visit, if Van can get them lodgings. Edgar made a long visit to Wentworth house before he came home, it gave him a nice opportunity of seeing his relations in that neighbourhood. Aunt Annie is trying to dispose of the last six years of her lease of Bridge house. She tells me she has had a nice letter from Guy and his wife in Toronto they must pay a surgery assistant at the hospital there much better than they would in England, or Guy could never support a wife on his pay. Dr Syrett has gone for a weeks holiday into South Devon with the Dudgeons. Cyril has had no tidings of his watch's so it must be regarded as a dead loss doubtless. Ask Uncle Churchill to chose you one when you decide to replace yours. I expect your visits to Christchurch are few and far between. I hope Ella and boy are doing well.
I am sending off a box today containing a pair of pince-nez for you. I have not opened it, but possibly there may be both distance and reading glasses as I was not sure what kind you wanted, and cannot remember when I ordered. If it is not right you must let me know after you have examined them. Charlie tells us he is going to a Shakespearean, fancy dress ball, his character to be Sir Walter Raleigh in green velvet trunk hose, feathers and jewel velvet cap. All very smart evidently.
I see my writing is getting very shaky so think I had better give over as they do not like me to tire myself writing letters etc.
With much love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
April 18, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're going on well now, no asthma and unpleasant sheep washing experiences. I am going on quietly in the right direction I believe, though I am kept in rather a state of uncertainty by having experienced one or two slighter fits of an epileptic form character, my speech, the muscles of the left side of my face and my left arm all being affected. Dr Ferrier, kindly came down last Saturday to see me and gave me a hopeful prognosis, but good as this is I feel it is all very uncertain and that no one can be very sure of his opinion.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are staying at Gowing's lodgings for a week or two. I enjoy my chats with Aunt Isabella.
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I am glad to hear that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge House, the club next door, having taken it and she has taken a house called the Retreat down Friars Lane, where Chancellor used to live, there is a convenient walled garden, where Dolly can keep her chickens, and the girls will not annoy their neighbours with their musical practices.
Cyril has been rather troubled with sciatica in both legs at the same time, which has been rather bad for him. He went to Wentworth House for five days and seen all the better for the change, he will be very glad when they leave Sheerness. My mind is much exercised about Edgar's future. I think house of business . . . . . suit him, if I could hear of any clerkship, I suppose Mr Elworthy does not want a bookkeeper or trustworthy clerk. I should think he could soon be trained but not being able to ride would be a serious drawback. I must try to get him something in the city I suppose, or as a junior master in a preparatory school perhaps.
Dr Syrett has just bought a new and more powerful motor car; he and Mr Wilkinson went to Coventry for it and brought it home, via Rugby, Northampton, Bedford, Cambridge, and Haverhill about 2 miles the side of Haverhill it suddenly stopped dead, no petrol - their tank had not been properly filled before starting fortunately, a bicyclist came up who road back to Haverhill and had some oil sent out, but it was un-pleasant sitting in the on the hedge side in the pitch dark on a cold night he was very glad of the companionship of Mr Wilkinson. Have you had any tidings of your lost watch or field glasses.
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Cyril has heard nothing of his watch and watches, even Edgar has joined the band of losers, I sent him up P.O. 15/- to Wentworth house a fortnight since, he never received it and the order was cashed by someone who must have abstracted it.
Nayland is quite a deserted village just now, the Dudgeons at Seaton in South Devon, and the Gray's at Westgate. Edward Hopkins has dissolved partnership with his man, and is again seeking a post. Rees has gone to Scarborough upon what sounds like a wild goose chase. Those boys pick up with any plausible traveller they may meet and get taken in of course. It is a good thing to believe in yourself but you must be as cautious as the serpent in your dealings with strangers.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Uncle Harold, Aunt Bertha and Olive have gone down to their new house at Wolverley near Kidderminster.

Alston court.
Nayland
May 1, 1907
My dear Harold,
Your letter and photo of 6000 sheep in the . . . . reached us a few days ago. I was most interested in your account of the sheep dipping procedure. Am thankful to hear that you are keeping well I hope you will have a good time at Christchurch and see (sic) the exhibition will be a nice change for you and one you will deserve after your recent labours.
Edward Hopkins is home again, bothering everybody to get him into a berth. I think Canada was too hard for him. He had not gone through your in engineering mechanics training which, although it was very hard for you at the time has been of great value to you in your present labourers employment. It will all turn up trumps to you by and by.
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Aunt Isabella and Dolly have been at Gowing's Lodgings for the last month and Grace has been staying here so we have had quite a nice gathering during the Easter holidays. Now Miss Johnson has returned and Bob goes back at the end of the week
I continue to gain strength in my left side but my head soon gets confused if I have business matters to attend to like the Stoke and Melford club accounts. I can walk four or five times round the garden without much fatigue, and for greater distances I go in my bath chair.
I am very sorry that you are so cut off from church privileges but at any rate keep yourself well in hand until you are more fortunately situated. It is such a comfort in middle life to look back and feel that you had an upright, cleanly life in your younger years. There is nothing that brings you more satisfaction and peace of mind, than the recollections of that as years advance.
I was very grieved to hear that Percy Elworthy's engagement to Bertha has been broken off. How was it. Had they not seen enough of each other beforehand, so as to have proper opportunities to knowing each other's peculiarities. It is a most unfortunate time for the girls to be coming to England. Uncle Arthur has let his house was three months Aunt Ann . . . . is about to change her house and besides she has no heart for gaiety just now. I am not able to entertain anybody and Uncle Henry is too unwell to be depended upon and has no house as they are living in lodgings at Richmond or Brighton at present. Everybody will be very disappointed as the New Zealand rail and relate relatives are always warmly welcomed and their visits much appreciated.
This letter was unsigned

39. Edward's Letters 33: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 7 May 1907, 23 May 1907.
Nayland
Wednesday,
May 7, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think I may rightly report that the last week has been one of slight improvement in my walking, though I still require a balancing arm on one side with my stick on the other. I suppose Ada and Bertha will be due in about 10 days or a fortnight I wish the families over here were better able to entertain them but as you know, we are all in rather an unusual unsettled state just now in trouble or moving house etc.
Aunt Annie has not been able to let Bridge house, yet, nor hear of a cheaper one that would suit her and her family. Aunt Isabella left the yesterday she has been staying in the village six weeks, I have seen more of her than I have done since her return from India. I have much enjoyed my chats with her reliving
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old memories with her. I heard Eden Everett yesterday about your glasses, and he says that I ordered two pairs a month ago to be sent to you. I am quite puzzled, I hope I shall shortly hear from you that you have received them and then it will be all right. I don't want to send them to you twice. I get very confused often now about matters of business and waiting for an answer from New Zealand is a long business.
A picture of some of you on the "Tongariro" taken from the tender at Tilbury, puzzled me at first, and I thought you were the young man you were the young (sic) leaning on his elbow, whispering into the. . . . . man's ear. I was glad afterwards, to discover you more for on the right-hand of Miss B. The first man had to cunning a smile but was really absurdly like you. I'm . . . . your . . . . . one best.
Aunt Annie, has not got Bridge House of her hands yet which is rather a worry, nor has she found a cheaper one large enough for herself and family. Charlie says that Jack has grown a beard and looks ruffian in consequence. Cyril is off shortly for a tour around about Norway. Bob has had rather a shock being told by Mr Sinclair in Ipswich that he must wear spectacles continuously, except at hockey when it is considered dangerous so Cyril will be the only were the only glassless one amongst you, and it is lucky for him in his profession.
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The Routhes go to their new home at Wendover in Bucks this week, and Uncle Harold is supposed to have got into his new house Wolverly Kidderminster about fortnight ago, though I am afraid it is far from being ready for them. He has . . . . . . . a Humber motorcar, which is very useful in the country.
Has Ella ever said anything to you about Bertha it must be most uncomfortable for her. I gathered from you that he seems such a good sort, how came he not to know his own mind better. I am very sorry about it. Is Bertha very different to her sweet . . . . . . . sisters, if not Percy has lost a good thing and wife.
Goodbye and God bless you, dear boy.
Your affectionate father's.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
May 23, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was very pleased to get your letter written from Christchurch, I think at the end of your holiday, it was fortunate you had George for a companion and Uncle Churchill was up in the mountains. The exhibition must have been very enjoyable.
Although you have the . . . . . . . winter weather before you it is not your first taste of it so you know what to expect and can provide clothing according to your needs. I hope "Bob" will turn out well, it is good idea to make her train some young ones for you and it will pay you well I should think even if hereafter it you did not keep them all. Charlie has gone in a parrot, supposed to be a talker. I suppose we ought to get some news of the travellers soon.
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I have not much to tell you about myself, improving I think I may say, but soon tired especially with business accounts. I am getting free however of all my trust matters as quickly as I can I cannot trust myself with the accounts now and the correspondence worries me. I shall hope to go about and see my friends more when the dentist has fitted me with a new plate as I am at present plateless which makes me talk worse than I need otherwise do.
I spend an hour in the garden in the afternoon, if it be warm enough. My dressing is slow in the morning, Mr Gowing comes to wash and dress me every morning as I require a good deal of assistance in these operations.
I am sending you a copy of the architectural review with an illustrated account of Alston Court. They may might have made a better selection of plates, especially I should have liked to have seen the library or drawing room instead of southeast corner of the courtyard as we already have one of east side and one of the north-east corner of west. But what is most tiresome is that they evidently did not know what a treasure they had of this old house, for they only printed the usual few, they sell
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to the trade and the issue was sold out on the third day. I have had great difficulty in acquiring copies, even now (sic) have not got nearly enough for my wants - I wanted to give away a good number to my friends and relations and say there stupidity is very vexatious.
We are in the midst of spring cleaning, and I have had a line from Cyril to say he has been put on half pay for a time for the economy and it is most trying to him, and poor economy when he was so busy with his wireless telegraphy. Everything is going to the dogs under our present government. Rumours are again flying about that Gray is going to retire, Mrs G. worries him and he is much more desirous of going on with his work as long as he can. I am anxious because I enjoy his sermon and general teaching and we might very easily get someone like Walls of Boxted or Rawlinson of Wiston, etc. Like you I enjoy a good service and sermon at the church I am glad you heard uncle C ("him"deleted) preach on Easter day,
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I think there is a better prospect of business it seems in New Zealand than in England. I don't think the old country made a good impression upon the Colonials and old Botha managed to go of with his pockets for the money a loan of 5 million I believe guaranteed by we poor folk at home. Mr Taylor, Mater's uncle Frank was buried yesterday at Blackheath. He was Mrs Todd's only brother.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.

40. Edward's Letters 34: To His Son Harry in NZ, Dated 28 May 1907, 6 June 1907, 20 June 1907.
Alston Court.
Nayland
May 28th 1907
My dear Harold,
You're number of the architectural review, ought to go off tomorrow. I believe by parcel post. It has been very annoying, only being able to get such a few copies. I call it a pretty . . . . . concern, not accustomed to deal with such an interesting gem as Alston court and so they only published their usual numbers for the trade. We are expecting to hear from Ada or Bertha tomorrow as to their engagements, and when they would like to come to us with so many of their relatives unable to receive them just now I am afraid it will not be easy
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for them to make out a nice list of hostess to last them on until January. Aunt Ada, who saw them last week told me that they were two very nice girls, and that Bertha did not wear the air of a bitter young lady. I hope you are keeping well and fit for plenty of hard work in the coming winter. We were rather astonished a day or two ago, to hear from Cyril that he had been discharged on half pay a stupid administrative muddle for he was busy with large classes he was instructing in signaling and wireless telegraphy . . . . . on the fourth day . . . . . the Admirals head got clearer (?) and he was appointed to the Warrior Channel Fleet, and much bigger ship than the Widow. Mrs Dudgeon has immediately pounced on him for summer theatricals and . . . . . his part very willingly - but now Cyril will . . . . . service and they must get on as well as they can. Charlie is coming down to help to their great delight unless he cant find a substitute . . . . . try his hand.
Jessie had a litter of six puppies yesterday, great excitement on Adria's part, but I do not suppose many will survive long. I want to put down my stable as now that I cannot drive the dogcart myself I see no pleasure in keeping my own horse, merely to be driven occasionally with brougham and . . . . . hired out . . . . . serve just as well at much less cost.
Keep a supply of postcards by you so that when you dont feel inclined to write you may send me a few lines on a card. I like to hear from you pretty often, I am going on a very, well, I think but soon get tired especially by figures or calculations. I hope to field more like myself when . . . . . has fitted me up comfortably with what T M Clark . . . . . euphemistically to call "dentures" I am very glad to hear
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that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge house, to a . . . . . . . . . . I think to open Terrace Gardens there, and she is hoping to secure a good house in the Avenue . . . . . . . . . . near the railway bridge and close to the landing place of two Ferry boats. I think by crossing the river she gets a larger and better hose for her money than she could do in Richmond and they want a fair sized garden for Winnies chickens and plenty of bedrooms, probably Mrs H. . . . . the patient will stay with them if they have a house with a sufficient number of rooms.
Wishing you every happiness and success in your career (in which you must steadily persevere
Believe me
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're not finding any bad affect left behind by your hunting cropper, wire mixed with fencing is not fair and very dangerous for the riders.
Bessie Julius saw the girls the other day and they astonished her by telling her they were going to commence a three months training course of nursing at St Bartholomew's on Aug 1 and they hope to come to her when this was over. So I am afraid the dull month of November will have began by the time they can reach us. I know Ada has been thinking of going through such a course for a long time past, and I suppose Bertha's broken heart has driven her with the same service. I don't much like the work for young girls, but it is the fashion nowadays.
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Aunt Annie Hand came to us yesterday for a few days, she arrived quite exhausted after spending six hours in the train. She had been paying a visit to Lyme churchyard. Would you care to have the Essex Standard sent on to you sometimes when I should remember it. I don't think foreign newspapers publish(?) too much.
The young folk here are working hard at their parts and holding frequent rehearsals, here or at the Dudgeons, 3 plays "A Voyage Benoit", "Poor Pillicuddy" and "Miss Flipper's Holiday". Actors; Mr Wilkinson, Mr Williams, Dr Syrett, Charlie, Miss Gray, Miss Denholm, Miss Gresham, Miss Williams, Miss Johnson.
The Bishop of Colchester commemoration of his golden wedding day he had a golden challis and paten presented to him by the clergy of the diocese and a golden goblet and cover by the city of Chelmsford, and parishioners of St Mary's.
I am thankful to say I still progress slowly on the way to recovery, but my mouth both for speaking and eating hangs fire. I have not found your Mr Agne very successful in fitting me out with a new plate. In reply to a little wedding present we see sent Phoebe Storr, she mentioned a George Adams and says they are all so fond of him than they are lost to imagine how they managed to get along without him before. They have changed his name to Brownie now.
Cyril likes his new appointment to the "Warrior" very well I think, he has Chatham again for headquarters. He will miss his uncle Harold, now, however, they are not yet settled in their new house, nor has he got a chauffeur yet who can drive at all safely.
I am afraid I must shorten my letter this week, for I have an inflamed eye and letter writing tires me more than it used to do.
With love from us both
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
Suffolk
June 20, 1907
My dear Harold.
Your letter of May 9, reached me this morning, and it gave me great pleasure to receive it and know that you are keeping well. I am very thankful to say that I have been going on well with only just two convulsive seizures of which to head, chiefly in my left arm and side of my face. Dr Ferrier kindly came down and examined me with the opthalmascope(?) report very encouraging. I am of course still very shaky and have more difficulty in letter writing. Sometimes, I am afraid making sad nonsense of my sentences.
Mr DeVere's(?) photos came out beautiful prints and a copy was
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posted out to you, some little time back, May 29 I think. So it should reach you, I hope in due time, and you can show the modern New Zealanders what the old country can do in domestic architectural works. I cannot send in the original photos away as I only have one copy, and they very fragile.
I am quite sure that you have done your best during your first year, . . . . . Everything was so new to you and the manual work so unusually hard work for you . . . . . should be of great assistance to you, and prepared you for the hard physical work you have had to do.
I often thank God for your steadiness and determination to stick to your work, and do your best to qualify yourself of the work that lies before you and I trust you may in time build up a happy home for yourself. That your character is being formed upon good principles. assure me that you will do well . . . . . I am sure Arthur Elworthy is a good man to work with.
Let me know when you get it that the bank . . . . . . difficulty about crediting you with the 20 pounds I sent you a cheque for. I was not certain, they might not require me to send it through the Bank of New Zealand in London.
Aunt Annie has sold the lease of the Bridge House at Richmond(?) - a lucky stroke as it . . . . . . . . . to sell - a public house at the back and bridge and steep slope in front most it most difficult to find and purchase. A man from Hammersmith has brought it I believe and will convert it with tea gardens.
Aunt A has taken a house in St Margaret's Avenue, close to the ferry landing place. so she can get over to Ariah(?) Lane immediately and so to Richmond. We are so surprised to hear that the girls are going into St Bartholomew's nursing training home. I wish they had left it for two or three more years before plunging into this unpleasant work, and it is a great strain upon the strengths of young girls.
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I see my sentences are becoming confused so will leave this to Mater to finish the page.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.
My dear Harry
It is quite time for your dear father, to have his afternoon nap, and I am winding up for him. I have just read him off to sleep first your letters always give him so much pleasure. The weather has been rather against him so very changeable, but I think if it once get settled and he is able to be out more he will get stronger.
Charlie is coming next Monday (June 24) he is taking part in the Nayland Dramatic Entertainment July 27 Miss Johnson is also acting the proceeds are to go to the Cricket Club
Much love from us all.
You're very affectionate.
Mater.

41. Edward's Letters 35: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 4 July 1907, 24 July 1907, 8 Aug 1907.
Nayland
July 4, 1907
Mater wrote to you yesterday I believe and I am only sending a few lines in my own writing as a postscript so to speak. I cannot say much about progress, as I do not think it is within measure or continuous, but I am thankful . . . . . I am not any worse, nor have I had any reoccurrence of the convulsive attacks. Adria with Miss Johnson and the little Syretts are staying at Felixstowe but the weather so far has been cold and wet.
I was very pleased to hear that Edgar has passed his final exam for the Oxford B.A.
It is a great pleasure to me to have such good account of you that your health is good and that you stick steadily to your work.
God grant, we may one day be spared to meet again . . . .
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
Postcard

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
July 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
The weather has at last changed at little and we are enjoying the commencement of a little summer warmth, nearly all July was cold and wet, and we were rarely without a fire in the evening. I continue to gain strength, but I am worried with a good deal of pain in my right leg, however, I live in hope of improvement. We have enjoyed visits from Mr Todd and Mabel, Charlie, Van and Edgar during the past month. Bob returns home on the 30th.
I hope I hope your work is going on well and that you feel you are a getting hold of the details of New Zealand farming. I believe Ada and Bertha enter upon the hospital nursing course next week, but we have not heard anything of them yet from themselves directly, so can tell you nothing about them of interest.
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I am asking Van to go on for me as I am soon tired of writing. Perhaps this tires me more than anything else, but don't shorten your letters in proportion as I always enjoy hearing of view and from you.
In Van's writing.
Many thanks for your last letter which reached me a week or so ago, I am at home just now for part of my summer holiday. I had to divide it up, this year and opted a week first of all at St Minver with the Bucknalls at the beginning of the month and Tuesday last I came down to Nayland to spend a fortnight or so at home. Edgar has gone off to Richmond and Charlie (also on holiday) is we don't know where: but I'm hoping to see him down here this week. Robert comes on Tuesday from school. We are looking forward to the Sunday School treat which has been fixed for this afternoon. Miss Johnson, Adrian and I hope to attend. It takes place at the vicarage this year.
I am afraid I shall not see Ada and Bertha during their stay in England. They are not coming to Nayland until later in the year and I do not suppose they will be near Cuckfield.
Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada will be coming back to Brighton in the autumn, I always in my visits to Devonshire Place, which take place periodically when they are there. Did I tell you how on one occasion Aunt Ada and I saw Professor Cyril diving off the pier on a bicycle.
I have just purchased a new tire for the back wheel of your old machine. This is the first big sum I have spent on it. It still travels well, although it looks a bit rusty in parts from being out in all weathers, and not getting cleaned as often and as it should. I hope it will not be long
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before you are able to get a bicycle yourself. We have not had news of Cyril has some time, but he is I fancy cruising about in the Channel with the home Fleet on HMS Warrior.
We saw the Prince of Wales, dashing through Head Street yesterday in a motorcar. It reminded me of the day when you and Cyril and I saw the present king on his way to the station when you were returning to school.
The Colchester sports, I see are fixed for next month but too late for me to go to them, I have not had a bathe and the old baths for a long time. A letter has just arrived from Cyril. He is at Chatham, and he sends us a photo of himself and fellow officers taken on board. Now I must leave room for father to wind up.
In ELF's writing
Van having kindly filled up my lacking brain for me.
I now remain.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
August 8, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was glad to receive your letter yesterday, dated June 24 in which you mentioned that you came to have sole charge of the electric shearing machine. It is also nice to hear it you are going to turn your old business to account, and it ought to pay you well after a time besides giving you a better position on the station. Your "Boss" seems to be a fine rider, generally coming in first in the steeplechase. I will let you know when the girls have decided when they will come to Nayland.
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November ish I expect be the month a dull month for a country visit, but it seems to suit their other engagements. But we are not likely to hear whether Charlie or Van or Cyril are home just then, but the latter is always uncertain now so we much hope for some help for him(?) Charlie and Mr Fuller came down in the motorcar a fortnight ago and that very evening, just after their arrival I had an attack the first one since February. It was a short affair and left no paralysis afterwards, but I was unconcious and slightly convulsed, while it lasted. I hope I shall not feel any worse for it in a little while but a relapse was very disappointing having had no return since February.
Aunt Annie and Margery are staying at Mr Gowings for a week and afterwards Margery goes to Holland with Lottie Alston on a sketching expedition
With with every good wish for your health and happiness.
Believe me, ever
Yr affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.

42. Edward's Letters 36: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 Aug 1907, 15 Aug 1907, 3 Sep 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
August 9, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think Van helped me with my last letter but I hope to manage better today and write to you myself. I have felt better and more like myself, for the last week or so now I am still weak in limb and forgetful in mind.
Aunt Annie Hand has been staying in Nayland for three weeks partly in lodgings and partly here. And next week, Aunt Lucy and Margaret and Kitty Hopkins come for a fortnight so I am not deserted by
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my relations. We are trying for a post as a junior master in a preparatory school for Edgar. It could be bad for him to be hanging about here doing nothing, so the sooner he gets something to do the better. For a month or until we hear of something he is going to stay with Van at Cuckfield
I hope your coaching about your shearing machine has gone off satisfactorily and that you feel quite competent now to direct your workers under you, you are no doubt right not to undertake too much mechanics work as you want to become an adept at farming generally in all its branches. I hope someday you will meet with some one with whom you can join forces, but go slowly and require more years and experience before investing money in the matter.
I am very much hoping to be able to take my seat upon the bench at its next sitting at the end of September, but I cannot help feeling rather nervous at appearing at any public function. We have found five wasps nests in the garden and field and hope we have now destroyed them all. Mr Taylor stayed two nights with us and gave Bob the character of being a good steady worker, but neither quick nor clever So he follows in his elder brother's footsteps, but it is a very good character for a boy to be good and tidy at his work. I am afraid, his mother would not like him to emigrate, but personally I think the openings in the new world are better than in the old. But you miss the amenities
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of life, music etc, and the church privileges of the old country.
Thank you for writing so regularly, your letters, give me great pleasure.
With love from us all
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Postcard
Nayland
August 15, 1907?
My dear H.
A card is better than nothing, as a greeting to you. I am going on fairly well but very soon get tired. Aunt Annie comes to us tomorrow. George Sumner and Maggie go on their various ways then. I think you are right as to your future to aim at a thorough all round knowledge of farming with an eye to your future and not stick to one depart (sic) to exclusively. Your reports of your work, are a great comfort to me and I have great confidence in your future progress.
E. L. F.

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 3, 1907
My dear Harold
I sincerely trust you are quite well now for your account of yourself tormented with asthma and boils made me very sorry for you in immersed in your work and no one to look after you. I do not know of anything that does much good for either complaint unless it be sometimes a change of residence -- going up to higher ground for instance, but you cannot . . . . . beforehand it is a
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matter of experiment. A tablespoonful of yeast taken three times a day in a little beer or water (I don't know if it is nasty or not) is said to be of considerable use in checking their repetition.
I have been going on more satisfactorily for the last month past, gaining strength and no return of the fits. I walk up the village sometimes though to no great extent. Edgar is trying for an appointment as a junior master in a preparatory school - I think he will do if only he can show enough force of character to control the boys. Taylor does not think that Bob has much chance of winning an entrance scholarship in a public school and so we must let him plod on in the usual course. Taylor says he is a very steady worker and a favourite amongst his schoolfellows and developing into a good cricketer.
Although your letters are very welcome don't bother to write when you are seedy but try and send a postcard if you can just to tell me how your. Our prayers go with you in your life and work
Believe me ever
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
September 4
Your letter of July 23 just received - glad to hear you are rather better and that you have seen a doctor about the boils - sharpened little wooden matches dipped in carbolic and glycerine equal parts and then rolled in fingers and thumb and tell until the vesicle onto top of
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the boil is perforated is the base is the best thing I know of to destroy the germ and stop the repetition.
We shall anxiously look out for your next card.

43. Edward's Letters 37: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 12 Sept 1907, 26 Sept 1907, 23 Oct 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 12, 1907
My dear Harold
I was much relieved to have a better account from you about asthma and boils. I too am going on fairly well and the weather being finer and warmer has been much in my favour. I hope New Zealand has enjoyed some nice rains - we have been full of garden parties here but all out holiday pursuits are coming to an end and we are thinking more of school, and serious occupations. Edgar has not heard of any opening yet but he must be patient cheerful. I hope you're Uncle
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Churchill's . . . . . up the West Coast has been satisfactory and that he suffered no mishaps by land or flood. Aunt Margaret returned to Eastbourne on Tuesday . . . . . and I think Aunt Lucy and Kitty return early next week. Aunt Isabella and Willie are staying at the Isle of White: Tolland Bay(?). I shall be glad to have a card from you and I hope be cheered about you.
Are the prospects hopeful for the year . . . . I suppose in your specialty of sheep farming you cannot tell much until the lambing season is on. I must ask Mater to finish this finally. I am so helpless in better writing by . . . . When you have share received it let me know the amount of your doctors bill as I should like to settle it for you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
In Mater's is writing
My dear Harry
At last I am sending you Adria's photo you must not think she really looks like that though she has grown very much, very nearly as tall as me - but her face has not that heavy expression. Your dear father has been decidedly better during the last month and he says himself that he feels better which is lovely to hear.
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Beau's holidays are coming to an end and he returns to Broadstairs, 22nd inst - they have all had very happy holidays with of course heaps of cricket -if they are enjoying Kitty Hopkins company she seems a nice girl. We are sorry about the asthma I do hope it has quite gone by now.
Much love from us all
Your very affectionate
Mater

Alston court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 26, 1907
My dear Harold
I wish I was on telephone to Pareora and could therefore hear before I write how you are. I trust that asthma and boils are things of the past. I have not been very grand just the last week a tendency to spit blood obliging me to be careful about my exertion. But I do not believe it means much more than nose bleeding in the wrong place.
Edgar is my chief anxiety just now, it seems so difficult to get him into any work. Employers are afraid of his arm leading to great a hindrance to his usefulness. Have you heard from Charlie that he called upon that little nurses as he calls them and he thinks
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that they have had about enough of it already and will not be sorry when December 1 arrives. They paid him a return visit one Sunday afternoon and had tea at Streatham Place. I saw very good photos enlarged at gallons a day at Gowan's the other day showing the octagonal font in Stoke and a view beyond between two of the pillars beyond showing the stained-glass panel to the memory of Mr Torlesse. I bought it and gave it to Miss Fanny Torlesse to remind her of her father and of your baptism. She was very pleased to have it.
Are field glasses useful to you, as Christmas is coming on and I should like to give you something really useful, your last pair was taken and that made me think you might like to have them replaced but I shall be glad of any suggestion from you if there is anything you would prefer.
I hope the electrical shearing change will add a nice little bit to your wages you have been so careful with your money that you ought to be able to plant a nice little nest egg for the future
I do not think I can write any more today I am in the bed and writing fatigues me
Believe me all ways
Your affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
October 23, 1907
My dear Harold
I am delighted to know by your last letter that the boils are apparently on the wain in severity(?), are you and your chum occupying the Elworthy's dining room now, is the young men in the office. I congratulate you on the possession of such a fine dog as "Black Darkie" Aunt Isabella and Dolly are here just now and Gerald has just gone the New Zealanders are still coming the first week in November I believe (Charlie suggested) but they keep changing their plans so that we are still uncertain as to when we shall really see them but these repeated delays mean
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that they have driven their visit off to the worst months in the year . . . . . when we shall probably have neither weather nor visitors . . . . . and none of the sons at home except Edgar who having failed to obtain the post he was trying for will be our only helper in guiding the visitors about. Edgar has also tried for a stool in a bank but one of his duties was to reach over and arrange the big ledgers at the opening and closing of the bank and his left-hand was too crippled to manage this office work with such . . . . heavy lifting . . . . . or a tutorship. I lost my Oyster Feast this year and I must remember to send you a Standard to shake up your remembrance of Colchester Worthies.
For myself I remain the status quo pretty well, weakened chiefly in my walking. I seldom go beyond the garden . . . . . in a bath-chair as my left . . . . . 3 weeks and uncertain in walking
Whenever I see our little flocks of 200 or 300 sheep strolling down the road I think of your thousands on the open prairie is and think what a very different job it must be but you are only going back to the earliest times on earth shepherds everywhere. Have you been so lucky as to hear any music of late I am so glad whenever you get the opportunity to hear some music or a play etc for sheep farming must be very monotonous but may turn up very lucrative, in the end you may yet get the opportunity opportunity (sic) of enjoying all these things
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

44. Edward's Last Letters 37: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 30 Oct 1907, 13 Nov 1907, 21 Nov 1907.
Nayland
Wednesday October 30, 1907
My dear Harry
I will begin my letter a day before the proper day in case I am not up to writing tomorrow. I am so sorry to hear that you are still enduring the boils I really did hope they were more decidedly on the wane. Resin(?) ointment smeared on linen and a piece of rag outside ought to help you pressure is nearly always helpful on top of these horrors. I am glad you have acquired another good dog they are such a necessity in your life.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are spending a fortnight with us. Nayland is all in excitement today as a menagerie pays us a visit tomorrow procession followed by an exhibition tent in a big tent. I heard that Henry is shortly leaving the White Hart to start a wine merchants in Colchester. The weather has been very unsettled
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on the whole, September was very fine Oct
. . . . so but is going out wet(?)
I expect your paddocks are frightfully muddy however these will dry and come off. I am sending you another watch for your Christmas present for I have quite forgotten if I sent you one or not after you lost yours in the spring. Our deaf parlourmaid makes all manner of awkward mistakes but we best wait a little longer to see if she can improve because she has several good points.
Poor Edgar cannot . . . . . . of a tutorship yet which seemed just the thing when the man thought he had better choose one with more experience - quite unnecessary with such young pupils 101/2 to 13 he kept his name on Gilberts(?) list but he has had no luck yet, his arm poor fellow cripples him in all directions. No news of Ada and Bertha coming yet they are going sometime between . . . . . and Xmas to Aunt Ada who has now come back to Brighton with Uncle Henry. I hear that Charlie is taking up your daily(?) paper from Van for the next 12 months do you crave any books from time to time or are you to sleepy for evening reading boils and asthma . . . . . may perhaps rather . . . . . to a novel.
I have been going on fairly well lately but am very staggering at times especially if I start off at all quickly before I have got my balance correctly
Our united love and best wishes for the coming Xmas, fill up your next letter with an account of your life's daily routine are you still being looked after in Mr Elworthy's house or are you altogether in your own quarters and what are these quarters I don't know it at all just now where you sleep and live
Oct 31.
Page 3
Do you pay for your sheepdog yourself or does the Boss look upon a dog as a part of a necessary outfit for looking after his sheep. I suppose you must get them to know to obey you and you only.
I seem to have ended my letter twice so accept our united love again
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
November 13, 1907 12:15 p.m.
My dear Harold.
I was very glad to hear from you this morning and that you were able to give a good account of yourself. You are reaping the benefit now of facing weathers and duties, wherever, they may call you. I know, I quite realise you live a very hard life, but it is a wholesome, manly, and it is so difficult to . . . . . alone in England. I believe there will get to you, this will get to you . . . . . about Christmas . . . . . any of our letters so you must accept our . . . . . good Xmas wishes for the year, I am sending you a key less watch for a present in place of the one you lost,
Page 2
as I forget whether you ever placed replaced your lost one. I hope to send a card photo also. Mr Gowers first was a failure, and the NZ girls are here for a week and if I could have entertained them I would have persuaded them to stay longer - but this all falls on Edgar's shoulders. They go on next to Aunt Ada's at Brighton, I am sorry so many of their relations are hors-de-combat just now when we are all anxious to entertain them. They are both very pleasant, good looking delightful girls Ada has her mothers voice and very delicate pretty features Bertha is rater like . . . . . They showed me the large Julius group taken I believe shortly before they left New Zealand it was very interesting as it included all the married daughters and their children and then their mother and the Bishop and the sons-in-law so it was a very comprehensive picture. Bertha has plenty of spirit in her and energy, the girls and Edgar were all nearly shot out of the dogcart yesterday they had kept Molly (the horse) waiting and she was restless having only been clipped a day or two before and felt cold so she began to jump herself up and down to warm herself, poor Edgar . . . . . no firm hold Bertha slid down onto the mat in front on her knees but was not discomposed in the least - they both behaved like born horsewomen. I suppose they have a good deal of practice in NZ and showed no nervousness. I feel I know your life etc much better since I have talked with A & B it all seems more lifelike, they give you great credit for your perseverance
Page 3
and say you are sure to succeed as you have learnt your year work from the beginning
We all wish you every good Xmas wish with happiness and success in your life progess. I am glad you heard Faust the music is such a treat and must be so refreshing amidst your work. Edgar has had no luck yet in his search for a tutorship for a small boy but he must have patience applicants all seem to be afraid of his arm. I think tho except for games it makes no difference its his ability to do all that is wanted . . . . . .
Though still very weak in my leg I am fairly well in myself only I walk very little now and trust more to my bathchair
With much love from us all
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn
My writing is very shaky

Nayland
November 21, 1907
My dear Harold
Xmas has passed but I can still wish you all good wishes for the year ahead for the new year - I hope this superintending of the shearing house and machinery will not only give you some responsible work undercover but a decided increase of pounds shillings and pence for you want to save and keep keeping with an eye to your future. We enjoyed the . . . . . .visit the girls were able to spare us they were so much in request that we had to be contented with rather a short visit, they are very nice girls and I like them both very much Edgar was in love with both of them and rarely took his eyes from them whilst they were here they took
Page 2
part in . . . . . the Choir Society practice . . . . . . whether or no on the strength of this Edgar joined the club this year as an active bass.
The girls are making a long stay in Europe . . . . . they proceed next to Wiesbaden I believe and they have still got . . . . . to do. Uncle Arthur is still most poorly he still sees double and he has someone one and has someone to go up and up to London with him it will probably get right again when the blood the result of the blow is all absorbed
Maters writing
I am finishing this for your father as he stopped writing to go out for a hour before luncheon in his bath-chair we all went by the Stoke Road and the sea and the sun was very bright so he found it very pleasant he was able to go over to Roberts yesterday afternoon to be present with Mr Dudgeon at the distribution of "Cole's Loaf" 170 loaves were given away to the poor of Nayland. They seemed very pleased to see your father there.
He has been pretty well lately I wish he could gain more strength but they say cases like this are always very slow
I had a nice letter from Ada today she and Bertha are now at Brighton with the Hunts
Page 3
the same post brought news of the death of my aunt Elizabeth she had not been very well but they thought was getting better but a bad heart attack came on last Monday and she died (quite peacefully) at 10 o'clock the following Wednesday morning, my dear father will miss her very much I fear
Beau writes they are getting up a play at school he is to be Dame Rumple an old woman he is getting quite a swell at football. I do hope so much your asthma has left you
Much love from us all
Yours very affectionately
Mater.

45. From Essex County Office Colchester.: Re Dr William Gilbert 1544-1603, 28 Jan 1904.
Essex County Standard Office
Colchester
January 28 1904
Dear Sir
The document you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of the article to appear in this weeks E.C.S. it is to be supplemented by some notes.
I venture to keep the document in my safe hoping you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted and framed and placed in the Town Hall
In great haste
Yours Faithfully
W Gurnly-Benham
Stamped envelope addressed to:
Dr Fenn
Alston Court
Nayland
Nr Colchester.

Discovery Of An Autograph Of Dr William Gilbert Of Colchester.
By the courtesy of Dr E.L. Fenn, late of Colchester, and now of Alston Court, Nayland, we are enabled to publish the following document, which Dr Fenn has discovered amongst some papers in his possession:

To all Christian people to whom this present writing shall come William Gilbert of London Esquire, sendeth greetings in our Lord God everlastinge. Whereas Richard Roberts of London Tanner, by his deede of bargaine and sale bearing date the day of the date hereof, for the consideracion therein mencioned hath gyven graunted feoffed, bargained and released unto the foresaid William Gilbert, his heires and assigns for ever, all his right title, clayme, and Interest, with (sic) ever he hadd, hath, or by any meanes may have in the capitall messuage and tenement and rents to the said capitall messuage on the part of the North and Sowth with all orchardes and gardens thereunto belonginge, with thappurtenances, scituat, lyenge, and beinge in the parishe of St Martyn in Colchester, abuttinge, as in and by the saide deed more att lardge yt doth and maye appeare.
NOW KNOWE ye me, the said William Gilbert, to have made and ordayned, and thee's presents in my steade and place putt and constituted my well beloved in Christ Robert Middleton, of Colchester, aforesaid, gentlemen, my true and lawfull Attorney, to enter for me and in my name, into the said capitall, messuage, rents and other the premises with thappurtenances or into any partt or parcell thereof and the full and peceble possession and seizon thereof, for me, and in my name to take, accordinge to the forme and effect, of the saide deed of bargaine, and sale, GYVINGE and hereby grauntinge unto my saide Attorney my full power and authoritie in execucion of the premisses as fully in evey thinge as the lawe will the same permit and suffer, and as if I my sceft (sic) were there personaly present, ratefienge, confirminge, and allowinge all, and whatsoever my saide Attorney for me and in my name shall lawfully do or cawse to be done, in or aboute the said premises, by vertue of their presents.
IN WITNES whereof, to this my present writinge, I, the saide William Gilbert have sett my hande and seale.
Dated the One and Twentith day of Aprill, in the Eight and Thirtieth yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lady Elisabeth by the grace of God Quene of England, Fraunce and Ireland, defendour of the faithe scilicet 1596
W GYLBERT
Sealed and delivered to the use of the said Robert Myddleton in the presence of me.
Ambrose GILBERT
Leonard Wallworth scr.
This document is of great value and interest as bearing the autograph signature of the great scientist and "first electrician." Only one or two other signatures of Dr William Gilbert are known to exist. Further reference to the subject will be found in our "Colchester and County Notes".

Children from this marriage were:

+ 286 M    i. Dr Charles Edward FENN [18] was born on 23 Sep 1873 in Richmond SRY, died on 30 Apr 1947 in 8 Priory Rd Kew London. at age 73, and was buried on 5 May 1947 in Richmond Cemetery.

+ 287 M    ii. Walter Robert Julius FENN [32] was born on 5 Feb 1875 and died on 9 Aug 1880 in Isle Wight at age 5.

+ 288 F    iii. Evelyn Alston FENN [34] was born on 29 Feb 1876 in Richmond SRY and died on 27 Sep 1877 in Portland Tce Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 289 M    iv. Harold Liveing FENN [33] was born on 28 Mar 1877 in Richmond SRY, was baptised in Stoke, died on 6 Jan 1969 in St Georges Hospital Christchurch NZ at age 91, and was buried in 1969 in Timaru N.Z.

+ 290 M    v. Reginald Alston FENN [35] was born in 1878 in Richmond and died on 11 Jul 1879 in Portland Tce Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 291 M    vi. Rev Ernest Vanderzee FENN M A [37] was born on 20 Feb 1880 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 31 Mar 1880, died on 22 Jan 1956 in Timaru N.Z. at age 75, and was buried in 1956 in Timaru N.Z.

+ 292 M    vii. Edward Churchill FENN [36] was born on 19 May 1881 in Richmond SRY and died on 20 May 1882 in Richmond SRY at age 1.

+ 293 M    viii. Lieut Commander Cyril Duncan FENN R N [38] was born on 19 Aug 1882 in Richmond SRY, was baptised on 4 Oct 1882, died on 9 Aug 1921 in Nayland SFK at age 38, and was buried on 12 Aug 1921 in Nayland Burial Ground.

+ 294 M    ix. Rev Edgar Julius FENN M A [39] was born on 16 Jun 1885 in Richmond SRY, died on 7 Aug 1942 in Castlethorpe at age 57, and was buried on 12 Aug 1942 in Castlethorpe Churchyard.


142. Mary Caroline JULIUS [58] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Mar 1852 in Richmond, was baptised on 23 Apr 1852 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 12 Jul 1890 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY at age 38. The cause of her death was cancer.

General Notes:
Mary was born about a quarter before 10 o'clock in the evening March 20 1852. Baptised 23 Apr 1852 at Richmond Old Church by Mr Dumergue. Sponsors Mr Hough of Ham Common, Lady Caroline Charteris and Mary Ann Morley of Short Hill in Nottingham. Ellen Hannah Julius and Emily Julius stood proxy.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Mary was Harold L Fenn's " dear Aunt Polly". She travelled to Australia 20 June 1884 arriving back in England 21 June 1885. Mary looked after Edward Fenn's children after the death of her sister Katherine.
She did not marry.

A Mary Caroline Julius aged 31 arrived in Victoria September 1884 aboard the South Australian from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

Dearest Harry
Saturday is Vandy and Cyril's holiday so I shall try & write to you on that day I suppose you get it on Tuesday morning, let me know; I dare say you are quite a happy boy by now & enjoyed your journey to school with that nice little boy - you have had a nice warm week but this morning it is blowing quite a gale. Your back numbers of the boy's own paper have come. I shall keep them till Easter & send you the others as they come. Vandy & Cyril have begun regular work with me again - and I have gone back to prison. Mrs Duncan took Van to the circus with Muriel last Monday - it was a treat for him. This afternoon he is finishing up your old dancing classes - I think he has one more.
And now much love my darling boy from all at home
Ever your very loving
Auntie Polly
XI The Green
Febr'y 2nd.
In a black edged envelope, stamp ripped of.

Harold L. Fenn
Malvern House
River
Dover
Dearest Harry
I cannot send you a long letter this week, but enclose you some of the lined paper you want. Your letters have been much better lately - It is such a nice bright morning after all the rain and cold we have had lately. If you have really bad toothache you must ask Mr Hammond to let you have it taken out - it is a stupid little tooth that is no good and you could go to someone at Dover, but if it is better we will have it out in the holidays.
I will write a longer letter next week - Much love from us all
Ever your loving
Aunt Polly
In a black edged envelope 12x9.5cm stamp ripped of, illegible date.

Royal Mount
Ephraim Hotel
Tunbridge Wells
Kent
February 19, 1889.
My darling Vandy,
The postman must bring you my birthday greeting as I shall not see you till later in the day. I am sorry, it has happened that we cannot see much of you tomorrow but I am sure "Nanny Goat" will give you a very happy day - and you will enjoy it and be a very happy boy.
And as we shall not be home till the afternoon you & Cyril must have dinner with me on Thursday and go to Whitelegs in the afternoon.
The picture at the top of this paper shows you the hotel we are stopping at - Father was very bad & hoarse last night but I hope he will be a bit better today - after breakfast we shall start for a good long walk, so I am writing this early - I have put a little X over the window of our sitting room where I am now writing - and there is such a lovely view from the window over park and field.
With very many happy returns and a loving kiss to my dear boy.
From your very loving
Auntie Polly

Dearest Van
Very many happy returns of your birthday - Auntie Polly's corner only gives me room to send you my love and every good wish for your happiness today and every day.
My love and a kiss for Cyril & Billy & I am always
Your affe Father
Edwd L Fenn

11 The Green
July 12th (c1889)
My darling Harry
One more letter after this, and we shall have you home I hope - it is a happy thought & the time will soon come. I am so glad you like cricket & are doing well at it - I should like you to get a really good hand at it - Father was the champion player at his school. When you come to Barmouth you will have to be a good walker & climber, & go up Snowdon with us. Father will like you to go excursions with him. I have begun to get your things ready, for we go on Aug 2nd & there will not be much time after you come home. Vandy has had a little Fox Terrier given him by Miss MacKinnon it is rather a mongrel cur, & not pretty like Vic(?), but I think will be a nice affec'ate little beast. I have had King Bar photographed & Van & Cyril, they are very good ones - Bar thinks it is a beautiful picture. Another Boy's own Paper has come, but I will keep it for you to take to the sea. It is late, & I am rather sleepy so Goodnight.
My darling boy - much love
Ever Yr most loving
Auntie Polly

1 Portland Terrace
Sept 20th 1889
My own darling Vandy
I shall come to see you tomorrow afternoon, Saturday, about three o'clock - so you must ask Mrs Allen if you may wait in for me - it will be nice to hear all you have been doing and I hope I shall see a very happy boy - if it is fine I shall bring Cyril with me - We all miss you very much.
Much love darling boy
From your most loving
Auntie Polly
On note paper headed with crest & motto immobilis.

