THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS Julius Family History

Descendants of John Julius of Nth Yarmouth & St Kitts


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418. Cecil Edrick Thomas GERAHTY [12860] (Digby Augustus Edward GERAHTY187, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 May 1884 in Queensland Aust. and died on 6 Jul 1972 in Hughenden Kennedy QLD at age 88.

General Notes:
In 1925 aged 41 Cecil's address was the Manfred Arms Hotel Julia Creek



Cecil married Myrtle Gwendoline PARKER [12861], daughter of PARKER [21255], on 26 Jul 1916 in Queensland Aust. Myrtle died in 1928.

Research Notes:
Images Courtesy Steven Wilder.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 665 M    i. Cecil Henry Francis GERAHTY [13546] was born in 1917 in Charters Towers QLD.

+ 666 F    ii. Mary Kathleen GERAHTY [21243] was born in 1919 in Charters Towers QLD and died in May 2006 at age 87.

+ 667 F    iii. Lilly GERAHTY [13632] was born in Charters Towers QLD.

+ 668 M    iv. William GERAHTY [21246] was born in 1928.


419. Francis Digby Newton GERAHTY [12862] (Digby Augustus Edward GERAHTY187, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1887 in Queensland Aust. and died on 26 Feb 1964 in Queensland Aust. at age 77.

General Notes:
Francis on 6 Jan 1915, aged 28 was living in Charters Towers, Queensland, and joined the Australia 2nd Light Horse Reg. 7th Reinforcement.

Research Notes:
Image Courtesy Steven Wilder.

Francis married Beatrice May HOBSON [12863] in 1921 in Queensland Aust.

420. Emily Jane GERAHTY [12864] (Digby Augustus Edward GERAHTY187, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 May 1892 in Normanton QLD. and died on 14 Nov 1985 in Charters Towers QLD at age 93.

General Notes:
Emily lived her life in Western Queensland caring for her 6 children and 2 grandchildren. One day in her garden she got something in her eye which blinded it, sometime later she also lost the sight of her other eye. Emily died at the aged persons home "Eventide" in Charters Towers QLD.

Memories of Granny Skinner from Claude Ernest Wilder her grandson.
My father died and Herb and myself were sent to live with Granny. Our father was only 22 years old when he died, the family home was sold to pay for all the expenses and we were sent off to Granny. As time went on Granny became blind and I was her sight. So I only had a fourth grade schooling and the kids used to rubbish me "Oh where's Granny today".
Granny spoke of Sweers Island in the Gulf where she was born. There was no electricity in the house until 1953 so things were very tough. She outlived two husbands and one son killed in the war and also her oldest daughter Biddy.
She spoke all the time of coming to Julia Creek in 1912, and her husband working at Mullungra, and later passed away in Eventide home in Charters Towers, where she is buried in the Lawn Cemetery.
C. Wilder 23 Jul 2012.



Emily married Herbert Christian WILDER [12866], son of Julius WILDER [12867] and Amanda Whilhelmine MIKKELSEN [12868], on 11 Mar 1913 in Queensland Aust. Herbert was born on 27 Dec 1891 in Queensland Aust. and died on 26 Oct 1928 in Queensland Aust. at age 36. The cause of his death was heart failure.

General Notes:

Herbert was a fencing contractor and teamster of Julia Creek Qld.

I (Albert N Wilder) was born on the 24th of July 1925 in Charters Towers. The reason for that was the family was living in Julia Creek but when one of us was to be born Mum always went to the Towers. Mum and Dad met there. I think they came to Julia Creek around 1912 or 14 and more or less used it as a base. Dad was a teamster, drover, fencing contractor. Mum used to go with him until there were too many kids. After 1922, when Herbie and Biddy started school, she stayed in town.
Dad would work at anything. When the council couldn't get a dunny carter he took that on for a while. He didn't have much schooling behind him and couldn't read or write, but he was learning. Towards the end he could write his own name.
He was Common Ranger when he died. I tell you what happened to him. He was on Mick Byrne's property, Wallacooloobie, wool pressing. There's a lever with a pawl on it that drives a ratchet mechanism. You push on the lever and the pawl presses the wool down. He had it just about down and the pawl broke, the lever sprang back and hit him under the heart. Well he was quite sick for awhile there, and he decided that we were all going to his brother's place for a holiday, a milk farm out from the Towers. At the Cape River a fella was bogged - it was all sandy roads. Dad had no tow rope so he gets out and helps push. He was a big powerful bloke. When we got to his brother's place he felt tired and went to have a lie down. They got tea ready and then Mum tried to wake him. He was dead. His heart was strained too much by pushing the car, plus the damage from the accident on Wallacooloobie. He's buried at Charters Towers. I was three 1828, yeah.
Mum was left with all us kids, Herbie, Biddy, Hilda, Clivey, myself and Donny - six kids. And then Pat, seven kids. She married Mick Skinner soon after Dad died. Mick was a navvy. He'd work at anything, anything at all, a bit like Dad. He started a little fruit shop in Julia Creek and did all right in that. They called him Mick but his name was Percy. He was a good bloke, too - treated us really well. It couldn't have been too long before he married Mum because Donny was a baby in arms. Eventually they had Pat, there only child. He's a half brother, Pat. He's a Skinner and we're all Wilder's.
Albert Norman Wilder


Children from this marriage were:

+ 669 F    i. Emily Frances Isobel WILDER [12874] .

+ 670 F    ii. Hilda Florence WILDER [12876] died on 20 Nov 1993 in Rockhampton QLD.

+ 671 M    iii. Clive Frederick WILDER [12877] was born in 1912 and died on 13 Sep 1943 in Killed in Action Lae Pacific at age 31.

+ 672 M    iv. Herbert Julius WILDER [12878] was born on 25 Sep 1913 in Charters Towers QLD and died on 17 Feb 1937 in Cloncurry QLD at age 23.

+ 673 M    v. Albert Norman WILDER [12880] was born on 24 Jul 1925 in Charters Towers QLD and died in 2009 in Townsville Qld. at age 84.


Emily next married Percy Harold SKINNER [12865], son of Alfred SKINNER [13365] and Alice Agnes ALLISON [13366], on 12 Jun 1931 in Queensland Aust. Mick was born in 1887 in Moree NSW. He was usually called Mick.

Research Notes:
Image Courtsey of Tank Sinker - https://sites.google.com/site/tanksinker/Home/max-burns-tanksinker

421. George Frederick GERAHTY [12869] (Digby Augustus Edward GERAHTY187, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Apr 1895 in Queensland Aust. and died on 9 Apr 1895 in Queensland Aust.

422. Julius E M GERAHTY [13624] (Julius Frederick GERAHTY192, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Dec 1888 in Ishtar Frederick St Ashfield.

423. Dudley GERAHTY [13625] (Julius Frederick GERAHTY192, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 6 Sep 1891 in Ishtar Ashfield NSW and died on 18 Sep 1891 in Ashfield NSW.

424. Beatrice Mary GERAHTY [13626] (Julius Frederick GERAHTY192, Augusta Louisa LOADER101, Lousia Caroline DARE72, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1893 in Ashfield NSW and died in 1937 in NSW Aust at age 44.

425. John St Felix DARE [20617] (Arthur St Felix DARE195, Hon. John Julius DARE E.C.105, John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 4 Jan 1906 in George Town British Guiana and died on 10 Feb 1996 in Fulham LND at age 90.

John married Doreen MALONE-LEE [1411], daughter of Dr MALONE-LEE [20614], on 9 Apr 1934 in George Town British Guiana.

General Notes:
Dare - Malone-Lee. On April 9 1934 at the Cathedral Georgetown British Guiana John only son of the late Arthur St Felix Dare and Mrs St Felix Dare British Guiana to Doreen only daughter of doctor and Mrs Malone-Lee 42 Bickenhall Mansions Gloucester Place London W
Times 1934

426. Margaret St Felix DARE [20667] (Arthur St Felix DARE195, Hon. John Julius DARE E.C.105, John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

427. Patience Noel DARE [20668] (Arthur St Felix DARE195, Hon. John Julius DARE E.C.105, John Julius DARE74, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

428. Barbara Clarabutt SKINNER [20632] (Blanche Sarah Waller SCOTT206, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 Apr 1900 in Thames Ditton SRY.

Barbara married Alan C F BRUCE [20633]. Alan was born about 1919 in England.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 674 F    i. Jean BRUCE [20634] was born in 1921.

429. Evelyn Humphris SCOTT [20640] (William Robert SCOTT207, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1898.

430. Ramsay Dare SCOTT [20641] (William Robert SCOTT207, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 21 Mar 1901 in MDX.

431. John Garrett SCOTT [20642] (William Robert SCOTT207, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1904 in England.

432. Ralph Maxwell SCOTT [20643] (William Robert SCOTT207, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1907 in England.

433. Hilma SCOTT [20648] (Walter Dare SCOTT209, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

434. Cicely Margaret SCOTT [20653] (Cecil Julius SCOTT211, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1912.

Cicely married DUNCAN [20654].

435. Hilary Blanche SCOTT [20655] (Cecil Julius SCOTT211, Blanch Emily DARE110, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1914.

Research Notes:
They had issue two sons.

Hilary married George Vere Francis LANCON [20656] on 1 Jun 1935. George was born in 1909.

436. Winifred Vesta ABELL [23309] (John Julius Dare ABELL217, Sarah Elizabeth DARE112, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born circa 1911 in Japan.

General Notes:
Winifred Vesta aged 11 is recorded as a passenger on the Empress of Asia from Yokohama Japan to Victoria British Columbia arriving 23 January 1922 enroute to London. She is described as born in Japan of Scotch (sic) ancestry religion Presbyterian .
Ancestry.

437. Phoebe Sarah ABELL [23310] (John Julius Dare ABELL217, Sarah Elizabeth DARE112, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Nov 1918 in Japan and was baptised on 19 Apr 1919 in All Saints Kobe Japan.

General Notes:
Phoebe Sarah Abell
Birth Date:11 Nov 1918
Baptism Date:19 Apr 1919
Baptism Place:Kobe, Japan
Event Type:Baptism
Father:John Julius Dare Abell
Mother:Vista Abell
RG 33: Foreign Registers and Returns, 1627-1960

Phoebe Sarah aged 3 is recorded as a passenger on the Empress of Asia from Yokohama Japan to Victoria British Columbia arriving 23 January 1922 enroute to London. She is described as born in Japan of Scotch (sic) ancestry religion Presbyterian.
Ancestry.

438. John Dare ABELL [20661] (John Julius Dare ABELL217, Sarah Elizabeth DARE112, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 Jun 1921 in Kobe Japan, was baptised on 30 Nov 1921 in All Saints Kobe Japan, and died on 20 Jun 2008 in Gympie Queensland at age 87.

General Notes:
John Dare Abell
Birth Date:8 Jun 1921
Baptism Date:30 Nov 1921
Baptism Place:Kobe, Japan
Event Type:Baptism
Father:John Julius Dare Abell
Mother:Vesta Abell
RG 33: Foreign Registers and Returns, 1627-1960

John aged 7mths is recorded as a passenger on the Empress of Asia from Yokohama Japan to Victoria British Columbia arriving 23 January 1922 enroute to London. He is described as born in Japan of Scotch (sic) ancestry religion Presbyterian .
Ancestry.

John is listed in the 1940 Navy List Royal Marines as a temporary lieutenant.

John aged 27 his wife Valerie aged 28 and son Geoffrey Dare Abell aged 2 are recorded as passengers on the Asturias departing Southampton 26 October 1948 for Sydney NSW. John is described as a shipping clerk, his address in Sydney is C/o Hurst Cowan Rd St Ives Sydney.
Ancestry

John married Pamela Dawn [23315]. Pamela was born in 1928.

John next married Valerie Marguerite C HURST [23311], daughter of Leslie Constant HURST [23312] and Margaret Rosalind KNOX [23313], Jun Qtr 1945 in Maidstone KEN. Valerie was born in 1920 in Tientsin China and died in Australia.

439. Hilda Isle ABELL [23314] (John Julius Dare ABELL217, Sarah Elizabeth DARE112, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born 1 Feb 1923 in Wandsworth LON.

440. Knowler NICHOLSON [5047] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

441. Whitworth B NICHOLSON [20665] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1897 in Yokohama Japan.

442. Field NICHOLSON [5046] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1900 in Yokohama Japan.

443. Winifred Mary NICHOLSON [5048] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1901 in Teighnmouth DEV.

444. Dorothy Patricia NICHOLSON [20666] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1902 in Teighnmouth DEV.

445. Mildred Joyce NICHOLSON [5045] (Winifred Maud ALLEN220, Annie Maria DARE113, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1908 in Bexhill SSX.

446. Flt/Lt Henry William Julius DARE [11100] (Alfred Julius DARE230, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1914 and died on 3 Aug 1943 aged about 29.

General Notes:
Dare - missing from Air Operations Aug 1943 Flt Lt., Henry William Julius Dare RAF VR (405 Sqd) Where ever you are most loving thoughts on your 30th birthday from Jean David Mother and Dad Hoping Always Any news gratefully received by Mrs Dare The Old Manor Colyford Devon
Ad: 3 Jun 1944 on Ancestry.

Ref http://lyons.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I4657&tree=T1&PHPSESSID=06946a84ee7d375dde7bdcbce892e1c9

Henry married Jean Rhoda WALCOTT [11101] on 29 Aug 1936 in Register Office, Battle, East Sussex, England. Jean was born on 2 Jan 1916 in Belknap, St. John's Park, St. Helens, Ryde, Isle of Wight.

447. Kenneth Barclay DARE [20629] (Alfred Julius DARE230, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1915 and died in 1915.

448. Damaris Primrose Lena DARE [20610] (Alfred Julius DARE230, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1918 and died in 2008 at age 90.

Damaris married Wing Cmdr Fulwar Rupert Craven FOWLE [20630]. Fulwar was born in 1912 and died in South Africa.

449. John Owen DARE [20615] (Alfred Julius DARE230, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Dec 1919 and died 1 Qtr 1997 in Thurlstone DEV at age 77.

General Notes:
1939 Register
Belmont Trevanion Road , Wadebridge R.D., Cornwall, England
John ODare13 Dec 1919Public Works Contractors Agent Single

John married COOMBS [20631].

450. Audrey DARE [11499] (Norman Fielden DARE231, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1920.

General Notes:
Audrey lives in the North Island of NZ

Audrey married MAYFIELD [11503].

451. Naomi DARE [20670] (Harold DARE232, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

452. George Harold Armine DARE [20612] (Harold DARE232, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Nov 1918 and died in 2010 at age 92.

453. John LOFTUS-TOTTENHAM [20625] (Marjorie Fielden DARE233, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

454. Michael LOFTUS-TOTTENHAM [20626] (Marjorie Fielden DARE233, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

455. Ralph LOFTUS-TOTTENHAM [20627] (Marjorie Fielden DARE233, Alfred Henry DARE115, George Julius DARE R.N.75, Louisa Caroline JULIUS40, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

456. Dr Mary Dorothea GILSON [1187] (Robert Cary GILSON239, Mary Anne QUILTER120, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 Oct 1892 in Harrow MDX, was baptised on 16 Nov 1892 in St Mary Harrow MDX, and died in Dec 1966 in Birmingham WAR at age 74.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, King Edwards School Headmasters House St Martin Birmingham. Mary is recorded as a daughter aged 8 born Harrow MDX

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Marston Green nr Birmingham. Mary Dorothea is recorded as a daughter single aged 18 a scholar born Harrow MDX

Mary married Dr Frederick Butwell WINFIELD MRCS LRCP OBE [10892], son of George F WINFIELD [5806] and Lucy Ann BUTWELL [6007], in Sep 1920 in District Meriden WAR. Frederick was baptised on 7 Feb 1892 in Solihull WAR and died in 1968 in Birmingham WAR at age 76.

General Notes:
NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, Frederick Butwell Winfield, of 23, Highfield Road, Edgbaston, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., and William Alexander Welsh, of 113, Lordswood Road, Harborne, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., carrying on the practice of General Medical Practitioners, at 23, Highfield Road, Edgbaston, and 113, Lordswood Road. Harborne, both in the city of Birmingham, under the style or firm of DRS. WINFIELD & WELSH, has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the 31st day of March, 1935. All debts due and owing to or by the late firm will be respectively received and paid by the said Frederick Butwell Winfield; the said practice will be carried on in the future by the said Frederick Butwell Winfield.
As witness our hands this 28th day of March, 1935.
WILLIAM ALEXANDER WELSH
F. B. WINFIELD.
Ref: THE LONDON GAZETTE, 5 APRIL, 1935 Pg 2387

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, The Square Solihull WAR. Frederick B is recorded as a son aged 9 born Solihull WAR

Children from this marriage were:

+ 675 F    i. Alison Lucy WINFIELD [8177] was born in 1922 in Birmingham WAR and died in 2014 in Haywards Heath Sussex at age 92.

+ 676 M    ii. Robert Newton WINFIELD [7365] was born on 12 Apr 1924 in Birmingham WAR and died on 10 Dec 2014 in Taunton SOM at age 90.

+ 677 F    iii. Jennifer WINFIELD [5493] was born in 1927.


457. Lieut Robert Quilter GILSON [1188] (Robert Cary GILSON239, Mary Anne QUILTER120, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 Oct 1893 in Harrow MDX, was baptised on 20 Dec 1893 in St Mary Harrow MDX, and died on 1 Jul 1916 in action France at age 22.

General Notes:
Robert Gilson was one of the many young men destined for greatness, whose lives of purpose, and promise, were cut short by the tragedy of WWI.

From a webpage posted on July 9, 2014. by librarysphinx publishing Robert's letters and images:
Gilson was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1912, a year behind fellow T.C.B.S.1 member Thomas Kenneth ("Tea Cake") Barnsley, and read Classics. When the War broke out in 1914, he decided to finish his undergraduate degree and trained as an officer alongside his studies through the Cambridge University O.T.C. Upon graduating with a First Class degree in the Classics Tripos Part I, Gilson was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the 11th Battalion Suffolk Regiment, known as the Cambridgeshires. The regiment deployed to France on 8 January, 1916.
At 7:30 AM on 1 July, 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, Gilson led his men over the top near La Boisselle. The German guns, which were supposed to have been destroyed by a week of heavy bombardment by British artillery, were still working. When the Cambridgeshires advanced, the German gunners, shaken but still alive and alert, opened fire. A fellow soldier reported that Gilson walked calmly and steadily forward in front of his men, taking charge briefly after his commanding officers fell, until he himself was killed by a shell burst. On that first day of the Somme, Gilson was only one of 6,380 casualties from 34th Division, the division that sustained the heaviest casualties on the deadliest day of fighting in British Military history.
We have a window into Gilson's brief life thanks to his prolific and eloquent letters to his school friends, family and his sweetheart, Estelle King, written from his time at Trinity College through to his last days on the Western front.
1. Tea Club and Barrovian Society, named after the Barrow Stores at King Edward's, where the group often met.
Ref: http://trinitycollegelibrarycambridge.wordpress.com/2014/07/09/wwi-gilson/

John Garth
Tolkien Studies
Volume 8, 2011
pp. 67-96 | 10.1353/tks.2011.0008
In Tolkien and the Great War, I dealt closely with the T.C.B.S., the circle of former schoolfriends who encouraged and critiqued Tolkien's early mythological writings from 1914. Among them, Robert Quilter Gilson played two crucial roles. In life, he was the social hub of the group. His death in the Battle of the Somme was a crisis that helped to catalyze and mature Tolkien's sense of creative purpose.
Ref: http://muse.jhu.edu/login?auth=0&type=summary&url=/journals/tolkien_studies/v008/8.garth01.html

Gilson Robert Quilter of Canterbury House Marston Green near Birmingham Lt 11th battalion Suffolk Regiment died 1 July 1916 in action in France Probate Birmingham 13 October 2 Mary Dorothea Gilson spinster Effects L710 2s 9d
Ref: National Probate Calendar.

Research Notes:
Image courtesy of Trinity College Cambridge.wordpress.com

Other Records

1. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, King Edwards School Headmasters House St Martin Birmingham. Robert is recorded as a son aged 7 born Harrow MDX

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Marston Green nr Birmingham. Robert Quilter is recorded as a son aged 17 unmarried a scholar born Harrow MDX

458. Hugh Cary GILSON [10889] (Robert Cary GILSON239, Mary Anne QUILTER120, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Jan 1910 in Marston Green nr Birmingham and died in 2000 in Teignbridge DEV at age 90.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Marston Green nr Birmingham. Hugh Cary is recorded as a son aged 9 months born Marston Green WAR

Hugh married Eileen TUNBRIDGE [9168]. Eileen was born in 1912 and died in 1999 at age 87.

Research Notes:
Ref: jane buck family tree <http://trees.ancestry.co.uk/tree/60590286/family?fpid=42058888074>

459. Dr John Cary GILSON CBE FRCP FFOM [10890] (Robert Cary GILSON239, Mary Anne QUILTER120, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Aug 1911 and died on 1 Dec 1989 in Honiton DEV at age 78.

John married Margaret WORTHINGTON [9355].

Research Notes:
Ref: jane buck family tree <http://trees.ancestry.co.uk/tree/60590286/family?fpid=42058888074>

460. Caroline GILSON [10891] (Robert Cary GILSON239, Mary Anne QUILTER120, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 1 Dec 1916.

461. Richard KNOWLES [10896] (Rev Cameron Quilter KNOWLES242, Katherine Ansilla QUILTER123, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

462. Brian KNOWLES [10897] (Rev Cameron Quilter KNOWLES242, Katherine Ansilla QUILTER123, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

463. Helen KNOWLES [10895] (Rev Maurice Mason KNOWLES243, Katherine Ansilla QUILTER123, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

464. Maria Vera QUILTER [10986] (Archdale Vere QUILTER244, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 1 Jun 1884 in Catwick YKS and died on 4 Jul 1947 in Los Angeles CA USA at age 63.

Maria married someone BENNINGER [10993].

Maria married William Wallace WOODWORTH [23524]. William was born on 25 May 1884 in Los Angeles CA USA.

465. Doris Russell QUILTER [1208] (Frederic Rowland Russell QUILTER247, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1900 in Battersea London SRY, was baptised on 7 Feb 1900 in Kempsey WOR, and died in Sep 1981 in Reg Exeter DEV at age 81.

General Notes:
Doris is believed to have married twice

Doris married Dr Gilbert Alfred BACK [10995], son of Herbert Hatfield BACK [24082] and Mabel Helen Graham [24083], 3 Qtr 1926 in Kensington LND. Gilbert was born on 17 Mar 1892 in Reepham NFK, was baptised on 13 Apr 1892 in Reepham NFK, and died in Dec 1975 in Reg Fulham LND at age 83.

466. Ruth Heap QUILTER [10902] (Hugh Henry QUILTER253, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 May 1907 in St Pancras Camden Town LON and died in Mar 1983 in Lincoln LIN at age 75.

General Notes:
1939 Register
Rose-Dene , Grantham M.B., Lincolnshire (Parts of Kesteven), England.
Ruth H Quilter 26 May 1907 single Unpaid Domestic Duties



467. John Frederick Rowland HILL C.M.G. [8327] (Mary Agnes QUILTER254, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1905 in Cairo Egypt, died in 1991 in Perth WA at age 86, and was buried in Guildford Cemetery WA. He was usually called Jack.

General Notes:
HILL, John Frederick Rowland, CMG 1955; B 20 April 1905 to Judge William Henry Hill; m 1930, Phyllys Esme (nee Fryer) one s two d. Educ: Pinewood School, Farnborough; Marlborough Coll; Lincoln Coll., Oxford. BA Oxon, Hon. Sc Jurisprudence, 1927; Cadet Colonial Civil Service, Tanganyika 1928; Asst. District Officer, 1930; District Officer, 1940, Deputy Provincial Commissioner, 1947; Provincial Commissioner, 1948; Sen. Provincial Commissioner, 1950; Mem. For Communications, Works and Development Planning, Tanganyika Govt, 1951-1956; Chairman Tanganyika Broadcasting Corp, and Director of Broadcasting 1956-57; Govt Liaison Officer, Freeport, Bahamas 1957-58; Supervisor of Elections, Zanzibar, 1959-60. Ref: Who's Who.

John was always known as Jack, he is remembered by his family below:

Memories of her father by Jennifer Hill 2012
Jack was born to Mary and William Hill on 20th April 1905 in Cairo, Egypt, in a house called Mason Alt Be. The family subsequently moved to Gezira, a fashionable island suburb on the Nile.
Jack was educated in England. He first attended Pinewood, a preparatory school in Farnborough, Hants, and then at the age of thirteen he was enrolled at Marlborough College in Wiltshire. Holidays were spent in both Guernsey and England until the First World War years (1914-1918) when all his holidays had of necessity to be spent in England only. After his school days, in 1924, Jack went up to Lincoln College, Oxford and following in his father's footsteps Jack read law. He was a keen sportsman, excelling particularly at hockey, cricket and tennis (he captained the Lincoln College XI in hockey and played a number of times for the University). He also played a lot of bridge.
Jack completed a course at Oxford University for aspiring colonial cadets, and was subsequently offered various postings in the Colonies such as Northern Rhodesia and Nigeria. He turned these offers down. Jack was very keen to work in East Africa, and when he was offered a position in Tanganyika he took it. He acquired the necessary uniforms and was ready to embark on his adventure into "darkest Africa." He sailed to Dar es Salaam, Tanganyika in May 1928 on the "Llandaff Castle." On arrival and disembarkation he was instructed to sail on the "Azania" to Lindi which was some 300 miles south of Dar es Salaam. Lindi was a typical small and remote Provincial Headquarters of the 1920's. Jack was assigned to be an Assistant to the District Officer, Walter Fryer, who later became his father-in-law. Walter Fryer had a daughter, Phyllys Esme, who was to marry Jack in Dar es Salaam on 27th June 1930.
Jack's first posting as a married man was to Kilwa, and their first child John Rowland was born on 19th December 1931 in the European Hospital, Dar es Salaam. His second child, Jennifer (Jenny) was born on 19th September, l933 in England while Jack and Phyllys were on overseas leave. Jack had many postings - Morogoro, Biharamulo, Ngara, Tabora (1936) and Kahama. He was in Kahama at the outbreak of the second World War in September 1939. He was 33 years old and considered to be of more use to Britain by serving as an Administrative Officer than by joining the Allied Forces. In 1940 Jack was promoted to District Commissioner of the Southern Highlands Rungwe District, the chief township being Tukuyu where the family were to live. Jack and Phyllys' third child, Patricia, was born in Tukuyu on August 27th 1942 and the family remained in Tukuyu until hostilities in Europe ceased in May 1945.
The family then took leave in Dar es Salaam while awaiting passage on a ship to UK. However, it proved impossible to return to UK by sea from Tanganyika as the only ships in those waters were overcrowded troop-ships ferrying servicemen back home. Jack finally made other arrangements for his family and he, accompanied by John and Jenny, took a trip down the Nile on a paddle steamer from Uganda to Khartoum in the Sudan, and from there by rail to Cairo, leaving Phyllys to fly from Nairobi to Cairo with baby Patricia. Jack and John obtained a passage on a troop-ship from Alexandria to Southampton: Phyllys, Jenny and Patricia flew to England in a 25 seater Dakota which was full of troops. The family were reunited in Sussex at the end of November 1945.
On returning to Tanganyika in 1946, and disembarking in Dar es Salaam Jack was posted to Moshi as District Commissioner. He was subsequently promoted to Provincial Commissioner and posted to Mbeya in the Southern Highlands Province. Jack was then posted to Tanga Province as Provincial Commissioner. In 1951 Jack Hill was promoted to Member for Communications, Works and Development Planning. In effect this meant that he was responsible for all communications and development works in the Territory, and was one of the top eight members of the Legislative Council of Government. This entailed living in the capital, Dar es Salaam during the governorship of Sir Edward Twining. Jack was presented with the CMG by Sir Twining three days after Jack's 50th birthday.
Jack Hill had spent most of his working adult life with the Colonial Civil Service (1928 to 1958) in Tanganyika Territory (now re-named Tanzania). After his initial retirement from the Colonial Service Jack was re-employed by the Colonial Office on a contract basis. He had the post of Chairman of the Tanganyika Broadcasting Corporation, and Director of Broadcasting in 1956 and was then posted to Freeport, Bahamas in 1957 as Government Liaison Officer. He returned to East Africa in 1959 to take up the post of Supervisor of Elections in Zanzibar in 1959; these were the first elections to take place on this island. When Jack finally retired he moved to England where he lived in Kent for a year with his wife, Phyllys, and younger daughter, Patricia. He, and Phyllys then moved to Guernsey. Jack and Phyllys emigrated from Guernsey to New Zealand in October 1975 and they settled in Whangarei where his daughter Patricia then lived. In 1985 Jack and Phyllys moved to Perth, Western Australia to live with their daughter, Jenny.
After a rich, full and adventurous life Jack died on 12th April 1991 in a Perth nursing home. He was 86. Jack is buried in Guildford a suburb of Perth, Western Australia.

Memories of Family Life and Quotes from his Father, by John Hill.
John Frederick Rowland Hill was born in a house called Mason Alt Be in the south part of Cairo, Egypt, he was always known as Jack Hill. Jack writes: "My early childhood was happy, not only because of the care and love my parents bestowed upon me, but also because they were living in comfortable circumstances. Their house facing Abdin Square where the Royal Palace was situated, had a vast marble floored hall and a wide marble staircase.There was a huge kitchen which L would raid with the aid of the Sudanese cook. My parents often entertained on what seemed to me a lavish scale, and from the top of that marble staircase l would surreptitiously watch the guests arriving, the men always in formal evening dress the ladies in long gowns and long white gloves. And then from the railed garden l would watch the soldiers changing guard at the palace. Sometimes there would be a full parade whilst at other times horse drawn carriages would arrive at the palace for some reception or other. I thought the soldiers very smart. And the mounted police, an elite corps, were splendid, mounted on grey or white Arab horses, and when there was a formal occasion they carried lancers pennants.

When l was about 6 years old we went to live in Gezira, a fashionable island suburb on the Nile. We had a tall featureless house, built l suppose during the early Victorian years, but it was cool and well appointed. And it was within easy walking distance of the Gezru Sporting Club. Amongst the multitude of facilities here was a large children's playground, and my sister and l spent many hours with friends here. It was here that I received my first cricket lessons from a vast Nubian called Sambo. About this time too l went to my first school, run by a Miss Quibel and my father began to teach me French using a bright pink book called, French without tears which started of with an exciting story about 'Jean a une plume' whereas 'Henri a un canif'. Most of the European children were in the charge of nannies, that worthy but now almost extinct breed of, women who played a large part in the lives of their charges. But I can only remember one of ours, called Bessie, who was short and buxom, but a kindly lass. Like many of her ilk, she was fond of the British soldiers and after many flirtations, married one.We then had a governess called Miss Dalton, a very severe, forbidding, stringy female. Once when l was suffering from some childish disease she retreated to her room with a supply of food and locked the door. She did not emerge for a number of days, and when she finally did, she was promptly dismissed. l had a number of friends, including my first girl friend who was American and several years older than me. We had lots of parties, and at one Christmas party Santa's clothes caught fire, and he was so severely burnt that he never recovered. l was so horrified that henceforth l would dread having any Santa Claus at a party.
I recall one occasion in early 1914 when a team of French aviators came to Cairo to give a display of flying.At Heliopolis we witnessed what was then the amazing feat of looping the loop. Then in the summer of that year, when I was 9 years old, my parents decided to send me to school in England because the standard of education in Cairo was not good enough!