Sheen House
Harrogate Oct 4th 1889.
My darling Ernest,
I am going to try and not call you Vandy anymore. Tomorrow, instead of seeing me you must have a nice long letter and on Monday I shall hope to have one from you - Cyril and I came here with Tip and Georgie last Tuesday - it has been rather cold and wet until today - but now I have just come in from a walk and it was beautiful - Miss Veitch took Cyril to a bazaar in the town yesterday and he bought a few penny things. Edith Brownrigg is coming to tea with us this afternoon and next week she is going to Norway to stay a long time - Poor Father and Bar will be very dull at home until we go back to them - Georgie goes back to Cambridge next Tuesday and then Cyril will have to begin much harder lessons with me. If he has time he is going to send a letter in this - Tell me in your letter if you can read mine easily. When I come home it will be nearly the time for your holiday - you must try and do your very best at lessons and play and then the time will pass quickly and you will be a happy boy. Did you like the lecture? Nurse will send the rest of your shirts by Father some day - Goodbye now my darling.
Much love from Auntie Ada and Cyril and most of all,
From your very loving
Auntie Polly.

Sheen House
Harrogate
October 11, 1889
My darling Ernie,
I am so sorry to hear from father that you have been on the sick list, and had bad eyes. I hope they soon are well, and you are back at work again. Cyril and I were very glad to get your letters he was very pleased with his. We do lessons every morning and then Cyril, Tip, and I go out for a walk - it has been such bad weather that we have not yet been able to go any nice country walks, like our old ones.
A little girl has been spending the afternoon here, she is younger than Baa but bigger and so spoilt and naughty - she knocked down everything Cyril built, would not eat her dinner, and we are all rather glad she is gone again. We have been to the gardens once, but it is not warm enough to sit about there. We shall have a great deal to talk about when we meet, I expect we shall go home about the 30th - Georgie has gone back to Cambridge.
And now dear old boy goodbye.
Much love from us all - longing to see you again.
Ever your most loving
Auntie Polly.

Hastings
Jany 31st
My darling Harry,
I promised you a letter on your first Sunday so I must fill this sheet of paper with all my news. We came here on Tuesday in the pouring rain and after driving about in a cab for some time, found some nice lodgings, but not facing the sea we have about three minutes walk to the parade - the first evening it was very rough, the waves were dashing up, the rain was pelting and we were glad to shut ourselves up away from it. Yesterday we started to see the Castle, the way up to it is very steep & dirty and the first thing Cyril, of course, does, is to fall down, and rise up covered with sticky mud from top to toe, so we had to leave the Castle and get home by back streets. Today has been very drizzling and we went out very little. Father sent me your card and I shall read your next letter when I get home on Tuesday. Poor Tip was so sad the evening you left, he roamed about from room to room in the greatest desolation. Winnie B came with us she is playing letters now with Vandy. Cyril has gone to bed and I am tired and sleepy. So goodbye my darling boy I have missed you so much and hope you are a happy boy.
Much love
from yr ever loving
Auntie Polly
On notepaper with the heading cut off.

XI The Green
Richmond Febry 16.
Dearest Harry,
This must be my morning for writing to you and Charlie for Van and Cyril have a holiday on Saturdays, if they work well through the week; and I get more time. Next Wednesday will be Vandy's birthday so they will have another holiday and come to dinner with me instead. We have had such deep snow this week but it is now all gone and baby says " the grass is come again". Last week I went with Aunt Isabella and Dolly to the Dogs House in London - I want one of those long dogs with crooked legs called a Dashshund and Dolly wants a pug - but although there were more than 600 in the House we could not get one we liked - they were nearly all mongrels. T(sic) kill over 300 a week - put them into a very large cage with a sort of stuff like chloroform and they lie down and die without any pain. I saw four little dead doggies looking just as if they were asleep - I do not quite know what to give Van I think it must be a large box of bricks. Why did you scratch out the e in acheing - do try to spell better I expect you did it for fun
- I shall tell you all the words you spell wrong - jolly ought to have two l's not joly. Would you like some more lined paper like the enclosed sheet for letters and then you could do it better. Vandy is waiting to post this so I must leave off now.
Goodbye my darling boy much love to you from all at home.
Ever your loving,
Aunt Polly.


XI The Green
Feby 27th
Dearest Harry,
you will see that Vandy liked your letter and stamps by what he says in the enclosed one, Charlie also wrote to him. I am so glad you both remembered the day I had him and Cyril to dinner and took him to Whitelegs the next day as we were not at home on his birthday. Father has been rather bad with a cold so Lucy and I took him away for two days to Tunbridge Wells, and we had a very long country walk there and enjoyed ourselves greatly. You will be pleased when you come home with a beautiful "mail cart" Mrs Duncan has given the children it is a big one that even Dolly has had an occasional ride in, but the seat is really meant for baby, but it will be splendid for you to pull. Your last two letters have been much better spelt and so much tidier that you hardly seem to want the lined paper but I will send you some when it comes, they had to get it for me. Your "Boy's Own Paper" has gone to you today - I have only two mistakes to tell you of in your last letter 1st we build a fort instead of built. 2 to sometimes wants another o at the end of a sentence also when you mean it in the sense of (sic). It is trying to snow every day but we do not get much only cold winds, I daresay you are having fine fun, Vandy is getting on grand with his French you must work hard not to let him catch you up.
Much love from us all to my darling boy.
From your most loving,
Auntie Polly

11 The Green
Richmond . . . . .
My darling Harry
I hope this will get to you tomorrow but I have lost the morning Post, and am not quite sure. Next week I am going to send you your hamper so you must let me know if there is anything you especially want. I shall put in your two "Boys Own Paper" and another Sunday at Home if you care for it - you were a kind of boy to remember Vandy's birthday - he has told you about his presents and they both enjoyed the circus. We are now working hard at lessons again - Mr Edgar came over yesterday to see how he was getting on in Latin - I am glad he did not go back to school, as there have been a great many down with measles. Half of Haileybury seem to be in bed with influenza by Charlie's account - he is all right again. I am so glad you have escaped. It has been trying to snow the last three days, and winds have been bitterly cold - now it is coming down in good earnest and looks very wintry. Georgie has been doing very well on the River, and the Clare boat has come out well in the bumping races. Geo is stroke I suppose and has been presented with a pair of oars a great honour. Last Monday the Bateman's pony (Stockings) was standing outside Aunt Bessie's being held by a small boy when he took fright chucked the boy on the pavement and bolted all down Dicke St & dashed into the window of "Feraris" the eating shop on big island, he not only broke all the plate glass but tore away the woodwork as well & spoil L2 worth of buns. The pony is very little hurt & they are going to keep him still, but uncle B will have a great deal to pay for damages. I have left very little room for goodbyes. Love from all.
Ever yr loving Auntie Polly

11 The Green
March 16
My darling Harry,
I think perhaps you will be wanting some stamps, so I have sent to you half a dozen & that will last till we see you again. Do you know yet when your holidays begin? Charlie comes home on the 11th April. Next Wednesday he will be confirmed and I am going to run down and see him for the day but not stop the night, so I will be able to tell you about it in my next letter. It will be my birthday treat and it happened just right for I should have to give Van and Cyril a holiday on such a great occasion. This reminds me will you try and send a letter to Dolly for her birthday the 20th it is nice to remember one another, if you enclose one in your letter tomorrow I will send it her on the right day. Father is going to try and get her a little pug dog - won't that please her? You must try and work very hard now till the end of term and bring home a good report of progress etc. This is my busy morning so I must end this now - with very much love to my darling boy.
From your loving,
Aunt Polly.


11 The Green
March 22
My darling Harry,
I was so very pleased with you all birthday card and you were a kind darling boy to remember the day and think of me - It was the 1st thing I had on my birthday when I got down to breakfast: I found a pretty little tea kettle from Aunt Bessie and a fern from Cooky & photo case from Aunt Ada & then later on in came Van and Cyril with a card & a bottle of scent from themselves, & a beautiful silver spirit flask from Father so I was very rich in presents & to make it nicer Aunt Ada came to spend the day with me, she was on her way to a Southsea with Uncle Henry. Dolly, I believe, had a good many presents & she was very pleased at your remembering her. Vandy has not gone back to school & will not now till after Easter he will have to keep on with his Latin through the holidays. Charlie comes home on the 10th two days after you. Miss Fanny Torlesse (your godmother) has come back from New Zealand & she spent one evening here last week. I cannot say she asked after her Godchild or showed much affection. The boys are very excited about the boat race, baby & I are "turn coaches" & are Oxford this year. I will enclose some stamps I ought to have sent some last week - I am going up to Aunt Annie's and must end this now. We shall soon have you home again. Much love and many thanks.
From your ever loving,
Auntie Polly


11 The Green
Saturday, March 23
My darling Harry
You were a very kind boy to remember my birthday Father gave me your letter early in the morning. I had a very happy day. Father went with me to Haileybury we had to start at 8.30 to get there in time for the confirmation we saw Charlie for a few minutes before going in to the chapel & after the service we went to get some dinner at the Inn - with Mrs Winter & her boy, the house was very full of visitors so we had to be content with a little room at the back of the bar, we strolled about in the afternoon, had little walk in the country but the wind was truly terrible, then we watched the boys playing in the fives courts - and about five we were entertained by the four boys in their study to a splendid tea. That ended the entertainment they had to go to work and we started for home - I had some very nice presents - Father gave me a beautiful clock and candlesticks for my drawing room & I had a lamp, flowers, & a fern from Van and Cyril. I have told you all the news now, & you must hear more on the 28th. Much love from all.
From your ever loving,
Auntie Polly.

11 The Green
March 27th
My darling Harry
I ought to have sent you my love and birthday blessing by an earlier post, but I waited that I might at the same time send you a knife. I hope you want one & will like it, & not chop off all your fingers with it - the blades do not seem stiff to open, for even, your nailless fingers but the thing they call a pick it, (sic) & you must forced it open with something - I wish you could have been at home tomorrow but you must have some special treat in the holidays in remembrance of it. We shall very soon have you at home again - Mr Hammond has written to say, you come on the 10th - I do not think I ever told you that your "Boys Own Paper" was bound at last & looks very nice. We shall be glad to have you home again, I hope it will be nice weather & you will get boating and cricket. I have little to tell you as I wrote so lately, only, very many happy returns of the day. I have been so pleased to see a great improvement in the last year - less selfish - less greedy & I do want my darling boy in to grow up good unselfish & loving, it is better than anything else, & you will have Cyril coming soon to follow your example at school & I do think it will be a good one. Fondest love dear old boy.
From your most loving
Auntie Polly

11 The Green
April 4th
My darling Harry
This will be my last letter to you, the next thing will be to welcome you on Thursday. Of course you can come home alone as usual, the trains and stations are rather crowded next week so mind you stick to your luggage. You may as well pay your ticket to Richmond & porters out of your own money, & I will re pay you - I have a good deal of news to surprise you about Charlie;1st he is going to walk home from school with a friend, taking him about two days, so we shall see him on the 11th; 2 the next thing, he is leaving Haileybury altogether, this term, & going to a tutor in Germany for a year, after Easter; Father has had to hurry it on, as he wants him to be there with another English boy who is only there till midsummer, it will be jollier for him, with some other boy just a first - Another thing is, Father & I are going with him the beginning of May, & can see him settled in his new house. And now I have a little bit of advice for you, that you may not like, just at first, but I am sure you will try to do what is right. Father does not at all like your having taken 4/- as a present, from your schoolfellow, on your birthday; it is not considered nice to take money from one another at schools, amongst older boys, it would be called "bad form"; & at Haileybury "pamperism", of course, you would not know this at first, but Father says he would be very glad if you would tell your friend that you have heard from home, & although your Father thinks it very kind of him to have given you such a present, yet he does not wish you to accept money from a schoolfellow, & ask him if he will not be hurt, at taking it back. I hope you will make up your mind to set this little matter right - and not be very disappointed, as you do not really need the money. We have not decided on your birthday treat yet. I think we must have a happy day somewhere, we will write down a few things, & you shall choose. We must try and give Charlie very happy holidays, as it will be his last at home for some time - I have written you a long letter, you must let us have an answer to it all on Monday. Much love dear old boy from all at home - we are all longing to see you & Tip will have a dozen frenzies.
From yr ever loving
Auntie Polly.

Dearest Harry
I think you can quite safely come home yourself this time, get a porter directly for your luggage, to carry it to the District Line & there wait for the Richmond train - Mr Hammond gives you yr fare & you must ask him to let you have 2/- more to come home with, give yr porter 4d or 6d & then get a 3rd single to Richd. If you come by yr usual train you will catch the 10.48 from Vic. I think. As we shall see you so soon I will not write more only best love from all.
Ever yr loving
Auntie Polly
11 The Green
April 5th

11 The Green
May 11th
My darling Harry
I must not neglect you this first week and I hope you will get this a breakfast tomorrow morning - Yesterday we made our little shopping excursion to London with Nanny and Bar - & bought all their summer clothes & hats ending up with tea at the airated Bread Place. We have seen scarcely anything of Aunt Lucy and the children they all turned sick on the Sunday and only Kitty could come to tea. Aunt Isabella tried one day to have Rees, but he could not eat any tea, and then without any warning was sick all over the table, so she soon had enough of him - they have now gone to their house at Wimbledon, Lucy Jesse Laura,& Kitty are coming to have tea with me this evening & having no piano, we shall have to be babies & play games after - Your flannel coat is come you shall have it next week with some shirts Nurse is finishing for you. I hope you will be a happy boy this term, & work hard at lessons & play - I want you to be clever at games, cricket, as well as at books.
Goodbye now my darling boy
Love from us all
Ever yr loving
Aunt Polly

11 The Green
June 1st
My darling Harry
I will be very good to give you a letter two Sundays running. I have just written one to Charlie I am glad you like your flannel jacket & I hope it will make you nice & cool & help you to run with great swiftness. I do not think I told you that poor Cyril has been in the ward again - he had just come in from his walk, when he swung the garden gate & jammed his finger in it, it was a horrible pinch, & tore the nail completely out. Nurse was close by, but he never cried out, only ran for his life, through the lobby into the house & then back again before she knew he was hurt, fortunately Father was in & bound him up at once, but he cannot use it yet; the new nail is just beginning. Auntie Ada's birthday was last Wednesday. Haven't you got it down in your birthday book - Van & C sent her a card & letter. I may take the little ones on the River this afternoon & teach Van to row. Your spelling has been very terrible this term Ada, you write as Ader all right - you put al write. But I am very glad to have my darling boy's letter. I only tell you this that you may know next time.
Much love from all at home &
From your most loving
Auntie Polly

11 The Green
June 15th
My darling Harry
This very nice little sheet of paper will just do to write to you on, & you shall have a larger one next week. Aunt Annie, from Dedham has come to stay a week at Fathers, with Maggie and Georgie and baby's birthday will be kept on Monday, with a picnic in the park, that is, if we do not have a wet Sunday which looks rather likely. "King Bar" is intensely interested about his birthday & enquires every day if it has come. I think it is about time for you to have a hamper so I shall see about it next week - & put you in some socks for Sunday, it is not so hot now, so you can bear it for one more day. Your "boy's own paper" has come, & you shall have it in the hamper. You must practise hard at your swimming, for I hear there is a place near Barm'th very good for canoeing & only boys that swim can go in canoes - Much love from all at home.
Ever y'r very loving
Auntie Polly

Deaths.
Julius. On the 12th inst, at Richmond, Surrey, Mary Caroline, youngest daughter of the late Frederick Gilder Julius, Esq, MD, age 38 years. No flowers.
Ref: Sussex Agricultural Express Saturday, 19 July 1890

1890 Death Notice : JULIUS - July 12 at Richmond Surrey, Mary Caroline, youngest daughter of the late Frederick Guilder Julius Esq., M.D., aged 38. No Flowers.

Julius Mary Caroline 19 August 1890.
The Will of Mary Caroline Julius late of 11 The Green Richmond SRY spinster who died 12 July 1890 at 1 Portland Terrace Richmond SRY was proved at the Principal Registry 19 Aug 1890 by Arthur Onslow Julius of 15 Finsbury Circus in the city of London Solicitor the Brother and Edward Liveing Fenn of 1 Portland Tce M.D. the Executors
Personal Estate L6334 14s 10d.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 9 scholar born Richmond SRY

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 19 single born Richmond.

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Mary is recorded as a sister-in-law, unmarried, aged 29yrs, born Richmond SRY, of private means (stock investments).


143. Arthur Onslow JULIUS [59] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Oct 1854 in Wardrobe CT Old Palace Richmond SRY, was baptised on 18 Nov 1854 in St John Richmond SRY, and died on 4 May 1929 in 113 Church Rd Ham London. at age 74.

General Notes:
Arthur was born at 7.50 in the evening October 14, 1853. Baptised at St John's Church Richmond by Mr Wilks November 18, 1853. Sponsors the Earl of Onslow, Mr Christopher and the Dowager Duchess of Shaftesbury.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Arthur was a Solicitor of Richmond Surrey, he practiced at 15 Finsbury Circus London. Arthur lived at Portland Terrace, Richmond, where Nancy Fenn attended children's parties, he then moved to Langham House, Ham Common.

LETTER FROM LORD ONSLOW.
Richmond
December 29th 1853
My Dear Madam,
May I beg to entrust to your keeping the accompanying little cadeau for my Godson Arthur Onslow Julius, with my very warmest wishes for his wellbeing here and his still better being hereafter.
It never occured to me till it was to late to give the order, to have the date of his birth and the year engraved on the cup, but as I perceive there is a blank sheild on one of its sides of a most inviting character for that purpose, I can hardly resist the temptation, if you will allow me, with taking it to Town with me on the first opportunity that offers itself.I will take especial care to have the figures more distinctly marked than those in the monogram on the obverse side of the cup which represent A.O.J.
Believe me to be
My dear madam
Your very faithful
Humble servant
Onslow

See image on picture file note birth date appears to be incorrect.

Arthur was named after Arthur George Onslow, 3rd Lord Onslow, (1777-1870), a family friend. This letter in the possession of Rosemary Julius 2003, is clearly dated, casting some doubt on the reported year of Arthurs birth.

Julius Jottings. April 1900 No. 2.
With reference to the Kings presents, mentioned in a last number, to Dr Julius, senior, a massive pair of silver candlesticks given to him are now in the possession of Mr Arthur O. Julius, of Ham, with the royal crest and Coronet on one side, and the Julius arms on the other.

FUNERAL OF MR A. O. JULIUS
THE TIMES 4 May 1929.
Many tributes of respect at Ham Church ceremony.
It was with great regret that we announced in our mid-weekly issue the death on Sunday of Mr. Arthur Onslow Julius, at 113, Church Road. Mr Julius, who was seventy-five years of age, was head of one of the oldest Richmond families. He was born at The Wardrobe Court, which was the residence of the family before the late Lord Cave lived there.
Mr. Julius was a solicitor, and continued practicing to the time of his last illness. He and his family lived in Ham some time ago for about eighteen years and during that time he took a prominent part in the life of the village. He was a churchwarden for several years, was chairman of the District Council and manager of the schools. His simple manner and kindly personality won him many friends. He leaves a widow and a married son, who is a partner in his father's firm. Another of his sons was killed in Mesopotamia during the war
The body was taken to St. Andrew's Church, Ham, on Wednesday evening, and remained there all night. A service was held in the church on Thursday afternoon, and it was attended by a large number of friends. The chief mourners were, Mrs. Julius (widow), Mr. Dudley Julius (son). Mrs. Hunt (sister), Mrs. Dudley Julius (daughter-in-law), Colonel and Mrs. Julius (cousins), Miss Ethel Julius (cousin), the Misses Bateman (nieces), Colonel and Mrs. Woodifield (brother-in-law), the Misses Woodifield (sisters-in-law), Mr. and Mrs. Percy Elworthy (niece), Dr. and Mrs. Charles Fenn (nephew), Mr. Leslie, Hull (cousin), Mrs George Hunt, and Mrs E.C.P. Hull.
The service was fully choral, the hymns "How bright those glorious spirits shine" and "Lead, kindly light" being sung. Mr. Reed was at the organ. The officiating clergy were the Rev. J. R. Pridie (vicar of Ham), the Rev. H. M. Gray (vicar of Richmond), and the Rev. Vanderzee Fenn (nephew of the late Mr. Julius). The interment afterwards took place in Ham Churchyard. There were many beautiful floral emblems.

Julius Mr Arthur Onslow (75) of Old Jewry EC solicitor and
Church-road Richmond (net personally L17,113) . . . . . L22695

Alternative date, death 2 May, he died aged 75 years.
In 1876 Arthur is recorded by his sister Katherine Fenn as having an address at 5 Bedford Gardens Kensington W.

420 Julius Arthur Onslow 15 Finsbury circus E.C.
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1889/90/91

P O Kingston 848 Julius Arthur O Solicitor Langham hse Ham
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1909/10/11/13

London Wall 2570 Julius & Thomas Solicitors 15 Finsbury Circus
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1909/10/11

Bank 8469 Julius & Thomas Solicitors 8 Old Jewry EC
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1912/13/14/17/20

Redhill 156 Julius Arthur O Solicitor Kingsholme Earlswd comn
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1914

Reigate 356 Julius Arthur O Solicitor Kingsholme Earlswd comn
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1915

Richmond 542 Julius Arthur O Solicitor 4 Portland tce The Green
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1917/18/20/21/22/23/24/25

Julius Arthur O Solicitor 4 Portland tce The Green Richmond 0542
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1927

Bank 8469 Julius Edwards & Thomas Solicitors 8 Old Jewry EC
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1912/14/15/17/18/20

Bank 8469 Julius Edwards & Julius Solicitors 8 Old Jewry EC
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1921/22/23

Central 1970 Julius Edwards & Julius Solicitors 8 Old Jewry EC
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1924/25

Central 2376 Julius Edwards & Julius Solicitors 8 Old Jewry EC
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1927.

Julius Arthur Onslow of 8 Old Jewry London died 28 April 1929 at 113 Church Road Richmond Surrey Probate London 15 June to Elizabeth Julius widow and Arthur Dudley Julius Solicitor. Effects L22695 10s 5d
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
Birth & baptism details IGI film FHL 1042204 record birth 14 Oct 1853, bap. 18 Nov 1853 - to search 2009

Surrey History Centre:
ESTATES OF THE TOLLEMACHE FAMILY OF HAM HOUSE IN KINGSTON UPON THAMES, HAM, PETERSHAM AND ELSEWHERE: RECORDS, 14TH CENTURY-1945
Catalogue Ref. K58
LMS/JLY January 1972
Langham House, Ham Common
FILE - Lease for 21 years; 1. Maj-Gen. C.E. Webber & another; 2 Arthur O. Julius esq. 31 Oct 1895; endorsed: Surrender; 1. A. O. Julius; Earl of Dysart 20 Feb 1914; plan in margin - ref. K58/6/218 - date: 1895-1914
FILE - Letters re improvements and rent; A. O. Julius to E. Edwards - ref. K58/6/219 - date: Feb-Mar 1903; May 1905
FILE - Draft surrender; A. O. Julius esq. to Dysart; With copy memorandum of surrender - ref. K58/6/221-2 - date: 20 Feb 1911 - 1913 - 2 messuages with yards & gardens called School residences in Ham St.
FILE - Counterpart lease for 21 years; 1. Maj.-Gen. Webber, G.T.Biddulph & Hon. Stanhope Tollemache, Dysart trustees; 2. Rev. Arthur Vaughan Blunt, vicar, Arthur Onslow Julius esq., and Hen. Negus, farm bailiff, churchwardens; Sydney Fletcher Higgins and Joseph Horace Noble, esqs., overseers of the poor; John Wm. Harker and Fred. Gridley esqs., and Wm. Warner, builder, all of Ham, school committee; plan in margin - ref. K58/6/384 - date: 10 Dec 1898
New Rd: Blunt Cott., no.43, Julius Cott., no.45 and Balgay no.47
SURREY ESTATES also TWICKENHAM ESTATE and LINCOLNSHIRE and LEICESTERSHIRE ESTATES and general estate management - ref. K58/13
Policies for properties not listed in /72
FILE - Julius Cottage, No.45 New Rd., Ham - ref. K58/13/142a-b - date: 1931, 1933
To find out more about the archives described, contact Surrey History Centre <http://www.archon.nationalarchives.gov.uk/archon/searches/locresult_details.asp?LR=176>
PROPERTIES IN HAM - ref. K58/6
Copyhold house and premises on North of Ham Common
FILE - Conveyance; 1. Dysart trustees and another; 2. Julius A. Bertram esq. - ref. K58/6/15 - date: 19 May 1899
FILE - Affidavit of Julius Alf. Bertram - ref. K58/18/74 - date: 24 July 1893
HIGH COURT, CHANCERY DIVISION, papers in the matter of the Estate of the Rt. Hon. Lionel William John Manners, Earl of Dysart, dec. - ref. K58/18.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 2 Old Palace Richmond SRY. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 7 scholar born Richmond SRY

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Richmond SRY. Arthur is shown at his fathers home aged 17.

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 15 Finsbury Circus St Stephens London. Arthur is shown in this Census at 15 Finsbury Circus born abt 1854 at Richmond, relationship Boarder to others in the house who were
George Early head and his wife Emma

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 4 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 37 a solicitor born Richmond

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Michael le Belfry York. Arthur is recorded as a visitor at the home of Richard & Emily Blunt married aged 47 a solicitor born Richmond SRY

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Langham House Ham SRY. Arthur is recorded as head of a 16 room house aged 57 married a solicitor an employer born Richmond SRY. there are 3 servants in the house.

Arthur married Elizabeth WOODIFIELD [626] on 8 Aug 1888 in Kensington MDX. Bessie was born in 1865 in London and died on 27 Mar 1936 in London at age 71. She was usually called Bessie.

General Notes:
Elizabeth is remembered as a charming woman who at one time lived in Kensington next door to Bertha Alison Fenn, Alston A Fenn's mother.

Bessie sailed on the "Kaikoura" for Wellington New Zealand in April 1891 the yoyage was scheduled to take 90 days

Julius Mrs Arthur Denbigh lodge Denbigh gardens Richmond 1353
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1930/31/33/34

Julius Mrs Arthur 14 St Albans mans W8 Western 8517
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1935/36

Julius Elizabeth of 14 St Albans Mansions Kensington Middlesex widow died 28 February 1936 Probate London 27 March 1936 to Arthur Dudley Julius and Maurice Alfred Edwards solicitors and Alice Haynes Woodifield spinster. Effects L16503 10s 0d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, St Michael le Belfry York. Elizabeth is recorded as a visitor at the home of Richard & Emily Blunt married aged 34 born London

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 31 Dalby Sq Margate KEN. Elizabeth is recorded as married for 22 yrs with 2 children both living aged 45 born London

Children from this marriage were:

+ 295 M    i. Arthur Dudley JULIUS [627] was born on 18 Sep 1889 in Richmond SRY, died in Stourton Caundle DOR, and was cremated on 7 Feb 1958 in Woking SRY.

+ 296 M    ii. Cecil Herbert JULIUS Lieut [632] was born Dec Qtr 1896 in Kingston MDX and died on 9 Apr 1916 in Mesopotamia at age 19.

144. JULIUS [12768] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Aug 1855. The cause of his death was stillborn.

145. JULIUS [12769] (Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 31 Aug 1856. The cause of his death was stillborn.

146. Ashley Alexander JULIUS [800] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 Aug 1845 in Hyde Park London MDX and died in 1881 in Canada at age 36.

General Notes:
Births.
Julius. On the 8th inst, at Norfolk Crescent, Hyde Park the wife of Alfred Alexander's Julius, of a son.
Ref: Morning Post 9 August 1845.

Ashley was a Solicitor, he emigrated to Canada. He is thought to have adopted his cousin Florence Charlotte Sayle's (nee Julius) children after her death in 1874.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873.
Julius A of Mortlake. 1a 0r 0p gross estimated rental value. L6

Julius Ashley A, aged 32, Mr, gentleman, saloon class, departed England arriving New York 15 May 1878 on the Algeria. He was accompanied by:
Alice T Julius aged 31 a wife.
E France Julius child aged 1yr 6mths.
Sydney G Julius child aged 3mths.
Ref: Ancestry.com

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Ashley is recorded as a son aged 5 born Paddington MDX

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Ashley is recorded as a son aged 15 scholar born London MDX

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Ashley is recorded as a married son aged 25 solicitor born Paddington MDX

Ashley married Alice Paget TILBROOK [801] Sep Qtr 1869 in Thetford NFK. Alice was born in 1847 in Cambridgeshire.

General Notes:
Alice was a nurse, who returned to her profession after her husband died in 1881.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Alice is recorded as married a daughter-in-law), aged 24 born Cambridgeshire

Children from this marriage were:

+ 297 F    i. Ethel Paget JULIUS [802] was born in 1873 in MDX London, was baptised on 14 Mar 1873 in Hertingfordbury Hertford Eng., and died Jan Qtr 1966 in Hastings at age 93.

+ 298 M    ii. Alfred Alexander JULIUS [1222] was born in 1875 in Kensington MDX and died Jan Qtr 1875 in Kensington MDX.

+ 299 F    iii. Eveleen Frances Leila JULIUS [803] was born in 1876 in Cottenham CAM and died in 1920 at age 44.

+ 300 M    iv. Sydney George Alexander JULIUS [805] was born on 29 Jan 1878 in Folkstone, KEN and died on 12 Jan 1941 in West MDX Hospital at age 62.

+ 301 M    v. Eustace Alexander JULIUS [1223] was born in 1879 and died in 1879.

147. Edith Isabell JULIUS [808] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1847, was baptised on 7 Apr 1847 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died in 1930 at age 83.

General Notes:
At her christening Edith the family were living at Norfolk Cres Paddington, she was baptised by Henry R Julius.

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900.
We hear that Miss Edith Julius has given up her home at Brighton and gone to live next door to Miss Minnie Julius, of 8, St Davids Avenue, Bexhill on Sea.

Deaths
Julius, On Jan 10 1930 at Buchanan Hospital St Leonards-On-Sea Edith Isabel Eldest Daughter of the late Alfred Alexander Julius of Stanley Lodge Mortake. Surrey Aged 82.
Ref: The Times Saturday 11 Jan 1930 pg 1 Issue 45408 Column A

Julius Edith Isabel of 13 Eversley-road St Leonards-on-Sea spinster died 10 Jan 1930 at the Buchanan Hospital St Leonards-on-Sea Probate London 21 Mar to Harry Joseph Charles solicitor. Effects L3763 4s 8d Resworn L3753 17s 2d
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calandars

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 4 born Paddington MDX

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 14 scholar born London MDX

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Edith is recorded as an unmarried daughter aged 24 born in Paddington MDX

148. Dr Stanley Alexander JULIUS [809] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 Jan 1849 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 14 Mar 1849 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, and died on 25 Nov 1891 in Hastings SSX at age 42.

General Notes:
Births.
Julius. On the 26th ult, at Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, the lady of Alfred Alexander Julius, Esq, of a son.
Ref: South Eastern Gazette 6 February 1849.

Stanley was baptised by George Quilter.

Stanley was of 19 Cornwallis Gdns Hastings a house he built on the corner of Homesdale Gdns, in 1880.
He was a Surgeon Major, head of Medical Staff First Cinque Ports, Member of the Old Volunteer Detatchment, Royal Sussex Regiment, for 18 years. He was keenly interested in the Royal East Sussex Hospital, local Freemasonry and politics.

To the Editor of the Standard.
Sir, I was surprised to read in yesterday's Standard that my brother, Mr Stanley Alexander Julius, a medical student, who has been residing in Cornwall for the last month, was fined L5 and 10s, damages by Mr Vaughan at the Bow Street Police Court, for wrenching off bell pulls and street door knockers. I have since made enquiries about the charge, and with the assistance of Police Constable 145 E, who was concerned in the affair find that the person who committed the offence, and was therefore fined, is a fellow student of my brothers, and that he was cowardly enough to give my brother's name.
By your giving publicity to the above facts you will greatly oblige.
Yours obediently,
Ashley A Julius.
Mitre Court Chambers, Temple, January 26.
Ref: London Evening Standard 28 January 1871.

Royal College of Surgeons of England.
The following gentlemen, having undergone the necessary examinations for the diploma, were admitted members of the College at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on Thursday, viz: . . . . . Stanley Alexander Julius (Mortlake) . . . . .
Ref: Daily Telegraph and Courier (London) 18 November 1871.

Apothecaries Hall.
At a Court of Examiners held on the 14th inst, the following gentlemen, having passed the necessary examinations, were admitted licentiate's of the Society of Apothecaries, viz: . . . . . Stanley Alexander Julius, of Mortlake . . . . .
Ref: London Evening Standard 16 March 1872.

Stanley is reported in the 1870/80's on numerous occasions in his local paper the Hastings and St Leonards Observer giving expert testimony as the Doctor attending deaths, and carrying out post-mortems. His practice address was York buildings.

Volunteer Appointment - the London Gazette announces the following: 1st Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteer Corps, Stanley Alexander Julius, gent, to be Acting Assistant Surgeon, July 30."
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer 9 August 1873.

Local Exhibitors at the Birmingham Dog Show.
At the 20th great annual Exhibition of sporting and other dogs at Curzon Exhibition Hall Birmingham from Monday to Thursday, the following names are to be found amongst the exhibitors . . . . . Mr Stanley Alexander Julius exhibited Bessie in King Charles Spaniel . . . . .
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer 6 December 1879.

The Vacancies in the Council.
Nomination of Candidates.
Holy Trinity Ward - Bell, James, 22 Robertson Street, Hastings, pharmaceutical chemist, proposed by Stanley Alexander Julius, and seconded by Thomas Holwell Cole.
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer 17 November 1883.

Death BMD 4th Qtr 1891 Hastings 2b 27 Stanley Alexander Julius 42

Deaths.
Julius. On the 25th ult, at Cornwallis Gardens, Hastings, Stanley Alexander Julius, LRCP, MRCP, aged 42, second son of the late Alfred Alexander Julius, of Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, and Lincolns Inn Fields, London.
Ref: Sussex Agricultural Express 11 December 1891.

Death of Surgeon Major Julius.
It is with deep regret that we announced the death of Surgeon Major Julius, at the comparatively early age of 42. For 18 years the deceased gentleman had laboured amongst us, and during that period he won the love and esteem of a vast number, and all who came in contact with him spoke in the highest terms of his frank manner, open generous heart, and his singular kindness to all. He was in touch with hundreds of young men, and every one, without exception, spoke well of him. When Mr Julius came to Hastings he acted as successor to the late Mr J C Savery, taking the practice of that gentleman in York buildings, and subsequently moving to Cornwallis Gardens's. He had been in Hastings but a short time when he was unanimously elected medical officer to the Hastings Court of Foresters, a post he held up to the time of his death, and one which he faithfully attended to in every detail, and there was just as much time devoted by the late gentleman to a poor Forester as there was to a rich patient. It is said by some that the considerateness of the Medical Officer not only drew many members to the Court but as a natural consequence was in no small way conducive to the great prosperity which it enjoys today. Mr Julius also succeeded Mr Savery as Medical Officer to the 1st Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteers, ranking as Surgeon Major. Here again the men were loud in the praise of the "Doctor" as he was called, who never thought a recruit to low in the scale to now and then speak a word of encouragement to him. In addition to these offices, he acted with his brother Volunteer, Surgeon Marshall, as lecturer of the Hastings branch of the St John Ambulance Society, and his work was of much value to all.
As the Admiralty Surgeon to the local Coastguards he faithfully attended to his duties as medical examiner of recruits. Mr Stanley A Julius was born at Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, in Surrey, his father having Chambers at Lincolns Inn Fields. He was the second son of Alfred Alexander Julius, and his grandfather was the court physician to his Majesty King George IV. This gentleman was well known in Hastings, as he lived for a long time at Maze Hill House, and was, at his death, buried in the graveyard attached to Hollington Church in the Wood. The deceased was educated at Blackheath, under the watchful eye of the Rev T Matheson and afterwards removed to Kings College London. He married in 1873 Genette (sic), the youngest daughter of Mr Thomas Hall Fisher, banker, of Cambridge, the ceremony being performed in the church situate in the grounds of the brides sisters house. Before the marriage Mrs Julius was related to Mr Julius through a sister marrying a first cousin of that gentleman. The mother of the late Surgeon Major was the daughter of Brigadier General Alexander, and on referring back, we find that this lady is a direct descendant of Aubery De Vere, thirtieth (sic) (actually 20th Earl) and last Earl of Oxford, and hence being directly descended from Oliver Cromwell.
It will be remembered that, during the great gale, a week or two ago, the late gentleman was down at Bopsep on the day of the storm, rendering every assistance, both medical and physical, and while at this work contracted a cold, which, although it did not prevent him continuing his active employment, still worked in his system, and on Sunday fits of fainting attacked him, as well as gastric haemorrhage. Feeling better he was at work again on Tuesday, but at twelve o'clock on that day he was brought home seriously ill, and he quietly passed away on Wednesday, at twelve.
He leaves besides the widow, a son, aged 17 (Stanley De Vere Alex), and a daughter, aged 16 (Muriel). We beg to offer Mrs Julius and the family our deep sympathy in the terrible bereavement which has so suddenly come upon them, and can assure them that the town generally echoes our sentiments. So far as the family are concerned, the funeral will be very quiet, but the local Volunteer Forces and the Foresters will follow.
The order of procession will be as follows:
The Firing Party of the 1st Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteers.
The Band of the 1st Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteers.
The Hearse with Pall Bearers.
The Chief Mourners.
The Horse of the Deceased.
A Mourning Carriage.
Privates of the Cinque Ports Rifles.
Gunners of the Cinque Ports Artillery.
The Naval Artillery Volunteers.
The Yeomanry.
Coastguards.
Non-Commissioned Officers of the above Corps according to Rank.
Juniors in Front.
Officers of the above, according to rank.
Bodies of Civilians.
Carriages.

The procession will leave the house at 2 pm for the cemetery, by way of Cambridge Road, Marine Parade, High Street, and London Road, and we are asked to state that the Foresters will meet at the Clarence Hotel, at 1.30, Mr C Vidler of Stonefield Road is the undertaker.
We may add that Dr Marshall, a close and intimate friend as well as brother officer of the deceased, who has attended him during his illness, and who it need hardly be said, has gained not a little popularity in this town, both by his geniality and his skill as a practitioner, has undertaken to carry on the practice for the present for the benefit of the widow and family.
At the last moment we are informed that the late Adjutant Major Cafe, who is now staying at Brighton, will attend the funeral today (Saturday).
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer 28 November 1891

Funeral Of Surgeon Major Julius.
The funeral of this respected officer of the 1st CPRV, took place on Saturday afternoon at the borough cemetery with full military honours. Col Brookfield, MP, was in command of the Rifles, assisted by Capt Farrell (adjutant), Major Westton, Capt Langham and several other officers. The Artillery, Naval Volunteers, and a contingent of the coastguards also joined in the procession, in addition to a strong deputation of the Hastings Foresters Court, of which the deceased was surgeon. The coffin was covered with the Union Jack, the plumed hat of the deceased being on top. The deceased's riderless horse was also in the procession, carrying his late masters saddle, boots, sword, etc.
Altogether the procession was a very imposing one. The rifle band played "The Dead March" en route to the cemetery. A large number of local doctors attended the ceremony, and others sent their carriages. The widow was escorted to the grave by Major Cafe (ex-adjutant of the 1st CPRV), a close friend of the deceased, and the other mourners were the two children of the departed one. Canon Sanderson conducted the service, at the conclusion of which three volleys were fired over the grave.
ref Sussex Agricultural Express 1 December 1891.

Re-Stanley Alexander Julius, Deceased.
All persons having claims on the estate of the late Stanley Alexander Julius, late of 19 Cornwallis gardens, Hastings, surgeon, deceased, are requested to send particulars thereof to the undersigned as promptly as possible.
Dated this 5th day of December 1891.
Langham Son and Douglas,
Solicitors
44A Robertson Street, Hastings.
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer 5 December 1891

Julius Stanley Alexander.
The Will of Stanley Alexander Julius of 19 Cornwallis Gardens Hastings surgeon died 25 Nov 1891 Probate London 28 January 1892 to Jeannette Julius widow.
Effects L2851 9s 8d.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
It would appear that the place of birth as recorded in the 1891 Census relating to Stanley and Jeanette has been transposed.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Stanley is recorded as a son aged 2 born Mortlake

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Stanley is recorded as a son aged 12 scholar born Mortlake SRY

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 19 Cornwallis Gdns Hastings. Stanley is recorded as head of house married aged 32 a surgeon born Mortlake. Also in the house was Kathleen Alexander a neice aged 10 born Dalhousie India

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 19 Cornwallis Gdns Hastings. Stanley is described as head of house married aged 42 a doctor of medicine born Cambridge

Stanley married Henrietta (Jeanette) FISHER [810], daughter of Thomas Hall FISHER [1502] and Agnes FIELD [23414], on 17 Apr 1873 in St Michael Figheldean WIL. Henrietta was born on 20 Sep 1848 in Cambridge CAM., died on 29 Jul 1935 in Petersham Surrey at age 86, and was buried on 1 Aug 1935 in Petersham SRY.

General Notes:
Births.
At Cambridge on the 20th inst, the wife of Thomas Hall Fisher, Esq, banker, of a daughter.
Ref: Cambridge Independent Press 23 September 1848.

Marriages.
Julius - Fisher. April 17, at St Michael's Church, Figheldean, Wilts, by the Rev Alexander Grant, MA, rector of Manningford Bruce, assisted by the Rev Henry de St Croix, MA, vicar of the parish, Stanley Alexander Julius, Esq, second son of the late Alfred Alexander Julius, Esq of Stanley Lodge Mortlake, to Jeannette, youngest daughter of the late Thomas Hall Fisher Esq Cambridge.
Ref: Bedfordshire Mercury 26 April 1873.

Death of Mrs Julius.
Link With Richmond's Past:
Her Active Life.
The deepest sympathy has been extended to Miss Muriel Julius on the death of her mother, Mrs Stanley Julius, which took place last Monday at their home, the Cottage, Petersham. She was taken ill on the Sunday, and only the previous Friday had attended the Petersham vicarage fat fete.
Mrs Julius, who would have been 87 in September, was the daughter of Mr Thomas Hall Fisher, Deputy Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire, and widow of Dr Stanley Julius, a member of an old Richmond family which came to the Old Palace in 1805 and lived there for two generations. She was one of the first to take sittings in Holy Trinity Church Richmond. That was 66 years ago. Since taking up residence in Petersham she had not attended regularly, but she maintained a keen interest in the church and was a reader of the parish magazine.
Mrs Julius was at one time secretary of the Richmond branch of the Girls Friendly Society, and a member of the Richmond Women Citizens Association. She lost her son, Colonel de Vere Julius, who commanded the Royal Sussex Regiment, five years ago. She was a great personality in Petersham, where she will be much missed.
Up to some six or seven years ago, when she fell while out with her dog, she was remarkably active for her age, and always took a keen interest in her daughter's activities and in local life.
The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon, following a simple service, conducted by the vicar, the Rev R. S. Mills, at Petersham Old Church. The internment took place in the churchyard.
The following sent floral tokens:
Miss Muriel Julius (daughter); Diana Julius (granddaughter); Mr Dudley Julius, Mr Arthur Julius, Lady Curtis (niece); Mrs Moggridge (niece); Miss Haynes (niece); Mary Hewitt; Dr and Mrs Williamson; Mr and Mrs Lionel Warde; Miss Marjorie Warde; the Dowager Lady Nuttall; Col and Mrs Bromhead; Mrs Henrys; Mr and Mrs Howland; Mr and Mrs Trevor Davis; the Rev R. S. Mills; Mrs and Miss Mills; Mr and Miss Deighton; the Misses Hack; Mr and Mrs Daniel; Mrs Wentworth Downer; Mr and Mrs George Widdowson; Mrs Henry Hunt; Col and Mrs E. V. Hugo; Mr and Mrs Soimenow; Mr and Mrs Bertram Cowen; Mr and Mrs A Tuckwell; Mr and Mrs Harold Broadbent; Ian, Michael and Ann; Mrs Casey; Miss Gwen Hughes; Mr Mrs and Miss Higgins; Mr and Mrs Charles Batham; Mr and Mrs John Lang; Mr and Mrs Calloway; Mr and Mrs Cecil Roberts; Mrs Douglas Mason; Mr and Mrs Kingswell ("From an earthly paradise to a haven of rest"); the Misses Bateman; the ladies at Petersham Almshouses; Mrs Hewitt; Mrs Ena Hewitt; Mrs Field; and Mr and Mrs Howorth.
Ref: The Twickenham Times ? 1935

Death BMD 1935 3rd Qtr Surrey N.E. 2a 105

Julius Jeanette of The Cottage Sudbrook Lane Petersham Surrey widow died 29 July 1935 Probate London 30 September to Muriel Ada Julius Spencer.
Effects L2935 15s 10d
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Cambridge CAM. Jeanette is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 12 born Cambridge CAM

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bath Cottages Norwich NFK. Jeannette is recorded as a lodger unmarried aged 22 an annuitant born St Andrews Cambridge CAM

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 19 Cornwallis Gdns Hastings. Henrietta is recorded as a wife aged 32 born Cambridge

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 19 Cornwallis Gdns Hastings. Henrietta is described as Jeanette a wife aged 42 employment "at home" born Mortlake SRY

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 7 Onslow Ave Richmond SRY. Jeanette is recorded as head of house a widow aged 52 living on her own means born Cambridge Cork.

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 7 Onslow Ave Richmond SRY. Jeanette is recorded as head of a house of 9 rooms aged 62 a widow mother of 4 children two of whom are still living of private means born St Andrews the Great Cambridge. Also in the house was a 72 yr old domestic servant Sarah Higgs.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 302 M    i. Lieut Col Stanley de Vere Alexander JULIUS [811] was born in Mar 1874 in Hastings SSX and died on 12 Sep 1930 in Millbank Military Hospital at age 56.

+ 303 F    ii. Muriel Ada JULIUS [1224] was born on 30 Jan 1875 in Hastings SSX and died on 12 Apr 1961 in Surrey at age 86.

+ 304 M    iii. Eric Seymour JULIUS [9069] was born on 8 Jan 1876 in Hastings SSX and died on 26 Jan 1876 in Hastings SSX.

+ 305 M    iv. Alfred Groves JULIUS [9068] was born on 8 Jan 1876 in Hastings SSX, died on 22 Jan 1876 in Hastings SSX, and was buried in Hastings Cemetery SSX.


149. Villiers Alexander JULIUS [814] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Nov 1850 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 5 Jan 1930 in Bexhill SSX at age 79, and was buried on 8 Jan 1930 in Bexhill SSX.

General Notes:
Births.
Julius. On the 19th inst, at Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, the lady of Alfred Alexander Julius, Esq, of a son.
Ref: London Evening Standard 25 November 1850.

Villiers was baptised by his uncle Henry R Julius.

Villiers was a Solicitor in practice with Julius & Creasy in Colombo Ceylon, he retired to England.

Julius & Creasy is the second oldest law firm in Sri Lanka, (founded 1879) it is also the largest. (2011)
The beginnings of the partnership go back to when E.D. Thomas joined Villiers Alexander Julius and attested their first Notarial Deed. E.D. Thomas' partnership with Villers Julius was of a short duration as the former returned to England in poor health, his place was taken by Harry Creasy. Harry Creasy, was the son of Sir Edward Creasy, one time Chief Justice of Ceylon, his name is synonymous with the Colombo Rowing Club.
Villiers Julius too was a powerful oarsman and the President of the Rowing Club. He was the then Senior Partner of the firm and along with Harry Creasy, worked long and hard hours. Their reputation for honesty, integrity, industry and precision grew to such an extent that they were universally respected and benefactors to Colombo society at the time. Sydney Julius, Villiers nephew succeeded the founding partners.
Ref: http://www.juliusandcreasy.com/inpages/firm_profile/history.php

Twentieth Century Impressions of Ceylon.
By Arnold Wright.
Contains the following articles by Villiers
Colombo Rowing Club Pg 265.
Article by Villiers on the history and achievements of the club.
Ref: http://books.google.com/books?id=eUF_rS8FEoIC&q=Villers+Julius#v=onepage&q=Julius&f=false

Fauna: By V.A. Julius
An article on fauna in Ceylon Pg 157.
http://books.google.com/books?id=eUF_rS8FEoIC&q=Julius#v=snippet&q=Julius&f=false

Football Pg 262.
The Colombo Football Club was rescued from extinction by Villiers.
http://books.google.com/books?id=eUF_rS8FEoIC&q=Julius#v=snippet&q=Julius&f=false

Julius Jottings January 1900. No 1.
Mr Villiers Julius is returning to Ceylon after a short visit to this country.

Villiers sailed 16 Mar 1922 from Southampton to Las Palmas, on board the Orania. His address is recorded as Bishopston, Sutherland Ave, Bexhill-on-Sea.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

1930
Probate: Julius, Villiers Alexander 41 Wickham-Avenue Bexhill-on-Sea Sussex died 5 January 1930. Probate 6 March to Ernest Reed Williams and Harry Joseph Charles Solicitors Effects. L12442 16s 9d Resworn L12602 8s 9d.
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars

Research Notes:
JULIUS
(Holy Trinity Church Nuwara Eliya Ceylon Sri Lanka)
Marriage & child/children of Villiers Alexander Julius of Colombo & Norah Laura
http://www.kabristan.org.uk/index.php?option=com_search&Itemid=5&searchword=Villiers+Julius&submit=Search&searchphrase=any&ordering=newest

Image of Villiers from:
http://www.juliusandcreasy.com/inpages/firm_profile/history.php

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Littleworth Close Mortlake. Villiers is recorded as a son aged 4mths born Mortlake

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Villiers is recorded as a son aged 10 scholar born Mortlake SRY

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Villiers is recorded as a son aged 21 single an Articled Clerk born Mortlake SRY

Villiers married Nora Laura MONEY [815], daughter of Lt. Col. Edward James Thrayle D'Oyley de Bourbel MONEY [14589] and Georgina Mary RUSSELL [14590], on 19 Sep 1883 in Colombo Ceylon. Nora was born on 30 Mar 1860 in Nainital Uttarakhand India, died on 2 Jun 1950 in 13 Palmerston Rd Westcliff-on-Sea ESS at age 90, and was buried in London Cemetery Ilford.

General Notes:

Nora had an address in London in 1916 C/O Messrs Boustead Bros 5 Fenchurch Street Londn R. C. (Now a pizza resturant in 2013)

Death Notice 2 Jun 1950:
Julius: On June 2 1950 at 13 Palmerston Rd Westcliffe-on-Sea, Nora Laura, widow of Villiers Alexander Julius, aged 91. Funeral 11am tomorrow (Thursday) City of London cemetery Aford
Ref: Ancestry Index Cards


Children from this marriage were:

+ 306 F    i. Nora Georgina Violet JULIUS [816] was born on 20 Nov 1884 in Colombo Ceylon. and died on 31 May 1960 in Dorset at age 75.

+ 307 F    ii. Edith Margaret Francis (Daisy) JULIUS [817] was born on 24 Apr 1887 in Ramsgate KEN.

+ 308 F    iii. Leila Sybil JULIUS [818] was born on 10 Mar 1889 in Ramsgate KEN.

+ 309 F    iv. Ina JULIUS [7761] was born about 1885 in Colombo Ceylon.

+ 310 F    v. Henrietta (Etty) Maud JULIUS [820] was born on 5 Apr 1891 in Colombo Ceylon. and died in Apr 1983 at age 92.


150. Ada Alexandria JULIUS [822] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Aug 1852 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 14 Nov 1852 in St John Richmond SRY, and died in 1934 at age 82.

General Notes:
Births.
Julius. On the 17th inst, at Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, the lady of Alfred Alexander Julius, Esq, of a daughter.
Ref: London Evening Standard 18 August 1852. Also Sussex Advertiser 24 August 1852.

Birth & baptism details IGI film FHL 1042204 - to search 2009

Marriages.
Layard - Julius. April 15, at St Paul's Church, Kandy, Ceylon, by the Rt Rev, the Lord Bishop of Colombo, assisted by the Rev E F Miller, MA, warden of St Thomas's College, Colombo, Charles Peter Layard, MA, Cantab, barrister at law, of Colombo, only son of Sir Charles Peter Layard, KCMG, to Ada Alexandrina, second daughter of the late Alfred Alexander Julius, of Stanley Lodge, Mortlake, Surrey, Esq.
Ref: London Evening Standard 22 April 1882.

Research Notes:
Ref: Images National Portrait Gallery London.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Ada is recorded as a daughter aged 8 scholar born Mortlake SRY

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Ada is recorded as an unmarried daughter aged 18 born in Mortlake SRY

Ada married Sir Charles Peter LAYARD [823], son of Sir Charles Peter LAYARD [10812] and Louisa Anne EDWARDS [10813], on 15 Jun 1882 in Kandy Ceylon. Charles was born on 5 Dec 1849 in Colombo Ceylon. and died on 8 Jun 1915 in Kent England at age 65.

Marriage Notes:
Ref: http://genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-genealogy/current+c-layard47520+2-2-0-1-0

General Notes:
Sir Peter was a Solicitor in Colombo, in partnership with his brother-in-law Villiers Julius, he later became Chief Justice of Ceylon.

Sir Charles Peter Layard, Educ. Cheltenham, and St. John's College Cambridge, 1872, Batchelar of Arts; 18 March 1891, Acting Attorney-General of Ceylon; 27 July 1888, Solicitor General of Ceylon; October 1892, Puisne Justice; Between 1 November 1892 - 1902, Attorney-General of Ceylon; between 1902 - 1906, Chief Justice

Brian Duncan wrote: May 2005
"I would be interested to hear from anyone who knows the LAYARD family. I was reminded of the name by the Daily Telegraph obituary of Bob Wright (contributed by John Feltham), which mentioned that Wright married Anne LAYARD, daughter of a senior ICS officer of the Central Provinces and Berar. My grandmother, who was born in India and lived in Calcutta for many years, listed two Layards in her address book: 'Mrs Layard' and 'Tommy Layard'. Furthermore, my 1st cousin (3 times removed), Albert William John FREND (c.1858-aft.1889), whose parents were both born in India, married Barbara Maud Teresa LAYARD (b.c.1869), daughter of John Arthur LAYARD of Melbourne, Australia, formerly of the HEICS, who had a brother, Sir Charles LAYARD, KCB. Barbara, and her younger sister Joan (b.c.1874) were recorded in the 1881 Census living in Cheltenham. I know that Albert FREND and Barbara LAYARD married in London in 1889, but I have not been able to find any further trace of them.
Best wishes, Brian Duncan, currently in Gettysburg, PA Poss. son: Frank Henry LAYARD born April 18 1872 educated Guernsey and St Annes. studied Law but was a tea planter. In 1923 was Director and Inspector of Estates for Gordon Frazer and Co See "Ceylon", compiled and published by Plate Ltd,Colombo, July 1924
Ref: http://genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-genealogy/current+c-layard47520+2-2-0-1-0

Layard Sir Charles Peter of the Grey House Langton Green Kent knight died 8 June 1915 Probate London 22 September 1915 to Dame Ada Alexandrina Layard widow and Villiers Alexander Julius Notary Public. Effects L21,170 5s 2d
Ref: National Probate Callendars

Research Notes:
Ref: http://genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-genealogy/current+c-layard47520+2-2-0-1-0

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, St Johns College Cambridge CAM. Charles is recorded as unmarried aged 21 an undergraduate born Colombo Ceylon

Children from this marriage were:

+ 311 F    i. Ada Mildred LAYARD [1227] was born on 29 Aug 1883 and died on 19 Nov 1969 at age 86.

+ 312 M    ii. Lt Col Charles Peter Julius LAYARD [1231] was born in 1885.

+ 313 M    iii. Raymond Julius LAYARD [1235] was born in 1886.

+ 314 F    iv. Edith Vivien LAYARD [1238] was born in 1888 and died in 1970 at age 82.

+ 315 M    v. Austen Havelock LAYARD [1239] was born in 1895.

151. Minnie Jessie Harriet JULIUS [824] (Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Jan 1857 in Mortlake SRY, was baptised on 22 May 1857 in Mortlake SRY, and died on 10 Apr 1935 in Bexhill-on-Sea SSX at age 78.

General Notes:
Births.
Julius. On the 16th inst, at Stanley Lodge Mortlake, Surrey, the wife of Alfred Alexander's Julius, Esq, of a daughter.
Ref: Surrey Agricultural Express 20 for January 1857. Also Morning Post 20 January 1857.

Birth & baptism details IGI film FHL 1041795 - to search 2009

Julius Jottings, No 6 Jan, 1902.
Miss Minnie Julius has left Bexhill, and is now living at Farnham.

Julius Minnie Jessie Harriet of 4 St Georges Road Bexhill-on-Sea Sussex spinster died 10 April 1935 at 29 Egerton Rd Bexhill-on-Sea Probate London 28 May to Harry Joseph Charles solicitor and Edith Vivian Layard spinster. Effects L8710 3s 3d
Ref: Ancestry National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Minnie is recorded as a daughter aged 4 scholar born Mortlake SRY

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London. Minnie is recorded as a daughter aged 14 born Mortlake SRY

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 8 St Davids Ave Bexhill SRY. Minnie is recorded as head of house with two servants aged 44 single living on her own means born Mortlake SRY

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 3 St Davids Ave Bexhill SRY. Minnie is recorded as head of house of 11 rooms and only occupant
aged 54 single of private means born Mortlake SRY

152. Isabella Maria DEVERILL [1242] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Dec 1837 in Richmond SRY.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Isabella is recorded as a grandaughter aged 13 born Richmond SRY

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Isabella is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 23 born Richmond SRY

Isabella married Ferdinand Mathias BRUNEL [1243] in 1867. Ferdinand was born in 1837.

General Notes:
Ferdinand lived in France, a wine grower near Nantes.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 316 M    i. Ferdinand George Gaston BRUNEL [1244] was born in 1869.

+ 317 F    ii. Anna Isabel Alice BRUNEL [1245] was born in 1872.

153. Percy Julius DEVERILL [1246] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1838 and died on 3 Nov 1863 in Meerut Bengal India at age 25.

General Notes:
Percy, a soldier, served at the Indian Mutiny

154. George Charles DEVERILL [1247] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1839, died on 27 Aug 1868 at age 29, and was buried in Nauuanu Hawaii.

General Notes:
William Edward Herbert Deverill (1848-1904) and his brother, George, were young Englishmen sent to Hawai'i (Sandwich Islands) by Queen Victoria to deliver a silver urn and other christening gifts to Prince Albert (1858-1862), the son of Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma.
But when the prince, dangerously ill when they arrived in Honolulu on Aug. 22, 1862, died on the 27th, the brothers presented their gifts to Queen Emma instead and then chose to forego the arduous return voyage to England in favor of remaining in Hawai'i. George died of tuberculosis,
Ref: http://thegardenisland.com/news/local/island-history-for-friday-june/article_9c99cf7c-7aa9-11df-80ab-001cc4c03286.html
Note: This is the only report of George travelling to Hawaii, most reports put Edward and Alfred as the emisaries.

Vancouver Island Coal Mining and Land Co.
In 1864, the company hired an architect in Britain, George Deverill, to draft a town plan based on topographical maps of the area. Deverill gave Nanaimo one of its most distinctive features, the fan shaped pattern of the downtown streets. Rather than section the town into a grid of regular rectangles, the streets follow the natural downward slope and bowl formation of the land. Such responsive planning was popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the construction of new towns. The radial plan also reflects aesthetic ideals popular in civic architecture at the time. City planning in London, Paris, and in newer American cities emphasized both beauty and reason. Wide avenues and streets were constructed to provide the most attractive sight lines and efficiently move traffic to important districts. In the case of Nanaimo, the radial plan leads the traveller to the primary business district and towards the natural beauty of the harbour.

Married Mar 8, 1865, at St Paul's Church, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, George Charles Deverill, Esq, Asst Mgr of Vancouver Island Coal Mining and Land Co, 2nd Son of late Colonel Deverill, HM 90th Light Infantry, to Mary, eldest Daughter of W H Franklyn, Esq, Justice of the Peace, Stipendiary Magistrate and Government Agent, Nanaimo. [see also Mar 9, 3 ? A Wedding Party] [Colonist, 1865-03-08*]
Births, Marriages and Deaths found in the index of Historical Victoria Newspapers Nanaimo 1858 to December 31, 1871
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bcvancou/nanpriorto1872.htm

A George Charles Deverill is mentioned in - Robert Brown and the Vancouver Island Exploring Expedition
edited by John Hayman 23 Jul 1864
http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=lf6t_IZHGAoC&pg=PA149&lpg=PA149&dq=George+Charles+Deverill&source=bl&ots=W54VsXzZls&sig=2MB3c7W51OL4C1g0Uewh2pbxSKs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RcE8UYfoPISckQXK7oDQAw&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAg

NANAIMO'S HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
In 1864, the company hired an architect in Britain, George Deverill, to draft a town plan based on topographical maps of the area. Deverill gave Nanaimo one of its most distinctive features, the fan shaped pattern of the downtown streets. Rather than section the town into a grid of regular rectangles, the streets follow the natural downward slope and bowl formation of the land. Such responsive planning was popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the construction of new towns. The radial plan also reflects aesthetic ideals popular in civic architecture at the time. City planning in London, Paris, and in newer American cities emphasized both beauty and reason. Wide avenues and streets were constructed to provide the most attractive sight lines and efficiently move traffic to important districts. In the case of Nanaimo, the radial plan leads the traveller to the primary business district and towards the natural beauty of the harbour.
Ref:http://www.nanaimo.ca/assets/Departments/Community~Planning/Heritage~Planning/Local~History~and~Historic~Resources/historicaldev.pdf

George Charles Deverill, who died in September. 1868; he was an assistant manager of the ...

George married Mary Victoria FOSTER [2763] on 8 Mar 1865 in St Paul's Church, Nanaimo Vancover Island CAN. Mary died on 27 Aug 1868.

Research Notes:
Married at Nanaimo, British Columbia, Mar 29, 1869, William Clarke to Mary Deverill, eldest Daughter of W H Franklyn Esq, Civil Comm of Seychelle Is. [Colonist, 1869-03-26*]
Births, Marriages and Deaths found in the index of Historical Victoria Newspapers Nanaimo 1858 to December 31, 1871
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bcvancou/nanpriorto1872.htm

Mary was a school teacher


The child from this marriage was:

+ 318 F    i. Laura May Julius DEVERILL [16482] died on 10 Jan 1867 in Nanaimo BC Canada.

155. Annie Stanford DEVERILL [1248] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Dec 1840 in Richmond SRY.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Annie is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 20 born Richmond SRY

Annie married Leopold Pierre BATTU [1249] in 1867.

General Notes:
Leopold was a major in the French Army, during the Franco/German War he was shut up with Bazaine during the seige of Matz


Children from this marriage were:

+ 319 F    i. Lucie Annie Jeanne BATTU [1250] was born in 1868.

+ 320 M    ii. Leopold Percy Leonce BATTU [1251] was born in 1870.

+ 321 M    iii. Herbert Alfred Edmond BATTU [1252] was born in 1875 and died in 1876 at age 1.


156. William Edward Herbert DEVERILL [1253] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 6 Sep 1848 in Burnley, Lancaster, Eng. and died on 26 May 1904 in Hanalei Kauai Hawaii at age 55.

General Notes:
William Edward Herbert Deverill (1848-1904) and his brother, George, were young Englishmen sent to Hawai'i (Sandwich Islands) by Queen Victoria to deliver a silver urn and other christening gifts to Prince Albert (1858-1862), the son of Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma.
But when the prince, dangerously ill when they arrived in Honolulu on Aug. 22, 1862, died on the 27th, the brothers presented their gifts to Queen Emma instead and then chose to forego the arduous return voyage to England in favor of remaining in Hawai'i.
George died of tuberculosis, but W.E.B. found employment on Kohala Ranch and as a photographer before moving to Kaua'i in 1875 to become deputy sheriff under Sheriff Samuel Wilcox. Other jobs Deverill held on Kaua'i included road supervisor, tax assessor, land manager, coffee planter and steamship agent.
Deverill, who possessed an excellent command of the Hawaiian language, was known to Hawaiians as "Kepolo," and to Japanese as"Deverill Man."
In 1880, he married part-Hawaiian Sarah Fredenberg of Hanalei and they would have six children.
Their home on Hanalei Bay once stood across from the present Hanalei Pavilion. Originally the Waioli Mission home of missionaries Edward and Lois Johnson, Deverill had it rolled on'ohi'a logs from Waioli and relocated to his homesite 3/4-miles away in 1890.
With remodeling and additions completed, the Deverill's Western-style, two-story home with verandahs also served as the Hanalei Hotel until it closed in 1920.
Interestingly, during January 1891, Deverill met Queen Lili'uokalani and noted in his diary that "Her Majesty arrived a little before twelve and so far all has gone nicely. The ball came off fine and lasted till 12 o'clock when the Royal Band played Hawai'i Pono."
W.E.H. Deverill died in Hanalei and is buried in the graveyard by the Waioli Church
Island History June 18 2010.

The Hanalei Hotel, known also as the Deverill Hotel for William and Sarah Deverill, who owned, operated and resided on its premises with their six children and a niece, was once located on Hanalei Bay across from the present Hanalei Pavilion.
A Western-style, two-story, timber-framed house with verandahs and accommodations for 15 guests, it remained in service from 1890 until 1920 when it closed.
Originally for many years the Waioli Mission house of missionaries Edward and Lois Johnson, it had been rolled on 'ohi'a logs from Waioli to its homesite on Hanalei Bay in 1890 by William Deverill.
There the house was remodeled and extensions were built, and following installation of a telephone in 1891, the Deverills would be notified of arriving guests by phone from Lihu'e in time for them to vacate bedrooms and make preparations.
Attached to the main structure by a lanai walkway was an addition used as a Hawaiian kingdom post office and general business office, and a detached building functioned as a combination medical dispensary, ironing room and living quarters for a man named Kateyama, the hotel's cook, baker and main helper.
Other structures included rainwater-catchment tanks, an outhouse, chicken coop and barn. There was a vegetable garden, and in back were rice paddies. The Deverills also maintained a boat house on the Hanalei River.
The Deverills were hard workers. Part-Hawaiian Sarah Deverill managed Hanalei Hotel, charging $3 a day for room and board, and was a midwife, a postal clerk and ran a butcher shop.
In addition to his hotel duties, William Deverill, an Englishman who'd arrived in Hawai'i in 1862 to present christening gifts from Queen Victoria to Prince Albert, worked as a photographer, deputy sheriff, tax assessor, road supervisor, coffee planter, land manager and steamship agent
Island History June 25 2010.
http://thegardenisland.com/news/local/island-history-for-friday-june/article_9c99cf7c-7aa9-11df-80ab-001cc4c03286.html
Images: Courtesy of thegardenisland.com

Page 76
TABLE No. I6.
School Agents by Islands, Districts, Name of School, Nationality.
. . . . . Hanalei...... W. E. H. Deverill... British......... Date of Appointment. Feb. 16, 1875.
Ref: Report of the Minister of Public Instruction to the President of the Republic of Hawaii for <http://quod.lib.umich.edu/p/philamer/BBT8872.1897.001?rgn=main;view=fulltext>

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii USA, 18 Jun 1900, Hanalei Kauai Hawaii. William is recorded as head of house married aged 51 married 20 years a tax assessor living in a rented home he was a naturalized Hawaiian arriving in the Islands in 1867 he and his parents were born in England. It is further noted that William enumerated this section of the census in Hanalei, his handwriting is very legible and attractive.

William married Sarah B FREDINBERG [1254] in 1880. Sarah was born in Jun 1861 in Hawaii.

General Notes:
The Deverill House-Hanalei Hotel
A prominent structure in Hanalei at the end of the 1800s and well into the 1900s was the Deverill House, also known as the Hanalei Hotel. The Western-style, timber-framed home was originally constructed in 1838 about 3/4 mile away, near the Wai'oli Mission House where it was built for Protestant teachers Mr. and Mrs. Edward and Lois H. Johnson. The Johnsons arrived at the Wai'oli mission station in 1837 and lived in the home until 1867 at its original site.
Around 1890, the former Johnson home was rolled on logs of ' lehua to a site closer to the beach and to the east, where it became the home of William and Sarah Deverill. Sarah had lived in the home as a child when she was a ward of the Johnson family.1 The home, which is no longer standing, was located across from the current site of the Hanalei Pavilion.
William Edward Herbert Deverill (1848-1904) came to the Islands from Lancashire, England, arriving at age eighteen with his brother Alfred Palmer Deverill.
The Deverill brothers were part of a contingent sent by Queen Victoria to present a christening gift to her godson, the Crown Prince Albert [Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa o Kamehameha] (1858-1862). Sadly, the young prince had succumbed to sickness and passed away at age four.
After the Deverill brothers presented the gifts to the queen, William and Alfred remained in the Islands. William Deverill had studied in France, and after arriving in the Hawaiian Islands he worked at Kohala Ranch on Hawai'i Island. He also worked in Hilo and Honolulu, including a job with Chase and Dickson photographic galleries where he learned photographic skills he later put to use in Hanalei.
William Deverill moved to Kaua'i in 1875, initially living in L where he served as deputy sheriff under Samuel Wilcox. William married Sarah Benson Fredenberg, who was part Hawaiian and had grown up in Hanalei. Sarah was the daughter of Mary Kau Kellett Fredenberg, a daughter of Captain Kellett, Hanalei's former Pilot of the Port.
William and Sarah Deverill had six children, including Edward, Percy, Florence, Stanford, Anne, and Herbert. The latter three were born 19 years after the first three. Also raised at the house was the Deverills' niece Lena.
In 1887 the Deverills moved to O'ahu, where William ran the Lunalilo Home. Then in 1890 William and Sarah moved to Hanalei where they ran the Hanalei Hotel out of their home just west of Hanalei Pier. Sarah and William Deverill had three children-Edward, Florence, and Percy-and then more than fifteen years later had three more children-Anne, Herbert, and Stanford.
1 p. 243, Damon, Ethel M. Letters from the Life of Abner and Lucy Wilcox, 1836-1869. Honolulu: privately printed, 1950.

Hanalei Hotel
Also called: The Deverill House.
Built: 1838, No longer standing.
Former Johnson Home-Moved from near Wai'oli Mission House around 1890.
Over the decades, many changes were made to the Deverill House, including extensive remodeling and additions. The home site eventually became somewhat of a community center, with a l walkway connecting the main building to a separate structure that housed a Hawaiian Kingdom post office and general business place, including a tax office.2
The main part of the Deverill House was two-stories, with five bedrooms upstairs and verandas on both levels facing Hanalei Bay. Extending out from the back of this part of the home was a structure containing the kitchen and pantry as well as the dining room.
Rooms on the western side of the Deverill House were used by the family for sleeping when guests were staying in the main quarters. After phone service was installed in 1891, a phone call from L would alert the Deverills of arriving guests so they could begin making preparations.
A separate building near the Hanalei Hotel housed a dispensary where a medical clinic was offered twice a week by a K doctor. The dispensary building also had an ironing room, and for many years was the quarters of Kateyama, the head helper, cook, and baker.
On the back side of the Deverill House were tanks to catch rainwater, and also a hale li'ili'i (outhouse). Other structures on the site included a chicken house and a barn. Various vegetables grew in the garden and rice paddies grew in the back yard. Behind the home and beyond the rice paddies was the Deverills' boat house, on the banks of the Hanalei River.
The Deverill children sometimes escorted guests to local scenic spots. Prominent artists of the time who painted Hanalei landscapes included Otto Wix, Robert Barnfield, and D. Howard Hitchcock.
[Photograph: William Deverill]
William Deverill had a multitude of jobs, serving as district sheriff, tax assessor, road supervisor, and property manager for Albert Spencer Wilcox. As an agent for the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company, William was in charge of all steam freight arriving or being sent from Hanalei Bay.2 He also started a coffee plantation on leased land in Hanak Valley on Kaua'i's N coast.
Sarah Deverill's many roles included serving as manager of the Hanalei Hotel where she charged guests $3.00 a day for room and board. Sarah was also a midwife, and she was known as a gracious and dependable hard worker. In the early 1890s, Sarah operated a butcher shop, slaughtering animals and selling beef.
William Deverill was an avid photographer and used his darkroom at the Hanalei Hotel to develop his own pictures as well as those of his guests. Japanese residents often called William "Deverill Man," and many Hawaiians called him "Kepolo."2
William Deverill died in 1904, and his grave site may still be seen alongside Wai'oli Mission Hall (the former Wai'oli Church) in Hanalei. The gravestone reads: W. E. H. Deverill, Burnly Lancashire, Eng., September 6, 1848-May 24, 1904, Hanalei, Kauai.
After William's death, Sarah assumed many of his former duties, including serving as the region's tax assessor and postmistress. The Hanalei Hotel remained in operation until 1920 when the automobile became popular, road improvements allowed faster access to Hanalei from L and visitors no longer needed to stay the night in Hanalei. Sarah Deverill passed away in Honolulu in the 1930s.
One of the daughters of William and Sarah Deverill was Florence K. Deverill, who taught grades one through four at Hanalei School. Florence was much older than her younger siblings, who were among her students at Hanalei School. Also working at Hanalei School was Florence's aunt, Elizabeth Fredenberg Lindley, who taught grades six through eight.
Another child of William and Sarah Deverill was Edward Deverill, who was born in 1881 and attended 'Iolani and Punahou Schools in Honolulu before returning to Hanalei where he worked as the tax assessor. Edward later worked various other jobs in the Islands and married Barbara Ella Lee of Los Angeles, who worked as a school teacher in Makaweli.
After Edward's retirement, Barbara and Edward moved to Hanalei where they built a house on the shore of Hanalei Bay. Barbara Deverill worked as a teacher at Hanalei School until 1952, and lived to age 100. Edward Deverill died on May 6, 1940, and was buried next to his father in the Wai'oli Church Cemetery.
Edward and Barbara's two sons were E.G.K. Deverill, Jr. and Herbert Spencer Deverill. Herbert worked for Universal Studios in Los Angeles as a motion picture art director before passing away in 1984. Barbara Ella Deverill's sister, Etta Lee Brown, was a movie star who played roles opposite Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks Sr.

2 p. 8, The Hanalei Hotel. Hanalei Yesterday, Part I, 1000 Friends of Kauai, 1990.
Ref: http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/hanalei-history-part-3.asp

The Hanalei Post Office
Around the turn of the century, the Hanalei Post Office was located near Hanalei town at the site of the Hanalei Hotel, also known as the Deverill House, where Sarah Deverill served as the postmistress. In 1915, the Hanalei Post Office was located on the land of Sheriff James K. Lota on Weke Road, across the street from the home of Charlie Forward.
Ref: Hawaiian Encyclopedia Hanalei History Part 4 http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/hanalei-history-part-4.asp [clxxi]

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii USA, 18 Jun 1900, Hanalei Kauai Hawaii. Sarah B is recorded as a wife aged 38 bn June 1861 married 20 years with 5 children 4 living she was a hotel keeper born in Hawaii her father was born in New York and her mother in Hawaii

2. Census: Hawaii USA, 3 May 1910, Hanalei Kauai Hawaii. Sarah B is recorded as head of house a widow aged 48 with 7 children 6 living a hotel manager living in a rented house born in Hawaii her father was born in England and her mother Hawaii

Children from this marriage were:

+ 322 M    i. Edward G K DEVERILL [1257] was born about 1882 in Hawaii.

+ 323 F    ii. Florence K DEVERILL [1255] was born in Oct 1883 in Hawaii.

+ 324 M    iii. Percy DEVERILL [1256] was born in 1884.

+ 325 M    iv. Norman S M DEVERILL [16502] was born in Feb 1900 in Hawaii.

+ 326 M    v. Stanford M DEVERILL [16503] was born on 28 Feb 1900 in Hanalei Kauai Hawaii.

+ 327 F    vi. Annie I DEVERILL [16504] was born about 1902 in Hawaii.

+ 328 M    vii. William E H DEVERILL [16505] was born about 1905 in Hawaii.


157. Col Julius Stanford DEVERILL [1259] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born 2nd Qtr 1852 in Colchester ESS and died in 1914 in Croydon LON at age 62.

General Notes:
Julius lived in the Sandwich Is (Hawaii). He was an officer in the U S Navy.

Research Notes:
His marriage details are sourced from England Free BMD Marriage Index 1837-1915 Ancestry.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Julius is recorded as a son aged 8 a scholar born Colchester ESS

Julius married Clara Jane SUTER [15929], daughter of Charles SUTER [15975], on 11 Jul 1880 in St Saviour Southwark London. The marriage ended in divorce.

General Notes:
Clara is recorded as of full age at her marriage a spinster living in the Parish of St Saviour Southwark LON

Research Notes:
Clara and Julius were divorced the petition was filed 22 Jan 1895, Decree Nisi 1 May 1895, Final Decree 11 Nov 1895.

In The High Court of Justice
Probate Divorce Division
21st day of January 1895.
The Petition of Clara Jane Deverill of 11 Preston Rd High St Poplar MDX showeth:
That the Petioner ..... on July 11th 1880 lawfully married Julius Stanford Deverill at St Saviours Southwark . . . . .
That after her marriage she cohabited with the respondent at divers places finally at 58 Bloomfield Rd Bow MDX . . . . . they had issue . . . . . Julius Ferdinand Deverill born 29 June 1881
That on or about Nov 1882 the respondent without cause deserted the petitioner and has not returned or contributed to her support.
That for sometime past the respondent at 11 Gaspar Mews South Kensington MDX has cohabited and habitually committed adultery with a woman whose name is at present unknown.
. . . . .
Ref: Ancestry


The child from this marriage was:

+ 329 M    i. Julius Ferdinand Alfred DEVERILL [15974] was born on 29 Jun 1881 and was baptised on 23 Apr 1882 in St Peter Stephney LON MDX.

Julius next married Emma Elizabeth PERRIN [15930] 2nd Qtr 1896 in Kensington LON.

General Notes:
Wifes name may have been Sarah Wheeler

Julius next married Emma Lydia KILBY [15931] 1st Qtr 1903 in Kensington LON.

General Notes:
Wifes name may have been Mary Ann Stone



158. Alfred Palmer DEVERILL [2742] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1849 in Burnley, Lancaster, Eng., was baptised on 10 Jul 1850 in Manchester Chapel of Christ Salford LAN, died on 21 Jan 1898 in Kamole, Maui, HI aged about 49, and was buried on 22 Jan 1898 in Kula, Maui, Hawaii. Ancestral File Number: 38K1-GX.

General Notes:
Alfred Palmer Deverill came to the Islands with his brother William as part of a contingent to present a christening gift to the Crown Prince Albert [Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa o Kamehameha] (1858-1862) from his godmother, Queen Victoria.
Alfred Deverill married Emma Lindsey they had Lena (Angeline) and three other children, he later abandoned the family and moved to Maui. On Maui, Alfred Deverill worked on the ranch of Captain Makee and married a Hawaiian.
Ref: Ref: http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/hanalei-history-part-3.asp

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 11 a scholar born Barnsley YKS

Alfred married Emma Angeline LINDSEY [2743], daughter of George Kynaston LINDSEY [2746] and Mary Kaala FAY [2747], in 1880 in Hawaii. Emma was born on 16 Jun 1856 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 3 Sep 1899 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii at age 43, and was buried on 4 Sep 1899 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii.

General Notes:
Emma Angeline Lindsey (1856-1899) was the second child born to George Kynaston and Beke Fredenberg Lindsey. At age 24 she married Albert Palmer Deverill.
Ref: Pg 64 Loyal to the Land: The Legendary Parker Ranch, 750-1950 By Billy Bergin

Emma was abandoned by Albert Deverill, remarried and had a daughter and son with George Thomas William K. Bell.1
Ref: http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/hanalei-history-part-3.asp
1 Helen Kapililani Sanborn Davis: Reminiscences of a Life in the Islands, as told to Maili Yardley. Honolulu, Hawaii, Native Books, 2000.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 330 F    i. Angeline Constance DEVERILL [2748] was born on 7 Oct 1881 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 29 Sep 1925 in Kula, Maui, Hawaii at age 43, and was buried on 30 Sep 1925 in Kula, Maui, Hawaii.

+ 331 M    ii. Arthur Palmer DEVERILL [2749] was born on 22 Aug 1884 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 21 Jul 1911 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii at age 26, and was buried on 22 Jul 1911 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii.

+ 332 F    iii. Lydia Sarah DEVERILL [2752] was born on 3 Dec 1885 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 16 Sep 1967 in Hilo Hawaii HI at age 81, and was buried on 18 Sep 1967 in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI.

+ 333 F    iv. Helen Lindsey DEVERILL [2750] was born on 20 Oct 1889 in Makawao, Mauai, Kingdom HI, died on 12 Jun 1954 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii at age 64, and was buried in Hawaii.

159. Herbert DEVERILL [15928] (Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1849 in Burnley LAN.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Ivanhoe Tce Ashby de la Zouch LEI. Herbert is recorded as a son aged 12 a scholar born Burnley LAN

160. Mary Isabel JULIUS [1032] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Sep 1841 in Farnham Road Farnham, was baptised on 17 Oct 1841 in Farnham SRY, and died on 3 Mar 1898 in Windsor BRK at age 56.

General Notes:
Mary was unmarried, In 1887 she was admitted as a Clewer Sister (see research notes Frederick Guilder Julius) where she was known as Sr Mary Isabel. She was professed in 1889 and in 1890 went to India where she was head of a Sisterhood. She served until 1894.

Julius Mary Isobel of Clewer Berkshire Spinster died 3 Mar 1898. Probate London 26 April 1898 to Alexander Kaye Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth Solicitors.
Effects L5212 19s 4d.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Mary may have died at Shere near Windsor (Guildford? E Fenn).

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 9 scholar at home born Farnham

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Clifton House Clifton Bristol. Mary is recorded as a grandaughter aged 19 unmarried born Farnham SRY.

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Somers Villa Isleworth MDX. Mary I is recorded as Mary J unmarried aged 29 a visitor at the home of arthur Brewin born Farnham

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 78 Church Rd Richmond SRY. Mary is recorded as a visitor at Arthur and Maria Brewin's home aged 39 unmarried born Farnham

161. Harriet Emily JULIUS [1033] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Dec 1842 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 25 Jan 1843 in Farnham SRY, and died on 13 Jan 1933 in Tunbridge Wells KEN at age 90.

General Notes:
Julius Jottings No 2 April 1900
Harriet Emily, daughter of Henry Richard and Mary Ann Julius, born in Farnham, December 28, 1842. Choir mistress (with Mrs Brewin) of Wrecclesham Church. Married at Wrecclesham to Arthur William Parker, April 30, 1868. Has trained with Rowledge Choir since 1871, and taken the lead in most parochial agencies.

Harriet was a resourceful and hard working vicars wife. She organised the choir and played the harmonium in the church (later she became the organist) and appears to have been as energetic as her husband. She set up a branch of the Mothers' Union which had been created not many years before, not far from Rowledge, by Bishop Sumner's daughter-in-law. The Rev. Parker's wife might well have been involved in discussions giving birth to the movement, since her father was a part of the circle around the Bishop.
Mrs. Parker also encouraged church activity in Buck's Horn Oak, then a small hamlet, somewhat remote from Rowledge Church. Mothers' meetings were held there and a certain Captain and Mrs. Heathcote held services in a laundry there until a mission was built (in 1905) which became, in time, a church.
She also set up a Girls' Friendly Society, a Ramblers' Association, a provident club for providing clothing and coal in winter - all of which were administered from the parsonage. Games were organised for the children in the vicarage garden. In 1882, a local branch of the Church Missionary Society was set up.
Ref: Old Julius by Birch & Waight.

Parker Harriet Emily of Glenberrie 7 Court-road Tunbridge Wells widow died 13 January 1933 Probate London 4 May to Florence Ellen Parker and Constance Emily Parker spinsters.
Effects L7334 17s 1d.
National Probate Calendars

Research Notes:
Parker family images courtesy of R Waight 2015

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Harriet is recorded as a daughter aged 8 a scholar at home born Farnham

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rowledge Vicarage Farnham HAM. Harriet is recorded as a wife aged 38 born in Farnham Surrey

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Woodcroft Red Hill Reigate SRY. Harriet is described as a visitor aged 48 born Farnham

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Rowledge Vicarage HAM. Harriet is recorded as a wife aged 58 born Farnham.

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Rowledge Vicarage Farnham HAM. Harriet is recorded as a wife aged 68 she had been married 42 years bearing 6 children all alive she describes herself as a Parochial worker and was born Farnham Surrey

Harriet married Rev Arthur William PARKER [1049], son of Henry John Neil PARKER [400] and Elizabeth STRIDE [401], on 30 Apr 1868 in Wrecclesham Church Farnham HAM. Arthur was born on 24 Feb 1841 in Shirley HAM, was baptised on 8 Sep 1841 in Shirley HAM, and died on 18 Apr 1917 in Tunbridge Wells KEN at age 76.

General Notes:
Hampshire Baptisms
ARTHUR WILLIAM PARKER
Birth year1841
Baptism year 1841
Baptism day8
Baptism monthSep
Son or daughterSon
First parent's first name(s)Henry John Neil
Second parent first name(s)Elizabeth
ParishSOUTHAMPTON SHIRLEY

Julius Jottings No 2 April 1900
Arthur was educated at Hyde Abbey School Winchester 1851-59; Lincoln College Oxford 1859-63; graduated 2nd Class in Classical Mods., 1861; 2nd in Greats 1863; Graduated 1863; Ordained 1864 to Trinity Church St Giles-in-the-Fields 1864-66; then Curate St Marys Southampton 1866-69; Married at Wrecclesham Church to Harriet Emily Julius April 30 1868; First incumbant of Rowledge Church (Farnham Surrey) 1871; He paid off the Church debt, built and twice enlarged the schools. Has taken a great interest in temperence work, and conducted a branch at Rowledge for many years.

Arthur was the vicar of St James Rowledge from its dedication in 1871 to 1914. A school accommodating 126 children was opened 7th May 1872 at a cost of L616, the school was enlarged in 1880.
A South window in St James was dedicated 23 June 1918 as a memorial to Arthur Parker and the Rev H M Harke who followed him, but died suddenly in 1917.
Ref: A Rowledge History by Florence Parker and others researched and published by Roy Waight.

In May of 1914 Arthur retired to Tunbridge Wells.