John recalls what Marlborough College would have been like for his father: When Jack was 13 he went to Marlborough College. The college had a reputation of being a tough school, and that was true enough. The very environment of the school was harsh, and the most vivid recollection of his first few years there was the persistent and biting cold of the winter and Easter terms. There was never enough warmth. The only form of heating in the classrooms was open fires, and the more senior boys always got the best positions. When Shakespeare wrote, "and milk came frozen home in pail", he had not experienced the dormitories where the chamber pots under our beds were solid with yellow ice in the mornings. Jack was allocated a place in 'A' House, which was an evil looking dungeon of a place, 3 stories high and a basement, and the centre of the building was a large 'well' surrounded by high iron railings. These railings had been erected after an occasion when a boy, being tossed from one corner to the other, crashed down the well and was killed. It had the atmosphere of a prison. There were many official school rules which had to be learnt and obeyed, and there were a number of unofficial rules which required the same degree of obeisance. For instance, when one was in junior house, and 'A' house was one of these, one was not permitted to wear any sort of overcoat when walking outside, and another dictated that all one's coat buttons were done up at all times. Non compliance with any of the unwritten rules meant a punishment of some kind or another. One of these was running the gauntlet of wet knotted towels between a line of boys who banged you as hard as they could as you went by.
After a couple of terms in a Junior House one went on to a Senior House, and in the case of Jack this was C3. Here he would have been subjected to 'fagging', which, in effect, meant one was used as a slave to a more senior boy, generally a prefect. One was obliged to perform all kinds of duties, such as cleaning his shoes, making his bed, and such like.It was not too bad if one was allocated a decent sort of fellow, but as often as not the prefect used his new won power to bully the new junior, and in those days prefects were permitted to use the cane. But every boy went through this phase, and Jack wrote, "My time at Marlborough became progressively more pleasant. I passed my School Certificate - the equivalent of '0' levels - without difficulty, and progressed ultimately to the Classical Upper VI."Jack was also an excellent hockey player, and was a regular member of the school's 1st. XI, and Marlborough was, as often as not, reckoned to be the best hockey school in England. He was also an adequate cricketer and rugby player, getting his 2nd colours in both.

Jack's very best friend at school was Wilfred Fison, who later married Jack's cousin, Joyce Quilter. They remained the greatest of friends until Wilfred's untimely death in a controversial air crash.
Jack Hill went up to Lincoln College, Oxford, following in his father's footsteps in 1924. He decided to read law there (School of Jurisprudence). There is no doubt that he enjoyed his years at university. He made many very good friends, and had many diversions. He played a lot of bridge, something at which he was excellent, and he did a lot of sport. He excelled on the field of hockey, captained the Lincoln College XI, and played a number of times for the university, although he missed out on a 'blue'. He also played a lot of cricket and tennis during the summer months. It seems that during the first two years he spent rather too much time indulging in pleasurable pursuits, including much going out to theatres, concerts and suchlike, and in his third year he had to abandon this way of life and get down to some real hard work. He moved from his college rooms into digs , firstly in Walton Street, and then in Iffley Road. He wrote: "I worked nearly all day and every day, and late into the nights. His finals were due in the summer of 1927. At that time he wanted to be a barrister, and to enter this profession one needed a First Class degree. As it happened, his papers on all the facets of law were up to First Class standard except that his exam on international law was not. And so he was awarded, as the chairman of the professors said, a very good second! It was during Jack's time at Oxford that the General Strike occured. This started in May 926. Jack and three of his friends decided to join forces to help the Government prevent the country being paralysed. One of these friends owned a rather battered Austin 7. Jack wrote: "We decided to go to London. All went well until we got to Hammersmith where, with a last desperate cough, the little vehicle gave up. A rather hostile crowd gathered around and started to call us blacklegs and other unprintable insults. We eventually managed to get the little beast going again, and we went to the Junior Canton Club in Pall Mall, which had been turned into a recruiting centre. We were sworn in as special constables and were issued with batons and armlets. We were told to report for duty at the Nine Elms Goods depot, and here we joined a pretty motley looking band of men under the command of a senior officer of the Indian Police Force!" Their job was to protect the sheds and the wagons which contained a large quantity of whisky as well as other valuable material. There were a few skirmishes, and a little bit of blood spilt, but on the whole they had a fairly quiet time. The Government stood firm and resolute, and after 9 days the General Strike collapsed. Having got his degree, it was then time for Jack to branch out on a career. He had the opportunity of joining the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank, and although the lure of the Far East tempted him, he decided that banking would be far too boring. He decided to apply for an administrative job in the Colonial Office, with a preference for an East African territory. He was first offered Nigeria, and then Northern Rhodesia, but he turned these down, and was prepared to wait for a vacancy in East Africa. A vacancy in Tanganyika came up, and he took it. After having completed a course at Oxford University for aspiring colonial cadets, he acquired all the necessary uniforms and so on, and was ready for the adventure into 'darkest Africa'. A passage was booked on the Llandaff Castle, sailing in May 1928. Jack decided to join the ship at Marseilles, and went by train from London to Paris and thence to Marseilles.The ship called in at Genoa and Port Said, his first sight of Africa! After 2 weeks or so the Llandaff edged it's way at dawn through the twisted channel into the very picturesque Dar es salaam harbour. Jack wrote: "All seemed peaceful and still and just what I had imagined a perfect tropical scene to be. Soon we were to be transported by a sorrowful looking motorboat to shore, and then through customs. I took a rickshaw - no vehicular taxis available then - to the one and only hotel in town called the New Africa, which had been built by the Germans before the 1914-18 war. I was instructed to report immediately to the Secretariat, where I met the Chief Secretary, 2nd only to the Governor. He told me I was to be posted to the port of Lindi, some 300 miles south of Dar. "There is a sailing there this evening", declared the Chief Secretary, "make sure you don't miss it"My heavy baggage was still on board the Llandaff, and this had to be left there, until it could be transported at a later date to Lindi.

I wondered if my welcome in Lindi would be as indifferent. The vessel that took me to Lindi, the "Azania" was foul in the extreme, and the cabin I had was hardly bigger than a large dog's kennel.The weather was foul too, and we rocked and rolled for three days. At one point a lifeboat was smashed, the cabins were flooded and rails were twisted The food wasn't too good either, and goat was served as a main dish." "Lindi was a typical small and remote Provincial Headquarters of the 1920s.There were something like 50 Europeans, several hundred Indians, and about 5,000 local Africans. One extraordinary custom of the day was the carrying of personal calling cards. Everyone, men and women, had their own cards, and these were dropped off whenever one made a visit - and a visit to the more senior Government officials was a must for junior officers. At the Provincial Commissioner's house one always had to sign the Visitors Book! Within the Province were 6 or 7 Districts, each of which was about the size of Wales. I was assigned to be an assistant to Walter Fryer, who later became my father-in-law.

Jack wrote of his time in Lindi: "It was not a very exciting place. There was a library with 100 or so moulding books, and a tennis court with huge cracks in the asphalt surface. There was a 7 hole golf course with each hole varying in distance by only a few yards and broken in it's monotonous flatness by a few palm trees. The diet consisted mainly of fish and athletic chickens. Occasionally we would have some terribly tough beef or a bit of goat. Vegetables came in once a fortnight by a coastal vessel called the "Dumra", and when she was in harbour we would indulge in games of poker with the captain of the ship and a tough female who was known as "Rough House Rosie", who thought she was an outstanding player, but most of her play consisted of outrageous bluffs, My salary was L400 per annum, and this was more than enough for me to live on and enjoy myself, I paid my servant, Mbembe 30 shillings p.a. One learns quickly in Africa. Whilst on my first walking safari I got bitten on the toe by a scorpion which had got into my empty shoe at some time during the night. I had to perform an immediate operation which consisted of slicing the wound with a razor blade and putting in crystals of Potassium Permanganate. The poison had numbed my foot and had crept up the lower part of my leg l was in considerable pain, and I had almost decided to return back to base when the pain began to recede. Every morning for the next 3O years in Africa I always "emptied" my shoes every morning before I put them on, and I never encountered another scorpion in all that time. On another occasion whilst on a sisal estate I went to perform a major duty of nature in an outside "hole in the ground" enclosed in a corrugated iron shed. Chancing to look up I saw in the beams a snake. I froze. Should I pull my pants up slowly and carefully or at great speed and make a dash for the outside? I chose the latter and I performed the operation very fast indeed, which was just as well for the snake was a black mamba. Another time whilst on safari I had the most violent toothache, I was some 35 miles from Lindi, and decided to walk this in one day in order to get to the doctor (the nearest dentist was hundreds of miles away in Dar es salaam). I told the porters they could take two days to do the journey, but one of the porters who had quite a heavy load challenged me to beat him to the town. I accepted, and promised to give him double wages if he succeeded. I am quite sure that he would have beaten me if had not been for my toothache, but I only won by several hundred yards.I was amazed at his stamina, for he did not appear to be a particularly strong fellow. He got his double wages anyway! Some of the porters I encountered on safaris in Africa did have amazing stamina, and I remember one fellow who carried 2 x 4 gallon tins of petrol in a box (about 60 lbs in weight) for 60 miles in 2 days.

Jack's first posting as a married man was to Kilwa, which had the reputation of being quite the worst posting in the territory. It was here Jack had his initiation into administering an area in darkest Africa.He wrote of daily life: We had no radios, and mail came and went once a fortnight. Refrigerators did not exist and the only way we had of keeping water cool was by immersing bottles of boiled water into earthenware pots. Fresh food consisted of locally caught fish and athletic fowls which were abominably tough. Green vegetables were unobtainable except for the occasional spinach which arrived by ship. The butter was made from buffalo's milk in India, it was greasy and unsavoury and became rancid if kept for more than a few days.
With the exceptional heat and high humidity, I lost a lot of weight. The houses accommodating Government officials were old thick walled houses built by Arabs in bygone days. They had small rooms and uneven floors, but at least they were cool.My boss, the District Commissioner, was called Major, nicknamed the mad major. He was elderly and stupid and unfriendly, and he had an extremely uattractive wife. They never entertained or indulged in any sort of social activity. On the occasion of the visit of HMS Effingham to Kilwa Kisiwani he took absolutely no interest and it was left to the junior officers there to entertain and look after our guests Capt Fraser and his crew. We organised a football match and a dance with gramophone music and plenty of beer in the evening, but Major did not participate, or even make an appearance at any time. Capt Fraser, afterwards reported to the Governor that the station Kilowatt was an unhappy one, and the mad Majors days were numbered thereafter. We were in the period of the great depression, and there was little point in pleading for a better posting as there were strong rumours that there would be reductions in staff. In 1931 we all had a cut in salary of 5%, and this was never restored once times improved a year or two later.
Jack and Phyllys's first child was born on 19 December 1931 in the European Hospital, which overlooked the sea in Dar es salaam.
Jack was then posted to Morogoro, at the foot of the Uluguru mountains, he continues: This was a much more pleasant place. There were two banks in the town, and the European population must have numbered around 150. There were plenty of safaris to be done, both by road and on foot. One such foot safari was undertaken by Jack and Phyll, together with the newly born baby John. As soon as we started off the rains started! It rained all day and all night and all the next day. The rivers were becoming swollen, and one river we had to cross was almost chest high.
Some of the porters formed a human chain across while others carried Phyllys and baby John across in a hastily made "machela" a chair lashed to two bamboo poles. Not one load was dropped in that crossing, and we squelched on, sometimes ankle deep in red mud, the rain pouring incessantly until we reached the lonely mission station, which had just one Holy Ghost Father, named Father Gervase. He was the only white man for many miles around and he saw no other white man more than once or twice a year. The mission was a pleasant relief and we were able to dry out before going on the following day. One of my main reasons for this expedition was to undertake a survey on a prospective road, and I spent a few days doing this before returning.
Once again the heavens opened, and the Wami river was in flood and totally impassable. Some mission Fathers offered us their hospitality, and we gratefully accepted this as being more comfortable than being under canvas. The Holy Ghost Fathers were very good to us for four days until the floods abated.They gave us good food, plenty of Algerian wine, and every evening we played cards and pontoon. Most of those chaps were Irish. Whilst they would not play for money, they were quite happy to play for cigarettes, and more than once we ended a session with the Father Superior sitting there with a small pile of cigarettes in front of him. I have to say that during my time in Tanganyika I found that the Roman Catholic missionaries were in general far more liberal minded, practical, and worldly wise than their Protestant counterparts.
Jack was then posted to Biharamulo and it was there that the family acquired a young fox terrier called Juan. Juan had been owned by the previous District Commissioner, he became the most lovable and loyal of pets. Biharamulo was a very remote station in the western part of Tanganyika, and amongst the dozen or so Europeans there was a doctor named Wilson, known as hollow chest.

Jack continues: In 1933 my son John, then aged about 18 months, had a fall. He grazed and bruised his knee badly, but this didnt seem to be of any great significance and "Hollow chest" considered there was no cause for anxiety. But, as there was no improvement after a fortnight or so, I decided to get a second opinion from the nearest other
doctor at Bukoba, some 120 miles away.Off we went in my old Ford 'A' model. The medical officer there was not optimistic and suspected TB knee joint. He considered an X-ray was necessary, so off we went for another 200 miles to Kampala, the capital of Uganda. And whilst we received the utmost civility and attention from the hospital staff, it, the X-ray machine was an ancient model, and the plates were indifferent and inconclusive. However, the doctors did tentatively confirm the diagnosis as T.B. I was advised to take John to England for treatment, This was trouble indeed, for I was not nearly due for leave, and furthermore my wife was pregnant. However, I decided that the only course of action was to take John, then strapped from thigh to foot in cumbersome Thomas splint, to England by air.
The Government granted me 6 weeks leave, and even paid for half my return passage Phyllys went to her parents in Kenya. Once again we set of again from Biharamulo to Bukoba, where we caught a ship across Lake Victoria to Kisumu,and thence by a rather tired train to Nairobi in Kenya. We took to the air in an Imperial Airways Hercules class plane. This was a four engine bi-plane,very reliable and very comfortable, but oh so very slow Our average speed was 150 mph. We landed at Entebbe, and then on to Juba where we stopped the night in a very hot and stuffy hotel. Off we went to Khartoum the next day, stopping to refuel at one of the hottest places in Africa, Malakal. We spent our second night on the trip in Khartoum, and the hotel here, even with the bare minimum of air conditioning and refrigeration, was heaven compared to the previous one in Juba, The third day of flying was most strenuous, The plane developed engine trouble on the first hop - one engine had to be turned off because of oil leaks and we had to wait at Wadi Halfa for about two hours whilst repairs were carried out. We then hopped over to Luxor and then to Cairo, and finally we landed in the dark at Alexandria, where we spent the third night of our journey. At Alex we caught the Scorpio class Flying Boat, and by comparison with our previous plane, this was luxury, and there was even a small bar down some steps. Our first stop was Athens, and then Brindisi. Everyone was kindness itself - the aircrew, the other passengers, the hotel staff, all helped to entertain John, and take him of my hands, although he seemed to suffer less from fatigue than I did.There was no plane from Brindisi to London, possibly because planes did not attempt to cross the Alps in those days, and we were entrained in a comfortable wagon lit, in which we travelled overnight as far as Paris. We were now on our fifth
day of travelling and the last hop was by Hercules from Paris to London.I managed to get John admitted to the Wingfield-Morris Orthopaedic Hospital near Oxford where be received 8 months of the finest treatment available in England under the aegis of the eminent orthopaedic surgeon, Mr Girdlestone. The trouble turned out not to be a T.B. infection of the knee bone, but streptococcic trouble. After being discharged he stayed with my parents at "Ghyllmead" for another 6 months, until we were able to get back to England again on leave. One of the most difficult tasks was to teach young John to walk again because, for the whole of his time in hospital, his leg had been encased in plaster-of-paris.
The family returned to Tanganyika by sea.
I was then posted to be in charge of a district called Ngara, and part of this fell into Urundi. I spent two years in Ngara. There was one earth road leading to the next town, Biharamulo 120 miles away, and another earth road leading to the 'Belgian' frontier in the other direction. During the rainy season neither of these roads were passable, and so we were for all intents and purposes marooned for at least one month every year. Even in the dry season we had to cross the Mumwendo river on a jerry built ferry, consisting of a steel cable and a pontoon of oil drums with a few planks of wood lashed on top with wire. There was no telephone line, and communication by telegraph was not possible. Nor was there any airstrip. In fact there were only three cars and one lorry within a radius of 100 miles. My wife and I had for company (European) a rather dour agricultural officer, two Protestant missionaries a few miles away, and a few French Roman Catholic missionaries another few miles away in a different direction. Communications and relationships between these two factions was anything but congenial. And so one can see that we lived a very lonely life. After sunset we had our simple meal and read whatever was available, often over and over again, by the light of a paraffin lamp. It was very peaceful; very quiet. We didn't even have a radio, and the post came once a week by 'runner' from Biharauoulo Our house was sparsely furnished, and we didn't have a bathroom. To have a bath the servants would carry a large galvanised coffin like tub into the bedroom and fill this with hot water from the kitchen stove.
The conditions may have been pretty primitive, but the climate was excellent, and at night it was often cold enough to have a log fire.I suppose the one main worry we had was the lack of medical facilities and attention. There was a local dispensary under the charge of an African who, however worthy, knew little more than how to bandage wounds and administer Magnesium Sulphate to the sick!The nearest doctor was many miles away at a mission station in Belgian territory.
I loved the work, and most of the people amongst whom I had to work were charming and friendly. The Mwami (paramount chief) was 6'4" tall, witless, and suffered from syphilis. He did little to help his people. My main objective was to improve the cultivation, processing, and marketing of the coffee crop, and despite many obstacles this was a great success. I was fully stretched, for apart from the coffee enterprise, the usual administrative work had to be carried out, collecting taxes, supervising the Native Courts, keeping the accounts, acting as Postmaster and Customs officer, and administering justice when necessary, although crime was pretty insignificant.
I recall an occasion when there was a pride of lions roaming about, and having killed a number of cattle, had turned their attention to humans! Despite sending out trained game scouts, the killings continued. I went out myself but I could not trap them A few days later I heard that the pride, consisting of three adults and two cubs, had been surrounded in one village and that the elderly male lion had been shot in the flank by a poisoned arrow.The pride dispersed and no further killings were reported. Some time later, when I was at a meeting in that area, I was examining the tax register and I saw that one man had not paid his taxes for 4 years. I called him forward and asked him if the record was correct. He agreed it was. And when I asked him the reason for this he told me that his crops had failed. "For 4 years in succession?" I asked. When he could offer no further excuse, I told him that he would have to pay of his taxes by working on the roads. "Don't do that, someone in the crowd shouted, he is the man who shot the lion".So I pulled out twenty four shillings (4 years worth of taxes) from my pocket and met his debt for him.There was great applause and thanks from the crowd.
Our postal service was magnificent. This came once a week by runner from Biharamulo, and it was always on time. Our postman was Songoro, son of Bugoma, and he was a wonderful, tough, stocky little fellow who was as reliable as the setting of the sun. He always arrived at the same time every Sunday afternoon and we'd often walk out to meet him. He would run the 60 odd miles through rough game infested bush country, sleeping just one night in a small village en route. He always had with him a penny whistle on which he would blow many a cheerful tune as he ran, with his mail bag over one shoulder and an old German Mauser on the other. He was very proud of his work.I managed to get him a new pair of khaki shorts and shirt as a uniform, and on the shirt was the logo "Royal Mail" in bright red letters. There was no prouder postman in the British Empire, and no postman more reliable!
Ngara, having an international frontier, was designated a customs post. The traffic was negligible. But one day a lorry stopped. The driver was an Indian chappie, and he had on board 4 gallon tins of petrol packed into wooden boxes. The duty to be paid was very small and hardly worth bothering about, but I could not understand why he should be carrying such a load when the price of petrol at his destination was much the same and the supply there was plentiful.I instructed that the cases be opened, and after a dozen had been opened, and nothing out of the ordinary discovered, I began to wonder if l was making a fool of myself. But at last the secret was revealed, and there in front of us were many dozens of bottles of perfumes, and large quantities of liqueurs and spirits. They are all for my own consumption, the driver pleaded.Such are the rewards of being a customs officer amongst all my other duties!

In 1936 Jack Hill was posted to Tabora, the headquarters of the Western Province, which in itself was about the same size as England and Scotland put together. Tabora had been the centre of the old slave and ivory trade during the era when the Arabs controlled the routes during the 19th century.

Jack wrote that he was given the task of magisterial duties:
There was no trial by jury in the territory. For one thing, Africans had been accustomed to trial by the own chief or headman.
There was one case worth recounting. It concerned the prosecution of a Mohammedan missionary of the Ahmadyya sect, an unorthodox and comparatively modern breakaway from the more widely accepted Sunni and Shia schools. This fellow was one of those red hot zealots, a preacher of great eloquence, and almost fanatical about the righteousness of his cause. The Liwali (town headman) was an Arab, who was highly respected by all communities in the town, and was a strict Muslim of the Sunni persuasion. For some seemingly trivial reasons, feelings between the two of them began to get more tense, and finally flared up when Ahmadyya spat on the doorstep of the Liwali's house, and allegedly abused him verbally.The dignified restraint of the Liwali and the prompt action by the police, prevented what could have been a very ugly situation. The missionary was prosecuted in my court, and lawyers appeared for both sides. Several experts on the teachings of both sects were called as witnesses. The court was packed each day with several hundred Muslims in spotless white robes, and skull caps or turbans, some of them green indicating that they had been on a pilgrimage to Mecca, It seemed quite extraordinary that I a European, should be sitting in judgement on a case involving two Arab Muslims on a matter about their religion, in a court filled with Muslim spectators, in the very centre of East Africa. To conclude on this, I found the missionary guilty, and imposed a hefty fine, and although he appealed to the High Court, he was unsuccessful.

Jack was then sent to administer the Kahama District, situated in the middle of nowhere between Tobora and Mwanza on the shores of Lake Victoria. Apart from some White Father missionaries he was the only European in an area very nearly the size of Wales. There were about 95,000 Africans, and a few Indian and Somali traders. The whole area was very largely acacia bushland, and, although much of this bushland had been cleared, the Tsetse fly was a fatal enemy. Jack brought his wife, Phyllys, and their 2 children there, and as a youngster of about 5 or 6 years old at that time, I remember the house vividly. It was a typical house built for Europeans living in the bush, airy, spacy, with a long verandah running along the front.Jack had a Chevrolet car, which was silver in colour, and called "The silver bullet" and we loved going for rides in this. It had running boards along the sides upon which 4 gallon tins of petrol were strapped. We also got a Dik dik here, this being the smallest and most fragile of the antelope species, no bigger and more slender than a miniature poodle. It was not long before the Dik dik became house trained and he was often in the sitting room with Juan (the dog), and they became firm friends. Every morning at dawn we would let Juan out of the house and the Dik dik out of his sleeping quarters. Then began the chase. First the Dik dik would tear around the house with Juan in hot pursuit. And after three or four rounds the positions were reversed and Juan would be chased by the Dik dik. The two of them loved this early morning ritual."
John Hill - Jack had his work to keep him occupied, but I am sure my mother must have been very bored with life at times. Jenny and I had an ayah to look after our needs, and she was a gentle patient soul. There were no other children to play with, and few toys, but I recall no sadness or frustration because of this. I do remember having a large set of lead toy soldiers which I would set up along the low wall in the garden, and they did battle occasionally!

Jack writes about a few unusual happenings: One day I received a telegram with the warning: Massive swarm of locusts approaching from N.E. stop usual action taken. Not having experienced such an invasion before I replied, "what action?", and later came the reply, "nothing". Within a few days a huge cloud of locusts arrived late in the afternoon and settled in the township of Kahama.Everyone took a hand at swatting them or collecting them for food. Locusts are very palatable and nourishing if the legs and wings are removed. I tried some on toast and they weren't bad at all.
All the townsfolk took a hand at trying to control them, and I even let some of the convicts out of gaol to lend a hand.
To no avail, for the blighters soon ravaged the maize and other crops and laid the fields totally bare. It became apparent that some swarms would lay their eggs, and that myriads of hoppers would emerge within a week or so. We had to prepare. Everyone was told to arm themselves with sticks, even children and the infirm. I had to close the school, and this distressed the children immensely for, unlike English children, they loved their lessons. When the hoppers did eventually emerge, all hell let loose. Villagers by the hundred were flailing about with their sticks, and shouting, and singing and banging, and making as much commotion as they possibly could. We had already constructed
ditches in which to bury these hoppers, and although we filled these, the total of our efforts was not very significant. This battle of man versus locust went on day after day, and throughout each day in the hot sun, for nearly a month. It was tiring work and dispiriting too for the work seemed endless. We had slaughtered millions. And then at the end of this campaign we had to assess the damage, and try to put right what the locusts had damaged. One thing was certain. Food was going to be in short supply, and I had to arrange for relief supplies maize, cassava, and other stuff to be brought in urgently. People were beginning to go hungry, and if the emergency supplies were delayed at all, we could have a serious problem of malnutrition, illness, and even death from starvation. Not only did I have to get the food to the district in bulk, but we then had the job of distributing and rationing it.
In the 3 year period, when Jack Hill was the District Officer of Kahama there was one other mayor disaster when the rains failed and the crops dial not materialise. Famine resulted. Nearly every part of the district was affected, but in the worst areas, people were on the verge of starvation. As is always the case, the children and the elderly were suffering the most. Some of the specimens he saw were not in good shape at all their bones had started to stick out and bellies were becoming distended. There was a huge demand on the food supplies, not only as a result of the lack of rains, but also because much food had to be transported to feed the troops in Abysinnia. He eventually managed to get several train loads of maize to be transported from Kenya.
When the war between Britain and Germany broke out in September 1939, Jack Hill was 34 years old.His use to Britain was considered best served by his remaining as an administrative officer in Tanganyika. In the early part of 1940, Jack was promoted to a District Commissioner in the Southern Highlands District of Tukuyu. This was a vastly different sort of region to that of his previous posts. For one thing there was plenty of rainfall, the average being around 100 inchs p.a. The flat desert-like plains and thorn trees of Kahama gave way to a lush tropical forest environment, with hills and mountains, rivers and volcanic lakes. It was a very fertile region, thickly populated, and intensely cultivated with small coffee plantations and other indigenous crops. The principal tribe was the Wanyakusa, who were a gentle, intelligent., and progressive people. Their main diet was bananas.The big tea companies found the area very suitable far producing a high quality tea, and there were many tea plantations in the district. The most northern tip of Lake Nyasa formed the boundary with what was then Nyasaland (now Malawi), and all in all it was a very congenial location. Tukuyu itself was a pleasant spot. The Boma, administrative headquarters, was an old German built fort, a most solid construction painted white and displaying the Union Jack in a prominent position. The Hill bungalow was some 200 yards down the road so it was a very short walk to the office every morning at 7 o`clock. The bungalow, built in about 1919, was typical of the sort of living quarters built for Europeans in those days, large and rambling. It had an extensive verandah running along the front, and the rooms were very open and airy. Hot water for the antique bathroom was fed from an outside oil tank which was heated with firewood. There was a very large garden which extended for over half a mile down a steep and narrow valley until it merged with the natural forest. This was designed and built by the first British District Commissioner after World War I, a certain Major Wells. He planted trees and shrubs by the hundred, and had small rivers and lakes constructed. Being a true Irishman, he had a lake and at the end an island in the outline of Ireland, and it was here that he would take his afternoon siesta. He would get his servant to play gramophone records of Irish airs, and occasionally paddle the small canoe over with a supply of Guinness. The Hill's were not so cut off in Tukuyu, as they had been in their previous places, because there were, perhaps, a dozen or so Europeans living in the small town, nearly all Government officers of one kind or another, and there were other tea planters living in the outlying regions. There was even a 9 hole very hilly golf course. Jack was a steady 12 handicap golfer, and Phyllys took it up too. And there was a thatched roofed club house, not a big one, but there was a bar there, and it served as a meeting place for the Europeans in the area. There was also a tennis court adjacent to our house. Jack still had his 'Silver Bullet' Chevrolet, although this was later changed for a black Ford (American manufactured), and they still had the dog Juan. There was an occasion when a young lad, not employed by the family, but someone who accompanied me out shooting, stole my pen-knife. My father was not disposed to be lenient for this misdemeanour. He had the young lad taken into the open area of the kitchen section, and he was told to take down his pants and bend over. An assistant from the office gave the lad six of the best with a bamboo cane. I witnessed the punishment, which was taken without any fuss or noise, and off the lad went without a tear being spilt. Fair justice.

Below is a copy of a letter, so typical of a communication from a reasonably well educated African of the time (the 1940s) addressed to Jack Hill:
Kind Sir
On opening this epistle you will behold the words of a dejobbed person and a very bewifed and much childrenized gentlemen who was vilently dejobbed in a twinkling by your good self.
Fo heavans sake, Sir, consider this catastrophe as falling on your own head, and remind yourself on walking home at the moons end to five savage wives and sixteen veracious children with your pocket filled with non-existant L s d and a solitary sixpence, pity my horrible state when being dejobbed and proceeding with a heart and intestines filled with misery in this den of gloom, myself did contemplate greedily culpaple homicide, but him who protected Daniel (poet) safe through the lions den will protect his servant in his home of evil.
As to the reason given by yourself esquire for my dejobbed the incrimination was laziness.
Ho, Sir,It were impossible that myself who has pitched sixteen infant children into this vale of tears can have a lazy atom in his mortal frame and a sad departure of L11 has left me on the verge of destitution and despair.I hope this vision of horror will enrich your dreams this night and pulverize your heart of nether milestone so that you will awaken and with such alacrity as may be compatible with your personal safety will hasten to rejobulate your servant.
So note it be. Yours despairfully
Akuku Subash.

My father kept the letter and later wrote a short sequel:
Gentle reader do not sob
Poor Subash has got his job.
The District Commissioner's heart melted and
rejobulated him!!