Will Arthur William Parker
Date 19 December 1898
I hereby revoke all former Wills and declare this to be the last will and testament of me Arthur William Parker vicar of Rowledge in the civil parish of Binstead and County of Southampton subject to the interest and control hereinafter reserved in favour of my dear wife I leave and bequeath ultimately to my dear children as follows: viz
I leave to my daughter Florence Ellen Parker the freehold land at Shirley near Southampton bordering the High Street bequeathed to me by my late father Henry John Neil Parker leased by him to Mr William Squibb at L36 per annum the rent of which at the present time is paid by Mrs Maffey of Adelaide Villa Belmont Road Portswood Southampton
I leave to my daughter Annie Sylvia Parker the freehold land at Shirley likewise bequeathed to me by my late father H.J.N. Parker leased by him to Mr William Squibb at L30 per annum bordering the road from Shirley to Southampton the rent of which is now paid by Messrs Evans Foster and Wadham of 2 Grays Inn Square London Also I leave to my said daughter Annie Sylvia Parker the freehold cottage with garden known as Yew Cottage Rowledge on the East of the playground of the National School purchased by me of Miss Mary Marshall as mortgagee for Mr Isaac Deadman and now rented by Mr Wakeford
I leave to my son Ernest Julius Parker the leasehold land (or freehold land if so proved under my fathers will) situated at Shirley leased by Mr Charles Marcer by appointment of Mr H.J.N. Parker to Mr James Mainer at L9 per annum the rent of which was for some time paid by Mr Hammond (as stated in my fathers will) but at the present time is paid by Mr W.R. Holden of Commercial Road Southampton the same being the land bearing the rent of L9 per annum bequeathed under my fathers will to my sister Ellen Parker and by her will to me
I also leave to my said son Ernest Julius Parker the freehold land and houses at Boundstone in the parish of Farnham known as Heathfield with nearly an acre of land adjoining as formerly belonged to Emanuel Barnard all which property was conveyed to me by my late father in law the Rev H.R. Julius by deed of gift dated the 15th day of January 1887
I leave to my son Herbert Francis Parker the freehold land in St Mary Street Southampton leased by Mr John Foot to Mr John Harris at L15 a year which was afterward assigned by Mr J Foot to my late father H.J.N Parker then bequeathed under my fathers will to my sister Ellen Parker and by her will to me the rent of the same being now paid by Mrs Russell of 111 and 112 St Mary Street Southampton I also leave to my said son Herbert Francis Parker the freehold land in Sewell Street West Ham (or Plaistow) Essex purchased by me of Mr Hugh Charles Godfrey and yielding an annual rent as leased to Mr James Tassell of L35 subject however to my son paying to my wife's trustees the annual sum of L20 interest on the sum of L500 advanced by them on mortgage or the full principle of L500 as may be arranged or in case the said mortgage or any part thereof shall have been paid off before my son comes into possession of the said land under this my will be in subject still to my son paying a corresponding sum to the part paid off into my general estate or submitting to an equal deduction from his share of the residue when determined
I leave to my daughter Constance Emily Parker the freehold lands situated in Cook Street Barking Essex on which are erected 23 houses purchased by me of Mr Sydney Smirk leased to Mrs Elizabeth Sutherland for 99 years from May 7, 1894 and yielding an annual ground rent of L8010s 0d subject however to my daughter paying to my wife's trustees the annual sum of L45 interest on the sum of L1125 advanced by them on mortgage at 4 percent or the full principle of L1125 as may be arranged or in case the said mortgage or any part thereof shall have been paid off before my daughter comes into possession of the said land under this my will then subject still to my daughter paying a corresponding sum to the part paid off into my general estate or submitting to an equal deduction from her share of the residue when determined
I leave to my daughter Mabel Alice Parker the freehold land in Waterhouse Lane Millbrook near Southampton leased by my late father H.J.N. Parker to Mr John Parsons at L20 per annum the rent of which is now paid by Mr Richard Galpin of Kelvedon House Kelvedon Essex the same having been bequeathed under my fathers will to my sister Ellen Parker and by her will to me
I also leave to my said daughter Mabel Alice Parker the land in Waterhouse Lane Millbrook leased by my father H.J.N. Parker to Mr N.N. Jefferies at L15 per annum the rent of which at the present time is paid to Messrs Goater and Blatch of Portland Terrace Southampton the same having been bequeathed under my fathers will to my sister Ellen Parker and by her will to me
I also leave to my said daughter Mabel Alice Parker the sum of L300 Stirling I wish it to be understood that in so far as the above named specific legacies to my dear children differ in value it is solely from regard to the varying cost of their education and to the probable prospects of their making income notwithstanding the annual rent interest or produce of all the above named bequests whether real or personal
I reserve to my dear wife Harriet Emily Parker so long as she shall live for her absolute use and control for the benefit of herself without children
I leave to my two sons Ernest Julius Parker and Herbert Francis Parker as co-executives with their mother of this my will each a legacy of L50 free of legacy duty to be paid in due course after the proving of my will
I leave to my dear wife Harriet Emily Parker the freehold property known as Firfield Rowledge purchased by me of the trustee of William Swan Jr absolutely
I direct that all my debts funeral and testamentary expenses be paid out of my residuary estate and subject to such deductions
I bequeath the whole of the residue of my property real and personal or in which I may have a vested interest to my dear wife absolutely with power to will the same if she survives me desiring only that she shall take steps to secure succession to the bulk of it to our children in such proportion as in varying circumstances she may consider fitting and in case my dear wife does not survive me I hereby leave and bequeath all the residue of my property real and personal and any in which I may have a vested interest to be divided equally between my six children I further point that if any of my children should marry and afterwards die before becoming possessed of any of the bequests under this my will the share of such child shall be put in trust for the benefit of any surviving husband or wife and children of such deceased daughter or son the trustees to have power to hold the property as received or to sell it or any part thereof and reinvest it in trust to pay the income of the same to the surviving husband or wife for his or her natural life and at his or her death to divide the same in equal shares between the children of my deceased son or daughter absolutely or if there be one child only then that child to take the whole and in the event of any of my children dying before me unmarried or after marriage without leaving consort child or children then the share of any such deceased son or daughter shall be divided equally between my other surviving children or their representatives as also shall be done at the death of a consort if there be no child or children
Finally I appoint my wife Harriet Emily Parker and my two sons Ernest Julius Parker and Herbert Francis Parker joint executors of this my will I declare this written by myself on the five pages forgoing to be my last Will and Testament
In witness whereof I hereunder set my hand and Seal this 19th day of December 1898
Arthur William Parker (L.S.)
Signed and delivered by the said Arthur William Parker in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses
Daniel Porter Post Office Rowledge Farnham grocer
Beatrice Porter Post Office Rowledge Farnham Surrey spinster

This Is a Codicil to the foregoing last will and Testament of me Arthur William Parker which bears date the 19th day of December 1898 whereas I have now sold the land in Waterhouse Lane Millbrook leased by my late father to Mr N.N. Jefferies at L15 per annum and which I bequeathed in my aforesaid will under certain reservations to my dear daughter Mabel Alice Parker I now believe and bequeath instead thereof and under the same reservations to my said daughter Mabel Alice Parker the piece of land in Tennyson Road Portswood near Southampton purchased by me at the same time of or through Mr Blatch yielding an annual rent of L16
In Witness whereof I have hereunder set my hand and Seal this 31st day of July 1899
Arthur William Parker (L.S.)
Signed and delivered by the said Arthur William Parker in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names at witnesses.
Ruth Porter wife Post Office Rowledge Farnham Surrey
Annie Porter postmaster Rowledge Farnham Surrey

This Is a Codicil to the foregoing last will and Testament of me Arthur William Parker which bears date the 19th day of December 1898 whereas I have sold the freehold land at Shirley leased by my late father to Mr William Squibb at L30 per annum to Mr William Bagshaw the present lessee thereof which land I bequeathed in my will foregoing to my daughter Annie Sylvia Parker under certain reservations I now withdraw that bequest and also the bequest of the cottage known as Yew Cottage Rowledge with garden on the East of the National School playground and instead thereof and under the same reservations during the lifetime of my wife I bequeath to my daughter Annie Sylvia Parker all the freehold land which I have agreed immediately to purchase of Mr Percy Willis Russell situated in Carlton Road Walthamstow Essex on which are built houses now numbered 42, 44, 46, 48, 50 and 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59, 61 and 63 in Carlton Road aforesaid yielding an annual rent of L67 10s 0d subject however to my daughter Annie Sylvia Parker paying to my wife's trustees the annual sum of L24 interest on the sum of L600 or thereabouts advanced by them on mortgage at 4 percent or the full principle of L600 as may be arranged or in case the said mortgage or any part thereof shall have been paid off before my daughter comes into possession of the said land under this my will then subject still to my daughter paying a corresponding sum to the part paid off into my general estate or submitting to an equal deduction for her share of the residue when determined I also leave Yew Cottage Rowledge with garden on the East of the school playground to my daughter Florence Ellen Parker under the same reservations as her other freehold legacy
In Witness whereof I have hereunder set my hand and Seal this 18th day of November 1903
Arthur William Parker (L.S.)
Signed and delivered by the said Arthur William Parker in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.
Laura Overbeck Duffield Ashmore Rowledge
Isabel Ross Duffield

This Is a Further Codicil to the foregoing last will and Testament of me Arthur William Parker which bears date the 19th day of December 1898 I hereby revoke the previous appointment of my son the Rev Ernest Julius Parker as an executor of my will he having taken up his permanent residence in South Africa in his stead I appoint my eldest daughter Florence Ellen Parker as joint executor of my will with the others previously appointed and I also transfer to the said Florence Ellen Parker the legacy of L50 previously bequeathed to my son Ernest Julius Parker for undertaking the duties of executor.
Arthur William Parker (L.S.)
Signed and delivered by the said Arthur William Parker in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.
Ernest Julius Parker Clerk in holy orders Rowledge Vicarage Farnham
Annie Sylvia Parker Nurse Rowledge Vicarage Farnham Surrey

This Is a Further Codicil to the foregoing last will and Testament of me Arthur William Parker which bears date the 19th day of December 1898 whereas I have sold the freehold land and houses in Boundstone known as Heathfield which I bequeathed in my will foregoing to my son Ernest Julius Parker I now withdraw that request and instead thereof and under the same reservations during the lifetime of my wife I bequeath to my son Ernest Julius Parker the sum of L450 Stirling.
In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and Seale this 24th day of October 1916.
Arthur William Parker (L. S.)
Signed and delivered by the said Arthur William Parker in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.
Florence Ellen Parker Spinster 7 Court Road Tunbridge Wells
Alice Emily Powell Domestic 7 Court Road Tunbridge Wells
Affidavit of due execution of 4th codicil filed.

On the 9th day of August 1917 Probate of this Will and four codicils was granted to Harriet Emily Parker Herbert Francis Parker and Florence Ellen Parker executors.
Ref: Transcribed by R Waight 2014

Parker Rev Arthur William of Glenberrie 7 Court-road Tunbridge Wells died 18 April 1917 Probate London 9 August to Harriet Emily Parker widow Herbert Francis Parker MD and Florence Ellen Parker spinster. Effects L13605 4s 11d
Ref: National Probate Calendar

Research Notes:
Parker family images courtesy of R Waight 2015

Medical Notes:
Arthur suffered from senility at his end - Roy Waight

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Providence Villa St James Cres St Faith Winchester. Arthur W is recorded as unmarried aged 20 born Shirley Hants.

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rowledge Vicarage Farnham HAM. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 40 M A Oxford incumbent of Rowledge born Shirley Ham

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Rowledge Vicarage Binsted E Hants. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 50 Vicar of Rowledge born Shirley Hants.

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Rowledge Vicarage HAM. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 60 a clergyman born Shirley Hampshire.

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Rowledge Vicarage Farnham HAM. Arthur is recorded as head of a 14 room house married aged 70 vicar of Rowledge born Shirley Hampshire

Children from this marriage were:

+ 334 F    i. Florence Ellen PARKER [1050] was born on 20 Nov 1869 in Farnham SRY.

+ 335 F    ii. Annie Sylvia PARKER [1051] was born on 11 Jun 1871 in Rowledge Farnham and died on 4 Mar 1959 in Bromley KEN at age 87.

+ 336 M    iii. Rev Ernest Julius PARKER [1054] was born on 20 Oct 1872 in Rowledge Farnham and died on 31 Jan 1942 in Northampton NTH at age 69.

+ 337 M    iv. Dr Herbert Francis PARKER [1055] was born on 10 Jan 1875 in Rowledge Farnham and died on 19 Jan 1947 in Malling Maidstone KEN at age 72.

+ 338 F    v. Constance Emily PARKER [1052] was born on 29 Sep 1878 in Rowledge Farnham and died on 29 Sep 1955 in Clevedon SOM at age 77.

+ 339 F    vi. Mabel Alice PARKER [1053] was born on 25 May 1881 in Rowledge Farnham and died on 11 Nov 1959 in Bromley KEN at age 78.


162. Maria Louisa JULIUS [1034] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 7 Dec 1844 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 3 Jan 1845 in Farnham SRY, and died on 19 May 1933 in Twickenham at age 88.

General Notes:
Marriages.
On the 7th inst, at Wrecclesham, by the Rev Joseph Henry Butterworth, MA perpetual curate of Stapleton, near Bristol, uncle of the bride, Arthur Brewin, of the Adelaide Road NW and 2 Copthall Chambers, EC, London, to Maria Louisa third daughter of the Rev Henry Richard Julius, MA, incumbent of Wrecclesham.
Ref: Morning Advertiser 10 July 1868.

Julius Jottings. January 1900 No. 1.
Mrs Brewin wishes us to state that she would be very grateful for a ticket for the Bath Hospital, and will gladly give all particulars of the case for whom it is needed.

Julius Jottings. April 1900 No.2.
We are indebted to Mrs Brewin's diary.
The first of January George (Brewin) arrived from visiting the Parkers at Rowledge. The New Year are bought Janette (Mrs Stanley Julius) over from Richmond for a call, and I heard from her that Villiers was shortly leaving for Colombo. On the 11th we welcomed Julius and Raymond Layard, who were spending their holidays in Richmond, and George escorted them to Hampton Court. On the 20th Agnes (Brewin) returned to Somerville College, Oxford, for her second term. On the 29th Julius (Brewin) left home to share his brother Frank's lodgings in Kensington. On the first of February Katie Julius, of Redhill, gave us a call. She came to escort a young servant to her first situation. (N.B. - she is a first rate hand at supplying her friends with the young servants). The following week Ella (Brewin) went to stay with the Thompsons at Peterborough, and helped them to move into their new house. Meanwhile, the Rev A. W. Parker and Mrs Parker came to pay us a visit, and I took the opportunity to have some music. Mrs Bateman came over, and Lucie, Laura and I are played most beautifully trios by Beethoven, Brahms, Fesca, Gounod etc. As one of the audience observed, it was "as good as St James Hall without the trouble of going there". Since then Mrs Arthur Julius, who was looking as well as ever, has been to see me.

Research Notes:
Surrey History Centre:
WARE FAMILY OF TILFORD, FARNHAM
Catalogue Ref. 1487
Creator(s):
Ware family of Tilford, Farnham, Surrey
Tayler family of Tilford, Farnham, Surrey

TITLE DEEDS, TILFORD AND ASH
COPY WILL OF MARTIN WARE (D.1872) WITH SUCCESSION DUTY FORMS, VALUATIONS, PAPERS AND CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE DIVISION OF THE ESTATE, ALSO TESTAMENTARY PAPERS OF OTHER MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY, AND OTHERS
Testamentary papers
FILE - Heads of settlement on marriage of Mr Arthur Brewin and Miss Maria Louisa Julius (1868); note as to funds divisible among Mrs Ware's sons under Mrs Burden's will (1859); copy will of Mary Dawling widow of Headley, Hants (1873); blank forms for a will, and for a married woman's will (1849 - ref. 1487/12/39-44 - date: 1849-1873
Ref A2A

Image courtesy N Bucknell (My Heritage)

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Maria is recorded as a daughter aged 6 scholar at home born Farnham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Somers Villa Isleworth MDX. Maria is shown wife of Arthur aged 26 born Farnham

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 78 Church Rd Richmond SRY. Maria is recorded as a wife aged 36 born Farnham

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 19 Strawberry Hill Rd Twickenham MDX. Maria L is recorded as a wife aged 46 born Farnham SRY

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 19 Strawberry Hill Rd Twickenham MDX. Maria Louisa is recorded as a wife aged 56 born Farnham SRY

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 53 Popes Grove Twickenham LND. Maria Louisa is recorded as a wife aged 66 mother of 6 children 5 still living born Farnham SRY

Maria married Arthur BREWIN [1070], son of Francis BREWIN Jnr [18919] and Emma SAVILL [18920], on 7 Jul 1868 in Wrecclesham Church Farnham HAM. Arthur was born on 17 Aug 1835 in New Kent Rd SRY, was baptised on 17 Aug 1835 in New Kent Rd SRY, died on 30 Mar 1919 in The Jungle Popes-grove Twickenham MDX at age 83, and was buried on 2 Apr 1919 in Twickenham Cemetery.

General Notes:
Arthur was a solicitor, then a stockbroker on the Managing Committee of the London Stock Exchange.

Brewin Arthur of The Jungle 53 Popes-grove Twickenham Middlesex died 30 March 1919 Probate London 26 May 1919 to Julius Arthur Brewin share broker and the Rev Maurice Ingram Home Clerk. Effects L20305 11s 4d
The National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
Arthur's birth was recorded in the Non Conformist Non Parochial Registers PRO RG4 4676

Other Records

1. Census: England, 1871, Somers Villa Isleworth MDX. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 35 a member of the Stock Exchange in the role of Attorney not Practising born London.
Brewin has been incorrectly transcribed as Brewer.

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 78 Church Rd Richmond SRY. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 45 member of the Stock Exchange born London.

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 19 Strawberry Hill Rd Twickenham MDX. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 55 a stockbroker born LND

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 19 Strawberry Hill Rd Twickenham MDX. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 65 a stockbroker/agent born Bermondsey LND

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, 53 Popes Grove Twickenham LND. Arthur is recorded as head of house married aged 75 a retired member of the London Stock Exchange born Bermondsey LND

Children from this marriage were:

+ 340 F    i. Emily Louise BREWIN [1071] was born in Sep 1869 in Isleworth MDX and died on 16 Mar 1875 in Wreccclesham SRY at age 5.

+ 341 F    ii. Ella BREWIN [1072] was born on 24 Mar 1871 in Isleworth MDX and died on 27 Feb 1952 in Wreccclesham SRY at age 80.

+ 342 M    iii. Rev Francis Henry BREWIN [1085] was born on 26 Nov 1873 in Brentford MDX and died on 9 Nov 1961 at age 87.

+ 343 M    iv. Julius Arthur BREWIN [1073] was born on 8 Mar 1875 in Richmond SRY and died on 22 Oct 1937 in 7 Denbridge Rd Bickley KEN at age 62.

+ 344 F    v. Agnes Elizabeth BREWIN [1084] was born in 1880 in Richmond SRY and died on 24 May 1967 in St Leonards on Sea SSX at age 87.

+ 345 M    vi. George Merriman BREWIN [1074] was born on 21 Nov 1883 in Richmond SRY and died on 6 Sep 1952 in Newburgh Orange New York USA at age 68.

163. Florence JULIUS [1035] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 Jun 1846 in Farnham SRY, was baptised on 12 Jul 1846 in Farnham SRY, and died on 3 Feb 1937 at age 90.

General Notes:
Julius Jottings, No 6 Jan, 1902.
Having left Talvancroft for two months last summer, Mr and Mrs Stevens and their family spent part of August and September in Switzerland. Mr Stevens and Alfred above the Rhone Valley, at Naye and Villais. Mrs Stevens with her sisters Katie and Octavia Julius, her four daughters, and Constance Parker, in the Bernese Oberland.
Some of the young people went up the Schilthorne, Faulhorn, and had a walking tour over the Grimsel and Furca, whilst Katie Julius and Eva Stevens took tickets for a fortnight and raced about the Swiss railways and lakes, from Lucerne through the S. Gothard into Italy, to Como, Lugano, and Maggiore, back down the beautiful Reuss Valley to Lucerne for Sunday, and then to Berne, Thun, Geneva, Lausanne, and back again to the lake of Thun, joining their companions at Adelbodin.
Unfortunately, the weather was often rather unkind, and somewhat marred the various beautiful excursions. During our last week with friends at Schaffhausen, I (Mrs Stevens) was interested in hearing and seeing something of the capital National schools. Certainly the Swiss, as well as the Germans, might give us useful hints. The religious difficulty is overcome by giving up the first half-hour daily to religion, when the different persuasions send their teachers; and each - Lutheran, Roman Catholic, Jew, etc - have a classroom placed at their disposal.

Florence collected much of the Julius family history recorded here, she wrote the small book "Genealogy: West Indies". At the end of her life with her daughter Christine's assistance she collated her records and sent them to Sir George Alfred Julius of Sydney to carry on the research. Sir George prepared Descendant Charts and notes transferred to this record. These charts were colour coded to each family and Jenifer his Granddaughter tells (in 2001) of her work as a young woman colouring in all the charts.

Florence Julius's letters.
Overlynch Farnham Jan 15 1927.
Florence wrote to Archdeacon Julian of St Kitts, setting out what she knew of the family in St Kitts in the 18th & 19th century's. She asked what information on the family was available on the Island to confirm or add to the record. It is presumed she set out what she learned in her booklet "Genealogy - The West Indies" mentioned above.

Overlynch Farnham Oct 16 1934
Dear Cousin George
I was delighted to get your letter last week, and you parcel this. What an excellent tree you have made and the different colours make it far easier to follow. I have not been able to study it yet and will write again later on. I am to dependant now on others and my two home daughters. Eva and Christine happen to be extra busy, Eva is copying out for you a little Julius history that I wrote for my children some few years ago, and I think is fairly correct, in my book I headed each chapter with a genealogy, I will send you the copy as soon as it is finished. I wish I could do it myself but I can only write not read. My Sister Mrs Parker died on Jan 23 1932 her name was Emily not Enid, she was named after Aunt Pem [775] her godmother who was always very fond of her and left what books she inherited from Grandpapa to her husband the Rev Arthur Parker who died previously.
The copy of will of William Julius is that of my Gt Grandfather, I am of the same gen as your father and we are first cousins. I am very glad to hear such a good account of him, he must be enjoying his vigorous old age. You certainly inherit longevity and vitality from the Julius race - a goodly heritage, tho it is not all pleasure to grow old and take patiently restriction after restriction. Did you ever come across such a case as that of Grandpapa and Granny living to be 91 & 93 dying within two months of each other (incorrect) nursed by their daughter of 70.
I have been much puzzled by our origin; we were told as children that our ancestors came over from Hungary at the persecution of John Huss
(Huss was a Czech martyred in 1415) but I never came across anything to prove it. DeVere Julius about a year before he died found some Julius portraits at Hampton Court and I went to look at them but came to the conclusion that Julius was the christian name, had they been ancestors they must have come to England with Queen Anne. I read up a good bit about this possibility but I don't believe in it; had de Vere lived (he was a most delightful man) he would have looked it up. Should you care to know more you may like to write to de Vere's devoted sister Muriel who lives with their old mother at Petersham; de Vere's only child Diana was given a good appt at the War Office where she still works, but you will have heard all about her from Ethel Julius.
I expect too that you know there is a marble memorial to Capt William Julius on the Sth wall of Westminster Abbey.
Yours most sincerely
Florence Stevens.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Florence is recorded as a daughter aged 4 born Farnham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Clifton House Clifton, GLS. Florences is shown at her grandmothers home in Clifton, aged 24, unmarried born Farnham.

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 6 Castle St Farnham. Florence is recorded as a wife aged 34 born Farnham

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Talvancroft Seale SRY. Florence is recorded as a wife aged 44 born Farnham

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1901, Talvancroft Seale SRY. Florence is recorded as a wife aged 54 born Farnham

Florence married James STEVENS [1099], son of Alfred STEVENS [7754] and Eliza [7756], on 9 Jul 1873 in Farnham SRY. James was born in 1847 in Farnham SRY and died on 18 Jan 1908 in Falmouth Cornwall, UK at age 61.

General Notes:
James practiced as a solicitor.

Stevens James of Talvancroft Seale Surrey died 18 January 1908 at Falmouth Cornwall Probate London 4 March to Alfred Julius Stevens solicitor and James Reginald Stevens gentleman.
Effects L37243 8s 2d Resworn L42693 18s 8d.
Ref: National Probate Calendar

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Castle St Farnham. James is recorded as a son aged 3 born Farnham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 62 Castle St Farnham. James is recorded as living with his widowed mother aged 23 unmarried an articled solicitors clerk with B A Garstall

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 6 Castle St Farnham. James is recorded as head of house aged 33 married a solicitor born Farnham

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Seale SRY. James is recorded as head of house aged 43 married a solicitor born Farnham, also in the house was an Anna Todd a school governess aged 37. She was also there in the 1901 census.

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Talvancroft Seale SRY. James is recorded as head of house aged 53 married a solicitor born Farnham

Children from this marriage were:

+ 346 F    i. Eliza Theodora STEVENS [1100] was born in 1874.

+ 347 F    ii. Eva STEVENS [1101] was born in 1876.

+ 348 M    iii. Alfred Julius STEVENS [1104] was born in 1878.

+ 349 F    iv. Mildred Florence STEVENS [1102] was born in 1879.

+ 350 F    v. Christine Louisa STEVENS [1103] was born in 1880.

+ 351 M    vi. James Reginald STEVENS [1114] was born in 1882 and died in 1971 in Rottingdean SSX at age 89.


164. Ellen Georgina JULIUS [1036] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Sep 1848 in Wrecclesham SRY, died on 27 Feb 1941 in Ashfield Leamington Spa WAR at age 92, and was buried in Leamington Cemetery WAR.

General Notes:
Funerals.
Mrs Ambrose Morris.
The funeral of Mrs Ellen Georgina Morris (widow of the Rev Ambrose Morris formerly Vicar of Wythall, Warwickshire) who died at "Ashfield" Charlotte Street, Leamington, on Thursday in last week at the age of 92, took place on Monday. A service was held in All Saints Parish Church, the officiating clergy being Rev Canon GEC Rolfe (Vicar), and Rev JR Simpson (Vicar of St John). The interment was in the family grave at Leamington Cemetery.
The mourners who attended were: the Rev and Mrs Cecil Morris, Miss Morris, and Miss Currie. Among others present were the Rev C Simmmonds, Mr RS Bullock, Mr E A Paine, Mr Aubrey Pitcher, Mr and Mrs D Hammerton, Mrs G Rolfe, Mrs Frank Tibbetts, Mrs R Morton Bell, Mrs Stewart Wilson, Mrs Cole, Mrs Mickleburgh, Miss Adamson, Miss G Lloyd, Miss Jackson, Miss E Evans, Miss Cox, Miss Goodchild, Miss B Cleveland, Miss E Reilly, Mrs Read, Mrs Frank Webb, Mrs Povey, Mrs TJ Corser, Mrs Warren, Miss Bell, Mrs Chambers, Mrs Hughes, Miss V Barnard, and Mrs Phillips (representing Miss Turnbull).
Wreaths were sent by: Cecil and Eva; Ethel and Margaret; Patricia; Annabella; Diana; her sister, Octavia Julius; Mr Bull; Rev Arthur Morris and Mrs Morris; Mr and Mrs Stuart Wilson; her nieces, Florence, Sylvia, Constance, May and Parker; Dr and Mrs Sydney D Povey; Mr and Mrs A Pitcher; Misses F and M Bell; Miss NG Evans and Miss EF Evans; the Misses Barnard; Mr and Mrs David Hammerton; Mrs R Morton Bell and Stella; Mr Tabor (Whitnash); M Morton Bell, Elsie Webb; Marjorie Harrison; Nellie Forjett; Irene Burton; Dorothy Burton; E Corser; and Mrs Hughes.
The funeral arrangements were carried out by HJ Dawson Ltd.
Ref: Leamington Spa Courier 7 March 1941.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Ellen is recorded as a daughter aged 2 born Farnham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Ellen is recorded as a daughter aged 22 single born Wrecclesham

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, St Thomas's Rectory Charlton LON. Ellen is recorded as a wife aged 32 born Wrecclesham SRY

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, St Thomas's Rectory Charlton LON. Ellen is recorded as a wife aged 42 born Wreclesham SRY

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Wythall Vicharage Kings Norton Worcestershire. Ellen is described as a wife aged 52 born Wrecclesham SRY

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Abbey Hill Lodge Kenilworth WAR. Ellen is recorded a head of an 11 room house a widow aged 62 living on private means born Farnham SRY

Ellen married Rev Ambrose MORRIS [1115], son of Col. Arthur MORRIS of Ballylongford [14153], on 1 Jan 1873 in Farnham SRY. Ambrose was born on 26 Jun 1834 in co Kerry Ireland and died on 12 Feb 1908 in Lichfield, STS at age 73.

General Notes:
Morris Ambrose Wythall Vicarage Alve-church Worcester; Deacon 1866 Manchester; Priest 1867 Winchester; Vicar of Withall Diocese of Worcester 1892; (Patron Vicar of Kings Norton; gross income L300 and house; population 1100). Formerly Curate of Rotherhithe 1867-71; All Saints Langham Place Marylebone 1871-72; Incumbant St James Guernsey, 1872-77; Rector of St Thomas Old Charlton Woolwich 1877-92.
Crockford's Clerical Directory 1898.

POST-REFORMATION CLERGY Pg.83
Rev. Ambrose Morris came in deacon's orders, November 25, 1866, to Rotherhithe (as curate); he had been ordained deacon in the diocese of Manchester by Bishop Prince Lee, February 1866, and he was permitted to migrate to the diocese of Winchester on account of the death of his incumbent. He was admitted to the priesthood by Bishop Sumner, of Winchester, at the Christmas Ordination of 1867, on the title given to him by the new rector, Mr Beck. He continued as curate of Rotherhithe until 1871, when he became curate of All Souls', Langham Place, St Marylebone.
From 1872 to he was incumbent of St James', in the Island of Guernsey, and from to rector of St Thomas', Old Charlton, in Kent. Since 1892 Mr Morris has been vicar of Wythall, near Alvechurch, in the diocese of Worcester.
ST MARY ROTHERHITHE.
There are still many in Rotherhithe who remember with gratitude his kind friendship and diligent ministrations. He married the daughter (actually niece) of the Rev. Churchill Julius, who is now the Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand.
Mr Morris has a son in holy orders, the Rev. Arthur Julius Morris. He was a scholar of University College, Oxford, and after serving the curacy of Hclston, in Cornwall and that of St Matthew's, Fulham he is now curate of St John's, Whetstone, in the London diocese.
Ref: Memorials to Serve for a History of the Parish of St. Mary, Rotherhithe
https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MYg8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA83&lpg=PA83&dq=Ambrose+Morris+St+Mary+Rotherhithe&source=bl&ots=2x0-R5JCyc&sig=8G7duxx5zbHJTBnzOo7fDO5TO1U&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CBsQ6AEwAGoVChMIicvujp3_xwIVhl2mCh3zgwfy#v=onepage&q=Ambrose%20Morris%20St%20Mary%20Rotherhithe&f=false

In 1890 Ambrose left the city for village life, appointed vicar of St Mary Wythall WOR where he remained until he retired to Lingfield Surrey.
Ref: Old Julius.

Morris the Reverent Ambrose of Birchacre Lingfield Surrey clerk died 12 February 1908 Probate London to Ellen Georgina Morris widow Alfred Julius Stevens solicitor and Herbert Francis Parker physician. Effects L14374 16s 10d
Ref: National Probate Calendar.

Research Notes:
Families of co Kerry.
Morris
Col. Arthur Morris had a youngest son, Mr. F. W. Ambrose Morris who passed away in Litchfield, England a few years prior to 1910. Col. Morris was the youngest son of Col. Samuel Morris, of Lizelton House, who had three sons - Sam who lived at Ballybeggan Castle, Tralee; Arthur at Ballylongford: and George who was a distinguished officer of the rank of Colonel, with service in the West Indies 1795 - 1801. His brother Sam, lived in Ballybeggan Castle, Tralee.
Ref: http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=WutPfYaJLY8C&pg=PA107&lpg=PA107&dq=morris+of+ballybeggan&source=bl&ots=XfZ5kkwUTi&sig=3WJiWmLnZ2R9RoX1KgydafjsFy0&hl=en#v=onepage&q=morris%20of%20ballybeggan&f=false

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, St Thomas's Rectory Charlton LON. Ambrose is recorded a head of house married aged 43 Rector of St Thomas Charlton born Ireland

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, St Thomas's Rectory Charlton LON. Ambrose is recorded as head of house married aged 54 a Clerk in Holy Orders born Ireland.

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Wythall Vicharage Kings Norton Worcestershire. Ambrose is described as head of house married aged 64 a Church of England clergyman born in Ireland

Children from this marriage were:

+ 352 F    i. Madeline MORRIS [1118] was born in 1873 in Guernsey CHI and died in 1875 at age 2.

+ 353 M    ii. Rev Arthur Julius MORRIS [1116] was born in 1875 in Guernsey Channel Is., was baptised on 5 Sep 1875 in St Peter Wrecclesham SRY, and died on 1 Sep 1939 in Royal Masonic Hospital Ravenscroft Park LND at age 64.

+ 354 F    iii. Ethel Constance MORRIS [1119] was born in 1876 in Guernsey Channel Is. and died on 18 Mar 1955 at age 79.

+ 355 M    iv. Ambrose Wilson MORRIS [1120] was born on 28 Sep 1878 in Charlton LON, was baptised on 12 Nov 1878 in St Thomas Woolwich LON, and died in 1883 in Woolwich LON at age 5.

+ 356 F    v. Kathleen MORRIS [1121] was born in 1880 and died in 1880.

+ 357 F    vi. Geraldine MORRIS [1122] was born on 5 May 1881 in Old Charlton Kent England and died on 20 Aug 1947 at age 66.

+ 358 F    vii. Margaret Emily MORRIS [1124] was born on 27 Sep 1882 in Old Charlton Kent England.

+ 359 M    viii. Maynard Denny MORRIS [1126] was born on 3 Feb 1884 in Old Charlton Kent England, died on 12 Jan 1931 in Los Angeles CA USA at age 46, and was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

+ 360 M    ix. Richard Gordon MORRIS [1130] was born on 5 Sep 1886 in Charlton LON and died on 14 Jun 1925 at age 38.

+ 361 M    x. Rev Cecil White MORRIS [1131] was born on 16 Sep 1887 in Woolwich LON and died on 22 Oct 1961 at age 74.

165. Edith Katherine JULIUS [1037] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Oct 1850 in Wrecclesham SRY and died on 4 Nov 1937 in Redhill at age 87. Another name for Edith was Kate.

General Notes:
The Times, Friday, Nov 01, 1850; pg. 7; Issue 20635; col F Births - on 28th ult, at Wrecclesham parsonage, daur to Rev H R Julius.

At the death of her mother Kate and her sister Constance moved to Croake Hill Road Redhill SRY.

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900
Miss E. K. Julius with her niece, Miss Brewin, and two friends had a very enjoyable tour to Rome, Naples, Florence and Venice, etc., this spring.

Julius Jottings April 1902 No 7
Miss Katie Julius and Miss Geraldine Morris have left England on a trip to Northern Italy, where they are visiting the picture galleries of Milan, Florence and Venice. They expect to return home shortly before Easter.

In 1901 Edith was in possession of two origional images of Isabella Gilder, which were published in Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901

Edith, on the 23 Nov 1911, sailed from London to Capetown on the Thermistocles. Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

Edith, on the 4 Dec 1934, sailed from Southampton to Madeira on the Winchester Castle. Her address is recorded as Uplands Guildford.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

Julius Miss E K Hollowdene Meadvale Redhill Reigate 1347
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1935/36/37/38

Miss Edith K Julius.
An Old Meadvale Resident and Devoted Worker for St John's Church.
Residents of Meadvale and members of the congregation of St John's Church Redhill, in common with a wide circle of friends by whom she was held in high regard, learnt with sorrow of the death of Miss Edith Katharine Julius, who passed away on Thursday of last week at Hollowdene Meadvale after a short illness. Miss Julius who was 87 years of age, had been in failing health for some time, but was able to attend church within a fortnight of her death.
Miss Julius had lived in Meadvale where her gracious presence was always welcomed, for many years. Of a kindly and sympathetic disposition, she was always willing to render help and never refused any appeal made to her. She was a devoted worker in connection with St John's Church and was for 20 years Sunday School Superintendent of Meadvale, where she won the affection of all the children. For the long period of 50 years she was an Associate of the Girls Friendly Society, in which she took a warm and practical interest, and she only relinquished her activities in this connection on account of failing health. Greatly interested in missionary work, Miss Julius was for many years a zealous worker on behalf of overseas missions, and she and her sister, with whom much sympathy has been expressed, delighted in placing their beautiful grounds at the disposal of the young people of the parish for their various activities, a kindness which was held in high appreciation.
The Funeral
The funeral took place on Saturday, the service in St John's Church being followed by the interment in the family vault in the churchyard; a fitting resting place beneath the tower of the church he loved so well.
The service was impressively conducted by the Rev T.W.D. Wright, assisted by the Rev H Andersen. Mr Drury (organist) presided at the organ and the choir led the singing of the hymns, "The Saints of God" and "Alleluia the Strife is O'er" and of the Nunc Dimittis as the cortege left the church. The mourners from the house were: her sorrowing sister Miss C. Julius, Mrs A. Wilson, Sir A. Haye Butterworth, Miss Parker, and Mr and Mrs A.G. George. They were met at the church by the Rev A. Morris, Mr and Mrs A. Stephens, the Rev M. Holme (representing the Brewin family), Dr H Parker, the Rev R Stevens, the Rev C Morris, Miss Stevens, Miss S Parker, Mr H Holme, and Miss Rose. Amongst the very large congregation were: Mr and Mrs H.A. Howe, Mr and Miss Knight, Mr Cortazzi and Mrs Copper, Miss Machin, Mr and Mrs Sanderson, Miss Boyle, Mrs Politeyan, and Misses Chantler, Miss Dennis, Miss Hunneybell, Mrs J Gear, Mrs C Gear, Mr J Gear and Mrs C.V. George, Mr and Mrs May, Mrs Woodman, Mr Kent, Miss Terry, Miss Ramsey, Miss Jackson Mason, Miss Smith, Miss Spencer, etc.
Floral tributes were sent by the following "Her loving sister, Miss C. Julius", "Angela, George and Betsy"; Sir Alexander Haye Butterworth; Mr and Mrs A. Stephens; Mrs Julius Brewin and family; Mrs Holme; Miss Brewin; Mrs Ferguson and Mrs Roberts; Miss R. De Renzi Martin, Mr Leslie Hull, Mr and Mrs H A Howe, Mrs Sutton and Barbara; Miss Windsor; Mr and Miss Knight; Mrs Vallance; Miss Sewell and Mrs MacIlwaine; Miss Boyle; Mrs Langton; Dr and Mrs Langton; Rev and Mrs Politeyan; Miss Machin; Miss Foster; Mrs Morris; Miss Knot; Mrs Cooper and Miss Gibbs; Mrs Stallard; the GFS and Scouts and Rovers; Mr Brown; Mrs Beckett; Mr H Parker; the Misses Page and Westhead; Mr and Mrs Sanderson; the Misses Parker; Mrs Pierpont; Miss Jackson Mason; Mr and Mrs Richardson; Miss Ramsey; Miss Brigden; Miss Rose; Miss Terry; Mrs J Purchase; and "Anon".
Ref: Surrey Mirror Friday 12 Nov 1937.

Julius Edith Katharine of Hollowdean Meadvale Redhill Surrey spinster died 4 November 1937 Probate London 6 January 1938 to Alfred Julius Stephens solicitor and Herbert Francis Parker medical practitioner. Effects L4562 9s 7d. Resworn L1856 5s 9d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 3mths born Farnham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 20 single born Wrecclesham

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Wood Lodge Bournemouth. Edith is a guest of Michael and Mary Rowlandson she is aged 30 unmarried born Farnham

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Woodcroft Red Hill Reigate SRY. Edith is recorded as a daughter aged 40 born Farnham

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Reigate SRY. Edith is described as Catherine head of house single aged 50 living on her own means born Farnham SRY

6. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Hollowdene Crowks Hill Rd Redhill SRY. Edith is recorded as head of a house of 8 rooms aged 60 single living on private means an employer born Farnham SRY. There were two servants in the house.

166. Constance Marion JULIUS [1038] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Sep 1852 in Farnham SRY and died on 21 Apr 1945 in Tunbridge Wells KEN at age 92.

General Notes:
Julius Jottings. No. 1 January 1900.
Hollowdean, Meadvale,
Redhill, Surrey.
Dear Editor, I fear I can say nothing original about the delightful Swiss tour that Constance and I enjoyed in the early summer, but you may like a short account of. We started on May 16th, and most March like morning, for Paris. Arrived at Dover, we saw our wretched little steamer rolling vigorously in the harbour, and it was very difficult to get downstairs; this rolling they say is caused by the new breakwater. However, our troubles did not last long, and by 7 o'clock we were at the G.F.S. Lodge, Paris, greeted by a charming hostess, Miss Snowden. A pleasant girl from Dolgelly, Miss Stewart, was staying there, who knows every inch of Paris, as well as its history, and was delighted to act as guide. Paris was not, however, looking its best, the erecting of the great Exhibition buildings made everything dusty, and though Rue de Rivoli was up for an underground railway.
After four busy days, we went on to Lucerne (Hotel Rigi), and were there on the Queen's Birthday. It was kept most patriotically, about 100 people being present at Church, and most of the steamers and hotels being decorated with Union Jacks - our dinner table was gay with them. From Lucerne we went at on over the Brunig to Meiringen, where we spent a cold wet week. It is not a specially pretty place, but some of the walks are glorious, especially the one to Rosenlain and a short steep one to the Alpbach Hotel. On May 30th weather kindly cleared up, and we went via Interlaken to St Beatenberg, a delicious, lazy place, where there is not much in inducement to go for walks, as you can sit in the gallery of the hotel and see the view of the Alps to perfection.
Our next move was to Grindelwald; a hot, lovely day, so we drove up from Interlaken to enjoy the beautiful Lutschine Valley to the Schonegg Hotel, a most comfortable and extremely reasonable abode. The most enjoyable day of the whole tour was June 12th when we crossed the Litch Scheidegg by the mountain railway. It is extraordinary how the little engine can push up such a steep gradient, a tough climb for walkers. In about an hour we reached the top, and found ourselves on the slopes of the Jung Frau, with snow on every side; it seems sacrilege for the railway to have invaded these mountains solitudes! After a few hours in that clear delicious air, we went down by an equally steep route to Lauterbrunnen, where we stayed one night, walking up the valley to see a series of imprisoned waterfalls called the Trummelbach. It is rather an eerie place, the river of falling from the high cliffs in a chasm seems to be trying passionately to get out - in one place it shoots horizontally through a hole in the rocks till it finds rest at last at the bottom. The next morning we walked in brilliant sunshine up to the far famed Murren, the panorama of peaks showing well through the fir woods. The hotel was fairly full of pleasant people, including Mr Chamberlain, the Chaplain, with his pretty Swiss wife and funny old German mother-in-law. But after a few days rain set in and as it was dull living in the steam of the seething cauldron of clouds that filled the valley below, we took flight, and came down to Spiez, on Lake Thun, and found sunshine again. Here we spent our last week, with many excursions on the lake and a rash up to Weissenburg, and reached home with great pleasure on June 27th after a most successful holiday.
This letter is not signed but the collater considers it was written by a sister of Constance.

Julius Jottings, No 6 Jan, 1902.
A drawing-room meeting was held at Earlswood Mount on November 13, on behalf of the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, of which Miss Constance Julius is the local honorary secretary.

Julius Miss C Hollowdene Cronks hill Meadvale Redhill Reigate 3847
Ancestry: London Phone Book 1940.

Julius Constance Marion of Hollowdene Meadvale Redhill Surrey spinster died 21 April 1945 at Southborough Nursing Home Tunbridge Wells Probate Llandudno 21 August to Alfred Julius Stevens and Michael Ralph Lance solicitors. Effects L12330 12s 0d
Ref: National Probate Calendar.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Constance is recorded as a daughter aged 18 single born Wrecclesham

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Constance is described as a daughter aged 28 single born Farnham SRY

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Woodcroft Red Hill Reigate SRY. Constance is described as a daughter aged 38 born Farnham

4. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Reigate SRY. Constance is described as a sister to Catherine head of house single aged 48 living on her private means born Farnham SRY

5. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Hollowdene Crowks Hill Rd Redhill SRY. Constance is recorded as a sister aged 58 single born Farnham SRY

167. Octavia JULIUS [1048] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Jun 1854 in Farnham SRY, died on 15 Jul 1942 in Southborough Kent at age 88, and was buried on 18 Jul 1942 in Southborough Kent.

General Notes:
Octavia was a missionary in Japan
JULIUS JOTTINGS January 1900 No 1
Extract from a letter from MISS OCTAVIA JULIUS, Tokio, Japan
October 1st - I do not like the Japanese as a nation, or taking them in any class; they have no moral backbone whatever, and are so utterly deceitful and dishonest. How can one like them? Numbers of young men come here: "Please teach me about Christianity; I have a Bible and know a little, and want to become a Christian." Somehow this smells fishy. I say, "I will gladly teach you about Christianity and read the Bible ; when can you come? We are here for that purpose - but do not teach English." "Oh, I don't want English."
Do you think that young man will come again? Not he ; never again he wants to get taught English for nothing, though there are plenty of schools and teachers to be had. The people are so small and mean. How can you like them ? Hardly one to be trusted, and very few even among Christians.
In spite of this, there are a good many .individuals whom I like very much. For instance, our two girls, Kibe and Inaba; they are so earnest and whole-hearted in their work, and willing to do anything; moreover, they take a scolding very well. Then, some of our Christians and inquirers one cannot help liking. Japan is a strange country. Flowers have hardly any smell, though there are several very sweet flowering shrubs. 'Very few of the birds sing, and no food has much taste. Beef, fowls, fish, vegetables, fruit all most uninteresting, and very little taste, quite different to what you have in England, and even if imported they soon get all the same.
Last week I went in the evening with our Vicar, Tomita San, to call on a family called Takahashi. It was a strange household, especially in Japan, where everyone is married, unless a priest, or diseased. It consisted of a young man, about 23, who is a catechumen, and always at church ; his elder sister, about 26 ; these are the heads of the house, and are both dentists ; his aunt, about the
same age ; and a young man, also a relation, studying dentistry under him; and these four live together in a very nice semi-foreign house. Tomita has been visiting them for some time, but the two ladies wanted to be taught by one of their own sex, so Inaba and I are to go every Tuesday evening at seven. They are busy all day. It would be nice if they all became real Christians.

JULIUS JOTTINGS April 1900 No 2
Part of a letter from Miss Octavia Julius Missionary at Tokio.
Lately we have made acquaintance with a really charming family in a high Japanese position. The father is an Advocate and Member of Parliament; he is almost always away from home- now in America. His wife is head of the house during his absence, and he has two big boys at school, one girl about fifteen, a dear little boy of nine, and a sister of the husband about twenty two.
We became acquainted with them through Miss S., who met them at Nikko in an hotel in the summer. They were very friendly, and she asked us to call them, which we did, and from the first they were most agreeable. Miss P gives an English lesson, followed by a Bible reading, to the sister and another married lady twice a week.
Last Thursday they invited its to spend the afternoon with them; we arrived about two. The house is nothing special, just a comfortable goodsized one We soon started off in very nice kurumas the little boy riding with Katharine, with whom he is great friends-first to the zoo, then to see the chrysanthemums, which are very extraordinary. They are trained to form clothing for figures, life-size, and head, hands and feet are stuck on.
These figures are arranged in groups illustrating famous Japanese scenes, ancient and modern, chiefly murders and such like. These scenes are on sort of stages, and every few minutes the slage turns round and another scene is presented; scenery, figures, all done with flowers and greenery. All is accompanied with drums and flutes, which make a horrid din.
Thousands go to see them, and as each pays a small sum to enter each separate stage, they must make a lot of money. I was thankful when it was over ; I hate to see the pretty flowers treated so. Though it may be very clever, it seems an indignity to them, but this sort of thing exactly suits the Japanese.
In your letter you observe that you expect to hear that I went up " Asama." " Naka naka ! " as we say in Japan, or, " Indeed no! " It is eight miles in a straight line, but much further by road, and though we have pack-horses and kurumas, you might as well talk of going up Mont Blanc in a bath-chair as going up the latter; and you forget that, going up a volcano, you walk ankle deep in ashes, and there is no footing for a horse, being very steep, and for the last two or three miles not an inch of level; this makes it a very trying climb.

JULIUS JOTTINGS 0CTOBER 1900 No 3
TOKIO, February 22nd, 1900.
DEAR EDITOR,
I must congratulate you on the first number of Julius Jottings. Every contribution was interesting to me ; it not only gives most welcome news of our large and scattered family, but brings out literary talent front many among the rising generation in a most startling manner. I ought, perhaps, to say " risen," as we old aunts must now be reckoned the " waning generation."
I must observe that, you picked out a wicked bit from my letters, it was written in answer to one from the Lady Cheshire, in which she remarked, "So and So seems so fond of the Chinese, much more so than you seem of the Japanese, and certainly more than I should be." I think my answer must, have been written after several disarrangements and disappointments, and I was right down in the " blues." I only hope my friends out here won't see it, or I should "catch it"
As I have never been favoured by a visit, from any of my many relations, in this fascinating country, they will have no idea what a topsy-turvy land it is, especially as regards the. language, where every sentence begins where we should end, and there are such funny adjectives, such as " The fast-legged man," "A high-nosed boy," i.e., proud, etc. ; so, as I have entered the 13th year of my sojourn in Japan, please put down curiously-expressed sentences, incorrect grammar, etc., to this fact, and also that the climate affects brains to a remarkable degree.
My partner, Miss Peacocke, and I live in a Japanese house next door to a large theatre. From upstairs in the summer you can see what is going on inside, but in spite of comical and old-fashioned Japanese dresses, it does not appear very attractive. All the actors are men or boys ; they wear masks, or else have their faces painted like clowns.
We are very proud of living in the Capital, in which are great contrasts of high civilisation to debasing barbarism; we have many friends among the Japanese (to say nothing of foreigners), and there are many opportunities of various kinds of work for our Master.
I shall have been out for the second time five years next November, when a furlough is due, and it is probable that we shall both return the following spring. I only wish the Siberian or Indian railway might be finished by then, as the long sea voyage is a sort of nightmare, even to contemplate. But the thought of the many dear ones to meet at the end cheers one through. OCTAVIA JULIUS.