Jack and Phyll went really up-market in Tukuyu for they had here a radio, which crackled and squirted all manner of noises. They would listen to the BBC Overseas Service relayed from Daventry, and especially the evening news bulletin at about 7 o'clock in the evening. They read a lot, and had Penguins books and Blackwoods magazines, and The Illustrated London News sent out regularly from England by Jack's father. Every half hour or so, Phyll would say, "Darling the light is getting a bit low", and Jack would respond with alacrity by getting up and pumping the paraffin lamp violently until it gave out a brighter light. Every Christmas day all the servants were given a decent present, and were invited into our lounge to listen to the King's Christmas day message, Bwana Kingi Georgi was there talking to them from the radio. They didn't understand one word of what he was saying, but they all had their eyes glued to the wooden box and sat there in complete silence. And at the end of the speech they all smiled, and got up and left quietly, having first said thanks to my father for allowing them the privilege of listening to 'their king'. They were simple nice folk.
The bungalow roof was of corrugated iron, and it was lovely to hear the rain beating down whilst lying in bed at night.
There was no such thing as a flush toilet, Jack called the lavatory the thunder box, a wooden box like arrangement with a hole below which went down a long way. Our meals were simple, but there was plenty of meat, especially chickens, which were very cheap. There was a good supply of oranges too, and tree tomatoes from which my mother made superb jam. Bananas were unbelievably cheap. One could get a whole bunch with something like 50 bananas onboard for 10 cents. Rice was plentiful and fresh fish would be brought up from lake Nyasa.
All the roads were rough untarmaced ones, and during the heavy rains, especially around April time, many of them became impassable. Many a time the car became stuck, and it is always something of amazement that within minutes of getting stuck, help would be at hand from the locals.They all helped to push the car, invariably got covered in mud doing so, but they always smiled and laughed, and in the end got a few cents for their time and trouble.Jack went on many safaris around the District - just to write briefly about one, for this is the one I accompanied him on when I was about 12 years old We would be driven down to Mwaya on the shores of Lake Nyasa by lorry, and this also carried the tents, food and other supplies. The next destination was a place called Matema which was across the lake some 15 miles away. The only feasible way to get there was by canoe, and two of them were hired together with a crew of six enthusiastic paddlers for each canoe. From the time the canoes set off until they reached Matema was constant rhythmic singing.Most of the words of these songs were made up by the leader as he went along. The songs were about their women folk, or the crops, and other day to day happenings and problems. They even made up one song about me. Once a month there was a large market held at Matema, and as we arrived along the long sandy shore there were about 100 other canoes drawn up in the sand. They had come from the many villages scattered along the shores of the lake.
These villages had the asset, rare in those parts, of having excellent clay for the making of pots.Every available canoe was filled to capacity with pots of every shape and size, those for use in cooking, others were water jars, there were beer jars, and cups and flat dishes, plain and decorated. It was a wonderful sight.And then from the villages around Matema itself, and indeed even further afield, people would bring produce, grain, beans, bananas, coffee, rice etc, and other commodities such as cloth and mirrors and torches. All the owners then had to wait for "the off' which was a loud blast on a cow horn given by the market master. Then the commotion began; some 500 people began negotiating
and trading, most of which was by barter rather than with an exchange of money. The noise was deafening, the excitement tremendous, After a couple of hours or so, all the trading had been completed, and the market master again blew his horn, this time to signal the close of business. Then plenty of beer was consumed, until finally all the canoes, loaded to capacity, set off to their homes across the lake in the dusk. It was a splendid sight as they paddled towards the setting sun.
By this time, the chief had arranged for an ox to be donated to my father. There were also many chickens and a goat delivered to our camp which had been set up 100 yards or so from the shore line.The next day was taken up with a 'baraza' (meeting with the chief and headmen to deal with any local problems, and for all the locals to come and try to sort out their own problems, such as quarrels over inheritances, divorces, etc etc.)It was a time for all the aspiring porters to be selected for the onward safari, Once selected they were assembled and given their instructions about what load each man was to carry, and in what order The procession was to take place.
They were told that the safari was to depart at daybreak. My father then presented them with the ox for their consumption that evening, and this was duly killed, cut up and roasted on a large spit. There was a lot of singing and good humour until about 9 o'clock when they suddenly 'disappeared' very quietly.
We were up well before dawn.The tents were taken down, and the loading up began. There were something like 25 porters, each with a load of about 4O-5O lbs. The tent itself was a large very heavy canvas affair, with a verandah and a bathroom unit attached to the main tent, and this required 6 porters. The cook was sent on ahead of the main party to find and establish a good place to stop for breakfast, perhaps an hour's walk ahead. My father had his shotgun at hand, and I always had my .22 rifle in case of anything interesting to have a pot at, I would never do that now. There was always a pack leader who would decide on what song was to be sung, and he would start the singing, and then the party would move off. For those who may have seen the 193O's Tarzan films, with their depiction of the safari, it will give you some idea of the flavour of such an event. We would walk between 16 and 2O miles a day, through pretty tough terrain for the area was hilly and quite densely forested in many places. It was always very hot around midday, and everyone would take a minimum 2 hour break,Setting up camp in the early evening and cooking on a large open fire was fun for a young lad of around 11 years old. Sometimes Jack would stop at a village and hold a small 'baraza'. I remember we stopped on the return to Tukuyu at Lake Masoko, which was a volcanic lake. The locals reckoned that there was no bottom and that in the centre of the lake was a whirlpool which would suck you down. The water was very cold indeed but calm, and was pleasant to have a swim after a long day's walk.At one point of the lake there were crocodiles, and I recall shooting at these with my .22
On one safari along this same route my father took his dog, Juan. Jack wrote: "On the second day Juan went on one of his forays which was quite normal. But when I whistled and he didn't return I became quite anxious, After some minutes of no response, l took some porters with me and we went to search. After a while we found Juan lying there gasping for breath. Nearby was a hole in the soil which was emitting a smell of sulphur. The dog seemed to me to be nigh unto death. We tried to revive him with water, but this had no significant effect. I carried him to a village about one mile away. I was at a complete loss as to what to do when the Headman of the village came to me telling me that they all knew about these sulphur springs, and that on one occasion some children had been overcome and had been cured by the village doctor, an elderly witch doctor. I was a very long way from any proper medical help. I told the headman that I thought that water might be the answer, and I sat for about one hour under a mango tree trying to revive himThere seemed to be no apparent improvement, so I asked the witch doctor if he could do anything."Oh yes" he said, "I can cure your dog with my medicine." l thought it worth a try. The old man went to his hut and returned with a calabash filled with a greyish powder. He mixed some of this with water and instructed me to put about a teaspoon of the mixture down Juan's throat every hour for three times. The old man told me that the dog would go to sleep and wake up recovered. To my surprise Juan did fall asleep, and gradually his breathing became easier. He slept for many hours, and when he awoke he managed a little wag of his stomp of a tail, and although he was still pretty weak I could tell that he was certainly improved. Within two days Juan had completely recovered.
The witch-doctor refused to accept any reward for his deed, and I never bothered to ask him what the medicine was, for I knew that I would either get no response at all or some fairy-tale about the ingredients of the concoction."
Jack was posted to Moshi, a town close to Mt Kilimanjaro.It is on the slopes of the mountain that the tribe the Wachagga lived. This tribe was probably the most advanced in Tanganyika. They were intelligent and well educated, and they were a relatively prosperous people as a result of the thriving coffee industry in the region.
They were a handsome people too, often with quite pale skins. The men were taller than the average Tanganyikan and the women were very beautiful.The tribe had the reputation of being well mannered and courteous, and Jack said it was a pleasure to work with and for them.From his writings it is clear that he enjoyed his time in Moshi.
In December 1951. Jack got promotion to Member for Communications, Works and Development Planning. In effect this meant that he was responsible for all communications and development in the territory, and was one of the top 8 members of the Government. This entailed living in Dar es salaam. They lived at one time in a house in Sea View, a lovely house overlooking the sea. He had a responsible position, but it was probably far less fun than being out in the field. He was now 45 years old, and his annual salary in 1956 was L3,100, which was quite a tidy sum in those days. In 1951 (19 July) he and Phyllys attended Their Majesties afternoon party in the gardens of Buckingham Palace. On 23 April 1955, 3 days after his 50th birthday, Jack Hill was presented with the C.M.G. (Companion of the Most Distinguished order of Saint Michael and Saint George) by Sir Edward Twining, the Governor.
At some time towards the end of 1956 Jack Hill must have retired from Government service, for in Janaury 1957 he was Chairman of the Tanganyikan Broadcasting Corporation. He was still only 51, and too young to put his feet up altogether.
In January 1957 Jack Hill accepted an appointment as the British Government Liason Officer for the Bahamas Government vis-a-vis the development of Freeport in that country. This was a completely fresh challenge in a part of the world he had never been to. The job sounded interesting and he was released without obligation from his position as Chairman of the T.B.C. He was supposed to start this new job in May 1957, but this was delayed and he eventually arrived with Phyll at the end of September. However, the development of Freeport was a long way behind schedule with the result that Jack had no duties to perform and was subjected largely to a life of enforced idleness. He was being paid for doing nothing. The situation was made worse by the fact that the accommodation they had been promised did not materialise either, and they were put into a small apartment in Freeport. This was noisy and uncomfortable and totally unsuitable. Furthermore, they did not enjoy the overall atmosphere of the Bahamas. It was far too Americanised for Jack & Phyll. I recall my father saying that everything seemed so loud and noisy and bright and brash, and that the only thing people seemed to have to talk about was money. Jack demanded to be released from his contract without penalty, and this was accepted by the Bahamas Government. Their stay there was not a congenial one.
In 1959 he was appointed as supervisor to the elections in Zanzibar, and I believe this post continued for a 2 year period.
In about 1961 Jack and Phyll returned to retire in England. They bought a pleasant detached house somewhere in Sussex, but they were never able to settle there. I believe that Jack was not able to cope with the cold wet winters, and so they moved to Guernsey about one year later. They had a superb house built there, with a large garden and fine views. The address was "Kisiwani", Les Huriaux, St Andrews. They eventually found this to be too large, especially the garden, and so they moved on 1 April 1969 to another smaller residence called 'Les Bruyeres', Clos du Petit Bois, Rue Cauchez, St Martins. They both enjoyed Guernsey. The climate was far more congenial, and they made some good friends there. Jack continued to play golf regularly, and they seemed certain to remain there for the rest of their lives.
However, in 1975 when Jack was 70 years old, they sold up and went off to New Zealand. Their daughter Pat (my younger sister) and her husband had recently emigrated there from Scotland, and they wanted to be close to her. Pat and Hamish had settled in Whangarei, and it is to this town in the North Island that Jack and Phyll went. They bought a modest house quite near the town centre, and within easy reach of the shops, the library, and other facilities.Then 10 years later they upped sticks' again, and went off to Perth in Western Australia where their elder daughter and family had settled from Kenya.
Jack died 12 April 1991, and after a moving family oriented non religious service was buried in Guildford, Perth



Jack married Phyllys Esme FRYER [9673], daughter of Walter FRYER [10948] and Elfrida Dora Maria (Ella) BURMESTER [10949], on 28 Jun 1930 in Dar es Salaam Tanganyika. Phyllys was born on 23 May 1911 in Johannesburgh South Africa and died on 10 Nov 1993 in Perth WA at age 82.

General Notes:
Phyllys was from South Africa with Irish /Danish/German ancestors, she came to Ashford High School Kent England for part of her education.

She married 28 Jun 1930 having just turned nineteen. It was described as a "fashionable wedding, the bride presenting as a picture of dainty prettiness in a gown of oyster satin made in the medieval style with a beautiful train lined with pink georgette and a flowing lace veil". Her mother was dressed in beige crepe de chine with a blue Bangkok hat. The Band of the Kings African Rifles played during the festivities, starting with The Last Stand, composed by Myddleton, and finishing with the Regimental March. Phyllys and Jack left on their honeymoon embarking on the mv Khalifi for Zanzibar where they joined the ss Madura en route for England, Phyllys was wearing a yellow flowered georgette outfit with shades of blue, a blue satin coatee with a yellow picture hat to match.

Her life then was closely bound to the support of her husband Jack in his successful career as a Civil Servant in Tanganyika East Africa, she had a knowledge of the challenges as her father was also a Civil Servant in East Africa.

Phyllys & Jack returned from their honeymoonhad to his posting in Kilwa-Kisiwani, noted as a difficult job, but there was a tennis court, a golf course and a freshwater swimming pool for their use. This would be little compensation for no radio, mail once every two weeks. Refrigerators did not exist, the only fresh food was locally caught fish, tough chickens and the occasional arrival by sea of green vegetables; butter was made from buffalo milk in India. there was a pit latrine. It was extremely hot in Kilwa with a very high humidity, but the thick walled houses were relatively cool, sleeping was under mosquito nets, lizards were encouraged in the house to eat the mosquitoes the cause of prevalent malaria. Life was tough for Phyllys but she was generally placid, happy and content.


Phyllys had a wonderful life but in 1990 suffered a stroke from which she never fully recovered.

Research Notes:


The child from this marriage was:

+ 678 M    i. John Rowland HILL [9674] was born on 19 Dec 1931 in Dar-es-Salaam Tanganyika and died on 11 Nov 2014 in England at age 82.


468. Monica Mary HILL [10932] (Mary Agnes QUILTER254, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Feb 1908 in Cairo Egypt and died on 17 Feb 1988 in Eastbourne SSX at age 80.

Monica married Lieut Col. Leslie William Watts MARRIOTT [10933] on 22 Apr 1930. Leslie was born on 12 Aug 1898 in Nottingham, died on 24 Jan 1990 in Seaforth SSX at age 91, and was cremated in Downs Crematorium Brighton..

General Notes:
Leslie served wirh the Essex Regiment


The child from this marriage was:

+ 679 M    i. Anthony John Crosby MARRIOTT [10934] was born on 17 Jan 1931 in St Marylebone LND MDX and died on 17 Apr 2014 in London at age 83.

469. Sylvia Mary QUILTER [1216] (Walter Vernet QUILTER255, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Feb 1902 in Guernsey Channel Is. and died in 1965 at age 63.

Sylvia married Dr Norman L WHITE F.R.C.S. [1217] 4 Qtr 1931 in Reg East Grinstead SSX. Norman died about 1967.

General Notes:
Norman was a gynaecologist of 15 Devonsire Plc., London. he resided at Silver Birches Bovingdon.

470. Joyce Valentin QUILTER [1218] (Walter Vernet QUILTER255, Rev Dr Frederick William QUILTER DD125, Arabella Maria JULIUS78, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Feb 1910.

General Notes:
Joyce sometime lived at Old Mill Cottage, Rue Poudreuse Guernsey



Joyce married Kenneth Wilfred Y FISON [1219]. Kenneth was born in 1905 and died on 8 Jan 1943 in action at age 38.

General Notes:
Kenneth was educated at Marlborough and John F R Hill was his best friend, he was a Cambridge hockey blue.

In WWII, he played an active part as a radio observer in the R,A.F. Volunteer Reserve. He was killed, as a passenger, in a night flight air crash on the 8 January 1943 in circumstances which indicated pilot error. After his death, a friend wrote in The Times : "His greatest happiness lay in the work he did for others. His enthusiasm and good fellowship were unbounded, and in all he did, he showed the breadth of vision and sympathetic understanding which only comes to those few who can learn from both life and reading."


The child from this marriage was:

+ 680 F    i. Susan Caroline FISON [10928] was born on 26 May 1936 and died on 6 May 1962 in Isle of Wight at age 25.

Joyce next married Hal DENNY [10913].

Joyce next married Alan OLDAKER [10926]. Alan was born in 1901.

471. Eric Aylmer VIVIAN [1330] (Ethel Maud VIVIAN260, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Aug 1890 in South Stoneham HAM and died on 21 Aug 1914 at Sea at age 24.

472. Kathleen Beryl VIVIAN [1331] (Ethel Maud VIVIAN260, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Aug 1890 in South Stoneham HAM and died in Mar 1956 at age 65.

Kathleen married someone Geoffrey Shuttleworth HOLDEN [11077] in Sep 1910 in Sheppy KEN. Geoffrey was born about 1886.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 681 M    i. Peter HOLDEN [11078] was born in 1911.

+ 682 F    ii. Patrica HOLDEN [11079] was born in 1916.

473. Cecil Ralphe Ennis VIVIAN [1332] (Ethel Maud VIVIAN260, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in Dec 1895 in Portsea Is. HAM.

Cecil married Evelyn MURRAY [11080] in 1920. Evelyn was born in Cahircireen, Co Kerry, Ireland.

General Notes:
This family is not proven


The child from this marriage was:

+ 683 F    i. Maureen VIVIAN [11081] was born in 1921 and died in 1921.

Cecil next married Peggy KNIGHT [1333].

474. Cyril Aylmer VIVIAN [1338] (Herbert Augustus VIVIAN262, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1893 in Miami Dade Florida USA and died in 1944 in Miami Florida USA at age 51.

Cyril married Helen Coffey [11069] on 17 Dec 1919. Helen was born on 15 Aug 1895 in Miami Dade Florida USA and died on 1 Jul 1981 in Miami Dade Florida USA at age 85.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 684 F    i. Muriel VIVIAN [11070] was born on 11 Oct 1921 in Miami Dade Florida USA.

+ 685 M    ii. John VIVIAN [11072] was born on 30 Jan 1930 in Miami Dade Florida USA and died on 4 Sep 2001 in Troy Oakland Michigan USA at age 71.

475. Herbert Archibald Aylmer VIVIAN [1339] (Herbert Augustus VIVIAN262, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Oct 1893 in Miami Dade Florida USA and died in Dec 1976 in Pennsylvania USA at age 83.

Herbert married someone Emma WILSON [11073] on 15 Jan 1917. Emma was born about 1894 in Florida USA and died in 1974 in Florida USA aged about 80.

476. Eileen Violet Beatrice VIVIAN [1340] (Herbert Augustus VIVIAN262, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Jul 1900 in Miami Dade Florida USA.

477. Rosemary NICHOLSON [1326] (Ethel Grace Madeline LAMBARD264, Ethel JULIUS134, George Charles M.D. (Dr)80, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

478. Cyril St John BATEMAN [574] (Guy Vivian BATEMAN276, Annie Ellen JULIUS137, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1909.

479. Winifred Alberta Ellen BATEMAN [575] (Guy Vivian BATEMAN276, Annie Ellen JULIUS137, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1911.

480. Charles Churchill JULIUS [579] (George Alfred (Dr Sir)277, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Oct 1899 in Freemantle W.A. and died on 13 Nov 1899 in Freemantle W.A.


481. Awdry Francis JULIUS [580] (George Alfred (Dr Sir)277, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Nov 1900 in Freemantle W.A., was baptised on 7 Dec 1900 in Freemantle W.A., died on 2 Nov 1989 in Wahroonga NSW AUS at age 88, and was buried on 6 Nov 1989 in Northern Suburbs Crematorium Sydney.

General Notes:
Julius Jottings June 1901 No 5.
We heard, too late for a last number, that George Alfred Julius (eldest son of Churchill Julius), who, in 1898, married Eva O'Connor, had a son and heir. He was born in November, 1900, a few days after the birth of a daughter of Mrs Cecil Wilson a sister of G. A. Julius.

Awdry came to Sydney in 1907, attended Sydney Grammar and Sydney University 1919-22, graduating as an electrical and mechanical engineer.

He worked in the USA for two years with General Electric Coy returning 1925, when he joined his fathers practice Julius Poole & Gibson in Sydney as a Consulting Engineer. Awdry became a partner in 1943, retiring in 1975.
He served his profession as a Foundation Member and Chairman of the Institute of Engineers (Aust), Council member of the Standards Assn of Aust, Foundation President of the Assn of Consulting Engineers (Aust), NSW Chapter Committee, Chairman of the Lift & Wiring Rules Committee, Chairman of the Automatic Totalisator Co.

Awdry and Agnes on the 28 Sep 1956 sailed from London on the Ruahine to Auckland. Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

He was the first holder of the Consulting Engineer Advancement Society of Aust. Silver Medal 1980.

Research Notes:
Alternative death date 27 Oct 1989



Awdry married Agnes Yolande Wood WANSEY [581] on 25 May 1926 in St Marks Sydney. Agnes was born on 25 Mar 1900, died on 21 Jun 1970 at age 70, and was buried in Northern Suburbs Crematorium Sydney.

General Notes:
JULIUS-WANSEY.
The wedding of Miss Agnes Yolande Wood Wansey, daughter of the late Oliver Wansey, of Waratah, Newcastle, and Mrs Wan- sey, of Darling Point, to Mr. Aubrey Francis Julius, son of Mr and Mrs G. A. Julius, of Darling Point, took place at St Mark's Church on Tuesday night. Canon Mather officiated, assisted by Canon Howard Lea. The bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr Dewar Wansey, was gowned in ivory satin and old lace. Her veil was lent by Mrs Julius She carried a bouquet of white hyacinths Her bridesmaids were the Misses Mary Wansey and Isabel Tooth (Bowral), Who wore frocks of peivouche blue, trimmed with maine velvet leaves They wore bandeaux to match, and carried mauve and pink flowers Mr Lawrence Nutter was the best man, and Dr. Whltesldes the groomsman Mr and Mrs. Julius lent their residence, Chollerton, for the reception, where Mrs, Wansey, who wore a black frock and hat, received the guests Mrs Julius wore black georgette with sequins and a black hat The honeymoon will be spent in a motor tour The bride travelled in an ensemble suit of cinnamon repp, with a hat to tone.
Ref: The Sydney Morning Herald Thu 17 Jun 1926


Children from this marriage were:

+ 686 F    i. Jenifer Mary JULIUS [582] was born on 17 Jul 1927 in Sydney NSW Australia.

+ 687 F    ii. Elizabeth Anne JULIUS [583] was born on 24 Mar 1929 in Sydney NSW Australia, died on 31 Mar 1991 in Sydney NSW Australia at age 62, and was buried in North Suburbs Crematorium.

Awdry next married Edna Mary DRANE (NEE THOMAS) [4455] in 1972. Edna was born in Feb 1917 in Aberdeen Scotland and died on 2 Oct 2008 at age 91.

General Notes:
Edna was of Wahroonga in 2008



482. Roderick Herbert JULIUS [586] (George Alfred (Dr Sir)277, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1904 in Freemantle W.A. and died in Jan 1939 in Katoomba Blue Mountains N.S.W. at age 35.

General Notes:
Roderick was schooled at Tudor House Moss Vale and Sydney C of E Grammar School. He worked as a car salesman, interested in aviation he obtained the agency for Taylor Cub Light Planes, forming Wings Pty Ltd, with Clarence Stumbles to train pilots on the aircraft. He travelled around Australia in these aeroplanes but was killed when he crashed flying over the Magalong Valley Narrow Neck Blue Mountains in fog. Roderick was aged 35 at his death.
Ref: Brian Conlon http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bconlon/adder.htm#top <http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bconlon/adder.htm

SIR GEORGE JULIUS' SON MARRIED.
The marriage of Mr. Roderick H. Julius, son of Sir George Julius, of Darling Point, and Miss Jessica Mack, daughter of Mr. Mack, K.C., was celebrated quietly at the Presbyterian Church, Wentworthville, on Tuesday afternoon. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. F. Barclay.
Sydney Morning Herald 3 Nov 1933

Early Disaster Light Plane Flight Around Australia
MACHINE CRASHES
SYDNEY, Wednesday.
Two young Sydney pilots, J. Clancy and H, Julius who left Mascot this morning in a light plane to fly around Australia, crashed at Old Bar aerodrome near Taree when taking off for Grafton. The plane was damaged but the pilots escaped serious Injury. The pilots plan to fly around Australia In their Taylor Cub cabin monoplane, one of the smallest light planes In Australia. They left Mascot at 7 a.m., and Intended to reach Brisbane tonight. Just after the plane left Old Bar a down current of alr struck the machine and It nose dived from a height of 20 feet, One of the wings was damaged, but both men were able to extricate themselves from the cabin. Julius received slight abrasions to the head, but Clancy escaped with a shaking, The plane will be shlpped to Sydney and reconditioned for another attempt.
Ref: Warwick Daily News (Qld) Thu 29 Jul 1937

"A BUMPY TRIP"
AROUND AUSTRALIA FLYERS.
Flying a small slngle-engined monoplane, with an engine rating ot 40 horse power, Messrs, R. H. Julius and J. C. Clancy arrived in Longreach yesterday afternoon on the third hop of their flight around Australia. The flight Is by way of demonstrating the utility of the light plane: its adaptability in Australian conditions and its capability of covering long distances. The plane left Sydney on Tuesday on its circuit of Australia and it is expected that a month will elapse before that city ls again reached. On Tuesday Brisbane was reached and the second day's journey was completed at Charleville. That town was left yesterday morning at 8.30 and it was 4.15 p.m. when the Longreach drome was reached. Landings were made en route at Tambo and Blackall. Very bumpy conditions have been encountered since the plane left Sydney. Yesterday's flight was particularly rough with heavy headwinds and a 15 degree drift on all day. Mr. Clancy told the "Leader" last night that the machine whilst behaving very well did a lot of bucking and at times was practically going sideways. The flyers expect to depart at 7.30 this morning and will spent to-night at Cloncurry. The route mapped out is by way of Darwin, Broome, Perth and then back to Adelaide. It is claimed by Mr. Julius that this machine, the Taylor Cub is the lowest powered plane to undertake the trip around Australia. It has a single engine with a rating of 40 horse power, the average cruising speed is 70 miles per hour and the range is 200 miles. For this flight the tank capacity has been doubled and the petrol load is now 16 gallons which will carry the plane 400 miles. The plane has a nicely fitted cabin with dual control and a wing span of 35 feet. Both Messrs. Julius and Clancy are pilots.
Ref: The Longreach Leader (Qld) Sat 11 Sep 1937

Penny-a-mile-Flyers To Speed Up In North-west
DARWIN. Thursday.
Continuing their penny-a-mile flight around Australia, J. Clancy and K. Julius, of Sydney, left Darwin for Katherine soon after daybreak today. The tanks in their tiny Taylor Cub monoplane were filled to their modest capacity of 16 gallons. Rather than risk trouble, the pair propose to cover the lonely north-west in the shortest possible stages.
Ref: The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld.) Fri 17 Sep 1937

ROUND AUSTRALIA ON 1d A MILE.
Julius and Clancy flying well.
Sir George Julius has received a telegram from his son Rod Julius, who with Jack Clancy is flying around Australia in a 40 h.p. Taylor Cub, stating that the airmen reached Port Headland from Broome yesterday , a day ahead of schedule.
Their machine carries only 10 gallons of petrol, and the flight has cost about 1d a mile.
The young Sydney airmen have completed the most difficult portion of the flight, across Northern Australia, and have covered 4000 of its 7600 miles. They are navigating by instruments and strip map and have had no engine trouble since leaving Sydney on September the 7th.

ROUND-AUSTRALIA FLIGHT.
To be Continued Tomorrow.
Unexpected delay in overhauling the engine of their Taylor Cub monoplane will prevent the departure of Messrs. R. H. Julius and J. Clancy from Maylands today on the remainder of their flight round Australia. It is now expected that the plane will leave tomorrow for Kalgoorlie, where the airmen hope to spend the night. By a coincidence, Mr. Julius was able to greet his father, Sir George Julius, at Maylands yesterday when the latter stepped from the airliner Bungana, on which he had flown from Adelaide. Sir George Julius is visiting Perth as an executive member of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in company with Professor A. C. V. Richardson, and his visit was planned after the departure of Mr. Julius from Sydney on his flight round Australia. Another passenger on the Bungana was Mr E. Wimperls, the British aeronautical scientist, who joined Sir George Julius in an interested examination of the diminutive aeroplane, which has already made a remarkable flight.
Sydney Morning Herald 1 Oct 1937

PENNY-A-MILE FLIERS
TRIP DELAYED
PERTH, Friday.
Because of the arrival by mail plane of Sir George Julius, father of Mr. R. H. Julius the departure of the aerial penny-a-milers
from Perth has been postponed until to-morrow morning.
Messrs R. H. Julius and J. Clancey, the Sydney fliers, have had their Taylor Club monoplane overhauled. They plan to land at Tammin, Southern Cross and Kalgoorlie on Saturday, Zanthus, Rawlinna, and Forrest on Sunday; Cook, Caloma and Ceduna
on Monday; and Port Pirie and Adelaide on Tuesday.
Ref: Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW) Fri 1 Oct 1937

FLIGHT COMPLETED.
Round Australia in Midget Plane.
SYDNEY, October 11.
R. Julius and J. Clancy, who left Sydney five weeks ago on a flight around Australia In a Taylor Cub monoplane, returned to Mascot to-day, having accomplished an 1000-mlle flight without mishap. The only mechanical dificulty experienced on the journey was an engine seizure near Roeburne (West Australia). when a forced landing was made without trouble.
Ref: Queensland Times (Ipswich Qld.) Tue 12 Oct 1937

PLANE HITS MOUNTAIN SIDE
Crash at Megalong Valley
ON FLIGHT TO AIR PAGEANT
SYDNEY, Monday.
With the bodies of two men lying in the wreckage, a plane was found on a rocky ledge, 100 feet above the Megalong Valley in the Blue Mountains this afternoon.
The plane, a tiny Piper Cub, had left the Kingsford Smith aerodrome on Saturday, bound for the Orange Air Pageant, and was flying low above the mist shrouded mountains when it crashed against a precipitous cliff.
The victims in the Blue Mountains crash were Roderick Julius, 33, son of Sir George Julius, and, Clarence Edward Stumbles, 32, of Bankstown.
About midday on Saturday, three brothers, - named Kirby, who live in the Megalong Valley, a famous tourist resort in the Blue Mountains, saw a yellow object on a narrow neck, but believing it to be the reflection of the sun on a wet rock they paid no attention to it.
This morning the object was still there and one of the brothers identified it as a wrecked plane through a pair of binoculars.
The three brothers and a man named McCarthy, traversed the rugged country to the spot where the plane crashed, and found the bodies of the two men in the wreckage.
The Kirby brothers remained at the plane while McCarthy returned to Katoomba and brought back a party of police and ambulance men. The journey took several hours. Sir George Julius travelled by car to Katoomba this evening.
When Julius and Stumbles took off from Mascot on Sunday morning a strong wind was blowing and flying conditions were difficult, but they were intent on reaching the pageant.
Last year Julius and another companion encircled Australia in a light plane.
Ref: Canberra Times 31 Jan 1939.

AIR CRASH MYSTERY
Was Machine Returning to Sydney?
PILOT CHANGED SEATS
SYDNEY Wednesday
The efforts of officials to check the movements of the Taylor Cub, in which Roderick Julius and Clarence Stumbles were killed when it crashed in the Megalong Valley on Saturday,
became more difficult to-day when it was found that Roderick Julius' body was found in the front seat, of the plane.
When the machine left Mascot aerodrome on Saturday for Orange, Mr. Colman, chief inspector of the Kingsford Smith Air Services asserts that Julius was in the back scat. It now seems certain that the flyers made a landing on their way to Orange, but no such landing has been reported.
The plane, had sufficient petrol for four hours flying when it took off, but evidence shows that it crashed nine hours after leaving the aerodrome.
From the position of the plane experts believe that the flyers were returning to Sydney when they crashed into the mountain. The fact that the throttle head had been torn back indicates that the pilot saw the mountain ahead shortly before the crash occurred.
Ref: Canberra Times 2 Feb 1939.
Clarence Stumbles was involved in Theatre as probably was Roderick - Ref B Conlon.

Other Records

1. Roderick Julius: Jul 1937, Old Bar NSW.
THE FLIGHT THAT FAILED
The smallest light cabin monoplane in Australia, a "Taylor Cub," known as the "Sterling," which crashed when leaving Old Bar, on the first leg of a proposed round Australia flight, piloted by two young Sydney airmen, Messrs. J. Clancy and H. Julius.
The pilot stated that the load was too heavy for the plane to clear some trees, and they decided to make a crash landing. The plane was fitted with a 40 h.p. motor, costing Id a mile to operate, and had a cruising speed of nearly 70 m.p.h. Mr Julius (with glasses) is shown discussing his flight with Mr. J. Beveridge, of the Shell Company. Shell spirit and oil were to have been used exclusively by the little aircraft in its flight.
Ref: Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW) Fri 30 Jul 1937


2. Round Australia Flight: 1937.
ROUND AUSTRALIA FLIGHT.
The above diagram shows the stopping places and distance of each "hop" on the route which Messrs. Rod Julius and Jack Clancy intend to follow in their flight around Australia in a Taylor Cub plane. Latest advices are that they plan to leave Sydney on Tuesday next. Their machine is a light monoplane, which will cost only one penny a mile to operate. They set out on a prevlous attempt on July; 28, but the machine crashed and was damaged at Old Bar.With an early start on Tuesday, the flyers hope to reach Brisbane by nightfall, after stops at Old Bar, Grafton, and Lismore. They probably will remain at. Archerfield all day on Wednesday, when the machine can be inspected, and will continue the flight on Thursday.
The airmen are not out to break speed records, for their light plane cruises at only 70 miles an hour. The route to be followed is for the most part along, recognised air services, and they expect to cover a distance of 7,300 miles in 29 days. Keeping to schedule they should reach Darwin on September 18; Perth on September 26, Adelaide on October 1, Melbourne on October 5, and Sydney on October 9.
Ref: The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld) Fri 3 Sep 1937

Roderick married Jessica K MACK [587] on 31 Oct 1933 in Wentworthville Presbyterian Church Sydney. Jessica was born in 1905 and died in 1936 at age 31.

483. George Yelverton (Pat) JULIUS [588] (George Alfred (Dr Sir)277, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1912 in Sydney NSW Australia and died in 2002 in NSW Aust at age 90.

General Notes:
George was educated at Tudor House Moss Vale and Sydney Grammer, he studied engineering at Sydney University

1943 Electoral Roll Wentworth Vaucluse: George was recorded as an engineer, of 48 Palmer St Rose Bay.
Ancestry

Famous Engineers Son Divorced
BASKED IN LOVE OF GIRL NAMED SUNNY
George Yelverton Julius, mechanical engineer, a son of famous consulting engineer, the late Sir George Julius, one-time engineer of the W.A. Govt. Railways, and inventor of the automatic totalisator, was divorced by his attractive wife Mrs. Daphne May Julius on the ground of misconduct with sheet- metal industry employe Sunny Foran.
Mrs. Julius said her husband was irresponsible, and always in debt. The normal hours of his homecomings ranged from 2 to 3 a.m. She also said he had "popped" her engagement ring for L30 and had then started in to take various other items, including household accoutre- ments, to "Uncle's". The honeymoon was spent at Kosciusko in 1940 and then for a period the young couple parked with Sir George at Darling Point. They set up house in Rose Bay and finally went to Gordon. Mrs. Julius said he was always borrowing money and was always out late at night. When I spoke to him about his late hours he said 'I will stay out if I want to. It has nothing to do with you. You mind your own business Then said Mrs. Julius she discovered that her husband was gadding about with a certain young lady. "I taxed him with this," said Mrs. Julius, "and he admitted it. He said her name was Sunny Foran. He showed me her photograph- she was in swimming costume- and said. 'Don't you think she's nice?' "He told me he was going to continue going out with her and I could not stop him. He told me he had meals at her place and said he liked going out with her friends." Julius left the home in November, 1945, telling his wife he was going to live at the Imperial Hotel, King's Cross. There, he said, he would be more free to go out with Sunny and her friends. Mrs. Julius said she later saw a telegram, and subsequently told her husband she knew he intended to go to Jenolan Caves for a weekend. "He just laughed," said Mrs. Jul- ius," and told me he had booked for 'Mr.and Mrs. Julius'." On December 16 last, accompanied by her sisters, Mrs. Punch, and Mrs. Crosby, Mrs. Julius went to the Caves House. She was inspecting the hotel register, where she saw in her husband's writing the entry "Mr and Mrs George Julius," when who should stroll down the stairs but George and Sunny. Said Mrs. Julius: "Surprised to see us.Pat?" apparently a nickname for George. Said George to Sunny in his most wintry manner: "We are not going to speak to these people." He tried to walk Sunny away, but Mrs. Punch observed: "This young lady is going to talk to us whether you like it or not." Sunny was asked whether she knew she was weekending with someone else's husband. Said that lass: "I did know he was married, but I thought he was getting his divorce. He told me he had been living apart from his wife for several years." She was told that George had two little daughters. "Oh," said Sunny, "he told me his wife had been married previously and that they were her's by that other marriage." With George, Sunny, who was wearing a wedding ring, was ordered to vacate the Caves House immedi- ately. The manageress had been present at the conversation and said she would not have them there any longer. She did not want a fuss. Mrs. Julius and her friends gave Sunny a lift as far as Mt. Victoria, leaving George to his own devices. In the car Sunny, according to Mrs. Julius and her sister, admitted she had slept with George the previous night and that adultery had been committed. Mr. Justice Calney found that Julius had committed misconduct and Mrs. Julius got her divorce and the custody of her two daughters.
Ref: Trove - Mirror Perth, WA : Saturday 31 August 1946

SENTENCED.FOR FALSE PRETENCES
SYDNEY. Monday.
George Yelverton Julius, 34, engineer, son of the late Sir George Julius, eminent engineer, was sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment at the Quarter Sessions to-day when he pleaded guilty to14 charges of having obtained money by false pretences.
Police evidence was that Julius had passed valueless cheques mostly among business acquaintances. Total amount covered by the 14 charges to which Julius pleaded guilty was L162 but the aggregate of his fraud amounted to L370.
Canberra Times 15 Oct 1946.

"DESIGNING" ENGINEER AND HOW!
George Yelverton Julius. One of the most bare-faced frauds in recent months was brought to light last week when George Yelverton Julius, 36-year-old Sydneysider, who described himself as a "designing" engineer (which he certainly was) appeared in the Police Court on a charge of having imposed on a widow.
JULIUS had evolved an easy way of making money, though not quite new. He advertised in a Brisbane newspaper for a housekeeper, met one applicant by appointment and a couple of days later phoned her saying he had lost his wallet containing L50. He asked for the loan until he got money from Sydney, but with Mrs Cynthia May Logan, a widow, this trick didn't succeed in its. entirety. According to the prosecutor (Sub Inspector Voigt,) Mrs. Logan applied for the house keeper job in a house at Ascot. She met Julius outside the G P.O., on August 20, where he engaged her and told her he. was temporarily staying at a city hotel. Two days later, added the prosecutor, Julius Informed the widow that a wallet containing L50 had been stolen from his hotel and would she lend him L10 to tide him over. She handed him the L10.
When on. August 24, Mrs Logan was due to take up her job with Julius she discovered that he had never been staying at the hotel, so she contacted the CIB. Julius was soon located and
L7 1s.0d odd of the widow's money found on him. Last week in court, the prosecutor said that Julius had been here from Sydney only since August 14. In October 1946 he had been convicted of 14 charges of false pretences and sent to gaol for 18 months.
Julius asked Mr. M. J. Hickey, SM, It he could make restitution of the money, saying he could get it from Sydney in 48 hours. The S.M. (to the prosecutor) : What chance has he? Prosecutor: None at all. He had made about a dozen more appointments to meet potential housekeepers when arrested. He had no house and no money and no hope. The SM sent Julius to prison for six months and ordered that the L7 10s found on him be repaid to Mrs Logan
Ref: Truth Brisbane, Qld : Sunday 28 August 1949

Mr. R. J. Coombe, S.M.
Bail Not Sought
George Yelverton Julius. 38, engineer, of. no fixed abode, was committed for trial on three counts. He did not apply for bail. The charges were that on August 23. at Gleneig. at the home of Oscar Valentine Roberts, he stole property valued in all at L242. On August 29 at Black Forest, he broke into the House of Ernest Edward Willcox. and stole property valued at L39 10/- On September 5 at Toorak Gardens, broke into the house of Mrs. Phyllis Ethelwyne Owen, and stole property valued at L80. A.P.P. Hender, prosecuting, said that most of the missing articles had been recovered.
The Advertiser Adelaide 18 Sep 1951

Law Courts.
George Yelverton Julius, 38, of no fixed abode, was sentenced to concurrent 12 month gaol terms on three admitted counts of house breaking at Glenelg. Black Forest, and Toorak Gardens, and larceny of property valued at about L350. Mr. E. Johnston made submissions for Julius, saying that partial restitution had been made, and full restitution would be made. Among the property stolen were private papers, which Julius took steps, by a letter, to return. Julius believed that it was that letter which had led to his apprehension, Mr. Johnston said. His Honor said that Julius's previous record left no option but a substantial penalty. If full restitution were made, that would be a circumstance to be taken into account by those whose responsibility it would be to say if the sentence should be served in full. The sentence was greatiy influenced by the return of the private papers.
The Advertiser Adelaide 20 Oct 1951

THE TIDY THIEF
ROBBED 150 HOMES
SHUTDOOR
A senior detective yesterday told the strange story of Gentleman George, illfated son of a world-famous engineer.
Sentencing George Yelverton Julius 46 on Friday to eight years gaol, Judge Amsberg declared him a habitual criminal.
The Judge said it would "take Shakespeare or a Zola to tell the tragedy of Julius's life" The detective told the Sun-Herald that engineering wizard Sir George Julius son of an Anglican Primate of NZ was only four months dead when police first picked up his son in 1946. Sir George first chairman of the CSIRO invented the totalizator . . . . .
His son studied design engineering at Sydney University. He tried to follow in his fathers footsteps and failed.
CHEQUES.
The detective said a Sydney factory employed George at $45 a week salary and $8 a week bonus. But in 1946 he was sentenced to 18 months for having passed valueless cheques. He took to stealing to make a living. On his own admission he committed 150 robberies since he shook himself free of his fathers shadow.
The detective said he knew of no other man in Australian criminal history with a housebreaking record to equal that of Julius. Police new him to be well educated, well spoken, neat and a man who carried his good upbring into his life of crime. Houses he robbed were always left in spotless order. He stole only money, radios, and jewellery which had ready value on the secondhand market. He always shut the front door tight when he left, "it was his trademark" the detective said. "Julius was a daytime operator he never worked at night. His technique was simple: knock at a surburban door and if the housewife was at home, he would say he was an insurance salesman or looking for a lodging. If the householder was out Julius slipped around the back. He put a bit of newspaper under the door, eased the key out of the lock, pulled the paper with the key from under the door, unlocked it and walked in. If no key was in the lock Julius would try to open the door with one of the keys he always carried. Only in the last resort would he force his way in through a window"
It was a day off last month for Detective Sergeant Fred Krahe and Detective Trevor Chaseling of the CIB Safe Squad. Driving in a private car they saw Julius walking near Peter's Corner Randwick in a midweek lunch hour. The detectives stopped. They said that in his pockets were 10 household back door keys and a hacksaw blade. The detective said Julius said he was on his way to carry out another robbery.
The detectives last words on the riddle of George Yelverton Julius: "He's a likeable fellow, charming, and easy to deal with. But he was a spoilt boy who always liked things easy"
Sydney Sun Herald c1954

Interview with Wendy Whitely (nee Julius)
ABC 6 Sept 2004
My father, George Yelverton Julius, was sent to jail for nicking Victa motor mowers when I was about 12 or 13, which announcement was made in the newspaper. Obviously, I was devastated. I didn't really know that much about him. Charismatic, apparently, and extremely charming, and women fell in love with him all over the place, but he mucked up a hell of a lot, and my mother basically threw him out when I was quite young. But somehow or other I identified with what I chose to think of as being his rebelliousness.
Ref http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2004/s1193966.htm

George was released from Goulburn Gaol in 1974, and his family lost contact with him. However in 2002 he was found to be living in Moruya, on the South West coast of NSW.
He died before any of his family renewed contact with him.



484. Alice Emily HANSELL [1498] (Mary (Polly) Ellen JULIUS279, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Mar 1908 in Wellington NZ and died on 1 Aug 1985 at age 77.

General Notes:
Bob Stewart remembers his Aunt Alice 2012
My Aunt and godmother, Alice was born 16 March 1908 in Wellington. Her schooling was at Chilton St James, Lower Hutt, where she, along with her sister Gwen, was a member of the first group of students at the school. Alice was Head Girl.
Alice graduated from Victoria University College, The University of New Zealand, with a B.A. in modern languages. There were few women graduates in those days.
Alice met her husband Walter when he was a Curate at St James Lower Hutt they had secret rendezvous meetings at the tennis courts. They married at St. James Church in 1931.
The ceremony was performed by Alice's grandfather Archbishop Julius, and the wedding reception was held at the Vicarage where guests were received by Arthur and Polly Hansell.
My Aunt Alice was a wonderful godmother, always remembering my birthday throughout my childhood, and showing a lively interest in me and my development. Alice worked side by side with her husband in many Parishes - Fairlie, Hokitika, St. Matthews, St. Albans, Oamaru, Island Bay, Ngaio and in Fiji. She used her considerable gifts and talents, for example on the Council and Executive of Mothers' Union, and Missionary Committee. She also played the organ and piano. Alice was a keen gardener. Matthew remembers that his mother used to take samples from her flower garden to transplant and nurture in the next garden during their various moves.



Alice married Rev Walter Ernest Detheridge DAVIES [1499], son of Frederick Detheridge DAVIES [19296] and Agnes Amelia Ottoline PRINS [19297], on 22 Apr 1930 in St James Lower Hutt Wellington NZ. Walter was born on 11 Oct 1904 in Colombo Ceylon. and died on 3 Jan 1967 in Wellington NZ at age 62.

General Notes:
Personal Memories by Dr Bob Stewart, great-grandson of Archbishop Churchill Julius. He was formerly Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Human Development of the University of the South Pacific in Fiji, and is now Executive Director of Scientific Journal Publishers Limited.

Walter Ernest Detheridge Davies (1904-1967) and Alice Emily Detheridge Davies (1908-1985):
Walter's wife Alice was the elder daughter of Arthur and Polly Hansell, and a Granddaughter of Archbishop Churchill Julius.
Rev. Walter Detheridge Davies, was born in Colombo, Ceylon on 11th October 1904 and was educated at Wesley and St. Clair Colleges there, and later at the Liverpool Institute Grammar School in England.
Before studying for ordination, Walter had an adventurous four and a half years at sea with the merchant service. His voyages took him to Mediterranean ports, the Far East, Africa, around the north of Russia and the United States and to most other parts of the world. He was once shipwrecked.
On May 22, 1922 the British ship on which Walter was serving, The Andree, was hit in the Delaware River in the USA by the then fastest passenger ship flying the American flag. The huge liner was trying to avoid a small rowboat, and hit the Andree, almost cutting it in half and driving it onto dry land.
Coming to New Zealand, he was for some years with the Public Works Department in the Civil Service in Wellington.
He trained for the Anglican ministry at St. John's Theological College, Auckland, and achieved grades 1-4 of the Board of Theological Studies. He was ordained deacon in 1928 and priest in 1929. He was Assistant Curate with Archdeacon Arthur Hansell at St. James Church, Lower Hutt 1928-1933.
My Aunt and godmother, Alice was born 16 March 1908 in Wellington. Her schooling was at Chilton St James, Lower Hutt, where she, along with her sister Gwen, was a member of the first group of students at the school. Alice was Head Girl.
Alice graduated from Victoria University College, The University of New Zealand, with a B.A. in modern languages. There were few women graduates in those days.
It was while he was a Curate at St. James, Lower Hutt, that Walter was to steal the heart of one of Arthur Hansell's daughters!
To get to know each other, Alice and Walter had secret rendezvous meetings at the tennis courts. They married at St. James Church in 1931.
The ceremony was performed by Alice's grandfather Archbishop Julius, and the wedding reception was held at the Vicarage where guests were received by Arthur and Mary Hansell. Gifts for the bride and groom were given by groups such as the Church Vestry, the parishioners, the Sunday School, the Young Men's Club and staff and students of Chilton St. James.
Alice was a loved mother of Margaret, Mary Joy, Matthew and John Barry, who tragically died at 22 months. Also she was grandmother of Penny, Judy, Diana, Richard, Andrew, Joanna, Philippa, Elizabeth, Susan and Rosemary, as well as a great grandmother. She was the matriarch of her family.
Alice worked side by side with her husband in many Parishes - Fairlie, Hokitika, St. Matthews, St. Albans, Oamaru, Island Bay, Ngaio and in Fiji. She used her considerable gifts and talents, for example on the Council and Executive of Mothers' Union, Missionary Committee. She also played the organ and piano.
Alice was a keen gardener. Matthew remembers that his mother used to take samples from her flower garden to transplant and nurture in the next garden during their various moves. Matthew also recalls that Walter grew vegetables which were a boon for the family's meals.
My Aunt Alice was a wonderful Godmother, always remembering my birthday throughout my childhood, and showing a lively interest in my development.
Walter was appointed Vicar of Fairlie, in the Mackenzie Country, in 1933, where his special gifts of engendering enthusiasm, resulted in the building of the Lake Tekapo Church of the Good Shepherd. During his time there the necessary finance was raised to build the remarkable church in its spectacular location beside Lake Tekapo. Many who helped to build the church were high-country shepherds from the slopes of the Southern Alps. The church has remained as a tourist attraction and very special centre of worship. Walter was widely recognised as a "Builder of Churches".
Its plate glass window acts as a reredos, and an inspiring view of the lake and mountains is enshrined. The foundation stone of this now famous church was laid by the then Duke of Gloucester, during his visit to New Zealand.
In 1935 Walter was appointed Vicar of Hokitika. While he was there the new Hokitika Parish Church was built. He was also Chaplain to the Hokitika Public Hospital and to the Mental Hospital. In 1937 he was appointed Vicar of St. Matthew's Church, St. Albans, Christchurch.
When Alice's grandfather died in 1938, Walter was appointed organiser of the Archbishop Julius Memorial Fund. The initial objective of the fund was to extend the chancel in the Christ Church Cathedral in Christchurch. The Prime Minister of the day, Rt. Hon M.J. Savage commended the memorial to all citizens of New Zealand. Walter argued that the pioneers of Canterbury had begun the Cathedral and the second generation had added the transepts.
He argued that it was now for the third generation to do its part in the enlargement of the chancel. Walter's efforts as organiser had yielded about 8000 Pounds.
Unfortunately the onset of the Second World War meant that the objectives of the fund had to be changed. Alterations to the Cathedral were finally carried out, including work on a lady chapel, better sound and lighting and a memorial to Churchill Julius. It is to be hoped that this memorial and others in the Cathedral can be retrieved safely after the recent major earthquake damage.
In 1938, he was made honorary Chaplain of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, New Zealand Division in Christchurch. He was also a chaplain to Toc H for ten years.
This was followed by a period as Acting Rector Pro-Cathedral, Suva, Fiji, and as chaplain to Bishop in Polynesia 1941-1942. In Fiji, Matthew (aged 3 at the time) remembers that he filled his father's petrol tank with water at a time when petrol was worth its weight in gold it was so scarce. His father explained very patiently the differences between petrol and water after he had drained the tank and salvaged the petrol. When there was a threat of the Japanese entering Fiji during the war, Margaret and Mary Joy were sent to New Zealand, and Alice, Walter and Matthew stayed behind.
Leaving Suva, Walter then resumed his position as Vicar of St. Matthew's in Christchurch until 1948. He served on the Standing committee for St. Margaret's College Trust Board; was Chairman of the Victory Memorial School Committee and Chairman of CORSO for the diocese of Christchurch in 1949. He was a Freemason for most of his adult life.
Walter was Vicar of Oamaru 1948-54. When in Oamaru, Matthew remembers making gun holsters and belts from leather sewed with his mother's Singer sewing machine. He recalls that there was never a scolding word spoken despite quite a number of broken needles! After starting at Christ's College, Matthew recalls that during one of their visits to Christchurch in 1952, a homemade pork pie went into the Avon River and sank like a stone much to the disappointment of a very interested duck. He said that his mother took this very well especially as it was her cooking.
Her nephew Rev. Winton Davies, described Alice as a special person and friend to many of us. 'She taught us how to accept challenges, to use humour to combat difficulties'. She had 'a wonderful searching, sharp mind, a delightful turn of phrase, marvellous use of words, a fund of anecdotes and stories'.
Walter became vicar of St Hilda's Church, Island Bay in 1954, and it was not long before St. Chad's Church was built in Houghton Valley and the Bata Shoe factory in Owhiro Bay was offered for church services. While he was vicar of Island Bay he made regular visits to the Sisters of the Catholic Home of Compassion, and the Salvation Army home for children - with an extra visit to the old people of the Presbyterian hostel. During Walter's time, the church suffered a minor fire which burned a hole through the side of the church. It was stopped by Fire Officers, and had been caused by a workman using a blowtorch to burn off old paintwork.
Walter was well known to many Wellington people through his work as secretary of the Wellington branch of the National Council of Churches, which he represented on the City Council public relations advisory committee. During the Festival of Wellington he was convenor of the festival's committee, and played a prominent part on committees associated with the New Zealand Billy Graham crusade in 1959.
In his last Parish appointment, Walter became vicar of Ngaio. After a long period of ill-health he was appointed chaplain of Arohata Girls' Borstal. Alice and Walter retired to their home in Raumati.
Walter died on 3 January 1967, and the funeral service was held at St. John's Anglican Church Paraparaumu Beach. Alice died on 1 Aug 1985, and the funeral service was held at St Andrew's Church in Palmerston North.

Research Notes:
DAVIES WALTER ERNEST DETHERIDGE
Born 11 Oct 1904 Colombo Ceylon [Sri Lanka]
Died 03 Jan 1967 age 62 Wellington
Son of Frederick Detheridge DAVIES an engineer in Ceylon
born 1879 Camberwell London died 12 Dec 1912 Ceylon
married 1901 Ceylon Agnes Amelia Ottoline PRINS born c1876 Ceylon died 1961 New Zealand
Married 22 Apr 1930 N.Z. Alice Emily HANSELL born 6 Mar 1908 died 01 Aug 1985 Palmerston Nth NZ. daughter of the Revd Arthur L HANSELL and Mary JULIUS
Education Liverpool Institute England Mar 1928 - Nov 1928 College of S John Evangelist Auckland grades IV Board of Theological Studies
30 Nov 1928 deacon Wellington
28 Jul 1929 priest Wellington
Positions:
seaman
30 Nov 1928-1933 assistant (to A L HANSELL) curate S James Lower Hutt diocese Wellington
24 Feb 1933 vicar Fairlie diocese Christchurch
09 Aug 1935-1937 vicar Hokitika
14 Feb 1936 rural dean Westland
30 Sep 1937 - 1948 vicar St Albans
1938 - 1939 organiser Archbishop JULIUS memorial fund Christchurch
Aug 1941 - 1942 acting rector pro-cathedral Suva and chaplain bishop in Polynesia
05 Oct 1943 permission to officiate diocese Wellington
1943 curate-in-charge Upper Hutt
1948 vicar S Alban Eastbourne
1948 - 1954 vicar Oamaru diocese Dunedin
1954 - 1962 vicar S Hilda Island Bay city and diocese Wellington
13 Dec 1962 vicar Ngaio
28 Jan 1965 honorary assistant curate parochial district Paraparaumu
Ref: BLAIN BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY of Anglican clergy in the South Pacific
http://anglicanhistory.org/nz/blain_directory/directory.pdf

Photo of Walter & Choir courtesy of John Shears. Jan. 2014.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 688 M    i. Matthew Grant DAVIES [4233] .

+ 689 M    ii. John Barry Hansell Dethridge DAVIES [5054] was born in 1934, died on 23 Jan 1936 at age 2, and was buried in Linwood Cemetery Christchurch.


485. Ethel Gwendolene (Gwen) HANSELL [1500] (Mary (Polly) Ellen JULIUS279, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Jul 1910 and died on 15 Oct 1995 at age 85.

General Notes:
A eulogy compiled and delivered by Bob Stewart [1704]

Ethel Gwendolen Cousins
10.7.10 - 15.10.95
Gwen was born in 1910 - a child of the Vicarage, and a younger sister to Alice. Her father was Vicar of St. James Church, Lower Hutt. She was educated at Chilton St. James School in Lower Hutt, and following her interest in art, went to Art School in Wellington, and taught at Marsden School in Karori, and Nga 'Tawa School in Marton. Some of her paintings have been collected for display in the Church Hall after the service for us to enjoy again over a cup of tea after the service.
In 1937 at the Student Christian Movement, she met a young man
Arnold who was a teacher at the Corrrespondence School in Wellington They became engaged and married.
They built a house at 23 Simla Crescent in Khandallah, and it wasn't
long before three children arrived; Robert, Michael and Mary. With an increasing family,a new dining room and extra bedroom were added to the house. Arnold used to travel in on the Railway Unit each day from the bottom of the road. Tragically Arnold was to have another battle with Hodgkins Disease, having had similar difficulties in early life. In those davs there was unfortunately no cure for the disease. Arnold eventually became bedridden,
An example shows Gwen's determination to find a silver lining when things were at their worst, and her encouraging nature. One of the children can remember being asked to take up their Dad's breakfast on a tray, An accident occurred on the staircase, the breakfast was dropped and the crockery broken. However Gwen managed to find one saucer still unbroken which she showed to comfort the sad child.
One day, Arnold was taken away in the ambulance for the last time and died on the way to the Hospital. Gwen was left a widow, still a young woman, with three small children, aged 7, 5 and 4 years.
The years to follow were to be a test of Gwen's courage and fierce determination to do the best by her children. With her warmth and strong sense of humour, she passed the test with flying colours! She knew loneliness at times, and was not well off financiallv, but she had enough for the essentials. As a single parent (before the term was invented!), she was always prudent, knowing how much her young children depended upon her.
When Grandfather Hansell died, she moved her faily to No 9 Homewood Crescent in Karori and her children went to Karori Main School. Bob can remember sitting as a family together in the sun in the North facing rear veranda with their small dog Jimmy. He can remember the warmth of the family, the humour that came from ordinary things. Gwen was willing to spend unlimited line time to listen to any of her children if they had something to talk about, a sorrow or a joy to share. A family saying was that she was not just a mother of pearl, but a mother of pearls.
Bob can remember family expeditions in the Austin Seven once a year to the beach. When the speedometer went over 30 mph, her children always remained as quiet as mice for fear that she would suddenly realise her excessive speed and slow down!
Gwen purchased the bright red Austin Seven, predominantly displayed in the window of Magnus Motors in Wellington, with some money that was left to her. The purchase of the beautiful red car somewhat shocked her father, who was perhaps concerned about the apparent extravagance of the younger generation. However he later somewhat reluctantly agreed to be driven around while sitting in the back seat. He appeared to evidence all the signs of enjoyment of this pursuit!
Gwen's life was to change when Ted came down from Feilding to take
her to a dance at Levin and Co in Wellington. She explained afterwards that they danced mainly at the Foxtrots! Ted and Gwen were to married at this very church in early 1953. Mum tackled the responsibilities of being a farmer's wife and looking after the farmhouse and garden with great energy. The children can remember being conscripted as workers in building a large concrete block wall which is still at "Hiamoe" today. Gwen had a lifetime passion and love for gardening, and had an enormous memory for the complicated Latin names of plants and shrubs.
Soon Robert Michael and Mary were joined by John, who was a lively addition to the household.
At Gwen's initiation, each of her children was a member of an organisation known as the Missionary Birthday Band. On their birthdays each of the children received a letter from a Miss Goodchild. The invitation was to respond to this with a letter of one's own and a small donation for Missionary work overseas.

One by one each of the four children went off to boarding school, and Gwen started her career as a devoted and supportive letter writer and sender of delicious cakes with thick icing and multi-coloured jubes covering the top, Gifts that were enormousIy welcomed, and were a young person's delight! Gwen used to get up specially early, in order to have the opportunity to concentrate on writing her letters. She also served as Secretary of the local Women's Institute, and worked on the minutes for the meetings with a great deal of care and attention.
Upon leaving school her children began to go their separate ways always delighted in letters and hearing all about what each was doing. When finally each was married, and grand children started to arrive, she was a loving and warmly loved Granny to Mary Ann, Hugh, Michael, Robert, Peter, David, Edmund, Julius and Guido. Christmas gatherings were particularly special. Gwen's delicious cooking, hosting the new families of her children, was legendary! Gwen kept up a wide correspondence with all her friends, particularly at Christmas.
Gwen was a particularly fond Aunt for Margaret, Mary Joy, John Barry
and Matthew, the children of Alice and Walter. She followed with great interest Walter and Alice's church career with their moves to various parishes.
Gwen all through her life was a keen collector of New Zealand postage stamps. She could point out particular stamps and the occasions on which she had been able to obtain them.
Particularly remembered by Gwen were her visits overseas. First as a very young women with her sister Alice and Mother and Father to Britain, and years later to attend Michael's wedding to Dee in the United States. Then later to Bob and Mary, at that time working in Fiji. She had a treasure trove of special things that she had collected over the years, which fascinated her children and her grandchildren. Very breakable., they were wisely kept in a glass cabinet!
Gwen had a very enquiring mind, and a particular interest in a wide range of Christian, philosophical and current interest matters. She was a committed Christian and keen church member. She was also very tolerant and broad minded, and in many ways time has vindicated the issues that she considered important. For example she was ahead of her time on issues concerning the environment. On the local scene she made a visit to the then Mayor of Feilding to determine what the Council was planning to do about recycling of refuse. She had a passionate concern for injustice, for example her support for anti-apartheid groups and organisations like the SPCA.
Gwen was a very, special person and will be greatly missed by her children, Bob, Michael, Mary and John, her grandchildren, Mary Ann, Hugh, Michael, Robert, Peter, David, Edmund, Julius and Guido; her daughters and sons in law, Mary, Dee, John and Toos; her nieces and nephews, Margaret, Mary Joy and Matthew; as well as all her many friends and other relatives, some of whom are not able to he here with us today.



Ethel married Robert Arnold STEWART [1501] on 22 Oct 1938 in St Mary Karori Wellimgton NZ. Robert was born on 7 Sep 1904 and died on 16 Aug 1946 at age 41.

General Notes:
Robert died aged 47, he was a teacher and taught at the NZ Correspondence School

Ethel next married Edmund (Ted) Frank COUSINS [4247] on 19 Jan 1953 in St John Fielding NZ.

486. Elizabeth Mary HANSELL [5055] (Mary (Polly) Ellen JULIUS279, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Aug 1914 and died on 6 Aug 1914. She was usually called Betty.


487. Jocelyn (Joy) Mary WILSON [1135] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1900 and died in NZ.

Jocelyn married Richard Strachan De Renzi HARMAN [1136], son of Richard James Strachan HARMAN [354], in 1932. Richard was born in 1896 and died in 1953 at age 57.