JULIUS JOTTINGS. January 1901 No 4
On November 28th, Miss Octavia Julius reached home after a five years' sojourn in Tokio, Japan, having started on October 27th. She and her friend, Miss Peacocke, started earlier than they anticipated, and chose the shortest route home, as they were in charge of an invalid missionary who was obliged to return to England as quickly as possible.
Even the shortest route is 12,000 miles of land and sea, via Yokohama, Tacoma, St. Pauls, Chicago and New York, and is a singularly uninteresting journey, especially a this time of year, but yet this one was not quite uneventful.
Half-way across the Pacific, November 5th was kept, not by burning Kruger on the captain's bridge, and having a bonfire on deck, as one of the passengers suggested, but by sending up rockets of distress, and burning blue lights, much to the amazement of the Chinamen on board, cheering, and finally singing "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow"
A little further on, in a high wind and fog, the "Victoria " passed one of her companion ships, that had got out of her course so closely that there were only a very few feet between the two large vessels; had they collided none would probably have survived to tell the tale, as no help was within hundreds of miles ; the gale which blew the one ever quicker home, had retarded the other, and she was rolling about helplessly, but finally reached her destination safely.
At Tacoma, an island on the West Coast of America, there was some difficulty about quarantine, the Chinese cargo being specially unsavoury, so the captain gave out that the ship would not start before 5 p.m. Relying on this statement., Octavia and a friend went for a glorious walk over the, hills. After a while a series of shrieks from the syren was heard, but they paid no attention, thinking it was merely taking vocal exercise, and continued their walk, returning at 1 p.m. in time to see the " Victoria" gliding away from the wharf, ungallantly leaving her two helpless passengers to their fate. A friend seized a speaking-trumpet and shouted "Come on by the night boat," which they did; but, alas, in so doing they missed the only fine scenery of the voyage.
Between Tacoma, and St. Pauls the train had a slight collision with a "switch engine" but, though all were shaken and startled, no one was hurt. The very night before, a collision took place on the same spot, when twenty-seven people were killed.
On the whole, the weather was most unpropitious, both on the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, the sea being rough the whole way. Across the Continent rain or snow fell every day, and from New York the log reported a "gale" the whole distance.
At Queenstown many passengers were to land at 6 a.m, some of them got up at 3 a.m. to have their breakfast, and be quite ready; but, alas when the port was reached, though the fine ship " Majestic " was steady, the little tender that put off to meet her tossed so violently that no luggage, mails, or unfortunate passengers could be landed, and though they could almost see their friends waiting for them "so near and yet so far " they were relentlessly carried on to Liverpool a twelve hours' journey, to be returned at the first opportunity.

Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
You ask me dear Editor to write something about life in Japan. So much has been written about that interesting country, both false and true, that I think I had better tell a little of what our experience has been, without describing the people themselves or their customs ; only I should like to observe that Japan is a land of astonishing contrasts.
In the capital, Tokio, we have trams, electric lights, telegraphs, telephones, factories, at least 12 postal deliveries every day, bicycles, and modern inventions of all kinds, fine European-looking public buildings, plenty of good carriages and horses, some streets are unusually wide, though much of the city is still composed of the old, low Japanese houses, crowded together, with narrow streets and courts ; parts of Tokio are very pretty, the ground hilly, and the detached houses, each standing in their own gardens, filled with flowering shrubs.
The population is just under 1.5 million. But a very few miles out brings you into the country villages, where a foreigner is rarely, if ever, seen, and the customs and habits of the farmers make one think that they have never changed for a thousand years or so, the primitive spindle and large loom, the ancient plough drawn by oxen or perhaps a small horse, the flail for threshing, the rough cart with sometimes solid wheels, etc.
Though even here there are signs of change in the village schools, prominent everywhere, for education is compulsory.
Miss Peacocke, my co-worker, and I live next door to a large theatre, close to the Foreign Concession. As the plays only go on by day, and the drums are always inside the building, we are not seriously inconvenienced by it; from the passage window in our Japanese house we can see on to the stage, and the audience sitting on the floor in their boxes, gazing entranced, or chatting or eating and drinking, the children meanwhile running about, sometimes peeping behind the curtain; going to the theatre is an all-day affair, perhaps lasting 10 hours.
After breakfast and prayers we have Bible study in both Old and New Testaments (of course everything in Japanese) with our 3 helpers, one an old lady and 9 young girls of 23; in the afternoons visiting is usually the order of the day, sometimes people in easy circumstances, living in pretty, roomy houses, keeping servants; but oftener among the very poor, either Christians or heathens; among the latter we have cottage meetings from time to time; every evening but Saturday is taken up with prayer meetings or meetings of some sort or other; on Thursday one is held at our house and is well attended, chiefly by our Christian women.
Then we have visitors coming at all times, often the Catechists from the country stations coming in for a chat, or a word of cheer, interest, and sympathy. Between us we have 6 or 7 Sunday Schools, and Miss Peacocke has a good deal of work among the students, several attending her Bible Class on Sunday afternoons and often coming in for a talk.
Periodically we go into the country for work; my favourite outstation is Misaki, a lovely fishing village on the sea, 6 hours from Tokio by a small steamer; here there are 10,000 people, mostly living in tiny cottages, having never heard anything more of Christianity than perhaps the name, so we have a wide scope for work.
Last time I went, my helpers and I used to look out for a promising site, and planting a long bamboo pole, we hung up a hymn printed in large easy characters, then out comes my concertina and its sweet (?) strains soon attract an audience, of course largely composed of children, yet adults, both men and women, thickly fringing the crowd; after; a hymn, a scripture picture is hung up, and a simple talk from my helper and myself follows, and is always listened to with interest and attention. One evening, after so windy and wet a day that the men could not go out to catch fish, about a dozen of them came in to see us "foreigners," and to hear what we had come for.
You could hardly realize their ignorance! Imagine men, perhaps 40 years old, with ordinary capabilities, not able to read a word, and not even knowing they possessed a soul l All they thought of and lived for was the present, working, eating, and drinking; spending all their money as soon as it was earned, and enjoying themselves in their uncommonly questionable ways; even their gods, to whom they are very attentive, and the priests are only useful to keep them in time of danger, and make them lucky in their catch of fish; to the first rudiments of truth some listened interestedly, others mocked.
Just opposite Misaki is a lovely rocky island, with old fine trees growing about it, and a village nestling in a sheltered nook; on going over there by a small ferry-boat, and passing through the village, we heard a man remark, " Those are Christian teachers, I should like to hear what Christianity is?" So in a few days we went again, and spoke in the middle of the village to about 100 of the lowest and most degraded looking people. Once we were interrupted by an old man, who cried out, in a high squeaky voice, "What ! isn't the moon a god?" Evidently the poor old fellow had been worshipping it from childhood, and it seemed hard to give up what he had believed a god for so long.
The longer one lives in a heathen land the more wonderful it seems that anyone should ever become a Christian. The only possible explanation is, that it is by means of a Divine power alone, quite outside man, and that God certainly does still work miracles. Now try and put yourself into this man's place ; he is a Ghinto priest, earning a most comfortable competence by blessing the fishermen's boats as they start off on their expeditions, he hears and is struck by a foreign religion of which he has heard the name, but naturally hates, but now lie can't shake off what he has heard, and finally becomes a Christian. Mark the result: Of course he loses his former means of livelihood, and not only that, but is turned out of his home, cast off by his friends, and even his wife is taken away from him; in order to live he joins a gang of coolies, and works on a new railroad. Or, again-an old woman with very strong opinions of her own, receives a visit from me, introduced by my Bible-woman, who is an old acquaintance of hers; she is polite and listens, and afterwards even lends her house for a meeting of the neighbours, but why should she attend to a stammering story by a stranger from the ends of the earth causing her by-and-bye to get rid of her idols, and, as she lies awake on her hard bed at night, constantly to commune with and lift up her heart to the new-found Deity? Surely this is a marvel!
And once more-a Christian doctor requests us to visit a patient, for whom he can do no more; we find a woman is the last stages of consumption but the poor heart of conscience is suffering far more than the body. "How can I find peace? How can I be saved?" is her incessant thought, as she tosses wearily from side to side, and for the first time she hears of the Saviour who came to save such as she is and soon after her heart is filled with rest and peace, the pained expression of her face quite gone, and when I asked her, did she sometimes think of what Christ had suffered for her, she whispered, "I am always thinking of Him; "and many others might be mentioned, all showing surely that miracles are still going on, really quite as wonderful as healing the sick or raising the dead.
But this is already too long, and I will only add that in the summer we have a holiday for 6 weeks, and go up into the hills about 6 hours train from Tokio, a cog-wheel engine taking us 4,000 feet high, where there is quite a little colony of wooden houses, foreign-built, mine among them. The air there is considered the best in Japan, and there are numerous expeditions, both far and near, to be made, on one's honourable understandings on train, on saddle or pack-horse, the last being the most novel and amusing, albeit the slowest.
Close by is the famous volcano, Asamo, who not unfrequently favours us with a shower of ashes or even small stones, and whose summit is fascinating to watch as it sends out sometimes huge volumes of smoke, and at others just a harmless-looking amount, such as a fire of weeds would emit. I came home the end of last November, and am much hoping to be able to return some time next year.
SAYONARA !

Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
Miss Octavia Julius has gone to Switzland for part of the summer.

1939 Register
60 Prospect Road , Southborough U.D., Kent, England
OctaviaJulius Birth 01 Jun 1854 Retired missionary in J Single

Julius Octavia of 60 Prospect-road Southborough Tunbridge Wells's spinster died 15 July 1942 Probate Llandudno 2 February to Alfred Julius Stevens and John Osmond Julius Stevens solicitor's
Effects L1008 14s 2d Re-sworn L2220 1s 9d
Ref: National Probate Calendar

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, The Priory Minster Yard Lincoln LIN. Octavia is recorded as a (school) boarder aged 16 a scholar born Wrecclesham

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Octavia is described as a daughter aged 26 single born Farnham SRY

3. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, Wythall Vicharage Kings Norton Worcestershire. Octavia is a guest of her sister she is described as a visitor aged 46 a missionary born Wrecclesham SRY

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Ethel Villa Church St March CAM. Octavia is recorded as a boarded aged 56 single of private means born Farnham SRY. The house contained 6 rooms

168. Madeline JULIUS [1039] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1856 and died in 1870 at age 14. The cause of her death was typhoid.

Research Notes:
Madeline's death dated is corroborated, Julius Jottings No 5 1901 Table No5.

169. Henry John JULIUS [1040] (Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 1 Jun 1858 in Farnham SRY and died on 27 Aug 1932 in Townsville Qld. at age 74.

General Notes:
Henry emigrated to Australia, and is thought to be the Mr H J Julius aged 30 who arrived in Victoria November 1884 aboard the "John Elder" from Britian.
Ref: PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923. Old Julius.

He travelled to Queensland and the following information is from the Queensland Police Gazette dated:
1888. Eulo Queensland Licensed Victualler's Licence transferred from Henry Mueller to H J Julius.
1888. Eulo Queensland H J Julius recorded as a Licensed Victualler
1888. Eulo Queensland H J Julius issued a Billiards License.
1889. Eulo Queensland H J Julius recorded as the Licensed Victualler of the Royal Mail Hotel Eulo.
1889. Eulo Queensland H J Julius issued a Billiards License Royal Mail Hotel
1890. Eulo Queensland H J Julius recorded as a Licensed Victualler
1890. Eulo Queensland H J Julius issued a Billiards License Royal Mail Hotel.
NZSOG CD 2007.

He Registered a Brand to himself:
Henry J. Julius
Royal Mail Hotel
Eulo Queensland
Brand: US4
Certificate Number: B26399
Date: 19 January 1888
Page: 157
Type: Registration
Country; Australia
State: Queensland
Record set: Queensland brands directories
Category: Education & work
Record collection: Farming & agriculture
Ref: Findmypast - Queensland Horse and Cattle Brands Index 1872-1899

In Chambers, on Wednesday, before his Honour Sir Chas. Lilley, O.J., the following were adjudicated insolvent . . . . .
Henry John Julius, of Eulo, licensed victualler, on the petition of P. K. M'Guigan, of Cunnamulla, wine and
spirit merchant, first meeting 21st instant . . . . .
Ref: The Brisbane Courier (Qld) Friday 8 November 1889.

Current News.
A "Gazette" extraordinary was issued on Thursday proroguing Parliament till the 31st December next.
The following persons have been adjudicated insolvent since our last issue: . . . . . Henry John Julius, of
Eulo, licensed victualler . . . . .
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 16 November 1889

. . . . . In the matter of Henry John Julius, of Eulo, licensed victualler, insolvent, Mr. Osborne, appearing for the insolvent, moved to annul adjudication order: order accordingly.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 16 August 1890

MANSLAUGHTER.
Joseph Riddell, on bail, was indicted for having on the 4th December last, at Eulo, feloniously killed one John Cashman. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was undefended. . . . . . the prisoner and a man named Cashman were both at the Royal Mail Hotel, about 10 o'clock when a dispute or a quarrel arose, and the two men agreed to go to the back yard of the hotel to fight.
James Kearney, J.P., residing at Eulo, deposed: On the night of 4th December last I saw the prisoner engaged in a fight in the back yard of the Royal Mail Hotel kept by Henry J. Julius. A man named Cashman was fighting with the prisoner . . . . .
The jury retired and in about half an hour were summoned into court by his Honor, who on learning they had not agreed asked if he could assist them to come to a decision. The foreman stated that he did not think his Honor could assist. There were nine to three, with little or no prospect of agreement. His Honor then further addressed the jury, and shortly afterwards a verdict of guilty was returned, with a strong recommendation to mercy. His Honor in addressing the prisoner said he believed that Cashman had provoked him and that his death was caused by something very near to an accident. He ordered prisoner to enter into his own recognisances of L80 to keep the peace towards all her Majesty's subjects for a period of twelve mouths.
Ref: Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld) Wednesday 12 March 1890

On Thursday last several cases were heard at the Police Court. In the case of Henry J Julius, of Villeneuve, versus Rose and Harriot Clark of Kilcoy for trespassing, the defendants were charged with tailing their fathers cattle in one of the plaintiffs paddocks, having crossed into it where there was a shallow crossing or ford in the Stanley River. The defendants pleaded guilty and as the plaintiff did not wish to press the charge, were fined 5s. each and costs of court, in all 19s.
Ref: The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld.) Friday 27 July 1894

Licensed Gates Notice
I HEREBY give notice that it is my intention to apply at the next Meeting of the Caboolture Divisional Board for permission to ERECT a LICENSED GATE on my property at Villeneuve, between Portions 65 and 66, in the parish of Kilcoy, and I also undertake to ERECT the said GATE according to the particulars, set forth in the Divisional Boards Act.
HENRY JULIUS.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 6 June 1896.

Properties for Sale.
TUESDAY, 30th MARCH,
IMPROVED FREEHOLD ESTATE.
Splendidly adapted for Fattening or Dairying purposes
MACTAGGART BROS, have received instructions from Mr. Henry Julius to offer for sale by public auction, at the Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, on TUESDAY, 30th March, at Twelve o'clock,
VILLENEUVE,
Situated Parish of Kilcoy, Morton district, distant fifty five miles from Enoggera Saleyards and twenty-five miles from Caboolture Station, on the North Coast Railway, with which place it is connected by a daily coach.
The area of the estate is 3900 acres of good grazing and agricultural land, having eight miles frontage to permanent water in the Stanley River, besides never failing creeks and lagoons. Subdivided into five grazing and two cultivation paddocks. The Property is well improved, the buildings and fencing being in flrst class repair.
A Creamery is to be erected shortly about one mile from the property.
Terms: One-third cash; balance at 1, 2, and 3 years, at 6 per cent.
For further particulars apply to
MACTAGGART BROS.
Brisbane.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 6 March 1897 also Saturday 20 March 1897.

Advertising
IMPROVED FREEHOLD ESTATE.
Splendidly Adapted for Fattening or Dairying Purposes.
MACTAGGART BROS.
Have received instructions from Mr. Henry Julius, to offer for Sale by Public Auction. At the Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, on TUESDAY, March 30, at 12 o'clock,
" VILLENEUVE,"
Situated parish, of Kilcoy, Morton district distant 55 miles from Enoggera Saleyards and 25 miles from Caboolture station, on the North Coast Railway, with which place it is connected by a daily coach.
The area of the Estate is 3,900 acres of good grazing and agricultural land, having eight miles frontage to permanent water in the Stanley River, besides never failing creeks and lagoons. Subdivided into five grazing and two cultivation paddocks. The Property is well improved, the buildings and fencing being in first-class repair.
A creamery is to be erected shortly about one mile from the Property.
Terms, one-third cash, balance at 1, 2, and 3 years, at 6 per cent.
For Further Particulars apply to
MACTAGGART BROS
BRISBANE.
Ref: The Week (Brisbane, Qld) Friday 12 March 1897 also Friday 26 March 1897.

Julius Jottings. January 1900. No 1.
VILLENEUVE,
WOODFORD,
QUEENSLAND.
22nd October 1899.
Your welcome letter was forwarded on to me at Caloundra from which charming little spot we returned last Wednesday after most enjoyable fortnight's holiday, which has done us all much good, but, oh, how delightful it is to get home again ! Never was there a truer saying than " there's no place like home," even it is only a bark hut. Somehow one never gets so comfortable a bed as at home, and then, when one is in our line; it is so particularly interesting to find how everything has grown, animal as well as vegetable Really my farm is quite a picture-potatoes looking A1, and oats nearly fit to mow. I have so large a crop in this year that I am obliged to go in for a mowng machine, Which is a ruinous investment (about L20), as well as building a hay shed, which, I fear, will cost as much more at least.
I have serious thoughts of sending 20 or 30 tons of chaff to the Transvaal, but don't know exactly how to consign it, as I don't know any agents there. We have had a magnificent season so far, although a slightly eccentric one, as we got three consecutive nights of frost at the beginning of this month, which did a lot of damage to some of the crops, notably to the wheat on the Darling Downs, thousands of acres being destroyed, as it was in the ear, and the following week the heat was something terrific, over 100 deg. in the shade at Brisbane We are just beginning to want a few showers as the sun is getting powerful, and drying up the top soil . . . . .
I hope you notice our patriotism in sending our little quota of troops to help fight the Queen's battles. I am writing by this mail for the song " Soldiers of the Queen," which I heard sung the other day, and admired very much . . . . .
I hope you got the photos all right; you will observe that I am really (as the black fellow aptly remarked) getting; quite barefooted on the top of the head.
Your affectionate Brother,
H. J. JULIUS.

Julius Jottings: April 1900 No2
Letter from H. J. JULIUS, Esq.
VILLENEUVE,
BRISBANE
Dear Julius,
Your letter of October 1st reached me at a favourable opportunity for ensuring a reply, as I am on the shelf for a week or two as far as hard work goes, with a broken head and fractured ribs ; thanks however, to the naturally adamantine properties of the former, no actual fracture took place, only abrasions ; and owing to my unimpaired appetite (and drinkitite), I am able to keep the latter sufficiently distended to keep them from pressing on my lungs.
And now as regards our Australian letter for the Jottings.
Dear Mr. Editor,
Some scientist has lately given out the astonishing fact that the sun is burning itself out, and that in the course of a very few years it will have lost all its heat. What the result will be to us on our little planet, I am not geologist enough to say, but I presume it will be chaos.
Strangely enough the weather we have been lately experiencing seems to further this bold theory, and some there are who are actually getting nervous and apprehensive that there may be some truth in this alarming prophecy.
No later than September in this year we had sharp frosts, which made havoc with the early crops of potatoes, pumpkins and maize, besides destroying hundreds of thousands of bushels of wheat on the fertile Darling Downs. These frosts were almost immediately succeeded by a heat wave, when life became .a burden with the thermometer at 108 deg Fahr. on the shady side of Queen Street, Brisbane.
Our weather-clerk, Mr. Clement Wragge however, has subsequently let us down with more congenial temperature and we had real Queen's weather to send our boys off on board the " Cornwall " to help the Imperial troops give the Boers the thrashing they deserve.
Here, in our immediate district, things are humming: two new saw-mills in full swing, timber, the principal product of this district, at a record price, and a new railway to Woodford actually being surveyed. Owing to the abundance of grass and water everywhere, farm and dairy produce are in good supply and prices consequently only moderate, which makes it hard for the farmers living more than twenty miles from a railway station to compete with their more favourably-situated brethren of the plough.
Best fat stock are keeping up well, in fact, better than they have been for years probably in consequence of the large contracts secured by the Baynes Bros. and other large meat-exporting firms from the Imperial Government. Maize is still keeping up to an exorbitant price, but the new crop will be fit for market in the early districts before Christmas, when we may expect a substantial reduction in values. Now that federation is un fait accompli, we shall probably find a more evenly regulated market throughout the Colonies, although I fear Queensland will have an uphill fight for the first few years, malgre her magnificent soil and unequalled timber. It is the population we are deficient in, and the mouths to consume our products. I am glad to say we have now got a medical man in our midst ; he is a son of Mr. Butler, my neighbour of Kilcoy, and has just returned to Queensland after satisfactorily completing his medical education in London. We are subscribing a retainer of L150 a year for him, which, with his general practice, ought to give him a fair income. Accidents, I regret to say, have been rather numerous here of late; broken bones of all sorts, including a smashed skull belonging to a little chap of five, which our local medico cleverly trepanned.
The Brisbane wool sales blossomed forth this year, and promise to be a huge success, as each one, so far, has exceeded its predecessor, both in the quantity of wool and price obtained last month's topping the Colonial market.
Wishing you, dear Mr Editor and all readers of Jottings, a Merry Christmas and Prosperous New Year,
I remain,
Yours truly,
A Queensland Contributor.

Julius's Jottings, June 1901 No 5
Villeneuve,
Woodford
Dec. 4th 1900.
Dear Mr. Editor,
Many thanks for the Jottings No 3, which arrived safely by Saturdays mail. Although I fear it will be too late for January's issue, I am sending you an account of a trip we had to the seaside which may prove interesting to some of your readers.
On Tuesday morning, Sept 18th, everybody was up and about very shortly after daybreak, packing portmanteaus and "tucker" boxes, running up horses, greasing buggies, etc. However, it was fully 9 o'clock before a start was made, my wife driving two children and Mrs. Thomas, the governess, in the buggy, whilst I followed in the big 4-horse waggonette, and my little girl and her cousin, aged respectively 9 and 11, rode their ponies. About 1 o'clock we find ourselves 24 miles on our journey when we camp for dinner, boil the family "billy" (Anglice) kettle], and feed ourselves and horses. After an hour and a-half spell, harness up again and away, over a road that gets worse every mile, to poor Mrs. Thomas' horror and dismay, who is not much accustomed to bush travelling.
Now I am in the lead to show the best track to the buggy, the children occasionally getting off their ponies and riding with me and letting the intelligent little creatures run behind, but they are soon glad to jump on their ponies again, as the bumps and ruts are something to be remembered, and are liable to cause a chromic desire to remain in a standing position for days afterwards. Soon after sundown, in spite of bad roads, the vicious attacks of mosquitoes and a few minor evils, Grigor's is sighted, which is our objective for to-day, and after feeding our horses and selves, and a little music on a rather aged piano, we turn into the snowy, sweet-smelling beds of which Mrs Grigor is so justly famous. The following morning after a slight breakfast, consisting of ham and eggs, fried cutlets, cold chicken and corned beef, with tea and coffee, we make a fair start at 7a.m., the horses none the worse for their 41 miles run yesterday; and now we are in the middle of those wonderful freaks of nature the Glasshouse Mountains, of which the following are some of the names: Beerwah, Beerburrum, Buderim, and many others that, even if I could remember, I could not possibly spell.
Before long Johnny Simpson's is reached, a long-headed Britisher and a personal friend of mine, who combines the professions of hotel-keeper, saw-miller, blacksmith and wheelwright, teamster and a few others. At the present time he owns 4 14-horse, and 5 20-bullock trains, so his forage bill for the month is pretty stiff, totaling something over 150 pounds. After a cursory inspection of his stud horses and apiary, and pockets full of oranges and lemons from his orchard, away we go, reaching Landsborough at 11am., 11 miles from where we started this morning. After getting the requisite stores, we start our final 16 miles and reach Caloundra, one of the most beautiful seaside spots I have ever had the good luck to visit, fairly early in the afternoon, and find our 'furnished house' swept and garnished, and really most comfortable, with the long breakers of the Pacific dashing on the shore 200 yards away. The usual sound keeps us awake, for nearly 11/2 minutes after we have sought our "downies", and the next morning's sun peeps at us over the waste of waters, up to our necks in them [the waters I mean].
After breakfast all hands and the cook go fishing, and more whiting, trevalli, rock-cod and tailor fish than we could eat in 3 days is the result; so after supplying the whole town, consisting of the telegraph operator, who is also the lighthouses-keeper, and the solitary boarding house keeper and his wife with a plentiful supply, we made for home, hot hungry and thirsty, where we were noisily welcomed by our 8 horses, who are beginning to think it is quite dinner-time. A little duck, snipe, and wallaby shooting vary the day's picture, and an occasional drive to Landsborough for stores serve to fill up a most intensely pleasurable fortnight's holiday.
Although we regret saying good-bye to the lighthouse-keeper and the boarding-house keeper, yet we are not really sorry to get back home and see how the stock has increased, and the pigs fattened, and the crops grown, and the thousand and one things that make a farmer's life so intensely interesting.
Henry J Julius.

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903 - 1908.
Julius Henry John - Stanley Gates Hotel, Moreton, Stone Hse, Lic Victualler.

ESK POLICE COURT.
An assault case, Wilhelm Kassulke v.Henry John Julius, came on for hearing before the Police Magistrate, at the Esk Police
Court, on Wednesday last. Mr. Smith appeared for the conmplainant, and Mr. E. J. Pender for the defendant.
Evidence for the prosecution was given by E. F. V. Kassulke, Ben Bryant, and the complainant, and for the defence by the defendant, Mrs. Isabella Julius, and Nellie and Minnie Burns. The defendant was convicted and discharged under section 343 of the Criminal Code, which provides that, in a case where the Magistrate is of opinion that the offence is of such a trivial nature as not to be deserving of punishmenot, he may convict the defendant and discharge him without imposing a penalty.
Ref: Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld) Saturday 27 June 1903.

MAGISTRATE'S COURT.
At the above Court yesterday before C. Burchell and E, G. Ling, Esq., J. J, P.,
Walter Sherwood v Henry John Julius, work and labour performed, claim L35/6/0.
Notice of defence filed 22/5/23, but the case was undefended. Mr Havard appeared for plaintiff and
there was no appearance of defendant.
Judgment by default for claim L35/6/0, costs of court, 10/- professional costs L/3/3. witness's expenses, L1/10/-, total L40/9/0.
Ref: Bowen Independent (Qld) Saturday 26 May 1923.

Personal:
Mr. Henry John Julius, wlio died In Townsville recently, had seen long residence in Queensland. Born In Surrey, England, 75 years ago, the late Mr. Julius was one of a large family of the late Rev. H. R. Julius. He came to Queensland 45 years ago, and
during his long residence in Southern. Central and Western Queensland, he owned several fine holdings.
Ref: Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld) Thursday 8 September 1932

These are also taken to be death notices for Henry John.
Mr. Henry George Julius, of Gumlu, on the Bowen line, died in Townsville on Saturday last, at the age of 74. Mr.
Julius lived in the Bowen district for many years.
Ref: Bowen Independent (Qld) Saturday 3 September 1932

Mr. Henry George Julius, a resident of Gumlu, on the Bowen line, died in Townsvllle on Saturday, at the age ot 74. Mr. Julius had lived In the Bowen district for many years.
Ref: Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld) Monday 29 August 1932

Research Notes:
Unplaced H J Julius's.
A Mr H Y J Julius aged 33 arrived in Victoria March 1882 aboard the John Elder from Britain.

A Mr H J Julius born 1863, his wife born 1866 and an infant of 1 year, sailed on the 26 Feb 1892, sailed from London to Sydney on the Oratavia.

Also a Mr H J Julius Clerk sailed on the 26 Nov 1909 from London to Brisbane on the Orvieto.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

Other Records

1. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 18 Caroline St Westminster LND. Henry is recorded as a boarder single aged 22 a law student born Farnham

Henry married Isabella CRAIN [2732], daughter of Irvine (Irwin) CRAIN [2711] and Mary Eleanor MOORE [2728], on 27 May 1886 in Wallsend Newcastle NSW Aust. Isabella was born in 1865 in Wagga Wagga, N.S.W. and died on 24 Jun 1952 in Qld. at age 87.

General Notes:
Name: Henry J Julius
Spouse Name: Isabella Crain
Marriage Date: 1886
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Wallsend, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1886 Registration Number: 6989
Australian Marriage Index.

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903 - 1908
Julius Isabella, Stanley Gates Hotel, Moreton, Stone Hse, Domestic Duties

DOINGS IN DIVORCE
A TOOWOMBA TALE.
The Martyn's Miserable Marriage.
Steals His Wifes Jewellery and Julius's Wife.
The story of Jean Madeline Martyn's marital mishap was told in the Supreme Court on Monday, October 18, before his Honor Mr. Justice. Chubb, when she presented a petition, praying for the dissolution of her marriage with her husband, Henry Herbert Martyn, on the grounds of his cruelty, desertion, and adultery with one ---- Julius, wife of Henry J. Julius, the licensee of the Stanley Gates Hotel, at Moore.
Mr Douglas (Instructed by Messrs, Morris, Fletcher, and Jensen) appeared for the plaintiff.
There was no appearance of the defendant. . . . . .
Jean Madeline Martyn said that she lived at Toowoomba. She was married on May 2, 1902. Her husband was an assistant surveyor with Henry George Blakeley He had never made a home for witness, who lived with her mother. All the money which her husband had given her amounted to £3. On the other hand, her husband used to come and got money from witness.
Then follows a long testimony of violence and abuse.
AS TO MRS. JULIUS
Minnie' Ollenberg, the wife of Charles Ollonberg, said that she was, in 1903, housemaid at the Stanley Gates Hotel, at Moore. In June, 1903, a surveyor named Blakeley and his assistant, Henry Herbert Martyn, came to stay at the Hotel. After they came witness noticed that Martyn and the licensee's wife, Mrs. Julius, became very friendly. She saw Martyn kiss Mrs. Julius, behind the bar. The first week in November, witness saw Martyn upstairs with hls arm round Mrs Julius, about 10 p.m. They went into a private parlor, and then into Mrs. Julius bedroom. They shut the door, and witness did not see them again that night. On October 20, they went into the bedroom and put the lights out, leaving the door open. It was moonlight, and witness distinctly saw that there were two persons in the bed. On November 8 witness was off duty, and when she came home there was a terrible row in the place, Julius said, "Martyn, I will make you pay.". Julius subsequently asked witness for a statement, which she refused to give. A few days later, when she came back for her clothes and money, Julius refused to give her the money which amounted to L30, unless she gave a statement.
His Honor: Did you get it?
Witness: No; never.
Witness said that subsequently she gave a statement.
Mrs Julius carried revolvers, and told witness that she would shoot her if she told anything about her.
Witness was not anxious to be mixed up in it. She gave a statement in the present case three or four months ago. George Alfred Whittlngton, an engine driver, said that he kept a store at Moore, near Esk, in 1903, next door to the Stanley Gates Hotel.
He met Martyn at the hotel, and constantly noticed Martyn about the hotel on very friendly terms with Mrs Julius. Witness had seen him wlth his arms round her. In October, 1903, witness saw Martyn go with Mrs Julius into a private parlor, and then into a bedroom. In November, 1903, Julius was away, and came back suddenly one night. Witness followed Julius into the hotel. Julius went upstairs and burst a door open, after calling his wife to open it. Witness then heard a great commotion, and Mrs. Julius screaming. Julius said, "I will make you pay dearly for this, Martyn." Martyn passed witness going down stairs. Julius, said to his wife, "This is a nice way to carry on behind my back." Witness heard Mrs, Julius threaten to shoot Minnie Ollonberg, and he took Minnie Ollenberg home. Later on, Julius asked witness for a statement, but he refused to give one. His Honor granted a decree nisi, to be moved absolute in three months, and gave the plaintiff the custody of the child, and ordered the defendant to pay costs.
Ref: Truth (Brisbane, Qld) Sunday 24 October 1915

Isabelle Julius
Death Date: 24 Jun 1952
Death Place: Queensland
Father's name: Irvin Crain
Mother's name: Mary Ellen Moore
Registration Year: 1952
Registration Place: Queensland
Registration Number: 001968
Page Number: 1231

Research Notes:
See Crain Family, Davis Family Tree, Ancestry. http://trees.ancestry.co.uk/tree/14318865/family?cfpid=122429394


The child from this marriage was:

+ 362 F    i. Constance Marion Isabelle JULIUS [1042] was born on 1 Jun 1890 and died in 1965 in Queensland Aust. at age 75.


170. Florence Charlotte JULIUS [849] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Jan 1848 in Great Staughton HUN, was baptised on 15 Jan 1848, and died in 1874 in Canada at age 26.

General Notes:
Lady Cowper was Florence's god-mother. Both Florence's children were adopted it is thought by Ashley Alexander Julius after their mothers death and their names changed.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, High Rd Mile End Colchester ESS. Florence is recorded as a daughter aged 2 born Gt Staughton HUN

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, The White House Downham NFK. Florence is recorded as a clergymans daughter aged 13 born Great Staughton Huntingdonshire. On census night she is a visitor at the home of Frederick Bell, solicitor aged 56, and Eliza Bell


Florence married Thomas Henry SAYLE [850], son of Thomas SAYLE [12025] and Mary Ann [12026], on 19 Feb 1869 in All Saints South Lynn NFK. Thomas was born circa 1847 in Hilgay NFK and was baptised on 7 Feb 1847 in Southery NFK.

General Notes:
Thomas Henry Sayle
Baptism Date:7 Feb 1847
Baptism Place:Southery, Norwich, Norfolk, England
Father:Thomas Sayle
Mother:Mary Ann
FHL Film Number:1526656
Reference ID:130

Marriage.
19 February 1869. Thomas Henry Sayle, son of Thomas and Mary Ann Sayle and Florence Charlotte Julius daughter of Archibald Eneas Julius Rector of Southery, at all Saints South Lynn Norfolk.
Ref: The College of Arms.

Thomas emigrated to Canada after his marriage, he remarried in Shanghai.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Westgate St Southery NFK. Thomas is recorded as a son aged 4 a scholar born Hilgay NFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Southery Norfolk. Thomas is recorded as the son of the wife single age 14 Hilgay NFK

Children from this marriage were:

+ 363 M    i. Henry Julius SAYLE [1341] was born on 2 Sep 1869 in Eastfield Rd Peterborough.

+ 364 F    ii. Laura Ethel SAYLE [1342] was born on 20 Oct 1871 in Southery NFK.


171. Charles Archibald JULIUS [851] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Jul 1849 in Great Staughton HUN and died on 20 Nov 1924 in Ryde Isle Of Wight at age 75.

General Notes:
Charles sailed steerage for Australia on the 12th April 1869 in "Young Australia" and arrived in Brisbane 13 July 1869, as a free settler. For many years he lived in Maryborough, Queensland, but returned to England in 1902, after 35 years in Australia.

Charles was a legatee under his fathers Will.

NOTES FROM MURIEL GATAKER JULIUS :
In 1870 he was appointed by Dept of Public Instruction a teacher at Maryborough Primary School. In 1875 it was proposed that a new school be opened at East Maryborough. Grandfather applied for the position as Headmaster and was accepted at a salary of L156 p.a.!
Floods interrupted the early days of the school; many homes were swept away and families were given shelter at the new school. It re-opened in March 1895 with between 50-60 pupils. Grandma assisted in teaching, and Aunt Edith Hampton, [Grandma's sister who lived with them] was also an assistant. Also involved in the school was a family by the name of Brown, Charlotte and Emily were assistant teachers
Reginald Hampton Julius was as early pupil at the school, and various other Julius names also appear on the school's register, children of the 3 other brothers who came to Australia at the same time.
Grandfather continued at the school until 1902 when the family [excluding Reginald Hampton] returned to England. They did not come back and Grandfather resigned in 1903. They lived in Shankin, Isle of Wight, and later in St. John's Rd. Ryde. in a house called "Swan's Nest", a very charming Elizabethan house. I have a painting of "Swan's Nest" done by Aunt Edith.
Charlotte Brown lived with the Julius family, and she went with them when they returned to England, also Aunt Edith Hampton. RHJ visited them in 1924, and it was while there are that Grandfather died (an angina heart attack). After Grandfather's death RHJ supported them generously for the rest of his life. Grandma, Aunt Muriel, Aunt Edith and Charlotte came back to Australia in the early 30s but did not stay long and returned to England. There they bought a house in Manor Road, New Milton, where Grandma died in 1940. Dad and I went to England in 1948 to visit Aunt Muriel and to see to their affairs. I can't remember when Aunt Edith died, but Charlotte died in 1953 and Aunt Muriel continued to live in the new Milton house until about 1963 when she was too old and confused to stay alone and went to a nursing home until she died in December 1965. Fortunately for us John Burroughs (a cousin of Aunt Muriel) was able to attend to her affairs on our behalf. I don't know where the cousinship with John Burroughs comes in in the family but he was a very fine man and conscientiously tried to look after Auntie.
P.S. Frederick Blagg Hampton had a sister Rosina Jane, who married Edward Fleming Burroughs, and John Lister Fleming Burroughs is their Grandson. This information came to me from Patricia Pharaoh (nee Burroughs, also a descendant from Rosina) and living in London.

NOTES FROM MURIEL GATAKER JULIUS :
GRANVILLE. The name of the school was changed to Granville in 1938. I was in Maryborough in 1965, after mother's death, and in the 'Maryborough Chronicle' on a Saturday was a large article re the opening of a new wing at the Granville State School by Mr. Pizzy Education Minister.
I went along [uninvited] to this opening and met the Headmaster Searle, other Education people, and many of the locals. Several old pupils who had gone to school with Reginald Hampton Julius, and Auntie came to meet me. On Monday I visited the school at invitation of Headmaster Searle, and was shown the original school register, with Dad's and other family names therein. There was also a large photograph of grandfather [very stained and eaten] so I undertook to have it restored for them. The 'new' photo now hangs in the Head's office.
At this time I thought up the idea of a JULIUS MEMORIAL PRIZE given as a prize for an essay to be set each year by the Headmaster. The winner to receive a book [with Julius Coat of Arms bookplate inside] for the pupil's use in going on to High School. This was carried on by me until 1975, the centenary year of the school, when we decided to make a 'Foundation Trust' to deal with the Memorial Prize for the future.
At the centenary celebrations, at which we were V.I.P.guests, this was done, and $1,000 [from M.G.J., M.H.B.,and R.S.B.] was presented to Rollo Nicholson, as trustee for the family, who together with the Headmaster, Schools Inspector, and Bank Manager, administer the Trust - and this is now continuing. [N.B. Rollo Nicholson is the eldest son of Gertrude and Harry Nicholson- Gert being a Gataker cousin]

The Deputy Principal of Granville School writes in May 2013
Dear Edward,
Granville State School continues to present the Julius Award for English to the Highest achieving Male and Female student of the Year. A plaque displaying the recipients is displayed in the Administration foyer. The foyer also displays portraits of the past Principals of Granville State School. The late C. A. Julius holds his place as the first of 12 Principals. The photo we use is as per your website.
Regards
Athol Butler

Charles is recorded with Katherine, Reginald and Enid as arriving in Victoria on the Kent in Jan 1878 from Britain, presumably they were returning from a trip. The ages shown appear to be somewhat inaccurate as Charles 28, Katherine 25, Reginald 2, Enid 1. Charles was described as a merchant.
Ref: PROV - unassisted immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

CLIPPING FROM THE "MARYBOROUGH CHRONICLE"
November 1924
A cablegram was received in Maryborough on Saturday morning announcing the death at Ryde, Isle of Wight, England of CHARLES ARCHIBALD JULIUS, formally of Granville, Maryborough. Mr JULIUS spent the best portion of his life as head-teacher of the State School in our Eastern suburb, and served his generation well.
He was a man of studious habit, and in addition to his duties to the Education Dept., successfully coached pupils for examinations, which fitted them for their professions in later life. It was in 1874 that Mr JULIUS was asked to take charge of the newly-constituted Granville school. After twenty-seven years of faithful service to his honourable calling Mr JULIUS retired from the Education Dept. in 1901. He then resided in Pialba for a brief period, and subsequently proceeded to the Old Country, where he has spent a well earned retirement. Mr. JULIUS is survived by his widow, and one son, REGINALD [well-known and highly respected Brisbane business man] and 2 grown-up daughters.
It was a coincidence that many of Mr.JULIUS' friends should read in the "50-year ago column" of Saturday's "Chronicle" of his appointment as teacher at the Granville school, bringing back memories of one who had been a good counsellor and friend, and that a few hours later a cablegram was received announcing his death on 21st November. In our "50 yrs ago column" we referred to Mr JULIUS as follows :
"A primary school was to be opened after the Christmas vacation on the east side of the river. The school house was healthily situated on the ridge on which Mr Wilsons house was situated. Mr.JULIUS, who for nearly two years had been teacher in the Maryborough school, was appointed to take charge. From his well known fitness of the management of such an institution, the most happy results were anticipated. At least 40 children would attend from the opening."
Mr JULIUS fulfilled this early prophesy.

MR. C. A. JULIUS
MARYBOROUGH. November 21.
A cablegram was received in Maryborough on Saturday announcing the death of Mr. Charles Archibald Julius, at Ryde, Isle of Wight, England. Deceased spent the best portion of his life as head teacher of the State school at Granville, and after 27 years in the Educational Department, returned to England in 1901. He is survived by one son, Reginald (Brisbane), and two grown-up daughters.
Ref: The Week (Brisbane, Qld) Fri 28 Nov 1924

Julius Charles Archibald of The Swans Nest St John's Road Ryde Isle of Wight died 20 November 1924 Probate London 13 January to Katharine Georgina Collet Julius widow
Effects L1043 5s 5d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
Charles birthdate may be 1850?

Family records show he was married in Brisbane 5 Oct 1872 perhaps.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, High Rd Mile End Colchester ESS. Charles is recorded as a son aged 1 born Gt Haughton HAM

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Charles is recorded as a son aged 11 born Gt Staughton Huntingdonshire.


3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Wadeford Manor Chard SOM. Charles is recorded as head of a house of 9 rooms aged 61 married 38 yrs a retired Queensland Civil Service born GT Staughton HUN

Charles married Katherine Georgina Collet HAMPTON [852], daughter of Sir Capt Frederick Blagg HAMPTON K.I.C. B.A.L. [4927] and Matilda Collet STRATFOLD [4928], on 5 Oct 1872 at Residence Rev Edward Griffith of Congregational Church Brisbane. Katherine was born on 15 Oct 1851 in March Cambridgeshire, was baptised on 7 Nov 1851 in March Ely CAM, and died on 13 May 1940 in Hampshire at age 88.

General Notes:
Birth.
Katherine Georgina Colet Hampton
England Free BMD Birth Index Q4 1851 Registration District Nth Wichford CAM Vol 14 Pg. 139

In the absence of a search of the above birth the following arises:
A date of "7 Nov 1851 Eglantine Villa March Isle of Ely" is given in the Bible of Frederick B Hampton in the possession of Pip Bucknell 2015.
A birth date of 15 Oct 1851 is supplied by the late Val Julius.

Marriage - 5 Oct 1872. Charles Archibald Julius & Katherina Georgina Collet Hampton.
Queensland Pioneers Index 1829-1889. Ref; 1872/B003709. NZSOG

Name:Katherine G Julius
Estimated birth year:abt 1853
Age:25
Arrival Date:3 Jan 1878
Arrival Port:Melbourne, Australia
Departure Port:Gravesend
Ship:Kent
Nationality:English
Ref: Ancestry.

Katherine her daughter Muriel, sister Edith and a Charlotte Brown sailed 17 Apr 1931 from London to Brisbane on board the Mongolia. Their address is recorded as Swans Nest, St Johns Rd, Ryde, Isle of Wight. They are all described as tourists, but will reside in Australia. They settled in Bowen Hills Brisbane but did not stay long before returning to England.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

Julius Katharine Georgina Colet of Pineflete Manor-road New Milton Hampshire widow died 19 September 1940 Probate Llandudno 28 October to Muriel Edith Julius spinster.
Effects L313 14s 5d
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of Pip Bucknell 2015

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Wadeford Manor Chard SOM. Katherine is recorded as a wife aged 59 married 38yrs with 5 children 3 still living born March CAM

Children from this marriage were:

+ 365 F    i. Charlotte Allison BROWNE [11275] was born about 1866 in Maryborough Qld Aust. and died in 1953 in England. aged about 87.

+ 366 F    ii. Frances Sybil Gwendoline JULIUS [853] was born on 18 Jan 1873 and died on 7 May 1873 in Queensland Aust.

+ 367 M    iii. Reginald Hampton JULIUS [854] was born on 15 Nov 1874 in Maryborough Qld Aust., died on 26 May 1952 in Mater Hospital Brisbane at age 77, and was buried in Family Plot MT Thompson Crematorium Brisbane.

+ 368 F    iv. Enid Blanche JULIUS [859] was born on 10 Dec 1876 in Queensland Aust. and died on 1 May 1951 in England. at age 74.

+ 369 F    v. Evangeline Mayor JULIUS [860] was born on 12 Oct 1878 in Maryborough Qld Aust. and died on 9 Jul 1879 in Queensland Aust.

+ 370 F    vi. Muriel Edith JULIUS [861] was born on 28 Aug 1880 and died in Dec 1965 in England. at age 85.


172. Canon Alfred Henry JULIUS [862] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 May 1851 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 11 Apr 1934 in Akaroa NZ at age 82, and was buried in Akaroa NZ.

General Notes:
Alfred was a pupil at Felsted School in Essex in 1862
Ref: Alumni Felstedienses NZSOG ENG.ESS.SAR

He sailed steerage from England on the 12 the April 1869 in "Young Australia" and arrived in Brisbane 13 July 1869, aged 18 years he was a free settler.

Official Notifications. (From Saturday's Government Gazette.)
APPOINTMENTS.
. . . . . To be second assistant teachars: . . . . . Alfred Henry Julius, Rockhampton.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld.) Saturday 26 January 1878

Department Of Public Instruction.
His Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, . . . . The following promotions in classification of teachers in the service of the Department of Public Instruction are notified, to take effect from the 1st January, 1879 : From Class III., Division 1, to Class II., Division 3 : . . . . . Alfred Henry Julius, . . . . .
Ref: The Brisbane Courier (Qld) Monday 17 March 1879.

Religious.
The Diocesan Synod.
The Synod met in the Diocesan Chambers at 4 p.m. . . . . .
The Bishop delivered his annual address as
follows . . . . .
I hope, at the same time, to admit to deaoon's orders Mr. Alfred Henry Julius, a brother of Mr Julius, of Gayndah. He is well known in the colony and greatly respected. He has been for some years connected with public education in Queensland and has been latterly one of the masters of the, Rockhampton Grammar School.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 23 August 1884.

Official Notifications. (From Saturday's Government Gazette.)
Clerical.
The Rev. Alfred Henry Julius, a minister of the Church of England, has been authorised to celebrate marriages in the district of Rockhampton.
Ref: The Week (Brisbane, Qld ) Saturday 6 December 1884.

Ordination Service.
The Bishop of Brisbane (Dr. Webber) held his first Ordination Service at St. John's Pro-Cathedral last Sunday morning, the day being Trinity Sunday. There were four candidates, two for the Diaconate and two for the Priesthood while an additional interest was lent to the ceremony by the fact that two other gentlemen were to be ordained on the same festival in London for work in the Brisbane Diocese. The candidates presented for the priesthood at St. John's were the Rev. Alfred Henry Julius, who has for some time acted as curate to Mr. Diggens at Rockhampton, and who is a brother of the Rev. A. C. Julius of Allora; and the Rev. John Hunt, a graduate of St. Augustine's Missionary College, Canterbury, who has done work in the Toowoomba district. . . . . . The service was a combination, in accordance with prayer-book ritual, of no less than five different forms of service - the ordinary Sunday service, the special collects and psalms of Trinity Sunday, the collects and psalms of the service of thanksgiving for the anniversary of her Majesty Queen Victoria's accession to the throne, and the two forms of prayer for the ordering of Deacons and the ordering of Priests respectively. The Ember days of the previous week had been duly observed, and the preliminary services on Sunday, and the ordering of the Church for the later ones, were superintended by the Rev. V. R. Handyside, of St. John's, who then proceeded to St. Andrew's, South Brisbane, to take the morning service. Matins commenced at St. John's at 10.20, the prayers being intoned by, the Rev. R. Bernard Wilson, acting incumbent of St. Andrew's, who also read the lessons. The Venerable Archdeacon Glennie occupied a seat within the sanctuary, and the four candidates for holy orden were placed in the front pew, underneath the reading desk. When matins were over, about 11 o'clock, the choir advanced, with the Archdeacon and the Rev. Mr. Wilson, and singing a processional hymn, to the western door, where they reformed in line to meet the Bishop. Dr. Webber wore his scarlet convocation robes, and while the organ played a voluntary the procession returned to the chancel. The Bishop took his seat on his throne, which had been placed at the north end of the altar, just within the rails, and the archdeacon resumed his seat at the south end; Mr. Wilson being at the reading desk, and the rest of the choir in their customary places. The voluntary having ended, Mr. Wilson entered the pulpit and preached the ordination sermon, taking for his text Isaiah, vi., 8 "Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, whom shall I send, and who will go for us. Then said I, Here am I send me". The preacher dwelt upon the vision which was vouchsafed to the prophet Isaiah, as the inauguration and the inspiring power of his ministerial work, and the marvellous depth of the moral and spiritual teaching contained in it, foreshadowing in dim mysterious outlines the great Christian revelation, commemorated on Trinity Sunday, which summed up in a single word the creed of the Christian, telling him of God's threefold work of love, and which was the prelude of the great anthem of praise which the Christian Church had been taught to sing. The sermon concluded with an earnest appeal to the people for their prayers, and to the candidates that their single aim should be the honour and glory of God, and their only wish to follow and obey His call in the work of the ministry. At the conclusion of tbe sermon, the Ordination Service proper was commenced. When it had proceeded as far as the Epistle, which was read by Archdeacon Glennie, the candidates advanced and stood before the altar rails, immediately in front of the Bishop, and were formally presented to him by Mr. Wilson. The Bishop then intoned the Litany, after which the prescribed questions were put to those applying for the order of deacon, on matters of faith and obedience, and they having been replied to, the Bishop, laying his hands on each of their heads in turn, admitted them to the office, the candidates kneeling. Mr. Fielder then read the gospel for the day. The two deacons were then in like manner admitted to the office of the priesthood, the laying on of hands being preceded by a period of silent prayer and the singing of the hymn Veni Creator antiphonally by the Bishop and choir. The Archdeacon and Mr. Wilson joined with the Bishop in the imposition of hands. The rest of the Communion Service was then proceeded with, the newly ordained communicating, as well as several memben of the choir and congregation, and this concluded the ceremonial. The canticle music throughout was Tours and Dyke's, and the hymns, a number of which were interspersed, were those given in the "Ancient and Modern " collection. We undertand that licenses will be issued to the four clergymen as follow:- Mr. Julius will be licensed to the cure of Springsure and Clermont, which district is shortly to be cut off from that of Rockhampton; Mr. Hunt will resume his duties in the Toowoomba district, and Mr. Fielder will be appointed curate to Mr. Jones, in the Toowoomba town parish; Mr. Simmons will be appointed curate to the Rev. H. Heath, of Ipswich.
Ref: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld ) Saturday 26 June 1886.

The Origins of the Church of England in the Parish of Clermont are already buried in antiquity, the earliest registers known to exist date only from 1885. In that year, ALFRED HENRY JULIUS, ordained Deacon in 21 Sept 1884 (Curate of Rockhampton 1884 - 1889) and Priest in 21 June 1886, Bishop Webber), was posted to Central Queensland, his sprawling circuit stretching from Springsure to Clermont (Rector of Clermont-Springsure 1886 - 1889). In the grip of a slump since the collapse of the Copper Mine bonanza, neither Copperfield nor Clermont offered to Clerics of any persuasion inducements that the fight for the souls was worth the sacrifices required, the pattern being remarkably similar in all denominations. The tenure of Rev. A.H. Julius, in fact, marked the formal beginning of Anglicanism in Clermont.
Long before 1885, however, the Church of England was represented in both townships, Copperfield apparently being the base of the Parish work initially. only after the decline of Copperfield was it supplanted by Clermont, and for the Church itself, that was during the incumbency of Rev. A.H. Julius. Almost as soon as he began his pastoral work at Clermont, Father Julius undertook the construction of All Saints'. "A little wooden church on the corner of Capella and Mimosa Streets". It was consecrated and opened on 3 Nov 1887. On 26 Sept 1889, at a Confirmation Service at Clermont, five males and six females were confirmed as adherents of the Anglican faith, the membership generally indicated robust health in the new Parish of Clermont.
At the end of the 1880s, Rev. A.H. Julius left Clermont for Gladstone (1889 - 1894), at the very time Clermont became a separate Parish within the Diocese of Brisbane. It was not until 1892 that it was transferred to the newly created Diocese of Rockhampton (1894 - 1904) Hon Canon Rockhampton 1899 - 1904. Father Julius' successor, Rev. W.H.Warrington consolidated the sound foundations, records of 1800 show All Saints with seating for 140, 15 stations in the Parish all conducting regular worship and 97 Sunday school students on the roll.

The following information is from the Queensland Police Gazette dated:
1887. Alfred Henry Julius, Church of England, is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Clermont Queensland in the Registry District of Clermont

1888. Alfred Henry Julius, Church of England, is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Clermont Queensland in the Registry District of Clermont

1889. Alfred Henry Julius, Church of England, is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Clermont Queensland in the Registry District of Clermont

1890. Alfred Henry Julius, Church of England, is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Gladstone Queensland in the Registry District of Gladstone

1887 Report of lost stock 9 April 1887: A H Julius of Springsure reports on 4 April 1887 loss of a brown horse, blotched brand near shoulder, two large lumps inside of forearm, taken Emerald 30 September 1886.
NZSOG CD 2007

BRISBANE DIOCESAN ARCHIVES: Alfred Henry JULIUS.
Deaconed 21.9.1884 by Bishop Hale [we think]
Priested 21.6.1886 by Bishop Webber
Curate of Rockhampton 1884 -1889
Rector of Clermont-Springsure 1886 -1889
Vicar of Gladstone 1889-1894
Vicar of North Rockhampton 1894-1904
Hon. Canon of Rockhampton 1899-1904
Vicar Akaroa, Christchurch N.Z. 1904-1924. Retired.
Died 1934.

Alfred was a legatee under his fathers Will

Julius Jottings. January 1900 No. 1.
The Rev Alfred H. Julius has lately been made Canon of St Paul's, Rockhampton, Queensland. Canon Julius has been instrumental in building five churches in Queensland.

Extract from Power in the Land by Gertrude & Anthony Elworthy 1971.
"He worked as a teacher and a clergyman in Queensland from 1868-1904. He was Canon of Rockhampton Cathedral. He bought his wife and family to New Zealand in 1904 where he and his wife worked tirelessly in his parish of Akaroa on the Banks Peninsular [near Christchurch] for 20 years. He had remarkable gifts, a phenomenal memory, preaching without notes, his parishioners said it was a joy to hear him read the lesson.
He was the first Canon ordained at Rockhampton Cathedral.

Extract from a letter to his sister Mrs. Hull. Julius Jottings April 1900 No 2.
The Vicarage,
North Rockhampton,
October 31st,1898.
To give you some idea of a Sunday's work in my parish. Yesterday [Sunday], Holy Communion, 8am.; llam., full Morning Service, with Sermon; 3 to 4 Sunday School; 4.30, Masonic Service in the Cathedral, two miles distant. I, as Chaplain of the Lodge, take the whole service and preach; 7.30 pm., full Evening Service, with Sermon. This was an easy day, having no travelling to do. October 23rd.-- Celebrated Holy Communion 8am.; 11am., full service; 3pm, Bush Service at "Stony Creek," fifteen minutes away; 7.30, full service in Church again. I do the thirty miles on a bicycle. One more Sunday I give you. October 30th.-- 8am., Holy Communion; 11.15, full Service at Emu Park on the coast, twenty-nine miles by rail; 4pm., full service at Yepoon, sixteen miles from Emu Park by bicycle; 8pm., Service in Pigeon English, for the South Sea Islanders on the sugar plantation five miles from Yepoon. The next day, after two full Services in the Church, I took a Bush Service at Hedlow, fifteen miles away, driven in a buggy by Mr. Foley, my Lay Reader. Next week I hope to see the building of my Mission Church at Hedlow started. [This church has since been finished and opened.] This has been wanted for some time. On December 4th I have a Confirmation in my Church. The Candidates are scattered all over the large parish, so the necessary preparation is not easy as I have to go from one place to another to hold classes, often very many miles apart.
A clergyman's life out here is truly a hard and a busy one. It has its dark side, too; very dark at times; but one has to work away in faith and hope, doing one's best and leaving the result in the Master's hands. I confess I should like a rest for a while, after nearly sixteen years' of this constant work, but, at present, I see no chance of getting away.

Julius Jottings. October 1900 No 3.
THE VICARAGE,
NORTH ROCKHAMPTON,
QUEENSLAND,
May 14th, 1900.
Dear MR. Brewin,
I am really sorry I have been so long in writing to say how very much I appreciate Julius Jottings I sincerely hope you may be able to continue to publish the magazine. I intended sending you a contribution, giving some details of my working, but have been delayed by sickness, from which I was laid up from work for over two months, and afterwards by pressure .of work, everything having fallen sadly into arrears during my absence from duty.
As it is, I cannot get the time to write as I would wish, but instead enclose a contribution I sent to " Bush Leaves " some time ago. If you care to publish it I shall be very glad, as it gives a slight idea of one's work out here, and consequently may be interesting to other members of the Julius family.
With hearty fraternal greetings, and wishing you every success,
Yours faithfully,
ALFRED H. JULIUS.






I will try to send you a better contribution later on.

PARISH OF NORTH ROCKHAMPTON WITH THE NORTH COAST MISSION DISTRICT. Vicar-Canon Julius.
The parochial district of which I have been in charge since July, 1894, is a somewhat peculiar one, being neither a town parish, nor yet a regular bush district, but partakes of the characteristics of both. North Rockhampton itself is really a suburb of the, large and growing town of Rockhampton, separated froth it by the river Fitzroy; it is somewhat like a large English village. St. Barnabas Church, our centre of work, was dedicated on January 24, 1897, as our parish church.
Here we have a fairly complete organisation of church work, and were there no outlying districts depending on it, one clergyman would carry on the whole of the work satisfactorily; but this is not the case, as I hope to show, and, even with the help of a most willing and efficient Lay Reader, I am quite unable to cope with all that ought to be taken in hand. A curate is the greatest of out needs, but alas! there are no funds available for a second stipend, nor is there any probability of there being any for a long time to come.
St. Barnabas is a very good specimen of our wooden churches, and is fairly complete. In connection with St Barnabas we have two outside missions at work. The first, 15 miles distant, is known as Mt. Hedlow. Here we have a mission church, St. Luke, dedicated January 22, 1899. This little church, built of galvanized iron, and holding sixty people, stands in the bush with only three houses in sight, but is in the centre of a number of dairy farms scattered about at distances varying from one to ten miles.
The Lay Reader and myself go out alternately every second Sunday and hold service at 3pm. to a congregation of bush people, who gather from near and far in spring carts, buggies, and on horseback. These services are very hearty, and they supply a great need, as without them these people would be completely shut out from the ministrations of the Church. The services at Mt.Hedlow were started nearly three years ago in an old schoolroom, which served until the little church was built. We greatly need furniture; the greater part of that in use was made in my workshop at North Rockhampton. We are thankful to have the building, such as it is, and must wait patiently, for the rest.
Our second mission is at Stoney Creek, also 15 miles distant but in a different direction. Here we are not as far advanced as at Mt. Hedlow, as we are still holding service in a school room, but energetic efforts are being made to raise funds for a little church here, too, and we hope before very long to see our second mission church dedicated to the worship of God. The Stoney Creek district is much the same as that of Mt Hedlow, except that the people have not so far to come to attend services. These services are also held on alternate Sunday afternoons, and are both hearty and reverent, well repaying the somewhat heavy task of travelling 30 miles between the morning and evening services at St. Barnabas.
Our next church, Christ Church, is situated at Emu Park, a watering-place 30 miles distant, but reached from North Rockhampton by rail. This church dedicated in 1893, is complete in most respects, and during the summer season, when the place is full of visitors, I hold service on Sunday mornings, returning by train in time for Evensong at St. Barnabas. In working Emu Park I am greatly assisted by the Cathedral clergy, one or other of them frequently taking my place there, and last summer they conducted the services entirely for two months.
These four centres form what I may call the home part of our parish, but we must now go much further off for our next and last church. A journey of 133 miles by buggy from Rockhampton brings us to a township of St. Lawrence, almost at the northern extremity of the diocese. This is a very old place, and some twenty-five years back a resident clergyman lived and worked here for about three years, but after his removal to Gympie no one took his place, and only very occasional visits were paid to it, and in consequence all church work languished and almost died out.
An attempt was made to make a fresh start a few years ago, my predecessor, Rev. F.D.Pritt, and after him myself, making quarterly visits to the place. This revived the work a good deal, and in 1896 the Rev. A.E.Garrett was placed there to carry on the work under my supervision, while I continued to make my quarterly visits as before. The work of the resident clergyman soon began to tell not only in St. Lawrence itself, but also in the large district surrounding it.
Then last year we made a great step in advance. By the aid of a liberal grant made from the S.P.G. [Marriott Bequest] we built a really nice church, to seat 120 persons, furnished very completely. But, alas! very shortly after Christmas, St.Lawrence, was dedicated by the Bishop on July 31, 1898, our curate in-charge accepted work in the diocese of North Queensland, and the town and district is again left without a resident clergyman. I shall go there from time to time, but it is quite impossible to keep in touch with work 130 miles away.
We must have a man resident there, the stipend is ready, the church completed, but no one is forthcoming --will anyone volunteer? St.Lawrence is the centre of a large pastoral district, and there is ample work for a clergyman, apart altogether from North Rockhampton, and we are earnestly hoping to see it formed into a separate parish as soon as possible.
I have held the charge of during a nearly 16 years' ministry in what is now the diocese of Rockhampton. I hope these details, few and bare as they are, will be of interest to your readers, who, I trust, will not forget this parish among others in our distant diocese in their intercessions at the Throne of Grace.

St. Barnabas Vicarage,
North Rockhampton.
Queensland, .
September 16th 1900.
I am sending you another contribution for Julius Jottings, if you care to find room for it. I thought your readers might, perhaps, find some amusements from the difficulties attending "taking a marriage" in this out-of-the way corner of the world. I can assure you I have kept strictly to facts, and only regret I had not a camera to take a few "shots," as the efforts to get up some of the "Pinches"- notably the "Featherbed"- would be ludicrous enough. Anyhow, do what you like with it.
Yours sincerely,
A.H. Julius

TAKING A MARRIAGE IN QUEENSLAND, THE REV. CANON JULIUS.
On April 30th I received a letter summoning me to celebrate a marriage at a station called Collaroy. This station being in my parish, the summons had to be obeyed. Fortunately, ample time was given for all the necessary arrangements to be made, as the date given for the marriage was 31st May. Collaroy being 183 miles away from Rockhampton, the headquarters of all the parochial work, a great deal had to be arranged for carrying on the work in my absence.
On May 25th I started driving a pair of horses in my own buggy, taking with me a South Sea Islander, named Johnny Mai. The first day's stage of 29 miles landed me at a bush hotel, called Canoona, a little after sunset, where supper and bed were the order of the day. Next morning we started in good time for the next stage of 36 miles to Marlborough Station. Here I spent a pleasant evening, the manager and his family being old friends of mine. Before starting on the 27th I celebrated the Holy Communion, a pleasure always to be obtained at Marlborough.
Tooloombah, the next stage of 30miles, was reached in good time, as I had a fresh pair of horses, and as unusually good road all the way. The evening of the 28th saw me safely arrived at St. Lawrence, 32miles, a town at the extreme north of my parish. After arriving, we had service in the church to a good congregation. and I promised to spend the following Sunday with them. We made an early start next morning as I knew there was heavy work before us, the Connors Range having to be descended. I again got a change of horses at St.Lawrence, so the first 14 miles, over level country and good road, were got over in good time.
This bought us to the foot of the range, so here we took the horses out to give them an hour's rest before the heavy pull up the mountain, while Johnny and I boiled the "billy," made tea, and had our lunch. For the past 5 miles our road had been parallel to the range, which rises like a wall, 3,600ft. high, and up a spur, up which we had to go. After a good rest we began our ascent, both of us walking, or rather climbing. I driving the horses with reins, whip and voice [one horse would not do his fair share of work], while Johnny followed behind carrying a big stone to block the hind wheels every time we had to stop to let the horses "get their wind." It is impossible for English readers to understand what driving up an Australian range is like. It was a literal climb up a gradient of about 1 in 5, the road a mass of deep, water-worn ruts and loose stones. We reached the top in an hour and twenty minutes, without any breakdown, and were thankful to have a rest before going on again to Killarny, a station 7 miles from the top of the range.
The last and worst stage of 36 miles to Collaroy was now before us. I knew the road well, and, before starting, thoroughly overhauled both buggy and harness, and fitted the breeching I had bought for the purpose on the horses, to help us over the bad part of the road. So far I had driven, as we usually do, with collar and trace only on the horsed. The first 10 miles is fair travelling along the top of the tableland, but then comes about 9 miles of as heavy a road as I know in Queensland. It has been described as like the teeth of a cross-cut saw- up one pinch, down the other side, and up again; each of them so steep that to go up the horses can only pull a short distance, then the stone goes under the wheel, rest awhile, then on again, till the top is reached; a few yards further, then down, with brakes on hard, and the horses holding back in the breeching. The bottom is reached with a sigh of relief that nothing has given way; then up again, and so on till the bottom of the Red Pinch, the worst of all is reached. Here the worst of the road is over, so we camp for an hour and have lunch, then on again, and reach Collaroy at 5.30 p.m.
The following morning, the 31st, the marriage is celebrated, and then one whole day's rest is taken; no more could be allowed, as I had promised to be in St. Lawrence for Sunday, and this is Thursday. Accordingly, on Friday morning, the start for home was made, and the same road again negotiated with yet another pair of horses. The "Featherbed" so called from the granite boulders covering the road- Red Pinch, Cooper's Pinch, etc., were all successfully crossed, and Killarney again . reached before dark.
Saturday saw us once again at the top of the range before 10.00 a.m., and we stayed half an hour to prepare our descent. The brakes and harness were overhauled to see that all was right, then Johnny was set to cut down a young gum tree; this was firmly lashed to the back axle, the butt against the axle, and the bushy head dragging on the road behind. In this way we started down the mountain, never going faster than a slow walk, for fear of the buggy running away on us, breeching, brake and tree all doing their work well.
At the bottom the tree was cast off, and we camped for lunch. I have many times crossed this range, and never had anything go wrong but once, and then I had my Bishop with me, who bore the incidents of bush travelling very philosophically. I was very sorry for him, as he had to climb the range by foot, and it was a scorching hot November day, and as his lordship turns the scale at 19 stone the climb was no joke for him.
After lunch we harnessed up, and reached St. Lawrence again early in the afternoon. Here we spent Sunday as I had promised, and made the most of the day. My visits here are so seldom that Sunday is always a very busy day, as much work being done as time can be found for.
This particular Sunday we had Service, followed by Holy Communion, at 11.00 a.m.; Children's Service, 3.00p.m.; Sunday School [organising], 4.00p.m; Baptism, 5.00p.m.; Service again, 7.00 p.m.; and Confirmation Class, 9.00 p.m., which bought the day's work to a close. I left on Monday morning for home, and by making the same stages as in the journey up, reached North Rockhampton on Thursday, June 7th, somewhat tired, but quite ready to attend to the various duties awaiting me after my absence.
Your readers will learn from this that "taking a marriage" in Queensland is not always the easiest part of clergyman's duties.
A.H.Julius.

THE REV. CANON JULIUS.
AN INTERESTING LETTER.
The Rev. Canon A. H. Julius, who left Rockhampton for New Zealand on the 21st December sends us the following notes, which we gladly publish.
The Vicarage Akaroa,
Christchurch New Zealand.
2nd February 1904.
Dear Sir,
Thinking, perhaps, our many friends and acquaintances in Rockhampton might like to hear how we have fared since we left Queensland, I write to you in the hope that you will publish it in the "Morning Bulletin.' After a very pleasant ten days spent in Brisbane and Sydney we sailed by the s.s. Warrimoo - one of the Union Company's steamers - for New Zealand on Saturday, the 2nd of January, a week earlier than we had intended at first. We met a heavy gale just outside Sydney Heads and steamed against it for three days. Needless to say; we were all very seasick ; in fact there were, only three passengers on board who entirely escaped. We arrived at Wellington on the 6th January. Here we received a hearty welcome by cable from my cousin, the Bishop of Christchurch, and, after spending a very pleasant twenty-four hours there, left for Lyttleton on the 7th of January at 6pm. We ran into another gale in the night, but fortunately slept safely through it, thus escaping further sickness. We reached Lyttleton about nine o'clock the next morning a, cold, miserable morning with drizzling rain. The Bishop was waiting for us on the wharf, But we soon made our way to the train and set of for Christchurch. The tunnel, three miles long through the range at the back of Lyttlelton harbour, is very unpleasant, as it makes the carriages so dirty. We, were not at all prepossessed with the railway service and constantly compared it with the Queensland railways. Everything seemed so dirty and uncomfortable, and the pace slower than even the Emu Park goods train. It was still raining wlien we got to Christchurch, and very cold, and we were very glad when we arrived at Bishopscourt and could sit close to a good fire. Cbristchurch is a fine city, much more than Wellington ; but we were not able to go about much as the weather was so bad all the time we stared there. On the following Monday we left for our new home, Akaroa, and found it a lovely little place on a beautiful harbour. The first part of the journey was by train to Little River a small township at the foot of a high rugged range of mountains. Over the top of this range you go by coach, the road winding round and round the spurs until the summit is reached. From here the view is magnificent, Akaroa harbour lies spread out like a map some 2000ft. below. ramifying in every direction into lovelv little bays, surrounded with trees and backed by the lofty rugged mountains. The road winds down the mountains until you come to the shore of the harbour. Here we were met by a number of people from Akaroa who had come up the harbour in a steam launch to welcome us So we left the coach and finished our journey some seven miles, in the launch. The town, about the size of Gladstone, is built on a narrow strip of level ground between the harbour and the foot of the mountains. These rise almost at once from the sea to a height of between 2000 feet and 3000 feet, and in winter are generally With snow. It is very seldom that snow falls in the town itself, so we are told; but we are looking forward to plenty of cold weather in a month or 2. As it is, we are feeling the win cold, something like a westerly in July in Queensland, and sometimes are glad of a fire all day. We have a lovely home, with large garden and orchard full of English fruits all just ripening, everything green and growing luxuriantly. Evidently drought is unknown inaccurate. Altogether the prospect is a pleasant one in every way, and we look forward to a happy future in New Zealand.
Mrs Julius and myself would like to express our thanks for all the kindness we received from our many friends in Rockhampton at the time of our leaving; and, although we purpose making our future home in New Zealand, yet it will be long years before the memory of Rockhampton and its people will fade away. We trust that the heavy cloud that has rested so long over Queensland will, with the return of good seasons, and along, be removed and that a bright future awaits all our friends in the place where we lived and worked for so long a time.
Faithfully yours,
A H Julius.
Ref: The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld) Sat 20 Feb 1904

OBITUARY:
Many of the older generation in Central Queensland will remember Canon A.H.Julius and will regret to hear of his death which occurred suddenly at Akaroa, New Zealand on 11th April.
Canon Julius was on the teaching staff of Rockhampton Boys Grammar School under the late Mr. J. Wheatcroft. He afterwards took holy orders and was in charge of the Church of England parishes at Clermont, Springsure, Gladstone and North Rockhampton. During this period of services as Vicar at St. Barnabas's Church North Rockhampton, he continued his duties with those of head master of St. Pauls Day School but overwork resulted in a breakdown of health.
His cousin Archbishop Julius late Primate of New Zealand, offered him a living, which he accepted at Akaroa New Zealand, and in this parish he remained until failing eyesight compelled him to resign. His wife, a sister of Mrs. Ethel Denne of Rockhampton and his family of six girls and one boy are all living in New Zealand.
Canon Julius was a very able speaker and was much in demand as a preacher, and he was reverenced and loved by his parishioners and friends. He was Grand Masonic Chaplain of New Zealand and was accorded a Masonic funeral Canon Julius was twice married. His first wife Louise, was the eldest daughter of the late Mr.& Mrs. Holt. Mr. Holt was Headmaster of Pink Lily State School.
Mrs. Julius died a few years after their marriage, leaving one daughter, now Sister Elsie Julius of Kensington Hosp. Wellington. Some years later Canon Julius married Miss Denne.[This is incorrect, he married Miss Gaggin. ] .

From " History of Church work Akaroa and Banks Peninsular 1840- 1940: St. Peters Akaroa. Rev A.H. Julius 1904-1924. Le Bons Bay Church 1903 Rev W.W. Sedquick had the church re-opened. Bishop Julius came down and consecrated the church and services were arranged from Akaroa.
The arrangements were carried out by Rev. A.H. Julius.

New Zealand Card Index
Auckland Library
CHURCH OF ENGLAND - Akaroa.
Death of Rev. Alfred Henry Julius Vicar of Akaroa for twenty years.P.59., Obit., Vol.4.
NZCI000074730.

Research Notes:
An Alfred Julius aged 25 arrived in Victoria Jan 1877 aboard the Nemesis (with a Percy Julius) from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

KINDER LIBRARY
New Zealand
JULIUS, Alfred Henry
born 01 May 1851 Myland Essex died 11 Apr 1934 Akaroa buried 13 Apr Akaroa cemetery
first cousin to Churchill JULIUS later bishop of Christchurch
brother to the Revd Arthur Cowper JULIUS
second son of the Revd Archibald Aeneas JULIUS
incumbent Myland Essex and chaplain Hampton Court Palace
born 09/30 Jan 1837 Hampton Court Palace died 04 Mar 1895 aged 76 registered Downham
son of George JULIUS MD of East India Company physician to George IV
born 06 Jun 1775 at Nichola Town St Christopher West Indies died 1866
married aged 21 and Isabella Maria GILDER born 1774 died 1867 aged 92 Hastings co Sussex
and Charlotte MAYOR eldest daughter of the Revd Joseph MAYOR rector South Collingham Nottinghamshire;
married (1) 28 Dec 1881, Louisa HOLT, died 12 Nov 1882 daughter of Holt HOLT,
married (2) 14 Apr 1887, Louisa Brabbyn GAGGIN born 21 Jul 1867 died 15 Nov 1947
daughter of John Brabbyn Albert GAGGIN (2;138;124;21;56; 111;150)
Education
1862-1868 Felstead school
21 Sep 1884 deacon Brisbane (at S Paul Rockhampton) (138)
20 Jun 1886 priest Brisbane (111;84)
Positions
1867 arrived Queensland YOUNG AUSTRALIA
1871 employed Australian Education department
1884-1886 assistant curate S Paul Rockhampton diocese Brisbane (26)
30 May 1887 minister Clermont with Springsure Queensland
15 Apr 1890 incumbent Gladstone diocese Brisbane
01 Dec 1892 incumbent Gladstone now diocese Rockhampton
04 Jul 1894-11 Dec 1903 incumbent (SPG funded) North Rockhampton (111;46)
29 Jun 1899-11 Dec 1903 canon Rockhampton (111)
five years in charge cathedral day school (138)
1904 arrived Christchurch
09 Jan 1904-1924 vicar Akaroa diocese Christchurch
08 Nov 1924 officiating minister (26)
Other:
Oarsman Fitzroy river Australia
Freemason grand chaplain
Obituary
13 Apr 1934 (138)
May 1934 (69;113)
13 Apr 1934 p18 photograph (41)
07 Jun 1934 Australian Church Record
Jun 1934 Rockhampton Church Gazette (111)
http://www.kinderlibrary.ac.nz/resources/bishop/J.htm

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903.
Julius Alfred Henry Musgrave St Capricornia Nth Rockhampton Clergyman

Images courtesy D Becker

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Alfred is recorded as a son aged 9 born Myland ESS.

Alfred married Louisa HOLT [863] on 28 Dec 1881 in Rockhampton. Louisa was born about 1853 and died on 12 Nov 1883 aged about 30.

General Notes:
Louisa may have died in childbirth.

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903.
Julius Alfred Henry Musgrave St Capricornia Nth Rockhampton Clergyman

Research Notes:
Death & birth dates may be in error, the Ancestral File IGI has been adopted. Other dates are b 1863, d 12 Nov 1882.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 371 F    i. Elsie Louise Muriel JULIUS [865] was born on 15 Oct 1882 in Springsure Qld Aust.


Alfred next married Louisa Brabbyn GAGGIN [864], daughter of John Brabbyn Albert Victor GAGGIN [5064] and Susan BROWN [5065], on 14 Apr 1887 in Springsure nr Rockhampton Qld Aust. Louisa was born on 21 Jul 1867 in Leichhardt Dist. Hosp. Springsure Qld Aust., died on 15 Nov 1947 in 76 Banks Ave Christchurch NZ at age 80, and was buried on 17 Nov 1947 in Christchurch NZ.

General Notes:
Queensland Electoral Roll 1903.
Julius Louie Musgrave St Capricornia Nth Rockhampton Domestic Duties.

Name of Deceased Proprietor
Brabbyn Albert Gaggin, late of Springsure.
Date of Death February 10, 1867
Name of Claimant. Louisa Brabbyn Julius, of Christchurch New Zealand, wife of Alfred Henry Julius; of the same place clergyman.
Description and Situation of Land.
Allotment 4 of section 22, town of Springsure.
Estate Claimed to be Transmitted Fee-simple
Particulars of Will or Otherwise. Heiress-at-law.
Date within which Caveat may be Lodged - June 3, 1912.
J MITCHELL,
Registrar of Titles
Registrar of Titles Office,-
Brisbane, 20th April, 1912.
Ref: The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld) Monday 22 April 1912

Research Notes:
Image - D Becker


Children from this marriage were:

+ 372 F    i. Ethel Florence JULIUS [866] was born on 13 Apr 1888 in Clermont Qld., was baptised on 5 Aug 1888, and died in 1953 at age 65.

+ 373 F    ii. Edith Constance JULIUS [868] was born on 28 Dec 1889 in Springsure Qld Aust., was baptised on 2 Feb 1890 in Springsure Qld Aust., died on 20 Dec 1960 in Waiterimu Waikato N.Z. at age 70, and was buried on 22 Dec 1960 in Waiterimu Waikato N.Z.

+ 374 F    iii. Kathleen Mary JULIUS [870] was born on 21 Aug 1892 in The Rectory Gladstone Qld Aust.

+ 375 M    iv. Percival Eric JULIUS [872] was born on 9 Sep 1894 in Musgrave St. North Rockhampton Qld Aust., died on 15 Aug 1970 in Waiuku Auckland at age 75, and was buried in Waiuku Auckland.

+ 376 F    v. Lucy Isabel JULIUS [874] was born on 13 Nov 1896 in North Rockhampton Qld Aust., died on 27 Dec 1981 in Akaroa NZ at age 85, and was buried on 31 Dec 1981 in Akaroa NZ.

+ 377 F    vi. Marjorie Winifred JULIUS [876] was born on 15 Sep 1898 in North Rockhampton Qld Aust. and died on 14 Dec 1982 at age 84.


173. Rev Arthur Cowper JULIUS [877] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Nov 1852 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 12 Nov 1918 in NSW Aust at age 66, and was buried in St Thomas Enfield NSW.

General Notes:
Arthur set sail with his brothers in steerage on the "Young Australia" for Brisbane Queensland on the 12 April 1869 arriving on the 13 July 1869. He was 16yrs old. It is not known when Arthur returned to England and took up Holy Orders.

Felsted
Chelmsford
April 2, 1869
Mr Arthur Cowper Julius was educated in their school from June 1867 to March 1869. I have much pleasure in stating that during the whole of this time he was remarkably steady and well conducted.
For a considerable portion of the time he was under my own immediate tuition and always gave me perfect satisfaction in respect of his application to and progress in his studies. I entertain a great regard for him as a singularly well principled young man.
J.H. Backhouse M.A.
Second Master at Felsted Grammer School, Essex. Formerly Scholar of Brasenose College, Oxford.
(Felsted is a Public School dating from the 16thC)

Marriage 7 June 1875.
Arthur Cowper Julius of full age bachelor gentlemen of Southery father Archibald E. Julius Clerk in Holy Orders to Alice Brown of full age spinster of Southery father Thomas Brown gentleman. Signed by both in the presence of Ellen Amie Skilton, Joseph John Brown, Florence Brown, Blanche E. Julius, Fanny M. Julius. By licence by Archibald E. Julius.
Ref: marriage register St Mary the Virgin Southery

25 Aug 1878 - Arthur baptised his daughter Frances Eleanor as Curate of Barton Turf NFK.

Julius Arthur Cowper.
1879 Clergy Directory.
A. C. Julius Lit Pr 1879 curate Coddenham, Needham, Suffolk.

Suffolk Chronicle.
THE FAREWELL OF THE REV. A. C. JULIUS,
AT CROWFIELD.
On Sunday afternoon the Rev. A. C. Julius, curate of Crowfield, preached his farewell sermon. The rev. gentleman has been preferred by the Bishop of Tasmania, (the Right Rev. C. H. Broomby D.D.) to the parish and district of Brighton, in Tasmania.
Mr Julius has suffered considerably from ill health while he has been at Crowfield, and it is hoped that he will be better under another climate. The rev. gentleman's loss is deeply felt in Crowfield and the neighbourhood.
Besides being a good preacher he has made himself generally esteemed by his genial manner and the kind interest he has manifested in his parishioners.
Every worthy object has had his hearty support, and especially has his sympathy been extended to the Village Club, which, under his inspiriting influence, has passed the best period of its history.
And Mr Julius will not go away without proofs of the admiration and respect in which he has been held, for the people of Crowfield have presented him with a beautiful silver tea and coffee service and salver, while Coddenham, with a spontaneity of generosity which enhances the value of the gift, has contributed towards getting a handsome private communion service.
On Sunday afternoon, therefore, when Mr. Julius preached his last sermon, the little church at Crowfield was crowded, and even filled long before the hour for commencing service, and many hearers were affected by the solemn farewell which their beloved pastor bade them.
Mr Julius took for his text Hebrews xii., 27, " And this word, Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain".

Sunday 15th May 1881.
Arthur arrived in Hobart, Tasmania in 1881 on the sailing ship "ETHEL" with wife and four children. The passage took 6mths because ship blown off course in The Roaring Forties. Arthur was a bad asthmatic.

Arthur Cowper Julius. Allora Queensland Australia.
Deacon 1877; Priest 1879 Norwich. Incumbent of Allora, diocese of Brisbane 1885; formerly curate of Barton Turf Norfolk 1877-79; Crowfield, Suffolk 1879-80, Coddenham, Suffolk 1880-81; incumbent of Gayndah, Queensland 1883-85.
Ref: Crockford 1886.

The following information is from the Queensland Police Gazette dated:
1887. Arthur Cowper Julius, Church of England is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Allora Queensland in the Registry District of Darling Downs Central.

1888. Arthur Cowper Julius, Church of England is recorded as Registered to Celebrate marriage, he is resident in Allora Queensland in the Registry District of Darling Downs Centra

CLERGY DIRECTORY 1879 & BRISBANE DIOCESAN ARCHIVE :
JULIUS Arthur Cowper :
Lit Pr. 1879.
Deaconed 23 Sept. 1877 Norwich.
Priested 8 June 1879 Norwich.
Curate of Barton Turf Norfolk 1877-79.
Priest Norwich 1879.
Curate of Crowfield Suffolk 1879-80.
Curate of Coddenham Suffolk 1880-8.
Vicar of Green Ponds.
Vicar of Gayndah Queensland 1885.
Vicar of Allora Diocese of Brisbane 1885-87.
Vicar of Harrisville 1888-89

Arthur then left his wife and family in mysterious circumstances.
The following letter from his father to his brother Percy indicates why he wished to remain untraced.

Southery Rectory,
Downhall Market.
October 27, 1894.
My very dear Percy,
It is only quite recently that I have been told of Arthur's most disgraceful conduct poor Alice was a good and most excellent wife to him, so that he has not a shadow of excuse for his disgusting conduct.
I think that in one of your letters to Lucy you say that you do not think that it would be just that Arthur at my death should have anything left to him but that something should be done for Alice and her children; now in all this I perfectly agree, but there are difficulties in the way, for as I have often told you the whole of my insurances and your dear mothers property are all settled upon her children in what proportion I please so that I cannot in my Will leave anything to Alice or my grandchildren I have consulted my Lawyer about the matter and the only thing that I can do is this [that is if you will agree to it] that you will of course have your share absolutely, i.e. you can do what you like with it; I will leave you an additional sum which I wish you to invest in your own name and to give the interest to Alice and her children, I have such perfect confidence in you that I know you will carry out my wishes.
I fear that Arthur even after all that has occured will persuade Alice to give the money to him he will I know get hold of it if he can, so if you find she does give it, or part of it to Arthur tell her that, in that case you will not pay her the interest and then keep it yourself and if things go well with her and that she has sufficient for herself and the children to live comfortably upon then you may take the money for yourself, I am quite sure you will act justly and honestly towards them.
I shall be glad to hear what you think of this plan as soon as you can; also can you let me know where and what Arthur is doing, and if he is still living with that woman, why does Alice not get a divorce? He will if possible keep a hold upon her I cannot possibly send her any money at present as every thing is very bad in the old country at present my living this year is only L311 and next year L95 it will be still less; dear old Jane sends her fond love to "her boy" and all your party.
I cannot write more now and will only add my fondest love to yourself and your dear wife and all the dear children.
Yours most affectionately,
A.E. Julius.
The above arrangement above was executed in 1895, see letter in: Notes on Percy Julius.

There are presently no known details of his life after 1889, however in 2016 Susan Julius advises
"I know that Arthur worked in a Sydney university library and changed his name to Davis or Davidson".

Family lore has it that Arthur had an affair with servant and had a female child by her, after he left Alice he is said to have opened a home for homeless boys.

An addendum to Muriel Julius's book Family Jottings reads:
Re Arthur Cowper Julius - Beth Dicks (his granddaughter and daughter of John Julius, youngest of Arthur Cowper's family, told me, that Arthur Cowper suffered badly from asthma and took heroin for the complaint, he evidently had a nurse when he was ill, and that he "went off" with the nurse.

Betty Cottam told me Arthur Cowper had a big row with his brothers and went off to Sydney and changed his name to Davidson. He married a Marianne Emily Matchett who had a school in Sydney. There was a son, Jeffrey Villiers who died on his first birthday. A daughter Constance was born 1890 died 1979. Constance married a Fred Beaver of Bank NSW ? And they lived at Murwillumbah when Dad (R.H.J.) went to visit them (about 1927) at the request of his mother in England.
Since then we have known this family, Constance and Fred had 4 daughters Margaret (now Morgan), Betty (now Cottam), Helen and Kathie, so these 4 are the granddaughters of Arthur Cowper Julius.

John Davidson
Death Date: 1918
Death Place: New South Wales
Father's name: Archibald
Mother's name: Charlotte
Registration Year: 1918
Registration Place: Burwood,
New South Wales Registration
Number: 16592

A headstone in St Thomas Anglican cemetery, Enfield, Burwood, New South Wales. Row 10. Portion 41. Reads:
Sacred to the Memory
of
Marianne Emily Davidson
died October 13, 1910
aged 46 years.
Teneo Superiora Alfiora Peto. (Loose translation "Hold Superior Higher Things")
And of John Davidson
died November 12, 1980
aged 66 years.
Hores Non Nisi Serenas Numero (Loose translation "I count only the bright hours")

2016
The above information from Family Jottings, Susan Julius and some research in Ancestry Australia, reveals the fate of Arthur Cowper Julius who left his first wife & family, and as far as is known turned his back on his vocation.
He did in fact marry, it would seem bigamously, Marianne Emily Matchett on 28 Oct 1887 in Queensland under the name of Alfred Withers Davison (Davidson).
Alfred (Arthur) had surviving issue as stated above, Constance Mary Davidson who married Frederick Bathurst Beaver, they had issue 4 daughters.
Tying this deception together through the christian names used, Arthur Cowper, then Alfred Withers, then John by his death in 1918, is his death registration which shows his parents as Archibald & Charlotte, while he shares a grave and headstone with Marianne Emily.

Research Notes:
On file a poor copy of a sermon preached by Arthur first in Coddenham SFK 28 Sept 1879 then at several other Parishes in England including Crowfield and Southery, then at St Georges in Hobart at the morning service on 18 Sept 1881 finally in the afternoon at Birkwood Queensland (nr Harrisville) on Sept 23 1888. He delivered the sermon some 26 times.
His text was Psalm 77 Verses 19 & 20.
Thy way is in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known.
Thou leddest thy people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 8 born Myland ESS.


2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 18 born Myland Essex

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Parsonage Crowfield Suffolk. Arthur is described as head of house married aged 28 Curate of Crowfield born Myland Essex. Also in the house was Catherine Sarah Brown a visitor aged 22 single born Denver Norfolk, and two servants

Arthur married Alice (Garvie) BROWN [878], daughter of Thomas BROWN Gent [4929] and Emily FILLEY [23855], on 7 Jun 1875 in St Mary The Virgin Southery. Alice was born on 8 May 1847 in Denver NFK and died on 4 Aug 1951 in Woody Point Brisbane Qld. at age 104.

General Notes:
Alice appears to have been abandoned by her husband in circumstances not clearly understood, however her Father-in-Law Archibald Julius remained loyal to her and left a sum of money to be invested by her Brother-in-Law Percy Julius, for her benefit.