General Notes:
Richard Harman writes about his father in 2012.
Father was born 1896, Christ's College, Christchurch School of Fine Art 1915-6, in France as a scout 1917-8. Trained with two architects, Hurst Seager and Cecil Wood. Worked for newly established National Trust in England, about 1927-32, inspected decaying properties to advise on their state, historic relevance, value, cost of repair, etc before the Trust bought them. Designed the Church of the God Shepherd for Tekapo, 1935, other churches and some nice houses, had finished design of St Mark's Church Opawa and done sketches for widening the Christ's College chapel, and was well through designing Napier Cathedral when he died of pancreatic cancer.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 690 M    i. Martin Richard HARMAN [1137] was born in 1934 and died in 1934.


488. Frances Ethel Qona WILSON [1140] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 24 Jan 1903 in Norfolk Island.

Frances married Phillip Robert CLIFTON [1141] on 31 Aug 1929. Phillip was born on 6 Oct 1900.

General Notes:
Phillip was a West Australian farmer. His family also lived in WA


The child from this marriage was:

+ 691 M    i. Christopher George Phillip CLIFTON [1143] was born on 14 May 1934.

489. Joan Cecilia WILSON [1146] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1905 and died in 1906 in Norfolk Island. at age 1.


490. Alice Rosemary WILSON [1147] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1906. She was usually called Buddy.

Buddy married Richard Home STUDHOLME [1148] in 1927. Richard was born in 1901.

General Notes:
Richard and his family lived in England.



491. Lilian Awdry WILSON [1151] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Sep 1910 in Norfolk Island. and died on 28 Feb 1988 in Caloundra Qld. at age 77.

General Notes:
WEDDINGS
CROSS-WILSON.
A wedding of interest was celebrated at St. Saviour's Church, Sydenham, Christchurch, on Tuesday afternoon, when Lilian Audry Wilson, fourth daughter of the Bishop of Bunbury, Western Australia, and Mrs, Wilson, and granddaughter, of Archdeacon Julius, was married to the Rev. Christopher Francis Cross, third son of Mr. F. J. K. Cross and the Hon. Mrs. Cross, of Aston Tirrold Manor, Berkshire, England. Archbishop Julius performed the ceremony, and he was assisted by Dean Julius, the bride's uncle. Mr. Hoskin was the organist. The bride, who was escorted by her uncle, Mr. Percy Elworthy, wore a beautiful plainly cut frock of deep cream satin, with a loose front panel of old Honiton lace. Her beautiful bridal veil of old Honiton lace was held in place by a coronet of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of dark red tulips. The bridesmaids were two cousins of the bride, Miss Anne Elworthy (Timaru) and Miss Gwen, Hansell (Lower Hutt). They wore frocks of ivory ninon, patterned with large cornflower blue flowers and blue, shiny straw hats, and carried bouquets of blue violas. The best man was Mr. Roger Taylor, and Mr. Anthony Elworthy was groomsman. After the ceremony a reception was held at the Deanery. Mr. and Mrs. Cross will make their home at the Vicarage, Waihao Downs, where Mr. Cross is at present stationed.
The Evening Post 6 October 1932 Weddings.

2005 Rosemary Julius remembers Audrey Cross as a very nice woman.

Lilian married Rev Christopher Francis CROSS [1152], son of Francis John Kynaston CROSS [2070] and The Hon Elenor Mary PHILLIMORE [7155], on 4 Oct 1932 in St Saviours Sydenham Christchurch NZ. Christopher was born on 7 Mar 1902 in Aston Tirrold Berks and died on 28 Oct 1993 in Trebrown Gate Blunts COR at age 91.

General Notes:
Christopher was Vicar of Waihou Downs NZ then moved to England where he served in the Oxford, Northampton and Berkshire Dioceses.

He retired in about 1959 due to ill health.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 692 F    i. Philomel Daphne CROSS [1153] was born in 1933 in NZ and died in 1934 in NZ at age 1.

+ 693 M    ii. Michael Francis Cecil CROSS [1154] was born on 3 Sep 1934 in Waimate NZ and died on 2 Sep 1977 in Clyffe Pypard WIL at age 42.


492. Rev John Cecil Julius WILSON [1156] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Oct 1912 in Walkerville SA, died on 13 Feb 2009 in Cottesloe Perth WA at age 96, and was cremated on 16 Feb 2009 in Freemantle W.A.

General Notes:
John was vicar of St Lukes Havelock North NZ.

John writing in 1999 aged 87, says he was the Godson of Arthur Elworthy who gave him "a beautiful large English five pound note - the sight of it made one feel a millionaire. It came every birthday until the time I didn't write back and thank him - that was the last. I think I would have done the same"



John married Mary Winifred RICE [4350], daughter of Rev Eric Dudley RICE M.A. [14555] and Adelaide Maud SAMUEL [14556], in 1942 in Napier N.Z. Mary was born on 15 Sep 1915 in Tauranga N.Z..

The child from this marriage was:

+ 694 M    i. Vincent WILSON [4351] was born on 25 Aug 1943 in NZ and died in 1993 in Palmerston Nth NZ at age 50.


493. Rev David Churchill WILSON [1157] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Jun 1916 in Walkerville SA, died on 9 Jul 2009 in Midland Perth WA at age 93, and was cremated on 17 Jul 2009 in Karrakatta Cemetery. Another name for David was David Comber WILSON.

General Notes:
Memories of Her Father. Lexie Oldfield 2013
David left Adelaide with his family when he was 2 and moved to Bunbury when his father took up the position of Bishop in that Diocese. With his parents away a lot of the time - his father having to cover a large area in his ministry and never having learned to drive his wife, Ethel, drove him everywhere - the children were left at home with nurses and governesses. At 6 years old David was sent to an all-girls school which he hated, from there he went to Guildford Grammar in Perth which he also hated. He was terribly homesick and longed to be back in Bunbury.
Hoping to follow his father and older brother into the priesthood, he moved to Adelaide to study at St Barnabas College, however, he discovered that was not what he wanted to do and so before finishing his studies he moved back to Perth. He was ordained as a deacon which enabled him to take church services and perform other tasks within the church.
He was working at Christ Church in Claremont where Verna Ball was attending services. They married in 1943 and after having their first child moved to Denmark in the south west of WA to take up dairy farming. That was not successful financially and he had to find work elsewhere while Verna stayed on running the farm and bringing up four children. It was a hard and lonely existence for her.
In 1968 they moved to Perth and he took work at Chamberlain John Deere. He had several jobs before retiring. At about 70 years of age he decided to learn to play the piano and enjoyed the next few years learning and practising that.

He loved his family with all his heart, and had a good many friends who enjoyed his wonderful sense of humour. His greatest hobbies were cricket and classical music, particularly Beethoven and Gilbert & Sullivan. He also loved the English language and insisted on it being spoken properly. He was a talented craftsman when it came to making furniture and other things out of wood. Verna painted many oil paintings and David made the frames for them to go in. Some of the happiest moments in his life were spent pottering about in his shed and he missed it deeply when they had to sell up and move to a smaller unit when they were both in their 80s. David was only in the unit a few years when he became too frail for Verna to care for him and he moved into a hostel nearby. after breaking his hip he had to go into a nursing home. Once again he missed home, but his bright and positive personality seemed to keep him buoyed up and we rarely saw him unhappy. He endeared himself to all the staff at the home and he stayed there until his death in 2009.

Research Notes:
David was baptised and registered as David Comber Wilson but on the 8 Feb 1983 changed his name to David Churchill Wilson.



David married Verna E BALL [4354], daughter of Nathaniel BALL [12081] and Ester Dorothy PORTEOUS [12082], on 27 Feb 1843. Verna was born on 4 Dec 1920 in Tambellup WA.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 695 F    i. Natalie WILSON [4355] was born on 1 Nov 1945 in South Perth WA, died on 25 Dec 2003 in Shenton Park Perth WA at age 58, and was cremated on 31 Dec 2003 in Perth WA.


494. Michael Richard Varean WILSON [1158] (Alice Ethel JULIUS280, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 7 Aug 1919 and died on 30 Dec 1986 in Adelaide SA at age 67.

Michael married Margaret SMYTH-BLOOD [4358], daughter of John SMYTH-BLOOD [12079]. Margaret was born on 16 Oct 1916 in Adelaide SA and died on 20 Jul 1992 in Adelaide SA at age 75.

495. Edward (Ted) Stanley ELWORTHY [596] (Ella Caroline JULIUS281, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 8 Jul 1901 in Holme Station Sth Canty., died on 1 Dec 1986 in Christchurch NZ at age 85, and was buried in Woodbury Geraldine.

General Notes:
Ted farmed "Four Peaks" Geraldine for many years. He was a close friend of Harry Fenn of Maungati, they were both batchelors for many years

A Tribute to Ted and Dendorah Elworthy:
Ted and Dendorah must be remembered for their generosity and hospitality, always willing to share their home for every occasion which required more space than was available at the school. Both shared a love of music and they arranged many memorable evenings using their grand piano. Some notable Christchurch performers were invited and this made it a learning experience for everyone. On recalling an occasion when Dendorah had listened to a violin being played rather badly, she commented "this is not a violin, it is a vile din!"

Their religious beliefs played a large role in their lives. Concern for religious education in schools was mutual - Ted taking the Catholics in the shelter-shed and Dendorah the others in the school! Dendorah's valuable involvement in the Woodbury United Churches Guild, St Anne's Guild and the Vestry was widely recognized.

She loved people and her work for the Women's Division of Federated Farmers was honoured with life membership. Besides her continued interest in the Te Moana - Four Peaks W.D.F.F., she was an active member of the Geraldine Branch and also Provincial President from 1952 - 1957. The combined branches of W.D.F.F. honoured her memory by placing a garden seat in the Geraldine township, erecting a plaque and planting trees up the Te Moana Gorge. One of her most endearing qualities was a remarkable ability to laugh at herself, and this gift is what she will be remembered for.

She was a tireless worker for Red Cross and when others were inclined to say "We haven't the time", she would reply "But my dears we have a whole week".

Dendorah's love of her garden and for having masses of flowers for her huge arrangements (always with white or yellow "to give it light") was legendary. She was frequently asked to provide massive floral arrangements to enhance any occasion.

Ted's love of reading made an impression on everyone who knew him. He delighted in weighty, non fiction books. The Country Library Service van came to the district with a selection of books from which residents chose to provide reading for the next three months. Those on duty choosing the books knew that it was an important to select suitable literature for Ted. He was a very intelligent man and used every occasion to further his knowledge. This included even reading at school picnics! One delightful memory of him is seeing him drive a mob of sheep down through the Gorge on horse-back while still deeply engrossed in his book.

A wonderful story which people take delight in remembering is when the Elworthy family went to picnic on their own ground at The Poplars - a lovely and popular picnic spot up the Te Moana Gorge. They spread out the rugs and then were rudely told by other picnickers "Shift - that spot is being saved for others they shifted!" - and no mention was made of the fact that the ground was indeed their own property! As Dendorah said, let them enjoy it - we can come another day
Ref: A History of Four Peaks, NZSOG 2007

Research Notes:
Death date from daughter Celia, 1 Dec 1986, confirmed by a card from daughter Julia dated 28 Dec 1986, acknowledging a letter of condolence from the collator.



Edward married Denderah Heaton RHODES [597] in Nov 1933 in Hadlow Grange Timaru NZ. Denderah was born on 20 Oct 1911 in London., died on 5 Jul 1975 in Geraldine N.Z. at age 63, and was buried in Woodbury Geraldine.

General Notes:
Denderah came from a family of first settlers in South Canterbury NZ.

Denderah was much loved by all, and a generous hostess, Harry Fenn recalls with amusement the quip "A Denderah" which refered to a foodstuff found in a cake tin in an advanced state of mouldiness!

Research Notes:
Dates from Dendorah's daughter Celia.



496. Alice Rachel ELWORTHY [598] (Ella Caroline JULIUS281, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 May 1903, died in 1979 in Christchurch NZ at age 76, and was buried in Geraldine N.Z. She was usually called Rachel.

General Notes:
WOMEN IN PRINT.
The engagement is announced of Miss Rachel Elworthy, elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Elworthy (Holme Station, Timaru), and Mr. Hamilton Sinclair-Thomson, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Sinclair-Thomson (The Crossing, Geraldine), says the Christchurch "Press."
Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 100, 29 April 1924, Page 9

Wedding.
Sinclair-Thompson \endash Elworthy
A wedding of much interest was solemnised at St Mary's church yesterday afternoon, between Miss Rachel Elworthy, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs Arthur Elworthy (Holme Station Pareora), and Mr Hamilton Sinclair-Thompson, son of Mr and Mrs Sinclair-Thompson (The Crossing) Geraldine. The ceremony was performed by his Grace Archbishop Julius (grandfather of the bride), assisted by the Venerable Archdeacon J A Julius (the brides uncle). The church was most beautifully decorated with spring flowers and arum lilies. The service was fully choral with special choir, Mr Vine presiding at the organ.
The bride, who was given away by her father, looked very handsome in a beautiful frock of ivory and silver brocade with hanging side panels of silver tissue and long sleeves pointed over the wrists. The long court train of ivory georgette, embroidered in silver tissue roses on the left side, was finished with a very wideband of silver tissue. She wore also a Honiton lace veil (belonging to her mother), caught on each side with a tiny spray of orange blossom; and she carried a sheaf of arum lilies tied with silver ribbon. Silver shoes and stockings completed a charming toilet. The bridesmaids, Misses Betty and Margaret Elworthy, wore powder blue georgette, small hanging capes with hems outlined in silver, and embroidered in blue georgette roses, black Valenciennes hats trimmed with powder blue shaded roses, black satin shoes and silver stockings. Their bouquets were of anemones. The two tiny train bearers, Jose Neill and Margaret MacDonald, looked sweet in dainty petal frocks of powder blue georgette, edged with silver, silver sashes, shoes and socks, and wreaths of small blue flowers encircled their heads. Mr Ian McDonald was the best man and Mr Derrick Gould groomsman.
Reception at Home Station.
After the ceremony a large reception was held at home station. The house was fragrant with pink and white peach blossom, and a large marquee was decorated with cabbage trees greenery and ferns. The tables were arranged with white flowers.
Mrs Arthur Elworthy received her guests wearing a very charming frock of beige coloured georgette with tunic and panels of filet lace, and georgette sash, aged with sable; and cloche hat of beige brocade. She carried a beautiful bouquet of wallflowers. Mrs Sinclair-Thompson, frock and long cape of navy blue corded silk, navy hat with lace scarf, bouquet of exquisite pink flowers;

Rachel served in the W.A.A.F in WW II, as Air Officer Head of South Island NZ.



Rachel married John Hamilton SINCLAIR-THOMSON [599] in 1924. Ham was born on 9 Feb 1899 in Dunedin Otago NZ, died on 9 Nov 1989 in Christchurch NZ at age 90, and was buried in Geraldine N.Z. He was usually called Ham.

General Notes:
John was a sharebroker in Timaru.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 696 M    i. John Alastair SINCLAIR-THOMSON [600] was born on 8 Jan 1926 in Timaru N.Z., was baptised in Geraldine N.Z., and died in 2006 in Christchurch N Z at age 80.


497. Elisabeth (Betty) Mary ELWORTHY [602] (Ella Caroline JULIUS281, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Nov 1904 in Timaru N.Z., died on 21 Jun 1983 in Christchurch NZ at age 78, and was buried in St Peters Upper Riccarton ChCh.

General Notes:
Di Wilson describes Betty as her favourite cousin, she was an attractive, beautifully groomed woman with a great sense of fun.

Elisabeth married Derrick William Joseph GOULD [603] on 11 Dec 1924 in St Marys Timaru NZ. Derrick was born on 10 Oct 1900 in London..

General Notes:
Derrick was employed in the Stock & Station business in his family's company Pyne Gould Guinness. Supported by his wife he was very involved with the Canterbury Jockey Club.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 697 M    i. Arthur Humphrey GOULD [606] was born on 30 Aug 1927 in Christchurch NZ, was baptised on 25 Oct 1927 in St Barnabas Fendalton ChCh, and died on 19 Sep 2000 at age 73.


498. Commander John Churchill ELWORTHY R N [608] (Ella Caroline JULIUS281, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 15 Jan 1907, died on 23 Aug 1986 in Christchurch NZ at age 79, and was buried in Memorial plaque, All Saints Sumner.

General Notes:
John joined the Navy and trained at Dartmouth, was A.D.C. to Lord Bledisloe, Governor General to NZ. He retired from the Service to farm Richmond Hill and Scarborough Hill Sumner ChCh, then lived at Redcliffs. The Homestead at Richmond Hill burnt down in 1955.

John married Hester Mary HERRICK [609] on 7 Feb 1937 in Napier N.Z. Hester was born on 7 Jan 1910 in Hawkes Bay NZ.

General Notes:
WEDDINGS
ELWORTHY\emdash HERRICK
WELL-KNOWN FAMILIES
(From "The Post's" Representative.) NAPIER, This Day.
St. John's Cathedral, Napier, was the scene of a very beautiful wedding today, when Hester Mary, elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Herrick, Tautane, Hawke's Bay, was married to John Churchill, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Elworthy, Holme Station, Timaru. As both the bride and groom, are very popular members of the younger set, the wedding was a large one and friends came to Napier from all parts of New Zealand to be present. The ceremony was performed by the Bishop of Waiapu, Dean Brocklehurst assisting. Mr. Percy Tombs was at the organ and played Lohengrin's "Wedding March." The church was decorated with masses of hydrangeas in all art shades; the altar being done with roses.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kebbell (Alfredton), Mr. and Mrs. Charles Turrell (Wellington), Mr. and Mrs. Charles Birch (Wellington), Mrs. W. Turnbull (Wellington), Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Beetham, (Masterton), and Lieut.- Commander Fuller (Dunedin). Mrs. T. Hope and Miss Audrey Ormond (Wallingford), gave a large garden party at Wallingford a few days before the wedding and on Monday evening a bachelors' dinner was held at the Hawke's Bay Club. Among the presents received was silver electric iron from the Wimbleton-Herbertville Institute also from the district was a lovely glass bowl, decanter, and sherry glasses.
Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 33, 9 February 1937, Page 14


The child from this marriage was:

+ 698 M    i. Richard Frank ELWORTHY [2637] was born on 16 Jul 1945 in Auckland NZ and died on 4 Aug 2011 in Canterbury NZ at age 66.

499. Janet Mildred ELWORTHY [613] (Bertha Victoria JULIUS284, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Nov 1909 in London., died on 20 Jan 1919 in London. at age 9, and was buried in Brookwood Cemetery London.

General Notes:
Janet died tragically of peritonitis at their home in London. As was the way then, although there was large hospital nearby, the doctors arrived, the kitchen table was scrubbed down and they operated, but were unable to save Janet. There is a Memorial window to Janet in the Sth Nave of St Mary's Timaru.



500. Lord Samuel (Sam) Charles ELWORTHY Bt. Kt. [614] (Bertha Victoria JULIUS284, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Mar 1911 in Gordons Valley Timaru N.Z., died on 4 Apr 1993 in Christchurch NZ at age 82, and was buried in Gordons Valley Timaru N.Z.

General Notes:
Sam was educated, Marlborough and Trinity College Cambridge, and qualified as a Solicitor before joining the R.A.F. He had a brilliant career, including Chief of Air Staff, Chief of Defense Staff 1967-71, Life Peerage, Knight of the Garter, Constable & Governor of Windsor Castle, Lord Lieutenant of London. KG, GCB, CBE, DSO, LVO, DFC, AFC.
His sister Di, tells a story of Sam's birth at Gordons Valley. His mother was noticeably in labour in the 40 acre paddock (the parents bedroom) upstairs, Dr Drew downstairs with the anxious father was ordered upstairs to "do something", entering the 40 acre paddock Drew was loudly ordered out by the expectant mother ! whereupon he retreated to sit in neutral territory on the stairs and let nature take its course.
Sam was a man of deep humility and grace who in spite of his awesome achievements was universally loved and respected by all who knew him, his Queen can be included.
True to his view of life he felt called back to his roots for his last years, asking The Queen for an unprecedented release from his Royal duties, he retired to Gordons Valley in 1977.
Characteristically he is buried under a stone atop a hill on Gordons Valley with the simplest of inscriptions.

Sir C. Elworthy to be Defence Chief.
From our Air Correspondant.
Air Chief Marshall Sir Charles Elworthy, Chief of the Air Staff is to be the next Chief of the Defence Staff, as foreshadowed in The Times of September 6. The Ministry of Defence announced last night that he will succeed Field Marshal Sir Richard Hull next August.
The appointment has been held in turn by the heads of the three Services. Marshal of RAF Sir William Dickson became the first C,D.S. in 1958. He was succeeded by Admiral of the Fleet Lord Mountbatten of Burma from whom Sir Richard look over last year.
Sir Charles has been Chief of Air Staff since 1963. A New Zealander he was educated at Marlborough College and Trinity College Cambridge and called to the Bar in 1935. He celebrated his fifty-fifth birthday last March by flying a Lightning aircraft at 1000 mph.
The Times 30 Nov 1966 Pg 1 Col B

Sir Charles Elworthy Promoted.
Air Chief Marshal Sir Charles Elworthy, Chief of the Air Staff since 1963, is promoted to Marshal of the Royal Air Force from April 1. Sir Charles who is 56 is to succeed Field Marshall Sir Richard Hull as Chief of the Defence Staff in August.
The Times March 30 1967 Pg 14 Col B

King Edward VII's Hospital.
On Thursday the 17th of April Pg 9 Col 3 The Times published a Letter to the Editor expressing thanks by the Chief of Defence Staff S C Elworthy and others for the public's contributions to the cost of extensions to the King Edward VII's Hospital, Beaumont St London. The extensions will enable not only officers from the three services to be treated but now their wives and widows.

Sir Charles Elworthy joins BP board.
Sir Charles Elworthy, Marshal of the Royal Air Force, and Chief of Defence Staff 1967-71 has joined the board of BP.
The Times May 14 1971 Pg 23 Col A

Gordons Valley
RD2
Timaru.
29/9/86
Dear Edward,
Thank you for your kind letter of sympathy. My poor Audrey had been in hospital for fourteen months. It was a terrible day for me when I took her there knowing then she would remain for the rest of her life. I feel desolate without her but know that it is merciful that she no longer has to endure life in which there could be no joy.
Yours sincerely
Sam

Baron Elworthy Dies :
Baron Elworthy, a New Zealander who was a former Chief of Britain's Defence Staff and Marshal of the Royal Air Force, has died in Christchurch aged 82. He was found dead yesterday morning by staff at a retirement home.
Born in Timaru in 1911, Samuel Charles Elworthy graduated in law from Cambridge University and later joined the Royal Air Force.
During the Second World War he served in RAF Bomber Command, reaching the rank of acting air commodore. During the late 1940s he was seconded to the Royal Pakistan Air Force before returning to Britain to stage the Queen's Coronation Review of the RAF in 1953.
During 1959 and 1960 he was Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, Navy and Air Force in the Middle East. He achieved the rank of Air Marshal in 1960, Air Chief Marshal in 1962 and Marshal of the RAF in 1967. Baron Elworthy was appointed Chief of Britain's Defence Staff and made Marshal of the Royal Air Force in 1967.
He was Chief of the Defence Staff until 1971, Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle between 1971 and 1978, and Lord Lieutenant of Greater London between 1973 and 1978. He was made a baron (a life peer) , in 1972 after his distinguished service career.
Baron Elworthy, KG, GCB, CBE, DSO, MVO, DFC, AFC, KStJ, etc is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the recipient of the most post-nominal letters.
He retired in 1978 and returned to his family farm in Gordons Valley near Timaru. Baron Elworthy was a director of a number of prominent companies. He is survived by his three sons and a daughter. Lady Elworthy died in 1986.
A funeral service will be held in Timaru on Thursday.
NZPA

OBITUARY.
MARSHAL OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE THE LORD ELWORTHY, KG, The former Chief of the Defence Staff, who has died at Christchurch, New Zealand, aged 82, exercised immense influence during the late 1960s, when Denis Healey, the Labour Defence Minister, re-shaped the Armed Forces.
A genial New Zealander, "Sam" Elworthy had hit it off with Healey from his days as Chief of the Air Staff earlier in the decade. Their rapport was helped by Elworthy's acceptance of the cancellation of TSR2, on the understanding that the Labour Government intended to order the F-111 from America instead.
As Chief of the Air Staff from 1963 to 1967, Elworthy had to deal with a series of cutbacks. It was a difficult period, marking the end of the RAF policy of buying British aircraft in peacetime.
He found himself juggling with resources to meet commitments east of Suez, including the Indonesia confrontation, and facing Army criticism of inadequate helicopter support.
As Chief of the Defence Staff from 1967 to 1971 - first under Healey and then under Lord Carrington - Elworthy was faced with such contrasting issues as Soviet expansion (including the Czech crisis of 1968) and the need for Nato to develop its policy of flexible response. Northern Ireland posed reinforcement problems for the Army in Germany; and, to his bitter disappointment, the pledged F-111 was cancelled. At the same time the RAF lost its V-bomber deterrent role to the Navy's Polaris submarine.
Elworthy's principal achievements as CDS included masterminding the main withdrawal from the Far East and implementing a defence policy which concentrated on support of Nato in Europe and the North Atlantic. His efforts were recognised by the creation of the first "RAF peerage" since the Second World War.
Samuel Charles Elworthy was born in New Zealand on March 23 1911 and came to England for his education. He attended Marlborough Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read law and rowed (he became a member of Leander at Henley).
Although he did not join the University Air Squadron, he subsequently became a pilot officer in No 600, an Auxiliary Air Force squadron, flying biplane Hawker Harts.
Elworthy was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1935, but his heart was in flying and later that year he was granted a permanent commission in the RAF. He joined No 15 Squadron, flying Harts and Hinds, and was soon selected to take part in dive-bombing trials.
After two years he was appointed ADC to Sir Edgar Ludlow-Hewitt, C-in-C at Bomber Command. Thus at an early stage of his career Elworthy absorbed the atmosphere of High Command, while also obtaining an insight into the RAF's pre-war weakness.
By the outbreak of war in 1939 he was back with a bomber squadron, although No 108's Blenheims were switched to a training role as part of No 13 Operational Training Unit with Elworthy as chief flying instructor.
Subsequently he was fortunate to survive a perilous period of unescorted day bomber operations. When he joined No 82, a Blenheim light bomber squadron, in August 1940, the posting had looked like a death sentence: losses were horrendous.
On his arrival at Watton in Norfolk to command the squadron's "A" Flight, Elworthy learned that of 12 aircraft, the entire serviceable squadron recently ordered to attack a German air base at Aalborg in northern Denmark, only one Blenheim had returned, and that was because its pilot had turned back, fearing he had insufficient fuel to reach the target and get home. The pilot's excuse was not accepted. He was court-martialled, but acquitted.
It was against this unpromising background that Elworthy and his fellows were hurled at low level against the German "Operation Sealion" invasion, vessels assembling in Channel ports and against enemy coastal convoys.
There were further heavy losses but Elworthy's excellence as a flight commander, and good fortune in defying the odds, helped to ensure his promotion to command the squadron.
In early April 1941, together with an inexperienced sergeant, he attacked two 3,000-ton tankers in daylight off the German coast., Inevitably, Me109 fighters swept in. An air gunner was killed and one of the Blenheim's two propellers fell off, but he shepherded the novice pilot home.
Halfway through that month the squadron was posted to Lossiemouth on the north-east coast of Scotland to enable it to attack shipping off Norway.
Even more dangerous, Elworthy reckoned, was an order to attack Krupps at Essen in daylight. He wrote a last letter to his wife, then, to his enormous relief the raid was cancelled.
Fruitless losses across the North Sea in the face of Me109s against which the Blenheim stood little chance caused terrible grief to 82 Squadron's leader. When, that May, Elworthy was posted for staff duties at Bomber Command's No 2 Group HQ, he gave vent to his feelings and took issue with Air Vice Marshal Donald Stevenson, the Group Commander.
Elworthy argued that heavy losses were being incurred to no purpose on the antishipping operations. When his fellow pilot, the 5th Earl of Bandon, added his disquiet at the senseless attrition, "Butcher" Stevenson threw an ink-well at the wall, shouting: "Churchill wants it!"
In fact, the Prime Minister minuted that, while eclipsing the Charge of the Light Brigade, such deeds produced losses disproportionate to results.
In the early summer of 1942 Elworthy was posted to join the recently appointed C-in-C, "Bomber" Harris, at Bomber Command as his Group Captain Operations. This was a critical point in the Command's fortunes. and there could have been no more appropriate choice for this post as Harris began to question the rationale of the bomber offensive, and to introduce new techniques.
On the night of May 30 1942 Elworthy played his part in planning and executing the RAF's first 1,000-bomber raid on Cologne, in fact, after scrapping operational training units, there were 1,046 aircraft.
After a hard year working with Harris, Elworthy was rewarded with his own command, RAF Waddington, a Lincolnshire bomber base accommodating Nos 9, 44 and 50 Lancaster Squadrons.
At first Elworthy's squadrons operated from satellite airfields, while concrete runways were built, but that November, when the work was finshed, he welcomed two Australian Lancaster squadrons, Nos 463 and 467.
For a year Elworthy presided over a crescendo of bombing including many notable attacks on Hamburg, Berlin, Nuremberg and the flying-bomb and rocket V weapon development station at Peenemunde.
In the spring of 1944, anticipating the June landings in Normandy, Harris entrusted Elworthy with the delicate duty of representing him at the HQ of the Supreme Commander, Gen Eisenhower.
With Bomber Command committed to the direct support of "Operation Overlord", it was Elworthy's task to ensure that heavy bomber operations were integrated. It fell to him specifically to prepare a blitz on enemy rail communications, sparing, where possible, French casualties.
As the Allies began their advance through North-West Europe, Elworthy was posted as Senior Air Staff Officer to Bomber Command's No 5 Group, where, under Sir Ralph Cochrane, he oversaw numerous operations, includng the sinking of the Tirpitz.
When the war ended in Europe Elworthy was not yet 35 and had held the rank of Air Commodore for a year but that Christmas he was obliged to revert to Group Captain on joining the Central Bombing Establishment at Marham in Norfolk to plan for the evenual operational use of the Canberra, the RAF's first jet bomber.
In 1947 he experienced a change of scene and pace when he arrived in India as SASO of its No 2 Group. After Partition he transferred to the Pakistan Air Force. During this tropical interlude Elworthy reflected that, thanks to the war, he had come a long way without any formal staff training and that if he was to go further this should be remedied. Dropping rank again to Wing Commander, he attended the Joint Services Staff College at Latimer. This led, in 1950, to an Air Ministry desk as Deputy Director of Personnel.
He enlivened this dreary task ("the kiss of death") with an outspoken argument against Fighter Command's refusal to employ senior officers without a fighter background.
The Air Marshals responded by sending this career bomber officer off to command the fighter station at Tangmere in Sussex in 1951. On encountering fighter squadrons for the first time he seized the opportunity to fly with his Meteor Squadrons, Nos 1 and 29.
Two years later Elworthy took over the Meteor station at Odiham in Hampshire. Later he moved up to command Fighter Command's Metropolitan Sector, responsible for guarding London and the South-east against Soviet air attack.
In 1956 he was plucked from the Imperial Defence College to head the Planning Staff for the Suez Crisis. During the campaign he was taken ill and rushed to hospital. But by the end of the year he was fit enough to take up the post of Commandant of the Staff College at Bracknell.
In 1959 he joined the Air Council as Deputy Chief of the Air Staff. Almost immediately he was selected by Mountbatten, then Chief of the Defence Staff, to command British forces in the Aden peninsula, the first post-war triservice integrated command.
When, in 1961, Iraq threatened to invade Kuwait, a well-prepared plan, named "Vantage" to which Elworthy had contributed significantly, was implemented. Its success as a deterrent owed much to Elworthy's talent for achieving co-operation between the three services and civilians particularly in Aden.
On his retirement as Chief of the Defence Staff, Elworthy became Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle for seven years. He also served as Lord Lieutenant of Greater London from 1973 to 1978.
The combination of these illustrious offices gave rise to some diverting incidents. During the State Visit of the President of Italy, Elworthy greeted the visitor on arrival at Tilbury as Lord-Lieutenant and then dashed by helicopter to Windsor to perform the same duty as Governor of the Castle. The Queen, when presenting Elworthy on that occasion, remarked that the President must be beginning to think that she was rather short of functionaries.
Among his numerous other appointments, he was chairman of the Royal Over-Seas League and of the King Edward VII Hospital for Officers; Master of the Skinners' Company; a director of British Petroleum, Plessey and the National Bank of New Zealand; and a governor of Wellington, Marlborough and Bradfield Colleges.
Sam Elworthy was an extraordinarily handsome man and, despite his gallant war record and distinguished career, a modest one. He remained at heart a serving officer and was happiest in the company of his fellow officers.
His courage and physical prowess were legendary and until Whitehall swallowed him up, he took part in all the exercises and endurance tests which the troops under his command underwent, often lasting the course far better than much younger men.
He had a keen sense of humour and greatly enjoyed jokes in the Mess, especially when they were at his own expense. When he reached the higher ranks he was equally fearless in fighting for what he believed was right his arguments with Mountbatten as CDS, and at Cabinet level when he himself succeeded "Uncle Dickie" were celebrated in their day.
Elworthy was awarded the DSO, DFC and AFC in 1941 and mentioned three times in despatches between 1941 and 1944. He was appointed CBE in 1946, LVO in 1953, CB in 1960, KCB in 1961 and GCB in 1962. He was created a Life Peer as Baron Elworthy in 1972 and in 1977 became the first New Zealander to be installed as a Knight of the Garter. He was also a Knight of the Order of St John of Jerusalem.
In 1978, after he left Windsor, he returned to New Zealand, to live in the valley where he had been born. But he continued to make annual trips to Britain to attend the Garter Ceremony and to see his many devoted friends in the old country.
Elworthy married, in 1936, Audrey Hutchinson, who died in 1986. They had three sons and a daughter.
This obituary is thought to be from the Financial Times

THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 1993
OBITUARIES
Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Elworthy, KG, GCB, CBE,
DSO, LVO, DFC, AFC, Chief of Defence Staff, 1967-71,
Died on April 4 aged 82. He was born in Timaru, New Zealand, on
March 23, 1911.
AT THE point at which he took over command of the RAF in 1963, the career of Charles Elworthy had been one of almost unalloyed brilliance. He was commanding a bomber squadron in 1940 within four years of being granted a permanent commission. In a single year of operations he won three medals, the DSO, DFC and AFC. In the early postwar period he established himself as one of the persuasive influences on the development of bomber tactics.
As Commander-in-Chief in the Middle East for three years from 1960 he enabled Britain to be a stabilising force in a highly volatile region and in 1961 foiled an Iraqi attempt to seize Kuwait. A lawyer by education, he combined in abundant measure intellectual capacity with an ability to sway the minds of his fellow men and bend them to his opinion.
Many thus felt it sad that, when he reached the top of his service, it was largely as the instrument of a government policy of swingeing defence cuts which hit the RAF particularly badly. When he became Chief of Defence Staff four years later it was, as he himself said, virtually to discharge the duties of an undertaker on all three forces. He felt these humiliations keenly. His senior colleagues found it ironic that the RAF should have to suffer so badly under one of its youngest and most able commanders. Some looked for his resignation as a point of honour, as they did those of the other service chiefs. Elworthy felt he ought to stay in place, if only to try to minimise damage through repeated warnings of the consequences of defence cuts. It was not his fault that those warnings were totally ignored.
Sam Elworthy, as he was known throughout his service career was born in New Zealand, the son of a wealthy farmer. He was sent to Britain to be educated at Marlborough and Trinity College, Cambridge. There he read law and was a keen oarsman, rowing for the First Trinity Boat Club and twice reaching the semi-final of the Ladies Plate at Henley Regatta. At Cambridge he learnt to fly and subsequently joined 600 (City of London) Squadron, Auxiliary Air Force, a bomber unit.
He graduated in law in 1933 and was called to the Bar in 1935. But after less than a year at Lincoln's Inn, he joined the RAF and was given a permanent commission. After a year with No 15 Squadron he was appointed personal assistant to the AOC-in-C Bomber Command. For one so junior this was an acknowledgement of the powers of analysis and organisation that were later to take him to the top.
Soon after the outbreak of war, he was sent to an operational training unit to prepare young bomber pilots and navigators for operational flying. Although important, this job did not recommend itself to a man who was itching to get to grips with the enemy.
Elworthy restlessly agitated for a transfer to an operational unit and in December 1940 was given command of No 82 Squadron, equipped with Blenheims. To a man less totally dedicated this might have seemed something of a poisoned chalice. The Blenheim, wretchedly inadequate for its task, with a maximum bomb load of 1,OOOlb, was a poor cousin of the vastly superior Wellington.
Indeed No 82 had been so savaged during the Battle of France that it had been deemed no longer to exist after one raid in which it had lost 11 out of 12 aircraft. Only the vigorous exertions of its then leader, Wing Commander the Earl of Bandon, had saved it from extinction as a fighting unit.
Now, based in Norfolk, it had the thankless task of trying to inflict damage on Axis shipping and on targets in occupied territories. Elworthy rose above the technical shortcomings of his equipment and through sheer force of personality and flying skills welded it into a remarkably effective force. By the end of the year he had not only managed to avoid getting killed, a considerably more than
50-50 chance for a bomber squadron commander over 12 months of operations in those days, but he had been awarded the AFC, DFC and DSO.
Rested from operations, he next had staff appointments at No 2 Group and at Bomber Command headquarters where his experience and success as a squadron commander were useful in the planning of future bomber tactics. For a year from the spring of 1942 he commanded RAF Waddington, Lincolnshire, before being transferred back to Bomber Command HQ and then to No 5 Group where he ended the war as senior staff officer. His reputation as both operational commander and staff officer was, by then, a matter of discussion in the senior echelons of the RAF.
From 1945 to 1947 he commanded the Central Bomber Establishment and led its first overseas liaison mission to the Far East, Australia and New Zealand. His appointment as CBE in 1946 recognised his contribution to the development of bomber tactics and the testing of new equipment.
Among subsequent postings were secondments to the new Indian and Pakistani air forces and in 1953 he was selected to command the RAF station Odiham where the Queen's Coronation Review was held in June of that year. The success of this RAF occasion earned him appointment as MVO (fourth class) subsequently translated to LVO. From command of the RAF Staff College, Bracknell, he became Deputy Chief of the Air Staff in 1959. But in the following year this appointment was cut short when he was sent to Aden as Commander-in-Chief Middle East. It was a testing time. The region was politically unstable and trouble was never far below the surface. The increasing tempo of Arab nationalism was beginning to concentrate its attentions on the British presence in Aden.
Among Britain's tasks were protection of her oil interests, defence of the nascent Federation of Sheikhdoms against Yemen and support for the Sultan of Muscat and Oman against rebellious elements. But the most pressing danger was the longstanding claim on Kuwait by President Kassim of Iraq.
As soon as he arrived in Aden, Elworthy moved fast to complete a reorganisation of the Aden headquarters to enable the command to be reinforced by balanced forces in strength and at speed. Training was pressed forward relentlessly in temperatures which often reached 125F (46C). Within six months the new headquarters had become a symbol of Britain's will and capacity to intervene anywhere in the Middle East in defence of her own or her allies' interests.
This contingency planning was not completed a moment too soon. On June 25, 1961, Kassim suddenly and vociferously renewed his claim that Kuwait was part of Iraq. Soon afterwards British intelligence reported that a large Iraqi armoured force was massing close to the Kuwaiti frontier. The British government immediately ordered Elworthy to reinforce Kuwait. Commandos from aircraft carrier Bulwark, en route n the Far East, were ashore by July 1. In a few hours they had secured the airport, allowing a squadron of Hunter jet fighters to be flown in. More commandos were brought from Aden while elements of the Coldstream Guards arrived from Bahrain. Two troops of Centurion tanks were disembarked from the landing ship Striker. Thus by night fall small but effective infantry forces with armour and air support were in position to counter an Iraqi threat. Over the following days more armour and infantry with the most modern anti-tank missiles arrived to build the defenders up to a full strength brigade. Faced with this armed resolve, the Iraqi tanks stayed where they were. It was a lesson in deterrence, which stands in marked contrast to the indecision which necessitated the dispatch of a huge costly multinational expeditionary force to perform the same task in 1991.
In September 1963 Elworthy returned to the United Kingdom to become Chief of the Air Staff. He brought to the Air Ministry a wealth of experience and a fund of good will. Outwardly the RAF appeared to be a happy and efficient service with a great future ahead of it. But the new Chief of Air Staff was destined to preside over some of the heaviest cuts ever administered to the services. After an unhappy four years the situation had not in anyway changed when, in August 1967, he became chief of Defence Staff.
Many of his greatest admirers regretted that such a brilliant career in the RAF should have ended coincidentally with the introduction of a redundancy scheme for the services which became operative almost on the day he handed over as Chief of the Air Staff. Many officers and men left the service disappointed and disillusioned.
Nevertheless, Sam Elworthy will remembered for his many personal qualities. His unhappy time at the top of his profession does not detract from his qualities as a strategic thinker of the highest calibre and as a leader able to translate theory into concrete activity.
From 1971 to 1978 he was Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle and from 1973 to 1978 Lord Lieutenant of Greater London. In 1972 he was made a life peer. He retired to live in New Zealand in 1978.
He married, in 1936, Audrey Hutchinson, who died in 1986. They Had three sons and one daughter.

Timaru Herald 19 January 2004
Home-Coming: The banner of the late Samuel Charles Elworthy, Grand Knight Commander of the Bath, is now hanging in St Mary's Church, Timaru after being brought home from Westminster Abbey. The banner, which features the Elworthy coat of arms, was presented to the church at a special service on Saturday and is now hanging in the St Michael and All Angels Chapel. Archdeacon Philip Robinson is pictured at right leading the service.

Research Notes:
Sir C. Elworthv to be Defence Chief
From our Air Correspondant,
Air Chief Marshall Sir Charles Elworthy. Chief of the Air Staff is to be the next Chief of the Defence Staff, as foreshadowed in The Times of
September 6. The Ministry of Defence announced last night that he will succeed Field Marshal Sir Richard Hull next August.
The appointment has been held in turn by the heads of the three Services. Marshal of RAF Sir William Dickson became the first C,D.S. in 1958. He was succeeded by Admiral of the Fleet Lord Mountbatten of Burma from whom Sir Richard look over last year.
Sir Charles has been Chief of Air Staff since 1963. A New Zealander he was educated at Marlborough College and Trinity College Cambridge and called to the Bar in 1935. He celebrated his fifty fifth birthday last March by flying a Lightning aircraft at 1000 mph.
The Times 30 Nov 1966 Pg 1 Col B.



Samuel married Audrey HUTCHINSON [1134] in 1936. Audrey was born in 1910 in Auckland NZ, died in 1986 at age 76, and was buried in Gordons Valley Timaru N.Z..

General Notes:
Audrey was the only child of older parents, her father was involved with the Foundation for the Blind in Auckland. She took a degree at Auckland University and met Sam on a boat to England between the wars.



501. Anthony Churchill ELWORTHY [616] (Bertha Victoria JULIUS284, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Jun 1912 and died on 14 Nov 1984 in Dunedin Otago NZ at age 72. Another name for Anthony was Tort.

General Notes:
Anthony was born in Timaru, educated at Heatherdown School, Ascot and Marborough College, England. After a period with the Bristol Aircraft Company, he was sent to jackaroo with Sir Fergus McMaster in Australia. Subsequently, he farmed at Tuarangi, Maungati. He served in the 2nd NZ Expeditionary Force where in the rank of Major, he became Chief Instructor at the NZ Tank School in Egypt; at one point, Major Elworthy was responsible for the incarceration of the wastrel Nazi sympathiser King Farouk in the Cairo palace. After being wounded and invalided home, he returned briefly to farming before joining General Motors' training establishment at Petone, thereafter founding his own import business . In retirement he returned to South Canterbury. He and his wife researched and wrote a definitive biography of Churchill Julius, Archbishop of NZ entitled "A Power in the Land", published Whitcombe & Tombs, Christchurch NZ, 1971.
Ref: Dermot Elworthy 2013



Anthony married Gertrude (True) Fyans Lockyer NEILL [617], daughter of Sydney Edmund Dermot NEILL of Dunedin NZ [13359] and Gladys Amy WILLIAMS [13360], in 1938. Gertrude was born in Aug 1918 in Dunedin Otago NZ and died on 23 Sep 2011 at age 93.

General Notes:
True returned from finishing school in Europe and was engaged to Anthony.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 699 F    i. Victoria ELWORTHY [2634] was born on 23 Jun 1948 in Lower Hutt NZ and died in Feb 2005 in Ashburton Canterbury NZ at age 56.


502. Mary Annetoinette ELWORTHY [618] (Bertha Victoria JULIUS284, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 15 Jun 1913 in Timaru N.Z. and died on 29 Sep 2001 in Wexford Ireland at age 88. She was usually called Anne.

General Notes:
Johnny Jeffares writes of his mother in 2002.
My mother Antoinette (Anne) Mary Jeffares was, I suspect, a bit of a rebel, born before her time when rebelliousness was not appreciated by her very strict and Victorian mother, Bertha. This led to her having an unhappy and emotionally abused early life, before being sent back to UK and away from the family at the age of about 22. En route to UK, they stopped off in India to see friends, and there she met my father, Shaun Jeffares.
Shaun was the perfect person for Anne, who was then, and remained, emotionally fragile. They were inseparable, and were totally supportive of each other.
They both retired to Ireland in 1964, and had a very happy retirement until Shaun, fit to the end, died aged 91.

Diana Wilson writes that her sister Anne had stopped at Ootacamund Sth India in the Nilgiri Hills to see Bunny Guthrie.



Anne married Alfred Shaun JEFFARES [619], son of JEFFARES [23237] and Caroline Anne SEALE [23238], in 1937. Alfred was born on 14 Aug 1906 in Komgha Orange Free State S.A. and died in 1997 in Wexford Ireland at age 91.

General Notes:
Shaun was very much liked by his sister in law Di Wilson, the article below relates to the picture of Shaun and the farm boys.

THERE is a remarkable wealth of stories in a book to be published by Shaun Jeffares and one in particular descibes one of the more novel ways the game of Rugby took root in South Africa.
Jeffares was born in 1906 at a small village called Komgha on the borders of Transkei. He then moved to his father's farm in the Orange Free State where he grew up until 1920 when he moved to Ireland where he was educated. Qualified as a solicitor (Trinity College Dublin) he practised in Madras India, returning (1964) to Ireland in his retirement.
The picture taken by his aunt in 1915 shows Jeffares explaining the rules to his fellow players in what must certainly be the earliest game of multi-racial rugby, taking place, as it did, 33 years before the word apartheid acquired its evil connotations.
Below is an extract from his book "Black and White Memories":
From my personal point of view one of my father's greatest achievements was his introduction of rugby to the farm, although it involved him in a minimum of effort since all he did was to give me the ball and an outline of the rules. The result was probably the first multiracial seven-a-side rugby football in South Africa! I enlisted all the Xhosa and Basuto boys of a suitable age, which was the same as myself but allowing a margin of two or three years either way. Rugby was to them what water was to the proverbial duck. I think I must have been about nine when we began it and we kept it up until we left the farm.
Our field was on the open flatground between the farmhouse and the kraals. We had no goalposts so we dispensed with kicking of every kind. The pitch was marked out for each game with odds and ends like old tins and piles of clothing to give all approximate outline. To us a try was called igoldi and the game itself irugberi. Our rules were extremely nebulous but they served their purpose and we had many hours of fun from the game which all the Bantus loved. They shed their blankets (if Basuto) and other formal clothing and played in what was known in Africaans as sert-reims which could be translated as G-strings, while I had to stick to my shirts and shorts.
Most of my playmates were quick and elusive and I must have been much the same because I acquired my then Bantu name or the only one I knew of. It was the Basuto word litori being the name for meerkat, a sort of ground squirrel that was particularly brisk and fast on its feet But they had an advantage over me in that they had a shirt and shorts to get hold of if all else failed whereas for me it was like getting hold of eels!.

Alfred Shaun Jeffares usually known as Shaun Jeffares (14 August 1906 in Cape Province , South Africa - 29 October 1997 in County Wexford , Republic of Ireland )[1] was a South African-born Irish cricketer . A left-handed batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler , he played on first-class cricket match for Dublin University against Northamptonshire in July 1926, a match that also featured the Irish playwright Samuel Beckett .[3] His brother Edward played cricket in India .
Ref: Wikipedia

Alfred Shaun aged 14 was a passenger on the Edinburgh Castle departing East London South Africa arriving Southampton 30 August 1920. He is recorded with Caroline Anne Jeffares aged 46 taken to be his mother and siblings Elenore aged 11 Mary age 7 and Derek aged 3.
Ancestry.

Alfred Shaun aged 44 and his wife Antoinette age 37 were a passengers on the Chusan departing London's arriving Bombay 15 September 1950. Their last address is given as Ballykelly Drinagh IRL, Shaun is recorded as a barrister.
Ancestry.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 700 F    i. Eleanor Valentine JEFFARES [23239] was born circa 1909.

+ 701 F    ii. Mary Patricia JEFFARES [23240] was born circa 1913.

+ 702 M    iii. Derek JEFFARES [23241] was born circa 1917.

+ 703 M    iv. Dr John (Johnny) JEFFARES [4398] was born on 6 Jun 1941 in Madras India and died on 28 Sep 2004 at age 63.


503. Alice Diana ELWORTHY [941] (Bertha Victoria JULIUS284, Churchill D D (Archbishop)139, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Nov 1919 in Gordons Valley Timaru N.Z. and died on 7 Nov 2008 in Taupo NZ at age 88. She was usually called Di or Ga.

General Notes:
Di was born in the 40 acre paddock, the families name for her parents bedroom ! She met her husband when they were both staying at Government House during Race Week. Together they worked a mixed farm "Ngaioiti" 18 miles from Palmerston Nth, near Bulls, before retiring to Lake Taupo, in the 1970's. Di enjoyed several trips tramping in Nepal, she particularly likes a description of their party by a Sherpa guide "good walkers and they laughed a lot".

Di describes her upbringing as "thoroughly spoilt"

She was a wonderful exuberant women, who could laugh at life's nonsense, she brought the members of her family alive with her stories, particularly her grandfather Churchill Julius.

A year before he died Churchill Julius wrote this to his grandaughter :
My Dear Di
If I have weakness, it is for a good shaving soap, and of them all Yardleys is the best.
How did you discover my craving for a great treat in the New Year.
Affectionately
Churchill Julius



Di or Ga married James Glennie (Hamish) WILSON [2632], son of George Hamish WILSON [19057] and Ada Mary ORMOND [19058], on 6 Feb 1940 in Gordons Valley Timaru N.Z. James was born on 15 Dec 1909 in Bulls NZ and died on 6 Oct 1990 at age 80.

General Notes:
Hamish (Christened James Glenny, but called Hamish to obviate his mother using his real name, through a dislike of her father-in-law, after whom he was named!) was raised in a farming family of some wealth. Educated at home and then at boarding schools in New Zealand and Morven England, he served as a pilot with the RNZAF in the Pacific during WW II.
Hamish successfully farmed at Ngaio-iti, in the Rangitikei, for 40 years. The farm was developed into a park like property with excellent stock and animal husbandry. Horses and in particular polo were his favourite pastimes. An excellent horseman, he gained prominence in captaining the first New Zealand polo team to visit England with their own horses, in 1956.
At the age of 60 he retired from farming and moved to Taupo, where he pursued his interests in forestry, golf and polo, as president of the NZ Polo Association. He also wrote a book on the subject.
The Hamish Wilson Cup is played for annually as one of the major polo competitions in New Zealand.
He was widely respected and well loved by his children and grandchildren.

504. Albert Henry Ffitch HUNT R N [625] (Dr George Henry HUNT M.A. M.B.285, Ada Frances JULIUS140, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1909.

505. Thomas (Tommy) HUNT [2420] (Dr George Henry HUNT M.A. M.B.285, Ada Frances JULIUS140, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Nancy Fenn remembers Tommy (1999).
Tommy was twice married, Ruth was his second wife. he died without issue.

Thomas married Ruth [6370].

Thomas next married again spouse unknown.

506. Edith Nancy Alston FENN [31] (Dr Charles Edward FENN286, Katharine Pauline JULIUS141, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 2 Feb 1917 in 8 Lancaster Plc. Hamstead London, died on 26 Sep 2003 in Wimbledon London at age 86, and was cremated on 6 Oct 2003 in Putney Vale Chapel Wimbledon. The cause of her death was ischaemic heart disease. She was usually called Nancy.

General Notes:
Births.
Fenn - On the 2nd Feb., at 8 Lancaster place, Hampstead, N.W. the wife of Captain C. E. Fenn R.A.M.C., of a daughter.

Edith was always known as Nancy, she was born at her grandmother's home at Belsize Park 8 Lancaster Place, Hampstead, and educated at a number of schools (8 in all) including Ipswich and Worthing High Schools passing her G.S.E in 1934. A career in music (harp, she was a pupil of Edith Mason) was interrupted by WW II when she became a Land Girl. She worked first on a dairy farm near Sherborne, then moved to work at Home Farm, Ham House London enabling her to look after her parents who were in poor health.
Nancy was unable to return to instrumental music as wartime farm work had damaged her hands with arthritis, however music remained a lifelong passion. She developed her singing voice, achieving competition success as an amateur into her 80's when this was written (1999). A common love of music brought Nancy and Dudley Hadwen together (Nancy joked that noticing Dudley had an appreciation of Mozart's Clarinet Quintet she realised his sometimes hidden qualities). She was living in her late parents home at 8 Priory Rd Kew at that time.
Nancy was a member of the Wimbledon Friends Meeting.
Since 1987 Nancy regularly travelled to NZ to spend February with her cousins.
Nancy formed a charitable trust in 1985 from which she donated tens of thousands of pounds over the years in support of music in England particularly the English Sinfonia, the Society of Friends, opera, animal welfare, OXFAM, Hospice, and many other worthy causes.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES:
PRACTICING WITH GRANNY
Nancy Fenn is not competing for amateur billiards championship, but she played a practice game with Mrs Shuttleworth, her grandmother, one of the entrants in the Women's Billiards Championships
Mrs Shuttleworth brought along her granddaughter to act as mascot at the Championships now being held at Burroughes & Watts billiards hall in Soho Sq.
Nancy was thrilled. She plays a bit herself, and to see grannie play in a real championship was wonderful. The sacred calm of Burroughes and Watts could scarcely repress her enthusiasm. When grannie knocked up a nice little break Nancy's eyes shone with undisguised pleasure. But grannie was not quite good enough for Mrs. Sills, of Cambridge, who won the match 200-163." The tense silence as the match neared its end was almost too much for Nancy. She bit her lips in excitement, and watched with bated breath. An almost inaudible sigh left her lips when Mrs Sills made the winning stroke, and her eyes were suspiciously bright. She impetuously, ran across to grannie, and tucked her arm in the loser's, with an air that said, " Never mind, grannie dear, I'm sure you could have won if you'd tried".

Whistle For A Miss
Grandmother At Billiards
by James Dunn
Watching women play billiards is a study in grace and temperament. Since Miss Ruth Harrison become a professional player last year there is no amateur women billiards champion of Great Britain, so they are seeking one in a competition that, among other places began at Burwat Hall Soho Square W yesterday.
In this London qualifying section they were 21 competitors including Lady Constance Childe-Pemberton who is 62.
Mrs Shuttleworth, who had bought her granddaughter, charming Nancy Fenn, to watch her play Mrs Stills in the preliminary round enjoys playing billiards, but she does not believe that the billiards room is a sanctuary of silence.
BLIGHTED
When she misses an easy shot she whistles in disgust; when she gets into an awkward position she does not hesitate to denounce the balls as "blighted" and when her opponent makes a good stroke she cheerfully calls "Oh good shot"
Mrs Sills plays billiards as if she were bent on making the balls behave when she accidentally potted the white she said "Sorry" and chalked her cue with the determination of a woman who would see to it that such a thing never happened again.
During the game of 200 up there were no big breaks but the game was good to watch if only for the grace and sportsmanship shown by the players. Every time Mrs Stills fluked, Miss Nancy Fenn sniffed, but Mrs Shuttleworth smiled her jolly smile.
Mrs Stills ran out winner by 200 points to 163. Her best break was 19, and Mrs Shuttleworth, the jolliest of losers, broke down as an unlucky 13.
Lindrum may be the world's greatest billiards player, but I would sooner hear Mrs Shuttleworth whistle after a bad miss, than I would watch him make a 1000 break.

GIRL BILLIARDS PLAYER At the top of the page is a picture of Miss Nancy Fenn, the Worthing girl billiards player. She wears her hair in plaits down her back Last week-end, Miss Fenn was beaten in the semifinal of the girls' amateur billiards championship in London. Her father is a doctor and the family live at West Avenue, Worthing.
Dr and Mrs Fenn told me the other day that Miss Nancy is a pupil at the Worthing High School for Girls. Owing to the fact that she is studying for her school certificate examination, she has not been able to practice billiards of late although she is a member of the Worthing Women's Billiards Centre. She is 161/2 years of age, and intends to have another shot for the girls' title next year. Her tutors have been Miss Eva Collins who instructs the Worthing Women's Centre, and Mr Jaggard, the marker at the Forum Club. London. Better luck next time Nancy.

A quote about Nancy which the compiler has only added posthumously, at the request of the writer Christopher Alston [2606], although he is sure Nancy would have had a good laugh. Writing about Alston Court that his Aunt Charlotte [1532] had painted, he continued "Actually it was she who tried very hard in the 30's to marry me off to Nancy Fenn, a spinster of somewhat plain but pleasant features! My aunt thought it would be a good idea to return to my roots and live at Alston Court. I fear that in those days of my youth romance did not include family history! it was a nice thought though" Nancy's father became the owner of Alston Court about that time, but rarely lived there.

VISIT TO NEW ZEALAND.
Kingston & Wandsworth Quaker Meeting Magazine No 42 Summer 1992.
I am fortunate in having relations in New Zealand, many of whom have been over to stay with me in Wimbledon, so for the past few years have been happy to be at the receiving end of their kind hospitality (Edward & Jeanette Fenn).
I flew out at the end of January and when I heard that my neighbour on the plane was travelling to Christchurch to spend his 90th birthday with his son, while I would be celebrating only my 75th while I was away, I felt quite youthful. It was glorious to arrive in Auckland on a hot summers day with Hibiscus, Bougainvillea, Agapanthus, Roses and many other flowers growing in profusion in the rich volcanic soil.
Auckland is becoming quite a cosmopolitan city with people settling there from all over the world. There were many good concerts and exhibitions on when I was there in there splendid new arts centre, the Aotea. When I was there last year I attended a concert given by the Moscow Soloists Chamber Orchestra and this year by contrast I went to the musical "Chess" which rather to my surprise I really enjoyed! It is good to be in a city that has so many fine beaches within easy reach, clean, with long stretches of empty shores. Nearly everybody has a boat of some sort to go sailing round the beautiful islands.
I flew down to Invercargill at the southernmost point of South Island to visit more relations (Katherine Kitto). The town is very Scottish in character and it is not surprising that many Scots have settled there. We were lent a Bach (or little holiday house) at Queens town on Lake Wakatipu looking out towards the fine range of mountains called the Remarkables.
A friend I had met last year came to join us and remembering a conversation we had then had brought me a copy of Matthew Fox's "Original Blessing" which I am still reading with great excitement!
On the last Sunday, back in Auckland we went to Mt Eden Meeting. Several of their members have visited us in Wimbledon and they gave me a warm welcome. After Meeting for Worship we were taken round an adjoining house, now owned by the Meeting which provides very comfortable self catering accommodation for visitors. I was asked to tell Friends at home they would be very welcome to stay there if they were ever in Auckland.
I left New Zealand in early March with there Autumn approaching, to arrive back in Britain for the first signs of Spring.
Nancy Hadwen

2003 - Nancy recalls memories of a time during the 1st World War when her father and his family were stationed on Sailsbury Plain, probably operating at Longleat, where he was involved in early work with plastic surgery. Richard (Dick) Fenn was also stationed in the area for a time and a family story is of Dick bringing his platoon to a salute as Nancy was wheeled by in her pram.
Charlie and Dick Fenn used to write each other doggeral describing Nancy's progress as a child:
"Edith Nancy Alston Fenn has a temper well I ken
She has got the fat of ten
Edith Nancy Alston Fenn"

MEMORIES.
Nancy Hadwen 2001
Some time ago, as a long-time member of the Clarsach Society, it was suggested that I might like to write down some of my memories over the years.
I first joined the London Branch in the mid 30's, and attended several celidhs. I was studying the pedal harp and clarsach with Miss Edith Mason at the time, who also introduced me to Prunella Stack and the Women's League of Health and Beauty (Prunella was another of her pupils).
I was living with my parents at East Sheen, before the war, and remember Canon Hood, Rector of Keithley in Yorkshire coming to preach at Mortlake Church - afterwards he lunched at our house and I was thrilled to hear that Patuffa Kennedy Fraser was his wife! Later on, Miss Brown Douglas (whom many of us remember with affection) sold off some of her harp music, amongst which I found the second volume of 'Songs from the Hebrides' that had actually belonged to Patuffa, and was signed by her inside, and dated 1917.
During the war I worked on a farm in Dorset, and one day, bringing the cows in for afternoon milking, was astonished to see Edith Mason the other side of the herd. She had come down from London unexpectedly, to seek some peace and quiet in the country!
I see from the London branch newsletter (April 2000) that during the war Miss Rouse and Miss Mackinnon (the two Secretaries at the time) moved down to Bournemouth, where they continued to play and teach the harp. They very kindly asked me to stay with them for a weekend - and what a treat it was for me to have a brief respite from my farm work
My membership of the Clarsach Society lapsed for a time after the war (having to handmilk the most difficult cows my fingers were finding it hard to cope with harp-playing once more!). I was attending a singer's workshop at the City Lit however (where incidentally I met Marigold Dick just starting her harp career!) and a friend suggested I should go with her to a celidh at the home of Gwendolen and Edith Mason in Kensington, and so I was drawn into the net once more!
The newsletter (no 13) again brought me in touch with interesting people. There was an article by Penny Sibson about John Thomas's harp, that was now in New Zealand - my Grandmother had been a pupil of John Thomas, so I was immediately interested. It was a fascinating story about a Doctor Charles Nalden, a professor of music at Auckland University and founder of the first Conservatorium of Music there. He had just written his autobiography called "Half and Half - The Memoirs of a Charity Brat". At just three weeks' old, he had been deposited at the Foundling Hospital in Coram Fields, where the discipline was very hard for a child. However, he was sent, with other boys, to train in a military band. Later he worked his way up to become Director of Music at Kneller Hall.
Amongst many instruments that he played was the harp (he studied with a pupil of John Thomas), and when he heard the great man's harp was for sale, he made several bids to buy it, and was eventually successful. Later he decided to emigrate with his family to New Zealand and the harp went with him! As I was about to visit my cousins in Auckland, it was suggested I should call on Dr Nalden at his home, to purchase my copy of his book. I received a most kind and friendly welcome - he not only got the harp out to show me, but also gave me a tape of his playing on it. I, in my turn, was able to give him a copy of John Thomas's 'History of the Harp' which he did not know about.
Needless to say I found Dr Nalden's book absolutely fascinating, and counted myself fortunate to have met him. Sadly I have just heard of his recent death - but he was an active musician well into his 90's, so perhaps harping may help to keep us all young.

Deaths.
Hadwen - Edith Nancy Alston at her home in Wimbledon, twenty-sixth of September 2003, peacefully aged 86.
Funeral, 2:15 PM, Monday sixth October, Putney Vale Crematorium, flowers, or donations to the Nancy Hadwen charitable trust, to homes and daughters funeral directors, for sixty-one Upper Richmond Road W. Tel: (020) 8392 1012
The Times, Personal Column, Saturday, October 4, 2003.

During the evening of the 26th Sept 2003 Nancy died peacefully of heart failure while watching TV, ending a life well lived in humble optimism, avoiding judgement and accepting of all. Her friends and family gathered first at the Putney Vale Chapel for a Quaker service of rememberance and committal to cremation, then to the Wimbledon Meeting House for a tribute of music and song organised by Anna Shuttleworth, and tea.
On the 24th of June Anna Shuttleworth, David Sellen, Jeanette and Edward Fenn, Kevin and Valerie Richmond-Price and David Wells gathered at the grave of Charlie and Ella Fenn in Richmond Cemetery London for tributes to Nancy and a symbolic scattering of part of her ashes on the grave. Unfortunately the grave surround had been engraved in Nancy's maiden name "E Nancy A Fenn 1914 - 2003" All present agreed this would have caused Nancy a great laugh.
Further to this, part of her ashes were scattered on Wimbledon Common, in Bathgate Rd and in the West Country by the Richmond-Price family.

A Celebration Of The Life Of Edith Nancy Alston Hadwen.
Putney Vale Chapel
6th October 2003
Order of Service.
Music by Mozart sung by Emma Kirkby
Welcome by Eric Bramsted of the Wimbledon Friends Meeting.
Hymn
Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of Creation
Joachim Neander 1640.
Contemplation and sharing on the life of Nancy Hadwen.
The shaking of hands
Recessional Music - Bach
Everyone present is warmly invited to gather again from 3.30pm today to continue this celebration with pictures music and song including a performance of the Mozart Quartet in D Minor by Nancy's musician friends, followed by refreshments; at the Wimbledon Friends Meeting House 40 Spencer Hill Rd Wimbledon SW19 4EL. (see page 4)
You are also invited to pick up your, or any floral tribute and bring it to the Meeting House and/or take it home with you.
Quaker Funerals
Nancy Hadwen, many years ago found the Quaker tradition of quiet contemplation in accord with her spiritual needs.
Quaker funerals have no set form, gathering together in silence, all present, are invited to enter into a communion of prayer and contemplation, bearing in mind those who are bereaved.
Anyone who feels moved to do so may speak, with helpful words, as well as messages, which may testify to the qualities the deceased displayed in life.
In this way loving remembrance and thankfulness may rightly find expression, together with thoughts of comfort and sympathy for those left behind.
Whether in silence or otherwise, all who are present may help by their thought and prayer in the fellowship, into which we are brought together, by the Spirit of Christ, our Christian Heritage or other beliefs.
The worship ends with the shaking of hands, each with the other.
It is in this way we gather today to celebrate the long and full life of Nancy Hadwen, who in her serene unselfish way brought much good to this world.
Nancy profoundly expressed her joy for life through her love of music, which she approached with uncomplicated universal enjoyment.

NANCY HADWEN -- 02.ii1917 - 26.ix.2003
"Remember that we all share responsibility for the meeting for worship, whether
our ministry is in silence or through the spoken word." (Advices & Queries No.12)

For Wimbledon Friends, Nancy was as much a part of the Meeting as were the flowers on the
table - which often she herself had grown and brought. Their presence made the meeting room just that little bit more welcoming for those coming in on a Sunday morning to worship. And like the flowers, Nancy's presence lifted our spirits, her ministry being more often than not of the silent kind.
When she did feel moved to share something with us in words, they were words of faith and quiet conviction, and they were the more valued for being infrequent. Friends recall her ministry as clear and deeply sincere; she did not speak at length and her ministry was the more effective for it.
Edith Nancy Alston Fenn was born at her grandmother's home in north London on the 2nd
February 1917. In later life she recalled memories of a time during the First World War when her father and the family were stationed near Salisbury Plain. He was a medical doctor, involved in early work with plastic surgery, and a brother, Richard (Dick) Fenn was also stationed in the area for a time. There is a family story of Dick bringing his platoon to attention and saluting as Nancy was wheeled by in her pram. After the war the family moved to Sussex, and Nancy became a pupil at the Worthing High School for Girls. In her teens she became skilled enough at billiards to compete at national level. She also had a great love of music, and was particularly fond of the harp, which her grandmother played. By this time the family had moved to East Sheen, and she began studying the pedal harp and clarsach (Celtic Harp) at the Royal College of Music in London, joining the London Branch of the Clarsach Society in the mid 1930s, and attending several Ceilidhs.
However, her studies and indeed her career aspirations were interrupted by World War II,
when she had to become a `Land Girl.' She worked first on a dairy farm near Sherborne, Dorset, then moved to the Home Farm of Ham House, London, which enabled her to look after her parents who were in poor health. Sadly, after the war ended, Nancy was unable to return to instrumental music, wartime farm work having led to her fingers becoming plump and her hands arthritic. In an article she wrote for the Clarsach Society, she noted: "My membership of the Clarsach Society lapsed for a time after the war (having to hand milk the most difficult cows, my fingers were finding it hard to cope with harp-playing once more). I was attending a singer's workshop at the City Lit however, and a friend suggested I should go with her to a Ceilidh . . . . . and so I was drawn into the net once more."
Music remained a lifelong passion. She developed her singing voice, achieving competition
success as an amateur into her 80's, and it was a common love of music that brought Nancy and her future husband Dudley Hadwen together. They were married on the 15th April 1950 in Kew, and Nancy moved into the house in Bathgate Road, Wimbledon, which Dudley's parents had bought. Sadly, he was a compulsive smoker, and after more than 30 years of marriage, he succumbed to lung cancer. He died on 14th May 1982 after a lengthy and painful period of ill health which proved a testing time for Nancy.
Following Dudley's death, Nancy began to travel again, including several journeys to
relatives and friends in New Zealand. She also returned to the clarsach, and once more took up singing, joining a local class at the Adult Education Centre, where she made many new friends. She also joined the Putney Music Society, regularly attending talks given by eminent musicians, and offering lifts to those who would otherwise have found it difficult to attend, particularly evening events.
Nancy began attending Wimbledon Meeting in 1960; she joined the Religious Society of Friends on the 18th September 1976 ("by convincement" as it says in the records) and proved a loving and committed member of the Meeting. She attended the meetings for worship regularly and steadfastly, and also came to the business meetings as often as she could. In due course she became the organiser of hospitality and refreshments, especially when it was Wimbledon's turn to host its monthly business meeting, and she filled this role for many years. Rather than press others into service, though, she was very relaxed about the job, believing that the Meeting responded best when gently led by example. She served as an Elder over many years and was most effective in her quiet convinced way. She was also a loyal supporter of the Meeting's discussion groups, and occasionally helped with the Children's Meeting. She was especially glad that Wimbledon Meeting included a group of children, possibly because she never had any of her own. Summer walks or picnics on the Common sometimes concluded at her lovely house with its well-kept garden for a delicious tea - needless to say, she was a keen gardener, hence the flowers for Sunday mornings.
Nancy had many other fine qualities: she was warm, sociable, cultured and very modest. She had a gift for friendship and this was very much in evidence from the many testimonies at her funeral. She was a very balanced person and this led to a serenity, which was an essential part of her personality. She was a good listener, too, and had much empathy for other people. Being young of heart, she took a strong interest in the world around her, and very much endorsed the modern Quaker acceptance of the arts and the rejection of that Puritanism which had denied music, theatre and literature its proper place in life. All these many positive qualities and her years of steadfast attendance at the activities of the Meeting made her a pillar of strength for our small community. However, her life was not bounded by Quakerism. Her vision was too wide for that, as the above record shows, and in all her many friendships she respected and appreciated the faiths of others. She could happily join with others in their worship, but her words: "Quakerism is right for me" encapsulated her belief. She loved the Meeting, and the Meeting loved her in return.
In 1985 Nancy set up a charitable Trust and appointed as a fellow trustee a friend from her late husband's firm of accountants who shared her love of music in general and opera in particular. Almost immediately she was asked to help the English Sinfonia, whose principal cellist at that time was a cousin of Nancy's, Anna Shuttleworth. The orchestra urgently needed a new office and in liaison with Graham Pfaff (its then Chief Executive) they were able to acquire a property in Sandy, Bedfordshire. When this was sold in the mid-990s, the Trust bought larger premises which were later donated to the orchestra in 2001. One of the first grants made by the Trust was in response to an appeal for funds to buy Mendelssohn's house in Leipzig and establish a museum there. Nancy was thrilled to be invited to its opening.
Both Nancy and her husband were devoted supporters of Glyndebourne. She liked to take her friends to the festival, where they enjoyed not only the music but also Nancy's excellent picnics. The Trust also supported the Musicians Benevolent Fund, but its beneficiaries were by no means confined to musical associations. The Trust reflected Nancy's concern for those in need, and made regular donations to the British Red Cross, Oxfam, NSPCC, RNID, Shelter and Trinity Hospice, and supported a number of Quaker projects. At a local level, it helped the Wimbledon Guild of Social Welfare and the Chamber Concerts Association of Wimbledon.
George Fox urged Friends to `keep their Meetings,' and Stephen Allott, writing in The Friend of 30th January 2004, reminded us that: "we need a solid body of Friends who will ensure, by their regular attendance, that the Meeting is there, both for newcomers and for less regular attenders." Nancy Hadwen belonged to that body in Wimbledon Meeting. She is greatly missed.
Approved by Wimbledon PM on the 9th May 2004, and signed on its behalf by Jenny Ellam, Clerk. Drafted by Kurt Strauss on the basis of material kindly provided by Anna Shuttleworth, Edward Fenn and David Wells, with additional material from Eric Bramsted and Ann Strauss.
It is the custom of the Society of Friends to create a panegyric of a deceased member, which becomes part of the Society records. ELF

Nancy's ashes were partly scattered about her favourite haunts in Wimbledon the remainder on her parents grave in Richmond Cemetery (Ref section 13 grave 10075)where she is remembered with her parents on the grave site. Due to a confusion her name is recorded as Nancy Fenn, this was not remedied as all involved felt Nancy would have been amused at the error.

Research Notes:
Nancy's War Time Letters
(Images of Originals in Event Pictures.)

Milton Cottage
Lily Lane
Bishops Cornwall
Sherborne Dorset
October 25, 1940
My dear uncle Harry and Margo,
We have just got your letter today with the great good news of the birth of your son and heir, I can't tell you how glad I am, it really is splendid, my very best congratulations you have set the ball rolling again, after everyone thought the Fenn family was going to peter out with me! As soon as the war is over I want the three of us to come out to visit you in New Zealand, the parents seemed quite keen when I suggested it the other day, it would be so nice to see you both again, and of course the great Edward Liveing!
I've now been on the land for nearly 4 months I've been so lucky in getting onto a very suitable farm, we came on it by pure chance. One day we came to Sherborne to see the school, and liking it so much, we stayed here for a week. Mummy and I went out to see a farm the first day, and two ladies in a car gave us a lift. We found one of them knew a great friend of ours and the other was a farmer's wife, they asked us to tea the next day, and we arranged I should start work on their farm in a fortnight. The farmer, Mr Foot is such a nice man though he was very sceptical about a land girl, he said "Let the girl come she will be fed up with it in a fortnight" he knows differently now. I got in for the haymaking and of course the harvesting for both of which we had perfect weather, though it was hard work as we were so very shorthanded. One day when we were through threshing we were up milking at 5.30 and didn't get our tea till 8 o'clock at night. There were some bombs dropped near us that night but they didn't keep me awake! We started milking in the usual way at 6 A.M. I do eight cows now morning and evening my fingers were terribly stiff at first, then I go to another farm to fetch the four horses, huge beasts, as big as Suffolk Punches. After breakfast I clean out the cow sheds and pigsties and feed two sets of calves, after that I do the job of the day whatever it is on, at present it is Mangold pulling and hauling, until I go for the cows for the afternoon milking. I enjoy the work very much and it is a very good thing to have plenty to do in wartime \endash Mr Foot and our two men are in the home guard. One night they were all called out and Mrs Ford and I were left with the prospect of milking forty-two cows in the morning. Luckily it was a false alarm and the men were back the next day there are two dear little boys at the farm, Michael and Freckles aged 9 and 7. I've learned quite a lot about small boys since I've been there! They're much nicer than I'd always thought! Mrs Ford has a brother at Dunedin New Zealand called Asten, she was a nurse and one of her patients she took to the South of France, is living at the farm at present. She is the boy's godmother, a Mrs Adams and very charming, her flat in town was bombed last week. I was so worried about my parents in London, we've had bombs all around our house, but so far we've had no worse than broken windows. M and D spent most nights under the dining room table last month as we have no shelter! It really is splendid the way everyone is carrying ................... page missing.
Written on both sides of two pages of writing paper. Endorsement on the front page.
"I suppose this will reach you about Christmas time my love and very best wishes for it and the New Year"

37 Grosvenor Gardens
Kingston
Sept 5 (43)
My dear Margo,
I'm afraid it's a long time since I wrote you, but these are such busy days, as you well know! Have I thanked you for the very interesting New Zealand paper? I was so glad to get it. You may have heard by now that after having tried to live at Alston court we came to the conclusion that it was really more than we could manage. Daddy said he could not stand the winter is down there, and of course there are endless difficulties and expenses running a house of that size (and garden) in war time, the Labour problem is steadily getting worse. Eventually we decided to offer it to Alston Fenn, he jumped at the chance of having it and as he can afford to run the house properly and is one of the family, it seemed an ideal solution to our problem, although we can't help feeling rather sad too, in spite of of the discomforts we have had to endure living there! The Fenns have two daughters, a little younger than I am, who love old things and are fascinated with the house (they have never had a permanent home with their father being in the army) Houses are very difficult to get in town now but we have managed to get quite a nice little one off Kew Green - where I think we all ought to be very happy together. I am still on the farm at Ham so can live at home, it is on the flat for daddy and of course we all love the gardens. It's an easy place to get up to town from too. We are parking daddy at my grandmothers at Hampstead, and I have got some time off to help mummy with the move which is on September 23 our address will be 8 Priory Road Kew Surrey. I went to see an excellent play at the arts Theatre Club the other day - it was G.K.Chesterton's "Judgement of Dr Johnson" - the member who took me was a Nancy Grigg (and niece of Sir James Grigg I believe) she lived near Timaru when young and apparently knew a lot of the Julius's - she mentioned a certain "Fenny" who I oppined to be my uncle! She was in the land Army but left it, and now works with a friend of mine at the War Office. This year we have doing a good deal of evening work - but one night I felt I had earned a treat so I dashed up to town (complete in breeches!) to hear a prom at the Albert Hall - it really was a most grand programme, all Bach and Handel Leon Goossens, Harriet Cohen, Thalben-Ball were some of the soloists. It was rather interesting to, as the Queen had decided to take Princess Elizabeth to her first prom concert that evening - I couldn't understand why everybody was standing up and clapping, until I looked just above me and saw them in the Royal box!
I was swimming in the open air pool at Twickenham last week and saw a notice of a concert to be given by an amateur orchestra, so I crossed by the ferry and thoroughly enjoyed Handel's Water Music which seemed most suitable! My annual weeks holiday I am having in October, I thought we would enjoy it better when the move was over. We haven't decided whether to go to Buxton or Malvern yet, I'll get back in time for Marigold pulling! I'm in digs at present in the house of a very nice girl whose husband is in the RAF in India, there is just the two of us and her dog.
I do hope this letter reaches you safely.
My best love to you all especially young Edward how I'd like to see him come and see us all.
from
Nancy
Written on both sides of three sheets of notepaper

Nancy's Letters:
8 Priory Road
Kew
Dec 3 (44?)
My dear Uncle Harry,
I really am filled with shame when I realise we shall be feasting on your beautiful cake at Christmas time and I have not even written a letter to send you our greetings - we also have to thank you for the most interesting local papers which arrived last month. I expect you are settling down in your new home, do you feel lost without your farm? I also, have retired from agriculture after precisely four years and four months. Daddy was again taken ill in the autumn and so was my grandmother, so that my mother had a very hard time with both invalids and trying to run the house (which we still have not got straight!) So I resolved that if the Labour Exchange would release me to work at home I ought to do so. Somewhat to my surprise they were most understanding and told me to give a weeks notice which I did forthwith. So now I'm back at women's work! And there's no shortage of that at home, even though it is slightly less strenuous than the farm.
I got the farmer safely married to a great friend of mine before I left, they had a very quiet wedding in September and spent their honeymoon in Devon and Cornwall - the housekeeper went off in a bit of a huff beforehand so I helped the secretary prepare the house for their homecoming.
I met the wife of the new director of Kew Gardens, Dr Salisbury, at a friends the other day, she was rather an interesting woman, and so I prevailed on mummy to call on her - unfortunately the day we asked them to tea mummy was unwell, so I had to be the hostess-in-chief luckily Muriel Julius came along too, and they appeared to have a great many professional friends in common, so we had a most entertaining afternoon. I miss my open-air life somewhat (though I've the garden to tackle in the spring) so whenever I go into Richmond to shop, I walk through the length of Kew Gardens, it's grand being so near them - we still take a lunch in there on sunny days and even Daddy can get slowly over the green to them on mild days (he is better now but has to take everything very carefully and always has a day in bed a week)
I dashed out to Kew church this morning - it's only a few minutes over the green - old Lord Lang preached today but we have two very alive young clergy who really have turned the church into a going concern! We had a sale last week, much to my amazement they took L522 - my grandmother managed to have her poppy party for Armistice Day, again this year, and she got L42 which really was very good. As I haven't much time to practice the harp now I'm having some singing lessons from a very charming Scandinavian friend of ours - I do so enjoy it. Her husband, who is half Dutch and half English moved from his city offices to what used to be a games club down at Teddington I lunched with him one day as it was just by our farm but it was a bit too much of a rush in my dinner as I had to polish myself up a bit before entering civilised society, it was enjoyable but I found it more restful to flop down under a hay rick!
My mother and I went to quite a good production of the Beggars Opera the other day which we much enjoyed - my cousin Anna Shuttleworth is now studying the cello at the college, she is in both orchestras and wanted me to go up to her end of term concert. There were about a hundred in the orchestra, and I thought played exceptionally well. I expect you heard a Doodle Bug fell just behind the Todd's on a garage in Old Palace Yard - and they suffered very badly from blast although neither of them was hurt mercifully - poor Aunt Adria (the Great-half one!) was very upset at the ruin of her precious glasshouse. Mummy and I have made several journeys to Wentworth House to save some of the poon plants from the winter's blast, as we have a little conservatory here. Both aunts seemed as well as could be expected, although A.A. has a rather awful time running the house with an invalid and only one somewhat emotive maid.
When we left Nayland we gave the Giles Chinese Dictionary away to Col Rundal but hearing they were very short of them at the School of Oriental languages he consented to present it to them. The next day a beautifully made parcel arrived from Ray which mummy said she had better take straight up to the school. At the last minute I suggested it might be better just to look in the parcel - on opening it I found "With love from Alston Court"! And the contents rows of lovely Suffolk Spice Pippin's - I should love to have seen M handing apples round to the Oriental professors. However the dictionary did arrive later and was received with enthusiasm. My best love to Margo and Edward and to yourself.
From
Nancy.
Written on five sides of notepaper, year uncertain.

8 Priory Rd Kew Surrey.
July 13, 1945
My dear Margo
We were so delighted to receive your long and interesting letter, I love hearing about your new home, it sounds so attractive and in such a glorious position - we have been thinking of you all this month and the little new arrival, how thrilled Edward must be - although there are many advantages of being an only child - I must say I wouldn't mind some brothers and sisters at present - I've had Mummy in bed lately I think she got thoroughly run down last winter - still if I could get my family all away to the sea for a bit it would do them a lot of good - daddy is better but I'm afraid he would find the crowded travelling conditions of the present day very trying - Aunt Alison then paid us a visit last week on the way from Northampton to her daughter Olive George at Eastbourne. She hired a car for the journey, which I believe cost her a fabulous sum. She arrived for lunch complete with chauffeur and maid!
August 12th. As usual I couldn't write the letter straight through, one seems to get so little time to settle down to things nowadays! Mummy seemed no better so my grandmother put daddy up for a week - I think he was really better for the change - and enjoyed several little bridge parties! Everybody now is trying to get away to the sea for the first peacetime holiday so we had great difficulty in getting anywhere to go to however we remembered two lady gardeners we often talk to at Kew - (they look after the Rose Garden and herbaceous borders) they had told us they had a little house at Broadstairs where they had a gardening business, which they had to leave at the outbreak of war - we ask them if we could picnic in their house and they very kindly agreed - we had such a happy peaceful week - the air is so bracing there and the sea glorious. I bathed and we had picnics & in the evening went down to listen to the very good military band on the front. Mummy's people had a holiday house there years ago when she was a girl, and she says it has altered very little since then even the same old concert party and the only new cinema was hit by a bomb! We only had two grey days which we employed in visiting Sandwich and Canterbury - I was fascinated by the latter though it is sad to see the devastation all round the cathedral, the sun came out as we reached it, and it looked very fine, it is grand to feel it is practically undamaged by the horrible war - budleas seemed to grow in profusion on bomb sites - we already have brought one home with us from Bath now we have one from Canterbury unfortunately Mummy was no better when we returned so visited our Dr, who sent her up to a specialist. She had had some bad glandular swellings - he was rather serious about it and she is having to go up to London each week for some sort of light treatment - oh how I hope it will make her better. Still I'm so glad to be near London where one can get the best treatments it would have been very difficult if we had still been at Alston Court where incidentally they seem very contented and happy. Now I must thank you for the perfectly magnificent cake which arrived safely a short while ago. It really is good of you to send me such a rich and beautifully baked cake I know the time it takes - and especially with all you have to do - we do appreciate all your kindnesses to us during the war - I am saving the cake for a very special tea party.
Sept 1st I have just received your letter with the gladsome news we are all so delighted at the arrival of Katherine and send our best love and congratulations. How nice of you to Air Mail the news we were all so anxious to hear, we toasted your health at supper - Adria Fenn is staying with the Todd's in the weekend, we expect her to tea today - mummy has started her treatments and they are doing her good I'm glad to say love from us all to you all
Nancy
Written on six sides of 3 sheets of letter paper..

8 Priory Road,
Kew,
Surrey
Nov 25 (1945)
My dear Margo,
I'm afraid this will arrive a little late for Christmas but I do send all my love and best wishes to you and your family, mummy embroidered this little coat for Katharine so I am sending it off for her, as she has had rather a hectic time going to and from the hospital for her treatments lately. She just finished a course last week and is having a break from them now, I think they really did her good. On top of everything else my grandmother was taken ill last week, the doctor thought it was all up with her, and we had to keep on dashing over to Hampstead, however he underestimated her North Country constitution! and this week she has rallied amazingly, and really seems on the mend. She had been doing too much lately with her various charities, for Poppy Day she had her usual party and made over L57 which was a splendid total. There was a terrific crush, and during the musical interludes I sat halfway up the stairs, the only seat I could find! Daddy seems better I'm glad to say, I've been with him to various tea parties lately and he thoroughly enjoys meeting all his old Richmond friends. One day we went to the Salisbury's, he is the director of Kew Gardens, they have a lovely old Georgian house on Kew Green very picturesque, but bitterly cold in winter with our fuel shortage. Today the gas people have gone on strike! And I've been trying to cook the meals with hardly any heat. Luckily we have an open fire in the drawing room where I keep a kettle going, but we generally do all our heating and cooking by gas, though I really prefer electricity. My greatest friends when we lived at Streatham were the son and daughter of the vicar of Christ Church, the girl was married last month at Holy Trinity Brompton (the third wedding running I have been to there) they flew to Ireland for their honeymoon as the groom was in Imperial Airways. The music at the wedding was lovely (there was a bishop and a couple of vicars to marry them properly!) And afterwards a very good reception at the Rembrandt Hotel. I dash down to the farm at Ham whenever I can, the Secetts always give me a warm welcome, I helped in the dairy and fed cows last time, it was fun for a change. Have you seen "Johnny Frenchman" filmed in Cornwall, the "Seventh Veil" (parts filmed in Richmond and grand music) and "Perfect Strangers" a naval film? I enjoyed them all especially the second one.
Mummy and Daddy join me in love to you all
from
Nancy
endorsed at the top of the first page "daddy sends photo of U Harry in youth as he thinks Edward resembles him so much"
Written on both sides of three sheets of notepaper.

8 Priory Road
January 16 (1946)
My dear Margo
I do hope these trinkets reach you safely, I know my mother intended to send you the blue enamel brooch, that belonged to my grandmother (Uncle Harry's mother) the other things also belong to her, except the little turquoise ring and bracelet, which I had when I was small, and I wanted Katharine to have them. The bracelet looks rather nice on a chubby wrist!
We are thankful to be nearly in Spring again, today has been glorious, sunshine all the time, I got daddy out for a bit. He gave me a bicycle for Christmas (my old one had had a hard time during my farm years!) I always bike whenever I can, to get fresh air, it's very useful for shopping when one cannot get goods delivered to one's house too.
Uncle Van is coming to stay with us in February, he wants to see the King's Pictures at Burlington house, (I have been twice already they are most interesting). Later in the month I really hope to get away to my friend at the Isle of Wight and grannies maids are coming to look after daddy.
Your tinned meats have been most useful during this wretched transport strike, the only dissatisfied one is Cymbeline the cat, who doesn't like tongue! We handed over my grandmother's house on December 31 I was relieved not to have to journey over to Hampstead any more, it took so much time. I went to a New Year's Eve party on Kingston Hill, it was great fun, we ended up with Sir Roger de Coverley. As there was no other way of getting home, I had to cycle in spite of wearing an evening dress which I hoiked up on an elastic band like a pintle. London is very full, everything booked up very much. I tried for the circus at Olympia, the Proms, with no success.
With love to you all from us both
Nancy
Written on both sides of two sheets of notepaper, Nancy ran out of room at the end.

Ommaroo Hotel
Jersey C.I.
July 29, 1947
My dear uncle Harry I feel quite guilty not to have written to you and Margo before to thank you for your letters papers and perfectly delicious cake, and another parcel of food, also very welcome \endash the latter so very useful to have \endash it is such a treat to have a change in our somewhat monotonous diet! It is more than kind of you both to continue your generous presents. As you see by the above address I am staying at Jersey \endash I came with a girlfriend of mine who lives at Richmond and we are both thoroughly enjoying a fortnight's holiday here. There are many remains of the German occupation here \endash including a large underground hospital built with Russian labour \endash we have been very lucky in our hotel and weather; the bays around the island are perfect for bathing. One day we went by the mail boat to Sark \endash it is too small for motor traffic and a most beautiful spot. We had an excellent crossing from Southampton but as we could not get berths didn't get much sleep that night! We return by day via Weymouth so will see more of our journey. I still have the Conways in the top floor at home \endash really very kind and helpful people to have in the house \endash while I am away Jenny (my maid) and her old mother are also staying in the house and enjoying visits to Kew Gardens and Richmond Park. I am so thankful to have Jenny she was with Granny for twenty-six years and really takes an interest in my well-being! And is a very true friend. I have just received a letter from the farm I was on in Dorset, inviting me down in August so I am going there to give a hand with the harvest. I expect you heard I had a few days at Alston Court, Aunt Adria was there to \endash they seem very happy and are making aEight Priory road good job of village life these difficult days. Did you hear of Jack Bateman's death last month, I believe it was quite sudden. Soon I shall be settling down for the winter and will let you know how I am getting on. Very much love to you all from Nancy
Squeezed into an Air Letter addressed to Mr and Mrs HL Fenn Taiko RMD Timaru NZ.

Sept 20 (1947) 8 Priory Road Kew Surrey England.
My dear Fenn family \endash I do hope all is well with you \endash I have been meaning to write to you in case you wondered what had happened to the watch and ring I was going to send it off sometime ago but found the watch was not going, so I took it into Richmond to be mended \endash it ought to be ready in about three weeks time \endash the man said being an old watch \endash you probably would not have been able to get it repaired in New Zealand. So I'm glad I noticed it before I sent it off \endash I have been very lucky with holidays this year \endash think I last wrote to you from Jersey where I had a glorious time lots of bathing etc. I had not been home more than a week when the farmer's wife at Sherbourne (where I worked in 42) asked me to spend a fortnight with them \endash the harvest was so early this year, I got up for all the cutting and carrying of the corn, but I enjoyed it and found I had not lost my skill with a pitchfork. Then the widow of our old vicar at Streatham \endash now living with her son \endash who is a rector near Worcester \endash also asked me down for a week \endash they are very old friends of ours \endash and I was so glad to be with them again, and also to see that part of England which was new to me \endash the Malvern Hills, Tewkesbury and Worcester \endash I intended going over to Cheltenham but A(unt) Adria was away. I did enjoy moving about a bit this year, I have been so stuck in the past and with direction of labour coming on again here probably will be in the future! To safeguard myself from being put in a factory I have taken a part-time job at my old farm at Ham \endash which I hope will allow me to carry on with my musical studies at the same time \endash life is a jigsaw puzzle nowadays! And one is restricted more and more in every way! I never thought I would take up farming again. The other evening I went to Covent Garden to hear Mozart's "Cosi fan Tutte" done by the Viennese State Opera Company. It really was most thrilling and very nice to see people turning up in evening dress as they used to in prewar days. I can't tell you how I appreciate all food parcels you send, the cake is still being reserved for a suitably important occasion before I cut it. Much love to all Nancy.
Squeezed into an Air Letter addressed to Mrs Fenn Gleniti Taiko RMD Timaru NZ.