Alice was known as Garvie by her grandchildren she resided for her last years with her daughter, Annie Madeline Ford of Whytecliffe Parade, Scotts Pt. Redcliffe, before dying aged 104 at Woody Point Brisbane.
Relatives claim that Alice was the first typist in the Queensland Public Service, Alice imported a typewriter and sought work from the Government Offices. Her office was a basement room in the Treasury Building. She worked until she was aged 60.
Alice played bowls at Ithica Bowling Club until she was 80.

Julius Jottings, No 6 Jan, 1902.
Julius Jottings record's Miss Nellie Julius visiting England, concluding "and we were delighted to see Mrs Arthur Julius again after so many years absence".

Australian Electoral Rolls 1903 Hamilton Brisbane. Alice was recorded as a typist of Windermere Rd.
Ancestry.

Kiaora
Bororese?
26 May 1907
My dear Arch and Clara,
I am not sure if you arrive home today or started for home but I have a letter there to greet you and next Sunday will be your birthday dear son, I wish you very many happy returns of it and every blessing - I hope you have both had a very happy little honeymoon in Sydney and after the tiring work of sightseeing will be glad to settle down in your own house - I always think sightseeing is more tiring then a day's work, but you know I am an old woman now and very fond of home - and I seemed to have come to the days when all my house birds are scattered - Daisy left us yesterday she came last Tuesday week and I shall miss her very much, but she gave me quite a nice long visit - her Rockhampton friends wanted her to go on there very much, but her nursing engagements wouldn't allow her to be absent from Brisbane any longer, she has a home now at the Governesses Home, she has to have one on a telephone and the girls are in a little cottage at Sandgate and have their dinner at a large Boarding House "Saltwood" kept by Miss Murray, a very nice woman and then go home to their . . . . . little cottage and they get their own breakfast and carry lunch to town.
Yesterday it was a great day in Bororese and Day and Ash and I went in the cart and looked on till it was time to go to the train 3.20 pm after that Ash drove me home - Jack rode in - I was so pleased to get your postcard from Sydney and here the telegrams reach due at the church - and I received the paper with the account of your wedding in which was very nice, I think Mrs Evans must have sent it. Now I want to hear what all the presents were and all about your time and what you get with grannies present -- Clara will have time to give all these details, but Arch must write too sometimes, he knows now I love my weekly letter.
Who sent the other telegrams? Did you run against any of our old friends in Sydney? I don't know if I told you of Mrs Cooper's death on the 29th of April in the Manly Hospital - poor dear has had a sad life and not a long one - only 38. Nell wrote us a tremendous letter last week of her start at the new hospital, I think she will be very happy and be sure to succeed - it seems to be a busy place - I don't believe you have seen her since you started for Garmet? so many years ago.
Now my dear children goodnight and every happiness go with you through your lives.
Best love from your loving
Mother

Hamilton.
Brisbane.
17th January 1909.
My dear Arch,
We all congratulate you most heartily on having passed the exam: your letter yesterday gave us great happiness I wouldn't hope too much after the great disappointment of two years ago - as it was just lovely to get your letter and now I suppose they won't require any more exams of you. You must be so pleased dear one and must have worked hard - your Christmas excursions to Jenolan must have been a great pleasure to you - fancy the old horse still being so useful, he is a real marvel I dare say little Alice was rather a tie to Clara, mothers with babies are rather inclined to stay at home - Harry Ricards and Dolly must have been helps, I suppose his horse and sulky too.
You must have been very busy moving did you take the new . . . . . grape vine Villa? The underground tank will be a great boon to the landlord - have you any garden or fruit trees I suppose the plums and greengages are just ripening. The girls have been developing some of the photographs, some have disappointed them very much - they think the plates must have been old - they are so spotted - one of Clara and baby is very nice, and I have put it in a pretty little silver frame - Jack is at Borningbak? now with Wilbie & Grieve, he is helping with work and getting 30/- a week and living with them - I think he is fencing, ploughing, and helping with a new dip - he was very sorry to leave Mr Mackay who liked him very much - but his eyes and head got so bad - he says his eyes are still sore and Dr Stawell wrote to him to say he thought it must be his eyes causing the headaches and he had better see an eye specialist - but Jack wrote to me that " he couldn't he messing about with more doctors and he would give up the study" I hope in time he will be able to start something satisfactory on the land - we don't regret selling Kiaora the land wasn't good enough. We have got house so nice again - Con is at work now in the Lands Department for six weeks - I have no servant, but have a nice woman who comes one day a week, one week to wash, and another to clean the house - I like cooking for them - my chief drawback is my deafness? Did you see a specialist in Sydney?
We have had a beautiful rain today, it was wanted badly. Is your new house any nearer to the mine - I suppose little Alice keeps Clara too busy to feel lonely now - kiss the dear little girlie for me I am so glad she is so good and happy - with very much love to you Clara and Alice.
I am
Your loving
Mother.

And Grand Old Centenarian
Played Bowls at 96.
Remarkable citizen is Mrs Alice Julius who celebrated her hundredth birthday with 21 relatives at "Chelsea" Scots Point, Redcliffe, on Thursday. Despite her age, she still reads, writes, knits and discusses current events, and played bowls until she was 96!
Born in Denver, Norfolk, England, on May 8, 1847, she left for Australia in the sailing ship, Ethel, in the year 1881, and arrived in Tasmania 3 months later. With her husband (now deceased) she lived at Granponds (now known as Kemsey), and after a few years in Tasmania, came to Queensland and settled Gayndah. In the past 60 years she has lived in Brisbane and at Scots Point. Up to four years ago Mrs Julius played bowls with the Ithaca Ladies Bowling Club and her set of bowls are now owned by Mrs Frances Forsyth, of Seaview Hotel, Sandgate.
Among the messages Mrs Julius received was one from Adml Sir Reginald Skelton (England), who was the engineer-in-chief of the British Fleet during the war, and who was with Capt Scott on his first polar expedition. He is a nephew of Mrs Julius. Another one was from Messrs C E Chuter, J England and A C Palmer who remember her as a member of the staff of the old Colonial Secretary's Department.

Keen To Be a 104.
She's 103 Now.
Mrs Alice Julius of Whitecliff Parade Scots Point, Redcliffe, at hundred and three, insists on 6 cups of tea every day. Here she is with one of them. The picture was taken yesterday on her hundred and third birthday which she celebrated also with a glass of wine to the astonishment of her friends. Since she reached the century she has become deaf and partially blind, but she is keen to reach 104 at least. Relatives claim that she was the first typist in the State Public Service. Widowed and seeking to raise her family, Mrs Julius, imported a typewriter and sought work from the Government Offices. Her office was a basement room in the Treasury Building. She worked until she was 60. She played bowls until she was 92, and knitted and worked in the garden until she was 100. Incidentally she raised a family of 6 healthy children.
Ref: Unidentified newspaper articles

Research Notes:
Picture with family taken on Alice's 100th birthday at Redcliffe 8th May 1947.
Susan Julius supplies names - 2009
Front row: l-r. . . . . Tom James (son of Constance (Con) James (Julius) with dog Rhett, Con (arthur & Alice's 5th child), Arch Julius (Arthur & Alice's 4th child), Alice (Garvy), Annie Madeline Ford (Arthur &Alice's 2nd child), Frank Ford.
Second row: l-r. . . . .Muriel Julius ( daughter of Reginald Julius who was son of Arthur's eldest brother Charles Julius), Reginald Julius, Reg's wife Minnie,Margaret Julius( Arthur & Alice's 1st child), ?, my grandmother Isabel Julius (Stewart), Eleanor (Nell) Simmers (Julius- Arthur & Alice's 3rd child), my Aunt Beth Dicks (Julius), Eunice James( wife of Con's son Bink) with their daughter Joanne, Bink James ( real name eludes Aunty Beth).
Back row: l-r. . . . . ?, one of Arch's sons, and far right my frandfather Jack (John) Julius.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Denver NFK. Alice is recorded as a daughter aged 3 born in Denver NFK

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Southery NFK. Alice is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 23 born in Denver Norfolk

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, St Mary Abbot's London. Alice Julius nee Brown is recorded as married aged 34 born in Denver Norfolk

Children from this marriage were:

+ 378 F    i. Margaret Alice JULIUS [879] was born on 16 Feb 1876 in Burwash SSX and died in 1968 at age 92.

+ 379 F    ii. Annie Madeline JULIUS [880] was born on 9 Jan 1877 in Chelsea London, was baptised on 11 Feb 1877 in Southery NFK, and died on 2 Mar 1968 in Sandgate Qld. at age 91.

+ 380 F    iii. Frances Eleanor JULIUS [882] was born on 31 Jul 1878 in Neatishead Norfolk Eng., was baptised on 25 Aug 1878 in Barton Turf NFK, and died on 21 Mar 1968 in Auckland NZ at age 89.

+ 381 M    iv. Archibald Cowper JULIUS [884] was born on 2 Jun 1880 in Crowfield SFK, was baptised in Jun 1880 in Crowfield Church SFK, died on 26 Nov 1954 in Inverell N.S.W. at age 74, and was buried on 28 Nov 1954 in Inverell N.S.W.

+ 382 F    v. Constance Isabel JULIUS [892] was born on 10 Aug 1882 in Australia, was baptised on 4 Oct 1882 in Greenponds Tasmania, and died on 3 Aug 1971 at age 88.

+ 383 M    vi. John JULIUS [894] was born on 27 Jul 1886, died on 10 Jan 1964 at age 77, and was buried in Brisbane Australia.


Arthur had a relationship with Marianne Emily MATCHETT [25100] on 28 Oct 1887 in Queensland Aust. This couple did not marry. Marianne was born circa 1864 in England, died on 13 Oct 1910 in NSW Aust aged about 46, and was buried in St Thomas Enfield NSW.

General Notes:
Marianne Emily Matchett
Spouse Name: Alfred Withers Davison
Marriage Date: 28 Oct 1887
Marriage Place: Queensland Registration
Place: Queensland
Registration Year: 1887
Registration Number: B011839
Page Number: 9366

Marrianne Emily Davidson
Birth: 1864
Death: Oct. 13, 1910
Age: 46
Burial: St Thomas Anglican Cemetery
Enfield
Burwood Municipality
New South Wales, Australia
Plot: Portion: 41 Row: 10
Created by: III
Record added: Jan 16, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 123532255

A headstone in St Thomas Anglican cemetery, Enfield, Burwood, New South Wales. Row 10. Portion 41. Reads:
Sacred to the Memory
of
Marianne Emily Davidson
died October 13, 1910
aged 46 years.
Teneo Superiora Alfiora Peto. (Loose translation "Hold Superior Higher Things")
And of John Davidson
died November 12, 1980
aged 66 years.
Hores Non Nisi Serenas Numero (Loose translation "I count only the bright hours")

Other Records

1. St Thomas Anglican Church Enfield NSW: Gaveyard where Marrianne Matchett and Arthur Cowper Julius are buried.

Their children were:

+ 384 M    i. Geoffrey Villers DAVISON [25108] died in 1889 in Ashfield NSW.

+ 385 F    ii. Constance Mary DAVIDSON [25101] was born in 1890 in Burwood NSW.


174. Stanford Percy JULIUS [898] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Nov 1854 in Myland Parish Mile End Rd Colchester ESS, died on 11 Sep 1929 in Gympie Queensland at age 74, and was buried on 19 Sep 1929 in Gympie Cemetery.

General Notes:
Stanford with his brothers sailed 12 April 1869 steerage on the "Young Australia" and arrived in Brisbane 13th July 1869. He was aged 15 and a free settler, remaining in Queensland all his life. At the time of his marriage he was a stockman at Corio.

Australian Electoral Rolls 1903 Queensland Capricornia Tarabonah. Percy was recorded as station master of Stoney Creek, Nankin Junction.
Ancestry.

When his first wife Christina died he was left with six small children so he advertised for a wife and sailed to England to seek a suitable one out. His choice could not have been better in Mary Evans.
He entered the service of the Queensland Railways retiring about 1922 having been Station Master at Nankin Junction, Stanwell and other stations in the Rockhampton area. His brother Alfred was Vicar in Rockhampton and baptised four of his children Ida, Gwendoline, Ronald & Stanley.
It appears that about 1910 he moved to Curra, near Gympie as Station-master and remained there until he retired. Railway memos below indicate he was not a man to be manipulated. His younger children were schooled at Curra. He retired to an agricultural and dairy farm owned by his son-in-law Alex Wilson at Sexton, near Gympie but did not work the farm. He was over 6 ft. tall with thick snow-white hair, clean shaven and quite the best looking of the brothers.

LETTER FROM PERCY'S BROTHER-IN-LAW : E.C.P. Hull.
My Dear Percy,
I daresay you have been thinking we have been [Clark and I] somewhat dilatory in settling up the affairs of the Executorship under your late Father's Will.
These, however, are matters which occupy a good deal of time and labour, and cannot well be hurried. I am bound to say that Jack Clark, who is a first rate man of business as well as one of the kindest and best of fellows, has been doing most of the work. This has been a great relief to me, as my partner has been absent since the end of June, and I have had almost too much work on hand.
I have to-day the pleasure to advise that we have paid into the Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., here, the sum of L4,000. Branches to be paid as follows:
To you at the Rockhampton Branch L2,000
To Charles at the Maryborough Branch L1,000.
To Alfred at the Rockhampton Branch L1,000.
These remittances are on account of the amounts which will be due to you each out of the Estate. In exchange for these payments you will each have to sign the forms on receipt which we have handed the Bank here, and these receipts when signed the Banks will send home to be delivered to us.
You will, of course, understand why the L2,000 has been remitted to you, as against L1000 only to Charles and Alfred.
We have also invested the L3,000 left to Blanche as her Trustees, and paid the L1,500 pounds left to Lucy for the purpose you no doubt understand about. Clark is now away for his month's holiday at the sea-side, and I shall be going away for mine towards the latter part of this month, and it will therefore probably be a month or two yet before we shall be able to get this matter finally closed.
Fanny and her children have been spending four weeks by the seaside at Brighton which has done them all much good, and they have returned home in the best of health.
Good-bye, my dear Brother, for the present, and believe me always,
Yours affectionally,
E.C.P. Hull.

CURRA SCHOOL RECORDS :
All commenced school at Curra on 31st January 1910
Ivy Gwendoline : age 12 years 4 months
Ronald Lewis : age 10 years 3 months
Stanley Villiers : age 6 years 6 months
From these school records it appears that Stanford Percy transferred to Curra end of 1909 or very early 1910.
Dorothy Joyce : age 6 years 4 months commenced school at Curra 29 Jan 1913.

Queensland Railways
District Traffic Managers Office
Rockhampton 6 Nov. 1895
To: Station Master
Stanwell
Ref: B4382
Delay to 14 up 31st October
On the first instance you inform me that 14 up 31st ult was delayed 15 or 16 minutes at your station.
Please confirm statement by memo and say what was cause of delay
R Quentin(?)
District Traffic Manager

Copy.
Stanwell 7th Nov 95
To: D T Mgr R'ton
Delay to 14 up 31st October
Sir,
Your B4382 of the 6th inst re the above. I beg to inform you that as I made no statement to you I have nothing to confirm on your statement above, about the accident to 14 up I remarked that she stopped here as the driver was doing something to the engine further than that I do not know what was the cause of the delay and I think it is very hard that a casual remark made unofficially to you should be made use of again and I am sorry to say that for the future I shall have to be very careful indeed what I say before you.
I am
Sir
Your obedient servant.
S P Julius

Queensland Railways
District Traffic Managers Office
Rockhampton 7 Nov. 1895
To: Station Master
Stanwell
Ref: B4382
Delay to 14 Up 31st October.
Your number 73 of 7th inst. You certainly informed me that 14 up was 15 or 16 minutes at your station on 31st ulto, and the reason then given was that the driver was doing something to his engine.
You will be good enough to confirm this statement as to time at your station, or withdraw it. It is your duty as an Officer of the Commissioners to give me any information you may have in connection with the running of trains etc and I shall be glad of any further explanation you may have to offer on your memo under answered: particularly on the statement "I am sorry to have to say that for the future I shall have to be very careful indeed what I say before you".
R Cautan
District Traffic Manager.

Copy.
Stanwell 8th Nov 95
To: D T Mgr R'ton
Sir
Your B4382 of the 7th inst received by 11 down today hence the delay to my reply. Previous correspondence re the above. I have again to repeat that I made no statement whatever tyo you re time at thiss station of 14 up and I most certainly decline to confirm or withdraw a statement I never made. Re my duty as our Officer of the Commissioners I beg to inform you that I have always carried out my duties as an Officer to the best of my ability and shall continue to do so as long as I am in the service and further I consider that your correspondence re this matter amply justified the last statement in my memo No 72 of the 7th March
I am
Sir
Your obedient servant
S P Julius

Queensland Railways
District Traffic Managers Office
Rockhampton 9 Nov. 1895
To: Station Master
Stanwell
Ref: B4382
Delay to 14 up 31st October
Your memo No. 73 of 8th inst.
I wish to give you an opportunity of reconsidering your position in this matter. The guard in his report sheet shows only one minute at Stanwell, while you informed me verbally train was fifteen or sixteen minutes at your station.
R Quentin
District Traffic Manager

Memorandum
18 Nov 1895
The Station Master Stanwell to District Traffic Manager R'ton
Delay to 14 up 31st of October
Sir,
Your B4382 of the 9th inst re the above. I beg to inform you that I have nothing to reconsider in this matter my memos 72 and 73 are perfectly correct in every particular.
I am,
Sir,
Your obedient servant
S.P. Julius.

Queensland Railways
Decision Affecting Employee
General Traffic Managers Office
Brisbane July 17, 1911
Papers S11. 18275
Full Name of Employee: SP Julius
Position: Station Master
Place: Curra
Particulars of Case Dealt with:
Points lock and Choke lock Unlocked at Curra on 3 July 1911.
Decision: That he be fined 5/- and caution
Decision Takes Effect: Forthwith
JG Brown
General Traffic Manager
Southern and Western Direction
I have this day received a copy of the above and note contents.
Signature SP Julius
Received July 20th 1911

OBITUARY :
STANFORD PERCY JULIUS : 19th September 1929.
Death has claimed an old and respected resident in the person of S.P. JULIUS who died in a Private Hospital on Gympie on the 19th instant. The late Mr Julius, who had passed his seventieth year, had enjoyed good health until a few weeks prior to his death.
Mr Julius had served a considerable number of years in the Queensland Railway Department in the capacity of Station Master, and was stationed at Curra for a lengthy period until the age regulation compelled his retirement a few years ago. Since then he had been engaged actively in dairying and agricultural pursuits at Sexton. He is survived by his widow and grown up family.

JULIUS Stanford Percy of Sexton : At Gympie on September 19 after a short illness. In his 75th year "So He giveth his beloved sleep".

Research Notes:
Percy received a letter dated 27 October 1894, from his father regarding his brother "Arthur's most disgraceful conduct" see notes Arthur Cowper Julius.

A Percy Julius aged 21 arrived in Victoria Jan 1877 aboard the Nemesis (with an Alfred Julius) from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

A Mr S P Julius aged 24 arrived in Victoria July 1896 aboard the Ophir from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923.

Image Courtesy K M Davis 2013

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Stanford is recorded as a son aged 6 born Myland ESS.




Stanford married Janet Christina ARMSTRONG [899], daughter of William ARMSTRONG [22628] and Margaret PATTEY [22629], on 6 Oct 1880 in St Pauls Nth Rockhampton Qld. Janet was born on 19 May 1853 in Port Stevens N.S.W., died on 11 Sep 1895 in Stanwell QLD at age 42, and was buried in Stanwell QLD.

General Notes:
Christina was from Maryvale.

Death - Janet Christina Julius 9 Sept 1895
Queensland Federation Index NZSOG


Children from this marriage were:

+ 386 F    i. Charlotte Mayor JULIUS [900] was born on 28 Nov 1881, died in 1952 in Brisbane Australia at age 71, and was buried in Lutwyche Cemetery Brisbane.

+ 387 M    ii. William Armstrong JULIUS [902] was born on 16 Jan 1883 in Queensland Aust. and died on 20 Feb 1883 in Queensland Aust.

+ 388 F    iii. Unnamed Daughter [4932] was born on 23 Feb 1884 in Maryvale Qld, died on 23 Feb 1884 in Maryvale Qld, and was buried in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 389 F    iv. Blanch Eva (Beebe) JULIUS [903] was born on 15 Feb 1885, died on 24 Dec 1974 in Murgon Qld. at age 89, and was buried on 27 Dec 1974 in St Peters Churchyard Gympie.

+ 390 F    v. Ida Mya JULIUS [905] was born on 23 Mar 1887 in Clermont Qld., was baptised on 2 Feb 1888 in Clermont Qld., and died on 8 Feb 1888.

+ 391 M    vi. Lionel Percy JULIUS [906] was born on 16 Aug 1888 in Queensland Aust., died on 1 Aug 1956 in Brisbane Australia at age 67, and was buried in Services Section, Lutwyche Cemetery Brisbane.

+ 392 F    vii. Ruby Marie JULIUS [910] was born on 8 Dec 1891 in Stanwell, was baptised on 13 Jun 1892 in Primitive Methodist Ch Rockhampton, died on 27 Jun 1954 in Nundah Pvt Hospital Brisbane at age 62, and was buried on 29 Jun 1954 in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 393 M    viii. Cyril Norman JULIUS [912] was born on 4 Mar 1892 in Stanwell, was baptised on 13 Jun 1892 in Primitive Methodist Ch Rockhampton, died on 26 Sep 1953 in Gympie Queensland at age 61, and was buried on 28 Sep 1953 in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 394 M    ix. Archibald Armstrong JULIUS [916] was born on 31 Jan 1894 in Nankin Junction Qld, died on 24 Nov 1966 at age 72, and was buried in Hammond Lawn Cemetery Brisbane.


Stanford next married Mary EVANS [924] on 9 Sep 1896 in Primitive Methodist Manse Archer St Rockhampton. Mary was born on 31 Dec 1873 in Brecknockshire WLS, died on 12 Aug 1954 in Lister Hosp Gympie at age 80, and was buried on 14 Aug 1954 in Gympie Queensland.

General Notes:
Mary answered an advertisment in England by Stanford for a wife after Christina died.

Valmai Hancock mentions as an event in Mary's life the following: "23 June 1878 "Kapunda" at Rockhampton Aust."

Australian Electoral Rolls 1903 Queensland Capricornia Tarabonah. Mary was recorded; domestic duties Stoney Creek Nankin Junction.
Ancestry.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 395 F    i. Gwendoline Ivy JULIUS [925] was born on 11 Sep 1897 in Rockhampton, was baptised on 5 Mar 1898 in Rockhampton, died on 26 Dec 1928 in Dudley Hosp Mugon Qld. at age 31, and was buried on 26 Dec 1928 in Murgon Cemetery.

+ 396 M    ii. Ronald Lewis JULIUS [927] was born on 29 Oct 1899 in William St. Rockhampton, was baptised on 11 Dec 1899 in Nankin Junction By Canon Alfred H Julius, died on 4 Nov 1973 in Gympie Queensland at age 74, and was buried on 7 Nov 1973 in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 397 M    iii. Stanley Villiers JULIUS [928] was born on 17 Jul 1902 in Nankin Junction Qld, was baptised on 26 Apr 1903 in Stoney Creek By Canon Alfred H Julius, died on 1 Mar 1985 in Pialba at age 82, and was buried on 5 Mar 1985 in Gympie Cemetery.

+ 398 F    iv. Dorothy Joyce JULIUS [4931] was born on 29 Aug 1906 in East St. Rockhampton, died on 20 Dec 1965 at age 59, and was buried in Gympie Cemetery.


175. Fanny Maria JULIUS [934] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 May 1856 in Southery NFK and died on 23 Dec 1931 in Richmond SRY at age 75.

General Notes:
Julius Jottings. October 1900 No. 3.
The Hulls, who left in Elvaston Place, Kensington, about the end of June, have been spending some months at Craigton, by Balfron in Stirlingshire.

Julius Jottings. January 1901 No. 4.
Fanny wrote an article entitled "Notes from My Diary", it leans to the mundane but here are some highlights.
"In February 1900 we all left Earlswood Mount to enable the additions to the house to be completed. The house we occupied in London was in Elvaston Place; being situated near the Albert Hall, South Kensington Museum, and other places of interest. On May 25th I was presented by the Countess of Erroll at the Queen's Drawing-Room, held by the Princess of Wales. . . . . . a most brilliant affair, the ladies dresses and gentlemen's uniforms being most magnificent . . . . . I wore a primrose satin dress draped with the old Limerick lace, and a train of heliotrope brocade, trimmed with white ostrich feathers, and sprays of laburnum and wisteria.
We had great pleasure of a visit from my niece Madeline Julius from Queensland. On August 2nd we all went to Scotland, leaving Redhill at 5 p.m. and reaching Lennoxtown 6 a.m. the next morning. We had a drive of 8 miles to Craigton . . . . . we formed quite a little procession of four waggonettes with carts for the luggage. We numbered 22 souls all told"
At Craigton they played croquet, floated lazily on a small loch, raided the fruit garden, played billiards, took Highland dancing lessons, played charades and shot the moors for grouse and pheasant. They also visited the surrounding villages and sights, including the castle at Stirling. Fanny was given a present of beautiful scotch pearls found in the River Forth. "These pearls are very fine, and of an exquisite tint, both pink and blue".
In October they are visiting Edinburgh, finally the shooting season closes and they return home to Earlswood Mount on November 6th.

Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
Mr and Mrs E.C.P. Hull and Miss Winifred Hull have returned to Earlswood Mount, Redhill, after their prolonged stay in Algiers.

Julius Jottings January 1902 No 6.
Mr and Mrs E. C. P. Hull have taken Sir George Goldie's house in London for the coming season. Their address will be: 11 Queens Gate Gardens, S. W., and they are going up there in April.

Hull Fanny Maria of Park Gate House Ham Common Richmond Surrey widow died 23 December 1931. Probate London 26 January 1932 to Leonard Stewart Benson Hull of no occupation Charles John Leslie Hull secretary and Albert Young Hyland solicitor. Effects L 50,367 18s 3d.
National Probate Calendar.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Fanny is recorded as a daughter aged 4 born Southery NFK.

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Fanny is recorded as a daughter aged 14 born Southery.

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, The Mount Reigate SRY. Fanny is recorded as a wife aged 34 born Southery NFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Reigate SRY. Fanny is recorded as a wife aged 52 married 31 years with 8 children all living born Southery Norfolk.

Fanny married Edmund Charles Pendleton HULL [935], son of Rev John Dawson HULL OF WICKHAMBROOK SUFFOLK [1506], on 27 Aug 1879 in St Mary The Virgin Southery. Edmund was born in 1840 in Bangor Co Down Ireland and died on 8 Nov 1924 in Reg Kingston SRY at age 84.

General Notes:
Marriage 27 August 1879.
Edmund Charles Pendleton Hull of full age bachelor gentlemen of Blackheath father John Dawson Hull Clerk in Holy Orders to Fanny Maria Julius of full age spinster of Southery father Archibald Eneas Julius Clerk in Holy Orders. Signed by both in the presence of A.E. Julius J. M. Nicholson Blanche E. Julius Katie Julius Edward Hull Katie Clarke after banns. By J.D. Hull Vicar of Wickham Brook Suffolk.
Ref: marriage register St Mary the Virgin Southery

Edmunds company Hull Blyth & Co. were associated with mercantile and shipowning interests.
They lived at Parkgate Hse, Ham London.

My Dear Percy,
I daresay you have been thinking we have been [Clark and I] somewhat dilatory in settling up the affairs of the Executorship under your late Father's Will.
These, however, are matters which occupy a good deal of time and labour, and cannot well be hurried. I am bound to say that Jack Clark, who is a first rate man of business as well as one of the kindest and best of fellows, has been doing most of the work. This has been a great relief to me, as my partner has been absent since the end of June, and I have had almost too much work on hand.
I have to-day the pleasure to advise that we have paid into the Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., here, the sum of L4,000. Branches to be paid as follows:
To you at the Rockhampton Branch L2,000
To Charles at the Maryborough Branch L1,000.
To Alfred at the Rockhampton Branch L1,000.
These remittances are on account of the amounts which will be due to you each out of the Estate. In exchange for these payments you will each have to sign the forms on receipt which we have handed the Bank here, and these receipts when signed the Banks will send home to be delivered to us.
You will, of course, understand why the L2,000 has been remitted to you, as against L1000 only to Charles and Alfred.
We have also invested the L3,000 left to Blanche as her Trustees, and paid the L1,500 pounds left to Lucy for the purpose you no doubt understand about. Clark is now away for his month's holiday at the sea-side, and I shall be going away for mine towards the latter part of this month, and it will therefore probably be a month or two yet before we shall be able to get this matter finally closed.
Fanny and her children have been spending four weeks by the seaside at Brighton which has done them all much good, and they have returned home in the best of health.
Good-bye, my dear Brother, for the present, and believe me always,
Yours affectionally,
E.C.P. Hull.

Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
Mr Hull has started an apiary in his garden. We wish him every success with his bees.

EDMUND C P HULL
Birth year1840
Age84
Death quarter4
Death year1924
DistrictKINGSTON SRY
Volume2A
Page484
Record setEngland & Wales deaths 1837-2007

Hull Edmund Charles Pendleton of Park Gate House Common Richmond Surrey died 8 November 1924. Probate London 11 December 1924 to Fanny Maria Hull widow Leonard Stewart Benson Hull of no occupation the right honourable James Edward Geale Viscount Charlemont and Albert Young Hyland solicitor effects L 278,140 17s 10d
National Probate Calendar.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, St Mary Lambeth LON. Edmund is recorded as a boarder aged 31 single a merchants clerk born Bangor Ireland

2. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, The Mount Reigate SRY. Edmund is recorded as head of house aged 50 a merchant and coal contractor employer born Bangor Co Down Ireland

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Reigate SRY. Edmund is recorded as head of house married aged 71 head of firm Hull Blyth & Co steam coal exporters born Bangor Ireland

Children from this marriage were:

+ 399 M    i. Trevor Julius Dawson HULL [1349] was born in 1880 in Blackheath Lewisham KEN and died in 1927 at age 47.

+ 400 F    ii. Winifred Grace Alicia HULL [1343] was born in 1881 in Blackheath Lewisham KEN and died in 1937 at age 56.

+ 401 F    iii. Millicent Mary Blanche HULL [1350] was born in 1884.

+ 402 M    iv. Capt Leonard Stewart Benson HULL [1359] was born in 1882.

+ 403 F    v. Evelyn Fanny Charlotte HULL [1363] was born in 1887.

+ 404 M    vi. Capt Hubert Charles Edward HULL [1366] was born in 1891 in Redhill SRY.

+ 405 F    vii. Isabel Julia HULL [1369] was born in 1893 in Redhill SRY.

+ 406 M    viii. Charles John Leslie HULL [1365] was born in 1897.


176. Blanche Emily JULIUS [1977] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1858 in Southery NFK, was baptised on 25 Dec 1858 in Southery NFK, and died in 1938 at age 80.

General Notes:
Marriages 26 April 1893.
Thomas John Thompson 33 architect of Peterborough father John Thompson contractor to Blanche Emily Julius 34 of Southery father Archibald Eneas Julius Clerk in Holy Orders. Signed by both in the presence of A.E. Julius, John Thompson, E. A. Hull. After Banns, by Vincent W. Peake curate.
Ref: marriage register St Mary the Virgin Southery

BDM Marriages June 1893.
Blanch Julius Downham 4b 569

Blanch was a legatee under her fathers Will to L3000.00

Julius Jottings. April 1900. No. 2.
New Addresses.
Mrs T. J. Thompson, Southery Lodge, Peterborough.

Julius Jottings No 7 April 1902
Blanche contributed an article titled "Church Work in Peterborough" she notes that although the work is not vastly different from other large parish's. "Peterborough, being, of course, a Cathedral City, the whole of the church life centres in the Cathedral, of which we are justly proud and especially so as the West front is considered the finest in the world."
The parish in which they live is St Mark's, with a population of some 7500, "consisting almost entirely of the artizan class and railway employees" They have recently built a second larger church in the parish, dedicated to St Barnabas, at a cost of L4000. Blanche is concerned about the debt as they are not a wealthy parish, and suggests wealthy readers may help. "There is, of course, no endowment for this church and no extra clergy." . . . . . "The Parishioners are, however, I think most loyal, and cooperate in every way with the clergy, and most cordial relations exist between them, so much so that the present vicar on being appointed to the care of the parish was heard to say that he had been told that he was coming to a "most united Parish." She is proud of their Church Schools which teach about 1000 children but it is a serious financial responsibility, she hopes "that the present government may do something to more fairly adjust the present position of Voluntary and Board schools". The Sunday School is well patronised, having 57 teachers. The parish also provides Reading Rooms, there is a Debating Society, Church Lads Brigade, Girls Friendly Society ("in which she is personally much interested"), a Mother's Union, and the Church of England Temperance Society, Mothers Union.
"The services at St Mark's Church are bright and hearty, music and singing all that can be desired"
Blanche concludes "Now, Mr Editor, I am afraid my best is a poor best, but such as it is I leave it with you, hoping you will overlook the faults both in matter and composition, and with every wish for the success of Julius Jottings."
Blanche E. Thompson
Southery Lodge
Peterborough
17 March 1902.
Julius Jottings No 7 was the last published, perhaps the family had run out of news?

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Church St Southery NFK. Blanch is recorded as a daughter aged 2 born Southery NFK.

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Blanch is recorded as a daughter aged 12 born Southery NFK

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Church St Southery NFK. Blanch is recorded as a daughter aged 22 single born Southery NFK

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 119 Churchgate Southery. Blanch is recorded as a daughter (which is incongruious) single aged 32 born Southery

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 4 Lincoln Rd Peterborough. Blanch is recorded as married aged 42 born Southery

Blanche married Thomas John THOMPSON [937], son of John THOMPSON [12029] and Mary Caster [12030], on 26 Apr 1893 in St Marys The Virgin Southery. Thomas was born in 1861 and died in 1915 at age 54.

General Notes:
Thomas, was a Partner in a firm of Ecclesiastical builders and restorers, whose work included restoration of Peterbrough, and Winchester Cathedrals, and St Georges Chapel Windsor.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 106 Lincoln Rd Peterborough NTH. Thomas is recorded as Thomas J son aged 1 month born Peterborough

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 208 Lincoln Rd Peterborough NTH. Thomas is recorded as a son aged 10 a scholar born Peterborough

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Mount Lee Lodge Egham SRY. Thomas is recorded as head of house unmarried aged 20 a contractors son born Peterborough

4. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 15 Lincoln Rd Peterborough. Thomas is recorded as a son single aged 30 a builder born Peterborough

5. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 4 Lincoln Rd Peterborough. Thomas is recorded as head of house married aged 40 a builder and contractor an employer born Peterborough.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 407 F    i. Blanche Iris THOMPSON [1375] was born in 1894 in Peterborough.

+ 408 F    ii. Joan Mary THOMPSON [1373] was born in 1896.

+ 409 F    iii. Nora Julius THOMPSON [1376] was born in 1898 and died in 1898.

+ 410 M    iv. John Archibald Julius THOMPSON [1379] was born on 12 Mar 1900.


177. Lucy Adelaide JULIUS [938] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1864 in Southery NFK, was baptised on 15 May 1864 in Southery NFK, died on 30 Jan 1936 in Hatch End MDX at age 72, and was buried on 3 Feb 1936 in St Mary Churchyard Hunstanton NFK.

General Notes:
Lucy was a legatee under her fathers Will to L1500.00

SOUTHERY
WEDDING FESTIVITIES
The parish of Southery was en fete on Thursday, August 9th on account of the marriage that took place that day between John Lockie Clark, Esq., of Oakley Park, Hertfordshire and Miss Lucy Adelaide Julius, youngest daughter of the Rev. A. E. Julius Rector of Southery. As the bride and her family are widely known and highly esteemed throughout the district the event assumed quite a public character. The village was freely decorated with mottoes and flags, of which there were many festoons stretching at intervals across the roadways. The principal features of ornamentation were exhibited in the neighbourhood of the Rectory and the Church, which are not far distant from each other. Upon the lawn in front of the Rectory were two marquees, in one of which were displayed the handsome presents received by the bride and bridegroom, whilst in the other the guests were entertained. The floor was boarded and carpeted, and the tables were decorated with plant and flowers. On either side of the pathways leading to the tent where some fine shrubs in pots, supplied by Mr. James Bird, of Downham. Near the entrance to the Rectory was a triumphal arch of evergreens, bearing the inscription on one side, "Long life and prosperity," and on the other side, "Health and happiness," severally worked in ornamental straw letters upon chocolate cloth. Surrounding the structure were festoons of red, white and blue coloured glass bucket-lamps, which when lighted at night, presented an exceedingly pretty appearance. Over the churchyard gate was another triumphal arch, bearing "God bless the happy pair" and "This day I will bless you." The pathway from the Vicarage across the public highway to the north entrance to the church was covered with matting, and the aisle of the newly renovated church to the communion rail was laid with carpeting. Upon the holy table was a cross of white lilies, marguerites, daises, and jasmine; and upon the retable two vases of marguerites, white foxgloves and ferns. Shortly after 11 o' clock the band of the Ely Volunteers (H Company), under the leadership of a Bandmaster J. Joselyn, met upon the Rectory lawn, where they played for about half an hour. The bridegroom, attended by his bestman (Mr. H. Clark, of Thornhill Park, Sunderland), arrived at the church at 11.30, and soon after the bridal procession left the Rectory. The bride who was accompanied by her father, wore a dress of rich white corded silk, trimmed with a handsome old point lace scarf, with bouquets of orange blossom and fruit. In her hair were entwined orange blossoms, a wreath of which caught up her tulle veil. She carried a handsome bouquet composed of white flowers - stephanotis, tuberoses, eucharis, gardenias, bouvardias, and roses - bordered with maidenhair fern. The bridesmaids were Miss Blanche Julius, sister of the bride, who wore a cream-coloured Indian muslin dress, and with coffee - - - and apple green ribbon, with stringless fancy white bonnet trimmed with Marochal Niel roses, Miss Jessie Virtue, Miss Ethel Virtue, Miss Ethel Julius and Miss Ella Brewin, cousins of the bride (who were attired similarly to the chief bridesmaid, but wore large Leghorn hats trimmed with white tulle, apple green ribbon and Marochal Niel roses). Each bridesmaid carried a posy of choice mixed flowers (carnations, mignonette, roses and lilies) and solid silver scent bottles, elegantly hand-painted, with forget-me-nots, these being presents from the bridegroom.

The groomsmen were Messrs. H. Clark, A. H. Leigh, W. M. Blyth, G. Clark, and R. Culliford. As the procession entered the church, the choir sang "The voice that breathed o'er Eden." The Rev. H. S. Miles, Vicar of All Saints, Oakley Park, Hertfordshire, and the Rev. Canon Beechy, Rector of Hilgay, officiated, and the bride was given away by her father. The psalm "God be merciful unto us" was chanted by the choir and the large congregation. At the conclusion of the ceremony Miss Tearle played a lively march upon the organ, and the band performed the Royal Wedding March, whilst Mr. and Mrs. Clark left the Church amidst tangible proofs of goodwill from hundreds of spectators who lined the pathway to the Rectory. Breakfast was served in the marquee. The wedding cake was supplied by Mr. W C Smith, of High Street, Lynn.

The company included the bride and bridegroom, the Rev A E Julius, and Miss Blanche Julius, Misses Jesse and Ethel Virtue, Miss Ethel Julius, Miss Ella Brewin, Messrs H Clark, A H Leigh, W M Blyth, G Clark, R Culliford, Ven. Archdeacon and Mrs Nevill, Mr and Mrs E C P Hull, Rev H S Miles, Rev Canon and Miss Beechey, Rev A S, Mrs and Miss Latter, Rev S and Mrs Churchill, Rev J and Mrs Crosse, Rev H Smith, Rev J McGill, Rev and Mrs Rogers, Mr R W E Gibbon, Miss Kate Julius and Mr Leslie, Dr. Mackintosh, the Misses Tearle, Mr and Mrs Peacock, Miss Steele, Rev E R, Mrs and Miss Willford, Mr E H Willford, Rev A W Hertzberg, Rev H C Price, &c. The band played upon the lawn during the repast. At its close Mr E C P Hull of Southery House, Earlswood Common, son-in-law of the Rev A E Julius, proposed "The Bride and Bridegroom", and Mr J L Clark returned thanks, and proposed "The Bridesmaids," for whom Mr H Clark replied, and then gave "Our host, the Rev. A E Julius." Other toasts were given. At 3 o'clock the happy pair departed for Scotland to spend the honeymoon. During the afternoon a garden party was held at the Rectory. In the evening the grounds were illuminated by hundreds of coloured glass lamps, and the proceedings of a happy day, during which the Rev. A. E. Julius and his family did their utmost to please everyone, concluded with a dance.
The Downham Market Gazette


Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900
The Clarks are moving from Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, before Christmas.

Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901.
Mrs J. L. Clark having left Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, is residing for a few months at number 55 Lancaster Gate, London, W.

Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
Mrs J. L. Clark and her family having left Lancaster Gate, living for a time at The Hall, Bushey, Herts.
Their marriage date may have been 1886?

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Church St Southery NFK. Lucy is recorded as a daughter aged 7 born Southery

2. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Church St Southery NFK. Lucy is recorded as a daughter aged 17 a scholar born Southery NFK

3. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Southampton Lodge Friern Barnet MDX. Lucy is recorded as a wife aged 27 born Southery NFK

4. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, The Elms Watford Herts. Lucy is recorded as a wife aged 47 married 22 yrs 4 children all living born Southery NFK

Lucy married John Lockie CLARK [939], son of George CLARK Gent of Friern Barnet [12774] and Jane LOCKIE [23885], on 9 Aug 1888 in Southery NFK. John was born on 6 Jan 1851 in Monkwearmouth Durham, died on 23 Oct 1935 in Hunstanton NFK at age 84, and was buried on 26 Oct 1935 in St Mary Churchyard Hunstanton NFK. Another name for John was Jack.

General Notes:
John Lockie Clark was an entrepreneurial businessman and keen sportsman

John Lockie Clark Southampton Lodge Oakleigh Park Whetstone N. Freehold House.
Electoral Register Enfield 1887 - 97

John instigated divorce proceedings in June 1884 against his first wife.

Marriage 9 August 1888.
John Lockie Clark 36 widower gentlemen of Friern Barnet, father George Clark gentleman to Lucy Adelaide Julius 24 spinster of Southery father A.E. Julius Clerk in Holy Orders. Signed by both in the presence of A.E. Julius, Henry Clark, E. C. P. Hull, . . . . . Leigh, Blanche E. Julius. By licence. By Henry Miles Vicar of All Saints Friern Barnet.
Ref: marriage register St Mary the Virgin Southery

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900.
At the end of their usual summer visit to Hunstanton, Mr and Mrs J. L. Clark returned to Oakleeigh Park on their motor car, passing through Southery en route.

Julius Jottings No 3 October 1900.
The Clarks are moving from Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, before Christmas.

Julius Jottings January 1902 No 6 Pg 7
Mr & Mrs J L Clark have taken a house near London their address is The Elms Cassiobury Park Watford London N.

HUNSTANTON
THE LATE MR. J. L. CLARK. - the death occurred at his residence, "Homefields" on the 23rd ult., of Mr. John Lockie Clark, aged 83 years. He was the son of Mr. George Clark, of Sunderland, founder of George Clark, Ltd., the Southwick engine-works firm. At the age of 20 he joined the shipping firm Culliford and Clark, a business founded over 100 years ago., and subsequently became a partner. He was well known in shipping circles, and was one of the pioneers of tramp steamer brokerage. He early saw the great possibilities of the pleasure cruise industry, and was responsible for the first venture in that direction. He purchased the s.s. Ceylon in 1881 which, after being specially fitted out, took 100 passengers for a cruise round the world. His firm owned the first ships that brought full cargoes of wheat from the Plate and cotton from the Gulf. He had offices in London, Sunderland, Newcastle, Glasgow and Liverpool, and in one season had 100 steamers engaged in the cotton-carrying trade. This was easily a "record" for this branch of business. These were but a few of his pioneering feats in the shipping world.
He at one time resided at Oakleigh Park, Friern Barnet, and later for 17 years at The Elms, Watford, before going to live permanently at Hunstanton.
Probably Mr. Clark will be best remembered for his activities in the world of sport, of which he was a veritable Admirable Crichton. He participated in and supported practically every form of outdoor entertainment. He was captain of his school cricket XI., and became a very keen and efficient boxer. He was a prominent member of the Belsize boxing club. Although he never rode regularly to hounds, he was a very fine rider and a splendid judge of horses, and always broke his own mounts in. As a golfer, when over the age of 60, he held the amateur records for two courses - Hunstanton and West Herts, Cassiobury Park. He was one of the founders of the former club, and was captain in 1897. He won the captain's prize when over 70, and played regularly until he was 82. In a recent article written by Bernard Darwin and published in "Golf Illustrated" he was referred to as the Grand Old Man of golf. An enthusiastic motorist since motoring's earliest days, he owned a car in 1898 and was a contemporary member of the original Automobile Club with the Hon. C. S. Rolls., F. S. Edge and C. Jarrot. Shooting, swimming, diving and skating also found in him an active and skilful exponent. Greatly interested in photography from the time of the wet-plate, he later specialised in stereoscopic work, and had the first reflex camera constructed to his own design by Adams. He travelled extensively in his earlier days and visited most countries of the world. He became an excellent linguist and spoke French fluently. He was of an extremely kind and generous nature, and his courtesy and consideration to others endeared him to a wide circle of friends. A quiet benefactor to innumerable charities he was never known to refuse assistance to a deserving cause. During his residence in Hunstanton, football, tennis, cricket, the kennel society, music, and all social activities found in him a ready and liberal patron. Mr. Clark is survived by a widow (the daughter of the late Rev. A. E. Julius, a former rector of Southery), four sons and two daughters. His eldest son died in 1918.

The funeral of Mr. Clark took place at St. Mary's church, Old Hunstanton, on Saturday. The service was taken by the Rev. Douglas Smith, assisted by the Rev. H. F. Rushmer (vicar of Thornham). Mr. F. J. Bond was at the organ and a full choir was in attendance. As the mourners entered the church Chopin's Funeral March was played followed by "O for the wings of a dove." After a short service, Psalm xxiii. was chanted and "Abide with me" was sung. At the close the organist played the Nunc Dimittis. The immediate mourners were: the widow, sons and daughters, sons-in-law and daughters-in-law, other near relatives, members of the Homefield's staff, and some intimate personal friends. Others present included ....[then follows a long list of names]. The interment took place close to the south porch of the church, and the grave was lined with evergreens and dahlias. There were over fifty wreaths.
The Lynn Advertiser, Wisbech Constitutional Gazette

October 26, 1935 - Pgae 1 Col A - Deaths
CLARK.- On Oct. 23. 1935. at Homefields, Hunstanton, peacefully, JOHN LOCKIE CLARK, beloved husband of Lucy Adelaide Clark (née Julius), in his 84th year. Funeral at the Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin. Hunstanton Village, to-day (Saturday) at 2.30 P.m. Mourning optional.

Research Notes:
Biography of John (Jack) Lockie Clarke by John Green.
It has not been discovered where Jack went to school. It may be that like his business partner James Culliford, he went to Mr. James Chalmer's school in Sunderland, or he may have been sent to the Grammar School at Crossgate just outside Durham like his younger brothers. Whatever the case, Jack did not pursue further academic or professional training and instead went into commerce. At the time of the 1871 census he was describing himself as a "Ship Merchant" in Sunderland and later when he got married in London in 1874, he was still a merchant and living at Hampstead.

Jack's father must have recognised in his son someone with similar energy and business acumen to himself in his younger days and when he went into partnership with James Culliford in about 1875/76 to create the firm of Culliford & Clark, he appointed Jack as his representative in London. It has not been established exactly when Culliford & Clark first started trading in Sunderland (James had been in business from c. 1861), but it was probably about the time mentioned above. The firm is also reported to be trading in London in 1880 when it had offices at 32, Great St. Helen's in the city not far from the Baltic Exchange.

Jack's father's trust in him was amply rewarded, and it seems that Jack made a very considerable success of running the London branch of the business (there was also a Glasgow and a Liverpool branch for many years). The Sunderland branch, and later the Newcastle one, seem always to have been overseen by the Culliford family; first by James Culliford himself until a few months before his death in 1911 and later by his son Robert. In his Will, Jack's father bequeathed him sole charge of the Clark family's interest in the firm and at some stage, he must have become a full partner with James Culliford.

Culliford & Clark seem to have been ship owners and ships brokers in the main but also were involved in chartering and yacht managing. One early innovation that was attributed to Jack in his obituary was the idea of cruises. Hitherto people had mostly used ships to reach a particular destination but in 1881, the Inter-Oceanic Steam Yachting Company Limited was set up to offer yachting voyages for pleasure, voyages that would visit many places of interest.

One can only speculate about the extent to which Jack was instrumental in setting up the Inter-Oceanic Steam Yachting Company Limited but he and James Culliford were among its directors and, not surprisingly, Culliford & Clark were appointed yacht managers to the company. It is said that Jack acquired the 2110 ton screw-steamer Ceylon for the company from P & O in 1881. She had been a small passenger steamer with P & O but was extensively converted to provide first-class accommodation for 100 passengers and their servants, including "a luxurious boudoir for the exclusive use of ladies, and a capital smoking-room for gentlemen."

The idea of cruising on a yacht for pleasure took a year or two become established so, despite considerable advertising, Inter-Oceanic only succeeded in getting about 60 passengers on its first cruise, which sailed from Southampton in December 1881, and many of those only did parts of the voyage. The whole cruise was an around-the-world voyage lasting 10 months and costing £500 per passenger and £150 per servant for the entire trip; lesser amounts were paid for various stages. This was clearly much too ambitious a voyage for that time.

A second cruise was planned around the Mediterranean commencing in December 1882 (Fare £125), which never sailed, followed by a third to the Northern Latitudes (along the Norwegian fjords and Swedish coast-line). It too was not well enough supported, and the company was put into voluntary liquidation in June of the following year. From its ashes emerged the Ocean Steam Yachting Company Limited with a different office but, presumably, similar directors. It offered shorter cruises and survived until 1885 when it too went into voluntary liquidation. The s.s. Ceylon seems then to have been acquired by private owner who, when he was not using it himself, chartered it for cruises in the Mediterranean, North Sea, etc. These must have been successful because the s.s. Ceylon continued to be used as a cruising yacht for another 20 years or more.

At sometime Jack got to know a couple of city gentlemen by the names of Edmund Hull and William Blyth, who were in partnership in a coal contracting business. One supposes that Jack met them through needing to make arrangements for the supply of bunker coal for Culliford & Clark's steamships.

Edmund was married to Fanny Julius, and it seems likely that it was through this connection that Jack met, and later married, Lucy Julius, Fanny's younger sister; it is hard to imagine, otherwise, how someone like Jack would have met a clergyman's daughter from a small isolated Norfolk hamlet. William Blyth must have been a good friend also because he was a groomsman at Jack and Lucy's wedding.

Through Edmund and William, Jack seems to have developed quite an interest in coal as a business and the three of them were for a time co-directors of a company called the Coal Brick Syndicate Limited and, probably, its successor. This company was the owner of various patents for an improved process (it did not use pitch to bind the material) to make coal or coke dust, etc. into briquettes, and it hoped to sell the process worldwide.

As so often where Jack was concerned, so it seems, the financial arrangements were tortuous and, barely a year after joining the board, Jack found himself appointed liquidator of a company (one in which he probably had shares) that had bought the rights from the Coal Brick Syndicate to sell licences for the process in the United Kingdom. Meanwhile, the Coal Brick Syndicate had itself been liquidated and turned into the New Coal Brick Syndicate, which itself was liquidated three years later. Whether or not all these company formations and liquidations were bona-fide business transactions or simply a stock market scam can only be guessed at, as can the commercial success of the process on which they were based.

Jack's interest in coal obviously equipped him well to deal with problems in that industry when they occurred from time to time and this report from The Belfast News-Letter well illustrates his drive and initiative in the miners strike of 1893:'97

THE MINERS' STRIKE
The Central News telegraphs that a development has been brought about by the present disturbed condition of the coal industry in England and Wales, which cannot fail to have an important effect upon home trade and industry. Messrs. Culliford and Clark, of London, have, it appears, for years done a very considerable trade in arranging for the coaling of many of the great ocean liners, the fuel being conveyed from various coal ports to outgoing steamers as required. Owing however, to the existing strike, and the scarcity of coal even at increased rates, the danger has presented itself of vessels having to lay up for want of coal. This difficulty has, the Central News is informed, been surmounted by Messrs. Culliford and Clark who within the last few days have chartered vessels to carry several thousand tons of coal from Norfolk, Virginia, to the various Atlantic ports of call or destinations of the liners, and at one or other of these the steamers will receive their supply of bunker coal. It is stated that this is not the only firm which has adopted this expedient towards maintaining ocean-going traffic, and that the same time effecting a very great saving in the cost of fuel. Those who are interested in this new source of supply say that the present demand for the Pocahontas coal is unprecedented, and add that as fully equals the best Welsh steam coal the existing necessity of going to such a market for supplies is likely to have more than a temporary effect on future consumption of British coal.

The report of Jack's death below mentions other successful business activities that he instigated. In addition, he was of course a director and major shareholder of George Clark Limited (GCL) for many years and, doubtless, brought a keen commercial mind to the board's deliberations.

As the report of his death shows, Jack had many skills and interests outside of his business life, above all of which was his love of golf. It has not been discovered when or where he took up golf, but it may have been at the West Herts Golf Club, which was started in 1890 in Bushey Hall and with whom Jack was playing in matches as early as 1894 (he was described as a sterling golfer when winning three up against Stanmore in that year), or at the Hunstanton Golf Club where he was a founder member in 1891 and Captain in 1897. Two years later Jack was Captain of West Herts. From the 1890s onwards, he and his family were keen the patrons of both these clubs. Indeed, it may well be that when Jack decided to move from his house in Lancaster Gate (he had moved back into London at some point), he chose The Elms, near Cassiobury Park, Watford, because of its propinquity to the West Herts course, which had moved there in 1897. At that time, it was the only golf course in Hertfordshire.

The Hunstanton Club membership came about because the family had regularly holidayed in that part of Norfolk in the 1890s. When The Elms was eventually given up, and the family settled at Hunstanton, a house that Jack must have acquired early in the 1900s, their focus became the golf club there. At the time a local golfing wit wrote these lines in SHAP SHOTS, the golf club's magazine, in its issue of 14th February, 1918:-

For J. L. Clarke [sic] we justly claim,
A front page on the Book of Fame,
His record of a man of parts
Is in the annals of West Herts,
that he and his with us abide
Is flattering to Hunston's pride.


The members of the Clark family won many medals at Hunstanton. Jack himself won the President's Prize in June 1908 aged 56 and the Captain's Prize in July 1921 when he was nearly 70. In 1922 the family present a perpetual annual challenge cup - The Clark Cup - which has been competed forever since.,

Following Jack's win in July 1921 Golf Illustrated published this this comment by Mr. H. H. Hilton:-

The Player of Fifty and Over.
Judging by the performance of Mr. J. C. Clark [sic] in a recent event on Hunstanton links, there is hope for us all who are on the wrong side of the fifty mark. Mr Clark has arrived at the venerable age of three score and ten, but his handicap is only a matter of four strokes, and he has recently emphatically proved that it is a very free allowance, as in the play for the captain's prize he qualified for the match play with a return of 78 less 4'9774, and then in the subsequent match play proceeded to successfully eliminate the three players he had to meet. The first he defeated by two holes, the second of the Obstructors was accounted for much more easily as he had to cry enough on the fourteenth green, whilst the final of the 36 holes the veteran won by four up and three to play.
The Strain of Three Days' Play
To my way of thinking, the most remarkable part of this feat was the fact that the old gentleman could stand the strain of three days' consecutive serious competition play, and he must be gifted with an extraordinary amount of stamina. At the recent championship meeting at Hoylake it was rather significant that the men who were on the other side of the fifty mark were not a little inclined to flag in the afternoon round, and it was not a little evidence that the morning effort had taken not a little out of them. Of course, a club competition is not a championship, but still, Mr. Clark's performance was a wonderful feat, and the comparative veteran would probably be gratified if the old gentleman would tell us how it is all done; personally I cannot quite imagine myself proceeding through such an ordeal at the age of 70.

A few years later in May 1934 "MEL" (J. B. Melhuish, a noted sporting caricaturist) who did golf caricatures for The Tatler drew some of the personalities at Hunstanton and Jack featured among them as the sketch shows.

Jack is said to have had a reputation in the family for being rather tight with money and his grandson Michael Clark told this story by way of illustration. Once when Jack was staying at Gleneagles (something, he did every year taking the Royal Suite above the front door) he found that his bill, which he paid every week, included 6d per day for pressing his evening trousers, so he locked them away in a drawer out of the valet's reach. This carefulness with money does not seem to be borne out by the reports of his generosity to good causes in his obituary or by the fact that he helped set up several of his sons in various businesses. It may be that this reputation came about because the sons in question expected to be given the money rather than lent it.

Jack died in the middle of the 1930s depression, when, like others, GCL's business was in the doldrums, and it is a great credit to his business acumen that his estate was valued at over £300,000 '97 equivalent to about £16 million worth of purchasing power in 2009.

The terms of Jack's Will are illuminating in several ways: first, he clearly had deep reservations about Ivan and George's ability to handle money (and not without good reason - see their stories), and therefore, directed that they should not get their hands on any capital but only have the interest from it. Second, he wanted his son John's children, who were grown up by then, to have some income, so he stipulated that Ethel, John's widow, should only receive half the income from John's share. Finally, it revealed that he had kept a "Black Book" in which he had noted the amounts that he had lent or advanced to his children over the years.

It is interesting to speculate about to whom and for what purpose these loans and advances were made. The obvious candidates, one supposes, might have been Ivan and George during their years in America, Ivan's poultry farm near Colchester in the 1920s, and Archibald's farming venture in Kent.

In his Will, he directed that where entries in the Black Book had been marked by him, the amount involved was to be taken into hotchpot in determining the person's share of his estate. Who was affected by this and the amounts involved never emerged because after Jack's funeral, his sons had a family conference and agreed that the Black Book should be mislaid, and so it was.
Note
Calculation based on the retail price index.
Ref John Green: Family data website http://www.green.gen.name/index.htm

Image courtesy of John Green

Other Records

1. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, Southampton Lodge Friern Barnet MDX. John is recorded as head of house married aged 39 Master and ship owner and ship broker born Durham

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, The Elms Watford Herts. John is recorded as head of house married 22yrs aged 59 a shipbroker an employer born Sunderland

Children from this marriage were:

+ 411 M    i. Ivan Julius CLARK [1382] was born on 28 Jun 1889 in Southampton Lodge MDX and died on 13 Jun 1931 in Colchester ESS at age 41.

+ 412 M    ii. Archibald Cowper CLARK [1383] was born on 9 May 1891 in Southampton Lodge Friern Barnet MDX and died on 28 Jul 1966 in Wimbourne DOR at age 75.

+ 413 M    iii. Malcolm CLARK [1385] was born on 17 Dec 1892 in Oakleigh Park MDX and died on 1 Nov 1952 in Norfolk at age 59.

+ 414 M    iv. Percival George CLARK [1386] was born on 11 Apr 1896 in Oakleigh MDX and died on 17 Oct 1964 in Surbiton SRY at age 68.


178. Henriada Evilyn JULIUS [940] (Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in Apr 1865 in Southery NFK, died in May 1865, and was buried on 27 May 1865 in Southery Churchyard.

179. Aretas ESTRIDGE [11151] (Aretas William ESTRIDGE88, Ann Mary Wharton (Polly) JULIUS51, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1839 and died in 1882 at age 43.

General Notes:
All unproven

180. Mary Estridge KERIE [18778] (Rev. John Julius KERIE94, Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

181. Elizabeth Mary Fauntleroy KERIE [18777] (Rev. John Julius KERIE94, Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born circa 1814 and died on 21 Mar 1841 in St Kitts aged about 27.

General Notes:
St Mary Cayon
St Kitts.
On a white marble ledger over a stone vault in closed by iron railing, 2 corners of the stone missing and railing broken - much neglected:

Sacred
To the memory of
Elizabeth Mary Fauntleroy
The wife of
Thomas Turner
Who departed this life
On the
21st day of March 1841
In the
27th year of her age.
Ref: https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE198136

Elizabeth married Thomas TURNER [24160]. Thomas was born circa 1801 in St Kitts West Indies and died on 17 Jul 1874 in Holborn LND aged about 73.

General Notes:
Warrant appointing Thomas Turner Esq, to be a Member of Legislative Council, St Christopher.
Victoria, Reg.
Trusty and Well beloved We Greet you Well
We being Well satisfied of the Loyalty, Integrity and Ability of Our Trusty and Well beloved Thomas Turner Esq have thought it fit hereby to signify Our Will and Pleasure that, forthwith, upon the receipt of these Presents, you do swear and admit him the said Thomas Turner to be a Member of Our Legislative Council of Our Island of St Christopher. And for so doing business shall be your Warrant. Given at Our Court at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, this 17th day of February 1866, in the 29th year of Our Reign.
By Her Majesty's Command.
Edward Cardwell
Caribbeana Volume 1 Page 84

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, St George Bloomsbury LND. Thomas is recorded as head of house married aged 70 a sugar grower born West Indies St Kitts (struck out replaced by an indistinct "Hants" Ancestry transcription says Dorset)

182. Julia KERIE [24163] (Jedediah KERIE95, Elizabeth Mary (Nancy) JULIUS52, John17, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born circa 1818 in Bart SOM.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 36 York Plc St Marylebone LND MDX. Julia is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 32 born Bath Somerset

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, 36 York Plc Marylebone London MDX. Julia is recorded as a daughter unmarried aged 53 born Bath SOM

183. Edward JULIUS [718] (William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1813 and died about 1870 aged about 57.

General Notes:
Edward is mentioned in a letter by Sarah Ann Julius dated 23 Nov 1906.
EXTRACT as follows ; "William (born illegitimate 1795) had a son by marriage who ran away to sea, but I think his name was Edward. Just before my father (Charles James Fox Julius) died (1872) a young coloured man came to the island in a ship saying he was the boy who ran away some time previous to this visit. But I am sure his name was Edward. No doubt he is the same one who went to Australia and died there, for he came another time to the island serving on board a Royal Mail steamer and he came on shore to offer his sympathy to my sister on hearing our father was dead; The Canadian man must have forgotten his christian name and thought it was William that is all I can tell you"

However it may be that the above refers to William Warner Julius.

Edward is said to have married twice, and been a stonemason.

An Edward Julius died in Australia in late 1906 aged about 70yrs.
Conjectural dates have been entered against Edward.

An Edward Julius was called to Jury Service on 14 Jul 1840 in Basseterre by notice 3 July 1840.
Ref: Caribbeana Vol 2 Pg 180

These relationships require verification.

Edward married Margaret WARNER of Trinidad [719] about 1836 in Location unknown. Margaret died before 1858.

General Notes:
Margaret is said to be descended from Sir Thomas Warner 1st Bart sometime Govenor of St Kitts (1629?). Margaret was one of the last heiresses of the West Indies. Sir Thomas married a well born woman from St Lucia who is said to have been reduced in wealth when the French started disputing English claims on St Lucia.

Margaret is said to have died when her son William was in his teens. She was related to Plum Warner a well known cricketer.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 415 M    i. William Warner JULIUS [720] was born in 1838 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean, died on 30 Apr 1908 in 97 William St Sydney at age 70, and was buried on 1 May 1908 in Rookwood Cemetry Sydney.

+ 416 M    ii. Richard JULIUS [722] died about 1885.

+ 417 F    iii. Isabella JULIUS [723] .

184. Ruth JULIUS [759] (Charles James Fox97, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1835 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean.


185. Sarah Ann JULIUS [760] (Charles James Fox97, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Nov 1837 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died on 20 Jun 1907 in Basseterre St Kitts. at age 69.

General Notes:
Sarah writing in 1906 refers to Edward Julius (718) coming to the Island.
Sarah was the only survivor when Mr. Brewin discovered her living as an invalid in the Cunningham Hospital Basseterre about 1906. She wrote most interesting letters referring constantly to her dearly loved father and saying she could not understand why he never claimed his Estates or corresponded with his English relations. It was thought kindest not to enlighten her. She died in 1907 having much enjoyed and appreciated a little help given her from time to time by her English cousins.
Florence Stevens records Sarah as being buried in the Monrovian Church Nichola Town

Transcriptions of Sarah Ann Julius's letters.
St Kitts 25 Mar 1906
My Dear Cousin,
Your letter of date Feb 26th I received on March 23rd and it is with much pleasure I write this and accord to your affectionate recognition, their being no doubt we belong to the same family, yet some things seem so mixed up in my memo that you must make every allowance for my age and infirmity - you ask if I do not think that Julius Caesar was my fathers grandfather instead of his father - I think all along I have said that Richard Julius was my fathers father and Caesar Julius or as the name is Julius Caesar Julius was father to Richard and grandfather to my father.
I know my father was born in July 1797 (the day of month I have forgotten) he died July 5 1872 aged 75. I have heard my father speak with much feeling of his being at the bedside of his father just before he died and his telling him to be a good boy - he was 8 years old then he said - if so then Richard died in 1805 and it must have been the grandfather Caesar who sent on the boy (my father) to school in England almost immediately. my father was names Chas Jas Fox after the Statesman who died in 1806. Mr Fox and my fathers father were intimate friends and he wished the boy to be his Godson - it was done by proxy Mr Fox died before the child was sent on - when Julius Caesar died I cannot tell you, but I used to hear my father speak of an old Scotch lady as being his grandmother - probably she was the wife of Julius Caesar - her name was Ann Susanna Kerr of Greenock - also of two old maiden sisters Jenny and Lucretia who perhaps were the sisters of Richard. Of this I cannot speak with certainty - my father said these ladies were tall and stately and wore their hair which was white hanging behind in long curls - I know positively that my fathers mother who was the wife of Richard was named Sarah Ann Crooke the sister of one who sometimes acts as Governor when His Excellency was absent - she was counted a very handsome woman, so much so that one was heard to say "she was a compliment to her maker" but her figure was not good her name was Sarah Ann Cooke. She had two children, my father and a daughter who died in the sixties. I remember her well - she was tall and handsome, but very eccentric - I used to think her a little cracked (not very complimentary) but she was very fond of me and called me "Lady Sarah" - now to return to my father - he came back to St Kitts from England in his 20 something - I forget exactly his age then, but he never looked after any property left by his father who died intestate. I suppose all that went to the Crown - In 1835 he married a lady of good family from St Eustatius her name was Barbara Louisa Amory - she left three children at her death viz: myself born 1837, Ruth born 1835 and Abraham Whitehouse born 1843 - I am the only one living. - perhaps you may have seen my letter to Mrs Mayne which explained some of these things, for I got a letter from my other cousin, your sister, last week telling me that Mrs Mayne sent her the letter to read. What a pity that all of this that interests me as much, should be so incomplete in itself - I never thought a day would come when I would hear and know anything about my fathers family - he had spoken of trying to find them out but he never did. Anything that has any reference to my dear old parent is gratifying to me - he was an affectionate father and he made of me more a companion than anything else - he spoke to me and asked my advise as if I was equal to him in knowledge - he was of a lively disposition and had a keen sense of the ludicrous.
I have sent Mrs Brewin by this mail a photo of my father Chas Jas Fox Julius which the artist took from a negative he still had, tho the likeness was taken in 1866 when he was 69 years old - he had lost his wife (my mother) the year before and felt the loss very much.
My dear cousin I have written you a long letter but it has brightened me up and warmed my poor old heart to see I have so much sympathy shown me and interest from yourself and sister. I expected your letter as Mrs Brewin said you would write - the Julius Jottings already received are very interesting and I will look forward with pleasure to hear again from you - I cannot forget Mrs Foster and Mrs Mayne for all the pleasure and comfort which have come to me through them - ah! there are indeed good people in this world. Sometimes I have been feeling low spirited and unexpectedly I hear an Orderly say a "a letter for Miss Julius" or a paper as the case may be, it has sent a thrill through one and I praise God for his wonderful providence. Through Mrs Foster and Mrs Maine many a little want has been met, for to be in hospital implies a great deal and there were necessities which could not be got without money. May God reward them - I am sorry Mrs Mayne suffers so but God knows best.
Mrs Brewin's letter is written from Twickenham, I suppose she forgot to write Middlesex after - I have wondered if I address my letter to Twickenham if it will reach her - I dont suppose there is any other Twickenham except in Middlesex, so my letter to her is addressed Twickenham Middlesex.
Write soon again
I am with much love and interest
Sarah Ann Julius.

St Kitts April 8 1906
My Dear Cousin Florence
I cannot express all I felt when I received your last letter, which you forgot to date but I got in on 5th April - I thank you and all my other dear relatives for the love and kindness shewn to me - so far amazing and yet that and my surroundings do not prevent you thinking of me and being solicitous of my comfort. I received the P.O.O. (enclosed) for L3-16-0 contributed by you and the members of our family which you named - give my love to them all and thanks for such kindness which is more acceptable than you may think - as you say there are comforts which I "must" need it is even so. The wonderful providence of God towards me has filled me with amazement, and now that I am old & at times feeling sad & writing I had some things, needful, all the events have happened which have been so cheering - shall I not trust him & leave my future in his hands - Some persons think if one is in a hospital all their wants are supplied. I may be so with some but here if there is no chance of one getting better they are sent out & receive (in most cases) a shilling or two shillings weekly from the . . . . . Don Relief Committee. This place is more for sickness and going out when better, but in my case I could not but ask the Doctor to admit me (that was 21 years ago) and I would make myself useful to him as far as I could in exchange for my home here. - now that we are no longer strangers I tell you dear cousin about myself and you will see that the kindness you all have shown me, has been acceptable. I copy the Doctors letters and formerly helped the Matron - all that because I had a home here but my clothing was always a source of anxiety - I used to do bits of fancy work and get sale for them, now I am not able - I am in my 69th year, I think I mentioned that interesting fact in a former letter but at any rate I have had many little & many great wants, but within late I have been blessed with kind friends in Mrs Foster & Mrs Mayne, and God has brought to pass all that has brightened up my declining years - God bless you dear cousin Florence & all the others & some day, who knows? we may know each other better - what strange things do happen in our life - I know sometimes when reading (some-struck out) tales, I have thought the character overdrawn or the events impossible, but really "truth is stranger than fiction" - by the time you get this you will have received the one I wrote at the same time that I sent my father's photo to Mrs Brewin (my other cousin/when ever you see it you will imagine that he was very stout, before the photo was taken but his mind was troubled, router I should say, his heart was heavy & the poor fellow does not look cheerful - he had just lost his wife (my mother) - and the year following (1867) the town was destroyed by fire, and we lost everything - we could not save anything as the fire began in the house in front of us and we could just escape with our lives - that was the beginning of our great poverty for we could never replace the furniture we lost and among that a piano that was my greatest delight.
Now I have written you a long letter and yet with it all I cannot tell you any more about our family - forgive me for tiring you with this - write me soon again & tell me (your - struckout) the Christian name of Mrs Stephen's that I may direct my letters to you as Mrs William or Mrs Robert or any other name before Stephen's - give my love to the kind ones who have been so good to me
I remain
Your affectionate cousin
Sarah Ann Julius

St Kitts 25 May 1906
Dear Cousin (Louisa M Brewin nee Julius)
Your letter of 20th April I received on May 18th, you have no idea how cheering are the letters from you my dear relatives - it will make you happy to know you add such comfort to my life by your loving words & kind deeds - I look forward to the coming mails with pleasure - May God bless you all - it has made a great difference in my life & tho I suffer my affliction yet I have a great deal to be thankful for - I am glad to hear you got my dear fathers photo all right - it was taken not long after the death of my mother & only brother the latter died 4 months before my mother - he died suddenly of heart disease & all that depressed the dear old parent whom I loved more than I can express - all I ever knew or know he taught me & my sister, except music which I was sent out to learn - there were times when my father took a few lads to teach, or bring forward with their Latin etc previous to their parents sending them on to England to finish them up - those were the only times when I had others to study with as in a school - When I was about 16 my father went to New York thinking he might get on well in the States with his family but the winter was too severe for my mother & he returned so I have some experience of what winter is when you write me of the cold & snow I know what it all means - I think it must be a very trying time to the poor, but to those better off, the evenings round the fireside are cosy & nice - my father has told me that winter in England is not so severe as in the States - The postcards you sent me of the Old Palace Gate at Richmond & others are very interesting - I should be glad to have a photo of you and cousin Florence - I have no photo of myself now - I had one some years ago, but a gentleman paid me the complement of stealing it, and I am to old looking & worn to sit for one now, but when you see dear Pa' you see me, I mean as how he looks in the photo, so I look now - what a dear little thing Judith (Brewin [1087]?) must be, children make a home brighter I fancy - the little flower in your letter is a primrose - is it not?
June 2nd - I had to leave off, for I heard that as the route of the these Steamers is changed there would be no mail going from this island before the 6th June, but I heard last night that the mails for England close on June 2, so I am finishing up this - you say you are not far behind me in year's - you are a good way behind - my birthday comes on 23 November - I will complete my 69th year when that time comes - The Matron here says I ought to tell you how many comforts I have been able to get thro the loving thought of my dear relatives - My very spectacles have been put in new frames - I had a nice pair given me by the doctor some time ago & they are so (good - struck out) superior that I can see the finest point - so you were amused at my being told to add to my own writing "excuse bad spelling" - etc - their letters mostly end so, and begin with "I just take my pen in hand to write you" whereas they do not know what it is to write - I heard of one who dictated to another & said to tell of a friend of his illness - the person wrote as if the sick man was writing saying "I am very sick" but as the man died before the letter was posted, the writer made the postscript "Since writing the above I am dead" I fancy this must be only a joke, tho they are ignorant enough for anything - now dear cousin you must tell me what your name is besides Louisa what does M. stand for The Jottings you sent are very interesting - Some years ago about 30 or more a friend of mine returned (to St Kitts) from a visit she was making to England, & she told me among the passengers was a young man so much like my brother that it was remarkable - and strange to say his name was Julius Dare [1446] - it was indeed strange - first with a lightness & then the Julius being one of his names - it is so long now that I had nearly forgotten it, but such surprising things have happened to me lately, that I recall much that I knew - Now dear cousin I have written you a long letter, pay me back in my own coin - I would have written cousin Florence but I am tired a bit and may be late for the mail - give my love to all those who have so lovingly thought of me - I am indeed blessed with such to think of me in my home so far away - I have much to think of now besides my cats of which I have 5 (all old maids love cats you know!).
With much love dear cousin
I close affectionately yours
Sarah A Julius

St Kitts Oct 20 1906
My dear cousin Florence,
Your loving letter of date Sept 21 came safe to hand the very day when you must have been parting with your eldest daughter as you write to say I trust & pray that Our Father will bless her labours of love - How can I think you & the other dear ones for the kindness received at your hands - it will all be remembered in that day when it will be said "for as much as ye have done it unto the least" etc When I wrote last to cousin Brewin I was suffering from an inflammation in one of my legs, it seemed to be getting better but now gives indication of ulcerating - I cannot stand up for a few seconds without pain & I am afraid that no remedy can affect a cure as my age is against me - all I can do is use what the doctor gives to try & sooth the pain - I leave all in the hands of God The help received from you all enables me to get the many comforts which I never would have been able to get otherwise - the hospital does not give all that is required and such things as plasmon, Bovril and the like are sustaining, but only given here when the patient is low - it would be too expensive to give such things as everyday use - if I require I can buy for myself through the bounty of you my dear relations - I have no other means of procuring these things - you must give my love to those who have contributed so much to my comfort & I thank them from me. Oct 29th I have been obliged to leave off thro sickness I can hardly hold up for the pain in my leg - my last letter was a very lengthy one & I must apologise for it - it was in that letter I asked if any of you believe our dead could visit us - In this you will receive a faded likeness of my brother which is the only one I have - I had a nice and bright one taken from the same negative as this was taken from but it was stolen from me and I would like you all to have some idea of what he was like (Image on file 2005) for if you remember I told you that a lady met a young gentleman on board one of the Royal Mail Steamers sometime in the sixties, and was so struck with the likeness to my brother as he looked then in the photo and it was more surprised when she heard that Julius was a part of his name Julius Dare - he must be an old man now if alive - perhaps he may remember travelling in sixty something in one of the R M Steamers - A few days ago the Rector of our church here in Basseterre, was at the hospital & I told him what you asked me about his address or the address of any clergyman who would have the old records of births, deaths & marriages etc - he said a good many of those old records were destroyed when the town was burnt down in 67 but there were some not destroyed and those went back to 1747. He said if you wrote to him he would be glad to do anything to help you - his name is Alfred Watt Rector of St Georges Church Basseterre St Kitts. Then there is the church in one of the country places (Sandy Point) Sandy Point was once the capital of this Island and the name of Julius has much to do with Sandy Point. The name of the clergyman in Sandy Point is Rev W Pigott (I cant find out the christian name).
Nov 1st - I dont think any mail has gone out since I began this letter but you will understand why it has been written at different dates - I hope to hear from you soon again as I have said before, these letters cheer me up - Xmas will soon be here but I trust God will spare me to see the time - pray for me dear cousin I think my birthday which will be the 23rd of this month may be my last by reason of my increased infirmity, but we will know each other in Heaven - I hope you are all well - make allowance for this letter - tell me how everything goes on - how is little Judith - I think of her I hope her bright colour continues
With love
I am your affectionate cousin
Sarah A Julius

St Kitts Nov 23 1906
My Dear Cousin
I am writing you this on my birthday - 69 years - oh the infinite cares and temptations and snares Gods hand has conducted me through all these years - I am sure you think of me today - tho distant yet one of your own kin - We may not know each other here, yet I trust we will know & hand in our to one another in a bitter land - I wrote to tell you in my last that I was suffering from a bad leg which I feared would ulcerate, it has not come to that but every pore gives out water so that I cannot keep on a stocking but just lie down with something under the leg - it is most distressing & the doctor says he can't prevent it, but leave it to nature - What a vale of tears this is - just fancy in the ward next to the one I am in, I have a cousin, on my mother's side, 5 years older than I she has been twice married & the second husband is alive - this cousin had the courage to commit to an operation for cancer in each breast - they had not broken out yet, so the doctor advised her to have them out at once, as they would be sure to break out later on - he also advised her coming here - it is now three weeks since the operation and she is doing as well as can be expected, only she is very nervous - I can't go to see her neither can she come to me. Before I was taken with this water running I was able to go to see her - she told me she had a likeness of me which I had taken years ago & which she wants give me to send for you to see if I looked in anyway like a Julius - while I am waiting for that likeness another cousin gave me one she had of me - it is nearly obliterated but in a strong light it will give you some idea of what I was like at the time - she also gave me a good clean picture of my brother which she had - Julius Dare looked like that in the year 1860 something - late in the 60s when the lady saw him on board a Royal Mail Steamer & was struck by the resemblance before she knew that Julius was one of his names - I never knew I could have got a good clean picture of my brother to send you or I would not have given cousin Flo' that faded out one I sent her - now the only other picture I have is that of my sister Ruth but it is on a little kind of iron plate and quite spotted, I will keep that - we do not look alike. Last week a gentleman from on board a Canadian Steamer in the harbour here came to the Hospital & asked to see me - he said he was in Demerara and had been asked by some persons there to find out if anyone named William Warner Julius had ever been in St Kitts & also to find out all he could; he said that some person of that name had lately died in Australia (I think it was there he died) about 70yrs of age; he said there are many Julius's in Australia and very wealthy. This William Warner Julius had lived in Sandy Point & ran away from his father to go to sea; all that I could tell him was that my father had an illegitimate brother who lived at Sandy Point ( Sandy Point was the town formerly) ; this brother had a son by marriage who ran away to go to sea but I think his name was Edward - Just before my father died a young coloured man came to the island in a ship saying he was the boy who ran away some time previous to this visit. But I am sure his name was Edward. No doubt he is the same one who went to Australia and died there, for he came another time to this island serving on board a Royal Mail steamer and he came on shore to offer his sympathy to my sister & I on hearing our father was dead - the Canadian man must have forgotten his christian name and thought it was William - that is all I can tell you - now dear cousin remember me to all the others you may see and may God bless you all and repay you 100 fold for all the comfort bestowed on me by you my dear relatives - I pray God to relieve me of this distressing flow of wet - pray for me.
Your affectionate cousin
Sarah A Julius
How did your missionary sale get on in (4) Oct?
I enclose my little picture and a clean one of my little brother.

St Kitts Feb 5th 1907
My Dear Cousin
While my hand feels strong I must try and write you, altho' my body is very weak - before you get this you will have received an ill written letter acknowledging all your kind letters and telling how ill I have been, for the ulceration I feared came after all and I am so weakened that I cannot now get out of bed to help myself, and in consequence I get 2 falls off the bedstead - by the help of nourishment & stimulants I am unable today to write this - I was very glad to get your kind letter and to read about the recovery of your dear son Frank who I hope has not fallen back - I hope to that Elsie is getting on in India - all these accounts are very interesting and I am so gladdened by getting your letters - I got a letter two mails ago from another cousin Charles Archibald Julius telling one that Florence had sent him my letters to read & he gave me interesting accounts of his life & work - he told me he came home to settle in England in 1902 after having been in Australia for 35 years and married the daughter of Capt Sir Frederick Blagg (Hampton) of the Royal Artillery - I must acknowledge his letter while I am able to hold up - today you will make allowance for this dull letter - I also heard from Mrs Foster who was well & about writing you - when you write these of my dear cousin's who have been so good to me give them my love & Society if I do not get worse I will write them all in turn - I will look forward to receive a long letter from you - while here in bed unable to get up it will be so comforting to me. Dr Edmund Branch gave me a post card from Japan which he had forgotten he had - it will look too bad if one takes the trouble to write or take any interest in one, not to have that interest acknowledged - when able I will write & apologise - I must close this now dear cousin with much love I hope to write again but my strength is failing and only by good nourishment I can hold up.
Your affectionate cousin
Sarah A Julius.
tell me about little Judith also - you little know how happy I feel lying here & reading all the nice letters so full of sympathy & great comfort - ah where would I . . . . . have been able to keep up myself so with the hospital fare only - it may be God's will that I lie here & suffer all his will but his will be done - write soon - all interests me that you write

St Kitts Feb 18 1907
My dear loving Cousin (To Mrs Brewin)
How sweet your letters are to me - while I can hold up I will write to you as I hear a mail will be going out tomorrow - I suppose you have received all my letters by this, tho' I cannot remember the date of my last - I am sorry to tell you I am not able to get out of bed now, as the poison leg gives me so much pain - I think I told you that it came to ulceration just on my shin, but when I think of others suffering worse than that I am ashamed to complain - even today I am not lying back so low, but can sit up higher in rather recline in a more upright position than before & my leg . . . . . so bad - you can imagine the pain & restlessness it all gives one - I only slide down from the bed to the floor if reason? requires I feel very weak, but the nourishment I take . . . . . a warmth in my body & I receive 4 ounces of 3 star brandy daily - what a tiper! But dear cousin I cannot be grateful enough for my mercies not among the least is the love & sympathy of you all - a few days ago while feeling low spirited and weak I took up some of your letters amongst others - I do not destroy any letters just as I read them but keep them to read over and for reference - I read the letters which interest me much & I picture to myself the family circle - I am obliged to read the letters over for not knowing you all personally I sometimes forget who is who- I just received a letter from cousin Octavia on the 11th also full of interest & a photo of herself which she sent as I had once said how I would like a picture of some or all of my unknown relatives - you hold not a hope to me in your last received two days ago (I hear a mail is coming in tomorrow) that I may someday get a photo of yourself but Mrs Foster has told me you are bright & rosy & a nice companion so I know that much but would so value a likeness of you - try to send it. What a happy Xmas you all had - I think I could have enjoyed a bit of that nice turkey & and many of the other delicacies to - if it is so sweet on earth to mingle with each other what must it be when we meet in Heaven & trace all our happiness to Jesus - oh may we all meet above where this weary body will be for ever at rest & we all be free for ever from pain & sorrow - I am hoping before the mail comes to get a letter posted to you for I lost my chance in posting by the mail which bought your last (2 days ago) so I am able to reply to it - I am cheered very much and so glad to hear of the success of your collections - and also to know your dear George is well again - I hope you did not suffer from the extreme cold which I hear prevailed - even here it was very cold & and there was much sickness - I got a postcard from the doctor in whose care it was written at Xmas it came from Florence I think hoping I would spend a happy Xmas etc but the doctor forgot to give it to me for many days & when one takes the trouble to write you I am sure the letter should at least be acknowledged - the doctor has so much to do that he sometimes forgets to bring the letters - I am sure to get any directed me & not care of another - I am trying to sit up as long as I can for the bed keeps me to confined yet I am very weak & it seems as if I require a plenty of nourishment - I use a quantity of ointment & my sheets suffer - I have 2 now until it for anything else, but to rest my leg in & I used to take a pride in my nightgowns looking nice & white & my sheets nice but now I cannot help for it - when I received the kind donations from you all I firstly what I thought . . . . . for quiet illness, but the ointment has made my bed gowns wetn? bad - I trust to get another letter soon from you telling me about Ann? & all your doing - it is a comfort and pleasure to look forward to each coming mail - the very anticipation is cheering and dear cousin as you say I must tell you everything exactly I don't know how to ask after such generosity & loving kindness but every little contribution among you all will help me to get some & better things than the hospital affords & now I can only lie & trust in the same saviour who has helped me all along
Write soon accept my love and thanks for all your sincere regard and I will look out to hear as usual from you.
Your sincere cousin
Sarah A Julius


St Kitts March 19 1907
My dear cousin Florrie
Your dear little letter of Feb 19th came to hand on the 16th of this month & it made me happy to read your sweet words of love & sympathy. I am glad to know you are well, you must tell me in your next about your children & their work - Thank God I am no worse but still suffering from a wound which was caused by a nail going up in my right heel - it was from a shoe & is still very painful - I do not have any pain thru my spinal affliction but great weariness at the back of my neck, more so, as I cannot hold up my head - I hardly sit up in a chair tho I bought a comfortable rocking chair when I had the means of getting what I required - I lie back all day at the side of my bed & read or write in that position - Mrs Mayne tho a great sufferer herself seems to think more of others than herself & try's to cheer one in every way that she thinks of - I have just got a little tin from her & her mother of a famous ointment called Zambok which is said to succeed in doing good when everything fails. I am afraid the doctor will not let me use it tho as he does not like his patients to use anything he does not recommend - but I will try him - how good Mrs Mayne is - may God bless her - Also her mother & Mrs Foster who do a great deal to comfort me - their letters are full of sympathy - I told Mrs Mayne how I suffer from cold outwardly and the doctor says it is because I have so little flesh on my bones - Mrs Mayne and mother sent me a nice warm cape & from them a woolen petticoat mouse colour - she seems to be a great lover of animals & cries against the awful practice of vivisection doing all in her power to help the anti vivisection cause - she has sent me a nice book on "The Future of Animals" got up by several great man which book ought to do good, as it proves from scripture that the animals are more endowed with souls & have more reason than we give them credit for - I am very fond of all from the very lowest one & united rather suffer myself then see any suffer - when I pray I never forget to say "have mercy on thy whole creatures" and we should all pray for the coming of Christ's Kingdom.
Now dear cousin how can I thank you enough for the kind help you sent from those who contributed so readily to my necessities - you among them - ah my dear cousin you little know the many requirements even here & some things only money can give. The very day I received your postal order I was hesitating about buying a soft pair of carpet slippers for tho I cannot walk since my heel & leg are so bad, yet I slide of the side of the bed sometimes on the floor to reach anything etc and I do not like my bare feet on the ground - I hesitated as I was on the last of my little hoard and I required something nice to eat as well - but when I remembered how God has come to me already in my extremity I said to myself "I will leave my concerns in his hands" - I was amazed when hardly 2 hours later Mr Dinzey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . me by the mail & I never even knew a mail was in - I received then yours enclosing L1 and letters from Mrs Brewin & others all full of sympathy - I have asked cousin Brewin to send me at anytime any dark skirt that may not be needed by her, or anything else which to one shut in so from the outer world would be of great use - Will you do the same if you can - what ever useful thing would be acceptable - we have had a great deal of cold weather here & colds and coughs, but our mercies are great when we think of Jamaica - Mrs Maynes mother has friends who have suffered there also, and up to now do not know to what extent she may still hear - You ask about the wife of some clergyman here whose maiden name was Edith Barry - I have tried to find out the Christian name of the wives here as though you do not know the clergyman's name, surname, yet "Edith Barry" would be a clue - it would be interesting if I found it out - lately a clergyman has had a wife from England, I think his name is Julian he is in the country, but will enquire further - Last month we had an exhibition here with prizes, of animals, plants, fruit & everything that was worth showing up - that it is only a late thing here & it may do some good in making people care their animals when they know they will get paid for their looking well - I am much pleased with the photo of yourself & daughter how much alike you & Octavia are - your photo puts me in mind of my sister Ruth - the very expression - how likenesses run in families. Now my dear Coz I am tired after such a long letter excuse bad writing at the end particularly - when I say this I call to mind a funny thing - I write letters here for nearly all who cannot write for themselves, but everyone makes me begin with these words "I write these few lines hoping to meet you in perfect state of health" etc and all thin letters end with the hand "nothing more to say excuse bad spelling & writing" every one ends so - they think the letter is not complete without that - . . . . . I wrote for a young woman a letter and I asked every time I write, what again? when I was done I asked the same question and she told me to say " excuse bad spelling & writing" - what I compliment to me? but the poor creature did not understand it so - . . . . . excuse my bad writing & spelling (?) write me soon again, you dont know how it cheers me
With much love
Your affectionate cousin
Sarah A Julius
I am sorry to hear of the death of Anna's father happy those who depart in Christ - I hope Ella continues well.

Sarah died 20 June 1907.

Research Notes:
Extract from Cayon Diary at SOG LON.
1807 Sarah Julius died 9 June.

Web site for St Kitts Genealogical information:
http://website.lineone.net/~stkittsnevis/stkittsrec.htm



186. Abraham Whitehouse JULIUS [761] (Charles James Fox97, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1843 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean and died in 1865 at age 22. The cause of his death was was heart disease.

General Notes:
Abraham was unmarried, he died suddenly four months before his mother in 1865.
Mentioned in letters from his sister Sarah

Research Notes:
MIDDLESEX SESSIONS OF THE PEACE: ADMINISTRATION
Catalogue Ref. MA
Middlesex Sessions of the Peace, c 1350-1889
SESSIONS COMMITTEES
County Licensing Committee - ref. MA/C/L
CONFIRMATION PAPERS 1880: ST JAMES DIVISION
FILE - John Julius Whitehouse: 12 Piccadilly - ref. MA/C/L/1880/51-52 [n.d.]

What is the significance of the Whitehouse name? 2005.

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