8 Priory Road Kew
4 Jun 1947
My dear uncle Harry and Margo,
Thank you both so much for your kind sympathetic letters \endash it is just as you say I shall miss Daddy very much \endash we were such friends \endash but I realise how he would have hated to have been dependent on other people \endash it was wonderful how much he did manage to do \endash and it was much happier that he went before his life became too much of a burden \endash he missed Mummy very much to of course. I had just been away for my first holiday for nearly 2 years I stayed with a friend at the Isle of Wight for a week, granny's two good maids looked after D whilst I was away \endash he was so nice in wanting me to go. I shall always be thankful I was firm about coming home to be with him for what were to be his last few days with me. I took him into Kew Gardens in a wheelchair (the first time this year) the cherry blossom was out, and everything looked beautiful \endash it is such a mercy I had just got the nurse and her husband living upstairs \endash they both could not have been kinder and more helpful. My grandmother's maid, Jenny comes to me three days a week and is an absolute treasure. All my friends have been so kind asking me out. Today I have been planning with a girl to go to Brittany in the summer holidays and perhaps to Jersey \endash all new ground for me when at the Island last month the peowrittenple who on six sides had just moved to the next house were the Dudgeons from 2 Portland Terrace Richmond, of course they know all my friends and relations, it was.......... to meet there! I may do a bit of farm work this summer but as singing is becoming so interesting to me I want to keep my home together, I shall not take up agriculture seriously again! Now I must thank you for your wonderful food parcel I can't tell you how I appreciate and enjoy it it really is very kind and generous of you both, such a great help. I wanted Edward and Katherine to have his watch and ring so I will send them off soon by the safest route.
With much love to you all - yours affectionately
Nancy
P.S. Mrs Gray (nee Ada Julius) wrote she was returning to New Zealand shortly.
Written on an Air Letter addressed to Mr and Mrs HL Fenn Taiko RMD Timaru NZ8 Priory road Kew Surrey

10 Bathgate Rd London SW 19
Jan 3rd 1962
My dear uncle Harry and Margo
I really should have written to you earlier to say how absolutely thrilled we were with your wonderful tape! We do appreciate all the time and trouble you must all have taken to record it. Uncle Harry sounded just as he did in 38 when I last saw him (and very interesting to hear about his life in New Zealand) and Margo just as if she was talking to us in the room \endash your garden I'm sure would put ours to shame. I enjoy gardening up to a point but there are so many other things I want to do, my aim at present is to cut things down to a minimum flowering shrubs and grass! I hope for more help from my Gingers next season! Last year the weather was so often bad when they came over they couldn't do much. We had a very happy Christmas, our cousins came up to stay with us and brought their cat with them! It was fairly cold but so far no snow \endash then on New Year's Eve we had a regular blizzard \endash we were going to a party in North London but it was impossible to get out \endash cars were being abandoned in the snow everywhere \endash I've managed to keep the house warm and no frozen pipes so far \endash but travelling is still pretty bad \endash I haven't dared take the car out yet \endash poor Dudley took three hours getting to the office (usually takes him about an hour) I'll be thankful when the spring comes you talk of lilacs etc sounds to heavenly! Yet on the continent now they're wanting snow for the winter sports. Adria just missed hearing your tape \endash she came up for a day before Christmas \endash but she's longing to hear it \endash so hope she will come up again soon. Will get her to speak on the next tape we send you. Thank you for your lovely calendar (so far only one arrived)
Best love from Nancy
Written on a Air Letter

10 Bathgate Rd London SW 19
22 Aug 1962
My dear Margot,
Thank you so much for your letter with the great news that Edward has actually booked his passage \endash I expect you can all hardly believe it yet! I'll be under the clock at Waterloo Station on June 3rd! We will probably have a holiday in May, as I find Dudley badly needs one about that time, after having got the firms accounts out but will certainly make a point of being home when Edward arrives \endash I just want him to feel he can use this place as a base and feel free to make whatever plans he wants \endash and to come and go as he pleases \endash I hope it will be a better summer next year \endash it has been most unsettled this year \endash and occasional glimpse of the sun \endash and then the high winds and storms. We had another lovely visit to Glyndebourne last Friday to see Monteverdi's "Poppea" we enjoyed it enormously, glorious music and a wonderful performance. Though we had our picnic supper in the car park in the usual thunderstorm! We haven't gone around the gardens at Glyndebourne once this year, most disappointing, although it's more difficult to keep private gardens up to the mark in England the ones open to the public are really lovely \endash we went to the Savill Gardens which are in Windsor Great Park last Saturday \endash beautiful herbaceous borders and roses etc. On Sunday afternoon we walked over Wimbledon Common to White Lodge in Richmond Park \endash it is now the Junior Royal Ballet School \endash a glorious place for hermits open to the public during August well worth seeing.
Love to you all from us both
from Nancy
Written on a Air Letter

nr Bideford N Devon
Aug 7 82
My dear Edward
At last I've managed to get away to stay with Brenda for a holiday and am really enjoying myself and feeling the benefit. I spent two nights en route with Angela and Ken at Winchcombe \endash Angela has been splendid helping Adria \endash I think I told you she had been moved to a nursing home connected with Faithful House \endash but Angela rang me shortly after to say she was not at all happy about the home \endash where Adria was just in a ward \endash so together we found another nursing home where we liked the Staff and she could have a nice big room \endash ground floor level \endash they did it up for her, and we've moved her furniture pictures books etc in and it really looks much pleasanter than her previous rooms \endash at FH \endash Mary Legge is now ninety \endash but visits Adria frequently! Adria was wandering in mind (& body) and really needs twenty-four hours a day attention which FH said they could not give \endash I saw Adria three days running in the new home and she was beginning to look better already \endash although she did say she had to get back to her mother at Alston Court! But she's perfectly sensible most of the time \endash and her walking is improving, so we are hoping to get her out in a car sometime. I really got to know Angela & Ken which was good, and enjoyed staying with them lovely to get back from a hot sticky day in Cheltenham to have a swim in their swimming pool in the garden \endash with a glorious view of the Cotswold Hills! I've got Jenny and brother George and his wife and sister (The Ginger Family) looking after Charming (the cat) and Homebush whilst I'm away \endash which is a good thing also burglaries arrive in London (I've had two break-ins since May and with the insurance money would probably install a burglar alarm) I'm really enjoying my holiday in Devon (first for four years) and Brenda makes one so welcome \endash Kevin her son is very busy restoring old furniture in his workshop and I couldn't resist buying a country Hepplewhite chair he brought virtually in bits and made a beautiful job of. We went to the North Devon Agricultural Show day before yesterday \endash great fun but it poured with rain in the afternoon! Brenda the last few years has had a Subaru car which she has been delighted with (I expect you have them in New Zealand being Japanese) at the show her Barnstable garage had a stand and a super second-hand 1981 one owner car was amongst the exhibits. My old Rover is now ten years old and needs a lot spending on it \endash so after sleeping on it \endash we rang the garage \endash I had a run in the car \endash and we made a deal so now I'm going home in it! And good old Rover stays in Devon. It's a changeover I knew I would have to make sooner or later preferably sooner! I'm hoping to call in to see Alison and Ray for an hour or two on my homeward journey, haven't seen them for ages and I would be passing quite near them. I've had some good bathing here you can surf ride near Bideford. Been to a concert where some friends of Anna's (and mine) were performing at the North Devon music festival and am now really feeling much better for a holiday.
Written on four sides of two sheets of note paper
Do hope you and the family are well
Lots of love
Nancy

Other Records

1. Nancy's Letters:

Nancy married Dudley Manning HADWEN [491], son of Arthur Henry HADWEN [2526] and Eleanor Kathleen JOPP [2528], on 15 Apr 1950 in Kew Parish Church SRY. Dudley was born on 1 Dec 1903 in Putney London, died on 10 May 1982 in Wimbledon London at age 78, and was cremated in Putney Vale. The cause of his death was haemopericardium, dissecting aneurism of the aorta, carcinoma of the lung.

General Notes:
Dudley qualified a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in 1927 becoming a Fellow in 1960. He was for many years the Company Secretary for Whiley & Co of London goldbeaters, and administered private accounts. He shared a deep love of music with his wife Nancy, was keen on photography, mathematics, the stock market and travel. Much of Dudley's success came from an ability to focus exclusively on a subject, sometimes to the exclusion of everything else around him. Dudley inherited his family home at 10 Bathgate Rd Wimbledon built by his father, which was sold out of the family at his wifes death in 2003.

1939 Register
10 Bathgate Road , Wimbledon M.B., Surrey, England
Dudley M Hadwen01 Dec 1903MaleChartered Accountant Single1471

OBITUARY - Old Kings Club Newsletter No.61 September 1982.
D M Hadwen (1921) was at Kings (College School Wimbledon) during the First World War. After leaving he became a Chartered Accountant and, after a short time in private practice joined the firm of G M Whiley where he remained for 50 years, eventually becoming Company Secretary. Outside business he enjoyed a keen appreciation of music. We offer our sympathy to his wife Nancy.

Dudley's cremation ref was 60727, his ashes were scattered in the Garden of Rememberance, Putney Vale London.



507. Helen Marie JULIUS [629] (Arthur Dudley295, Arthur Onslow143, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 May 1916 in Haywards Heath Sussex, died on 28 Dec 2002 in Sherbourne at age 86, and was buried in Stourton Caundle DOR.

General Notes:
The late Nancy Hadwen remembered Helen and her sister Rosemary at a childrens party, post WW1, at the home of Bessie Julius (their Grandmother) in Portland Tce Richmond.

Julius H M & R M Gwyers Stourton Caundle Stalbridge 324
Ancestry: Bournmouth Exeter Portsmouth etc Phone Book 1968/69/70/71/72

A plaque in the belfry at Sturminster Newton records Helen was bellringer in a set rung 16 Feb 1974.



508. Capt Arthur Cecil Steuart JULIUS BA (Oxon) [630] (Arthur Dudley295, Arthur Onslow143, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1917 in England., died on 3 Dec 1944 in Netherlands at age 27, and was buried in Limburg Netherlands.

General Notes:
Cecil went to Charter House School in 1934 then B.A. Oxon. He served with the Royal Armoured Corps. No. 237969. 107th. 5th Bn. The Kings Own Royal (Lancaster) Regt. He died aged 27 in the liberation of the Netherlands, in a Tank accident.

He is buried at Mook War Cemetry Netherlands Grave III C 11. Awarded posthumously 1939-45 War Medal & Star.

There is a memorial to Cecil in St Andrews Church Ham Common London.



509. Rosemary Mourilyan JULIUS [631] (Arthur Dudley295, Arthur Onslow143, Frederick Gilder MD FRCS (Dr)82, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 Aug 1923 in Woodford Green LON and died on 10 Aug 2010 in Sherborne DOR at age 87.

General Notes:
Nancy Hadwen remembers Rosemary and her sister Helen at a childrens party at Bessie Julius's (their Grandmother) home in Portland Tce Richmond.

A plaque in the belfry at Sturminster Newton records Rosemary was bellringer No 3 in a set rung 16 Feb 1974.

Edward Fenn writes:
In 2003 whilst travelling in Dorset I visited St Mary Sturminster Newton and found the above plaque. Recognising that Rosemary and her sister Helen were the grandaughters of Arthur Onslow Julius, who had been missing to the wider family for many years, I walked out into the village and enquired of them. The first person I met said yes he knew the women, he had buried the elder one recently but Rosemary was in good health, living nearby in Stourton Caundle.
What joy, particularly for Rosemary, now almost alone in the world to find her extended family again, a great friendship was struck up. In 2005 Rosemary, who had flown only once before, flew First Class to visit us in NZ for a month, what an adventure for her. Amongst the many things she did was fulfill a lifetime fishing desire, catching a fine trout in the famous Rotorua/Taupo fishery in New Zealand's North Island. Her family were avid fisher's.
Rosemary & Helen had many interests over the years including making finely worked felt toy's which they sold in London's West End.
Rosemany was custodian to much Julius history and memorabilia which have now found new homes in the family, including the historic candlesticks given by George IV to George Julius. These form a focus of this website and are an apt memorial to Rosemary and her family.
E L Fenn 2011

510. Edith Pamela Geraldine JULIUS [807] (Sydney George Alexander300, Ashley Alexander146, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1915.

General Notes:
2005 Rosemary Julius on a visit to NZ remembers a Jill Hughes-Jones and her sister Peggy Hughes-Jones who married a Doctor named Elmes. Rosemary remembers their mother was connected to Geraldine Julius and they were perhaps connected to the family.
C 1951/52 Rosemary and Jill went skiing in Switzerland when Jill was called back to England as her father had had a stroke, the families lost contact at that point.

Edith married someone GRINDROD [11360] Apr Qtr 1937 in Hampstead LND MDX.

Marriage Notes:
Marriage E G P Julius m Grindrod Apr Qtr Hampstead MDX 1a 1546

511. Diana de Vere JULIUS [813] (Stanley de Vere Alexander (Lieut Col)302, Stanley Alexander (Dr)148, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1913 in East Preston SSX, died on 11 Jan 2002 in Cranham GLS at age 89, and was buried on 23 Jan 2002 in St James Cranham GLS.

General Notes:
Diana worked during the War for MI5, possibly as a shorthand-typist. At the beginning of the war her office was in West London, near to Wormwood Scrubs Prison. Her office was then evacuated to avoid bombing, and moved to Blenheim Palace, near Oxford. Diana was billeted on Molly Cooper, a widow living at Dun's Tew, a village near Oxford. She was probably there when Arthur Cooper, the son, returned from Australia. Arthur and Diana were married in 1943/44?. They later returned to Australia for a period.
In 1950, Arthur's son Edward, then aged 5, remembers a long summer's leave from Australia where they stayed in Bosham, near Chichester, Sussex. The house was named "Aisacre" and belonged to his mother's "guardian" 'Yorkie'. Diana had a guardian as a child because she was being educated in England while her parents lived abroad, in India and Malaya. Edward recalls from his mothers comments that Yorkie seemed more of a mother to Diana than Maude/Julia.

Diana, on the 6 Sep 1935, sailed from London to Bombay on the Moldavia. Her address was recorded as 22 Cadogan Gardens SW3.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk


Death Notice Times 2002:
Cooper - Diana passed away peacefully in hospital, Jan 11th (2002) aged 88yrs. Beloved wife of the late Arthur Cooper. Dear mother of Edward and a much loved grandmother. Funeral service at St James the Great Church Cranham, Gloucestershire, on Wed Jan 23rd at 11.15 am. Flowers may be sent to W S Trenhaile, Funeral Directors, 174 Bath Rd Cheltenham. 01242-224897

Research Notes:
1913 - Q3 2b 594 1936 - 3 April arrived in London on the Moldavia, Peninsula and Orient Steam Navigation Company Ltd. Ports of voyage - Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart, Adelaide, Fremantle, Colombo, Bombay, Port Sudan, Port Said and Marseilles. Proposed address, 46 Park Mansions, Kensington SW1
Ref Janine Dixon-Wikinson Genes United

Diana married Arthur Richard Valentine COOPER [2421], son of Richard Edward Synge COOPER [7605] and Molly BURKE [7606], in 1943 1944. Arthur was born in 1916 and died in 1987 at age 71.

General Notes:
Arthur had a passion for languages, about 1936 he joined the Government Codes and Cyphers School where his eldest brother Joshua Edward Synge Cooper worked. He studied Japanese before the war and this skill determined how the war was to go for him: he travelled to Hong Kong, was involved in decoding Japanese signals there, and was evacuated to Australia as the Japanese seized the colony, he finally returned to England about 1943.
Arthur continued to work in the highly secret area of signals intelligence, with his brother Joshua at Bletchley Park, and London.
In 1947 Arthur and his family went to Melbourne, Australia, for two 3-year tours of secondment to the Australian Govt. returning in 1953 they settled down to live in Gloucestershire - Bletchley Park had moved to Cheltenham to become GCHQ, Government Communications Headquarters, known in the press as the Spy Centre.

512. Rupert Desmond LUEDECKER [1226] (Leila Sybil JULIUS308, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was baptised on 25 Aug 1912 in St Mary & St Ambrose Edgbaston Birmingham.

Research Notes:
Rupert Desmond Luedecke Baptism 25 August 1912 Place; St Mary and St Ambrose Edgbaston Warwickshire England
Father Alfred Mother Leila. Father was a merchant, abode 106 Pershoe Road Birmingham and ceremony by E L Cochrane.
Reference EP 65/2/1 Archive Roll 13 - Ann McLachlan

From Find My Past
On the 12th May 1949 going to Africa from London
on the Dunmorthe or Dunnothas Castle - Ship
Union Castle Line
Port at which Passengers have contracted to land
Mombassa
Luedecke Mr A B L - 69 (1880 - last piece of information I found had Alfred being born 1879 this would match)
Luedecke Mrs L S - 60 (1889 this is spot on with her date of birth)
Tourist Classs
Location Deutsche in Luneburg Germany he is a Merchant (last known location for Leila Sybil Luedecke nee Julius was in July-October 1922 in Luneburg)
Country of Intended Future Permanent Residence Kenya
Country of Which Citizen or Subject Germany

From Google Books Site:
Kenya Gazette 11 September 1956
Electoral Area No 2 Nairobi South
Luedecke, Rupert Desmond
Departmental Manager Box 2532 Nairobi
Ref Kenya Gazette 11 September 1956 Volume 58 No 45
books.google.com.au/books?id=Elq_346LrfwC
Ref: Ann McLachlan

513. Sybil LUEDECKER [11507] (Leila Sybil JULIUS308, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

514. LUEDECKER [11508] (Leila Sybil JULIUS308, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

515. Bryony Lorna ABBAY [1225] (Henrietta (Etty) Maud JULIUS310, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Sep 1914 in Williton SOM and died on 4 Apr 1980 in Tiverton DEV at age 65.

General Notes:
Bryony L Abbay
Mother's Maiden Name:Julius
Registration Year:1914
Registration Quarter:Oct-Nov-Dec
Registration district:Williton Somerset
Volume:5c
Page:405

1939 Register.
15 Lionel Mansions , Hammersmith, London, England
Lorna (F) Stevenson-Hamilton (Abbay) 03 Sep 1914 single Civil Servant (Secretary Administer)

Bryony married Ivan James DeLano STEVENSON- HAMILTON [23621], son of Maj. Samuel Delano STEVENSON- HAMILTON [23622] and Bertha Gwladys Robinson SEATON [23624], on 15 Feb 1946 in St Andrew Framlingham Earl NFK. The marriage ended in divorce. Ivan was born on 16 Oct 1916, died on 23 Feb 1998 in Torbay DEV at age 81, and was buried in Newton Abbot DEV.

General Notes:
Stevenson- Hamilton = Abbay. On February 15, 1946, at St Andrews, Framlingham Earl, Norfolk, by the Rector, the Rev E P Walker, Maj Ivan James Delano Stevenson-Hamilton, DSO, the Essex Regiment, only son of Major and Mrs S D Stevenson-Hamilton of Hannam Court, Leicester, to Lorna, eldest daughter of Col B N Abbay CB, of Meru Kenya, and Mrs L B L Hughes of Kinangop, Kenya.
Statesman 12 March 1946.

Stevenson-Hamilton,
Ivan James Delano
Son of Maj. Samuel Delano Stevenson-Hamilton (1886-1964), The Black Watch, and Bertha Gwladys Robinson Seaton (1880-1959).
Married 1st (15.02.1946; divorced) Bryony Lorna Abbay (? - 04.04.1980), daughter (with one brother, Capt. John Richard Abbay, The Essex Regiment Army_officers_A01.html) of Col. Bryan Norman Abbay, CB (1881-1947), and Etty Maud Julius (1891-1983) [divorced; she remarried L.B.L. Hughes], of East Soham, Suffolk, and Meru, Kenya..
Married 2nd (12.1980) Marjorie, widow of Brig. John Turnbull, CBE, DSO.
Born 16 Oct 1916.
Died 23 Feb 1998 buried at Newton Abbot

29.01.1938 commissioned, The Essex Regiment
2nd Lt.29.01.1938 [65836]
T/Lt. Col01.07.1944- to 01.1946
Lt.Col.05.07.1962 (retd 16.10.1971)
DSO 24.02.1942 Middle East (Egypt and Libya)
MID24.02.1942
Ref: http://www.unithistories.com/officers/Army_officers_S02.html#Stevenson-Hamilton_IJD



516. John Richard ABBAY [23623] (Henrietta (Etty) Maud JULIUS310, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1916 in Polperro Cornwall, UK and died on 12 Jun 1941 in Fairford GLS at age 25. The cause of his death was sporting gun accident.

General Notes:
Births.
Abbay. On the 28th August, at Polperro, Cornwall, the wife of captain Brian Norman Abbay, 27th Light Cavalry, LA, of a son.

Abbay John Richard
Son (with one sister, who married Lt.Col. I.J.D. Stevenson-Hamilton Army_officers_S02.html) of Col. Bryan Norman Abbay, CB (1881-1947), and Etty Maud Julius (1891-1983) [divorced; she remarried L.B.L. Hughes], of East Soham, Suffolk, and Meru, Kenya.
Born
28 Aug 1915
Polperro, Liskeard district, Cornwall
Died
12.06.1941
Cirencester district, Gloucestershire / Wiltshire (sporting-gun accident)
[Oxford Crematorium]

2nd Lt..27.08.1936
Lt.27.08.1939
T/Capt.late 1940

Education: Dulwich College (1933-1934; boarder in The Orchard); Royal Military College, Sandhurst (31.08.1934-1936) [personal information sheet ].
Member, Essex Union Hunt.
27.08.1936 commissioned; The Essex Regiment 27.08.1936 to 20.04.1939; 2nd Battalion The Essex Regiment (Warley) 21.04.1939 to 09.06.1939 Adjutant, 5th Battalion The Essex Regiment (Territorial Army) (temporarily) 10.06.1939 to 12.06.1941; 2nd/4th Battalion The Essex Regiment (UK, France [Dunkirk], Shropshire)
Ref: http://www.unithistories.com/officers/Army_officers_A01.html

Deaths.
Abbay. On June 12, 1941, result of sporting gun accident, John Richard Abbay, Capt. The Essex Regiment, son of Col Brian Abbay CB, beloved brother of Lorna, and nephew of Capt, and Mrs Hudson. Great Ruffins, Wickham Bishops, Essex, aged 25.
"Good luck have thou with thine honour: ride on because of the word of truth and righteousness".

Lt John Richard Abbay. (1933 - 1934)
The Essex Regiment.
Born August 28, 1915. He was a boarder in The Orchard and after passing through Sandhurst was gazetted to the Essex Regiment in August 1936. He was posted to the 2nd Battalion and served at Warley until April 1939, when he went as temporary adjutant to the 5th Territorial Battalion. In August 1939 he was promoted lieutenant and soon after proceeded with his Regiment to France. He took part in the fighting in Belgium prior to the evacuation from Dunkirk his platoon acting as rearguard and covering the engineers as they blew up the bridges in the retreat to the coast. He was a keen horseman and rode in steeplechases. Until the outbreak of war he was a keen member of the Essex Union Hunt and while stationed in Shropshire after Dunkirk hearing that a famous old pack of foxhounds was going to be broken up, he took over half the pack, got his friends to help him and hunted the pack the whole season. He was promoted temporary captain at the end of 1940 and his untimely death on June 12, 1941, was the result of a sporting gun accident.
Ref : H Houterman www.unithistories.com

Abbay John Richard of Great Ruffins Wickham Bishops Essex died 12 June 1941 at Fairford Gloucestershire. Administration (limited) 8 September to Lorna Abbay spinster attorney of Brian Norman Abbaye. Effects L18 9s 7d
National Probate Calendar.



517. Diana Lorraine ABBAY [23620] (Henrietta (Etty) Maud JULIUS310, Villiers Alexander149, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Nov 1918.


Diana married Sq Ldr Francis BAVIN SMITH [24094] in 1943 in Mombasa Kenya. Francis was born on 11 Jul 1906.

General Notes:
FRANCIS BAVIN-SMITH
Marriage year1943
Marriage placeMOMBASA
CountryKENYA
Spouse's first name(s)-
Spouse's last name- (Firth?)
Page1106
Line number121
Record sourceGRO Index Army Marriages (1881 to 1955)
Record setBritish nationals armed forces marriages 1796-2005

Research Notes:
This family is based on the passenger manifests of the Kenya Castle dated 10 Feb 1955 and 30 Apr 1958, otherwise unproven.



518. Col Hubert Layard CHESSHYRE M.A. [1229] (Ada Mildred LAYARD311, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1906 in Farnham SRY.

General Notes:
In the patrilineal line Chesshyre belongs to the family of Isacke of North Foreland Lodge. The family name was changed by his father, Colonel Hubert Chesshyre, late RA, from Isacke to Chesshyre. Colonel Chesshyre, born Hubert Isacke, was the son of Major General Hubert Isacke, CB, CSI, CMG, six times mentioned in despatches, late Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment. Major General Chesshyre's father was Colonel Henry Isacke, late RA, himself the son of Robert Isacke, Deputy Lieutenant of the County of Kent, sometime Commander in the Honourable East India Company Maritime Service.
Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubert_Chesshyre

Research Notes:
Image Courtesy Wikipedia

Hubert married Katherine Anne BOOTHBY [19199] on 21 Mar 1939. Katherine was born on 11 Jun 1915.

519. Neville ISACKE [1230] (Ada Mildred LAYARD311, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1909.

520. Vivien Anne LAYARD [1233] (Lt Col Charles Peter Julius LAYARD312, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1920.

521. Stella Mary LAYARD [1234] (Lt Col Charles Peter Julius LAYARD312, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1921.

522. Gillian Anne LAYARD [1237] (Raymond Julius LAYARD313, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1929.

523. Anne LAYARD [1241] (Austen Havelock LAYARD315, Ada Alexandria JULIUS150, Alfred Alexander83, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1929.

524. Edward G K DEVERILL [16506] (Edward G K DEVERILL322, William Edward Herbert DEVERILL156, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Dec 1917 and died on 3 May 1999 in Hanalei Kauai Hawaii at age 81.

Research Notes:
This placement is not proved but based on the Social Security Death Index

525. Walter Foss SANBORN Jnr [16488] (Angeline Constance DEVERILL330, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

526. John William SANBORN [16489] (Angeline Constance DEVERILL330, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

527. Percy D SANBORN [16490] (Angeline Constance DEVERILL330, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) died in 1955.

528. Helen K SANBORN [16491] (Angeline Constance DEVERILL330, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
The interisland steamer brought freight to Hanalei about once a month, and store owners and rice planters headed for the pier with their horse-pulled carts and wagons. The daughter of Walter Foss Sanborn recalled hiding along the road in front of the Deverill house on the beach road, and "hooting and hollering when the wagons went by," and then suppressing their laughter as the drivers cursed "while they struggled to keep their shying horses under control."
Ref: http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/hanalei-history-part-4.asp [xcv]

529. Emma Angeline MAERTENS [16429] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 12 Jun 1905 in Hawaii and died on 21 Aug 1999 in Hawaii at age 94.

Research Notes:
Maertens, Emma - Birth
Vital Birth Information
Date
12 Jun 1905
Location
Kamuela, Hawaii, T. H. <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034351&eid=65929299748>

Emma Maertens
Marriage Information
Date
1925
To Hiram Jesse Haena
Ref: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/12157030/person/13217777536> <javascript:;>

Nahiwa Thomas Kaomealani married Maertens Emma Angeline 11 Jun 1922 S Kohala H-45 p62
Ref: Marriages Hawaii 1911-1929

Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-2012
Name: Emma Maertens
Publication Date: 5 Apr 1999
Death Date: abt 1999
Age at Death: 92
Birth Date: Abt 1907
Source Information:
Original data: The Obituary Daily Times. The Obituary Daily Times. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~obituary

Social Security Death Index
Name: Emma Haena SSN: 575-20-2166 Last Residence: 96720 Hilo, Hawaii, Hawaii, United States of America Born: 12 Jun 1905 Died: 21 Aug 1999 State (Year) SSN issued: Hawaii (Before 1951)
Source Citation: Number: 575-20-2166; Issue State: Hawaii; Issue Date: Before 1951.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.
Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

Maertens, Emma - Death
Vital Death Information
Date
21 Aug 1999
Location
Hilo, Hawaii Co., HI <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034351&eid=65998771938>
Description
Age at Death: 92

Honolulu Star Bulletin Posted Tuesday, August 24, 1999
Emma A.P. Haena, 94, of Hilo, died Saturday at home. Born in Waimea, she is survived by daughters Jane Kakelaka, Minerva Naehu, Emmeline Santiago Foster, Blossom Kelii and Lydia Haena; son Thomas Nahiwa; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and great-great-grandchildren. Call from 5 to 9 p.m. tomorrow at home. Services: 10 a.m. Friday at Borthwick Hawaii Funeral Home. Call from 9 to 11 a.m. Burial: Homelani Memorial Park.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 8 May 1910, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Emma is recorded as a daughter aged 5 born Hawaii.

2. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Emma is recorded as a daughter aged 14 a school girl born Hawaii

3. Census: USA Hawaii, 4 Apr 1930, Kinsale St Sth Hilo Hawaii. Emma is recorded as a wife aged 25 born Hawaii

Emma married Thomas Kaomealani NAHIWA [16514], son of Thomas Joseph NAHIWA [16521] and Jane Kaomelani SPENCER [16520], on 10 Jun 1922 in South Kohola Hawaii. Thomas was born on 2 Dec 1884 in Waimea Kohola Hawaii and died on 30 Jun 1939 in Maui HI at age 54.

General Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
Thomas Keomealani, (I. H. Nahiwa in entry)
Name:Thomas Keomealani
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 02 Dec 1884
Birthplace: WAIMEA, KOHALA, HAWAII, HI
Father's Name: I. H. Nahiwa
Mother's Name:Jane
Indexing Project (Batch) Number:C51892-1
System Origin: Hawaii-VR GS Film number:1014410 Reference ID: 2:1VCR96WCiting this Record
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FWS2-2B3 : accessed 06 Jan 2014), I. H. Nahiwa in entry for Thomas Keomealani, 02 Dec 1884.


Obituary
NAHIWA, THOMAS K., hotel proprietor, lawyer, manufacturers' agent, Waimea, Hawaii: born Waimea, Dec. 9, 1884; son of Joseph Nahiwa and Jane Davis (Spencer) Nahiwa; educated at Kamehameha School, graduated 1902; Territorial Normal School, grad. 1906. Began teaching school at Laupahoehoe, and later Kaapahu, Hawaii, 1906; was principal Alae School, Kona, 1907, and principal and supt. Kalihi Boys' Home for Non Leprous Children, 1908; married Esther Purely, at Paauhau, Aug. 29, 1909 (divorced, 1920). Asst. teacher Paauilo school, 1909; principal Makapala school, Kohala, 1910-18; quit teaching in 1919 and bought Waimea hotel, making specialty of tourist trade. Is representative of number of mainland firms as sales agent; has been interested in moving picture exhibitions for number of years; active in National Guard and Boy Scout activities; admitted to practice, district court, 1921.
Ref: Book "Men of Hawaii" About men of note and substantial achievement in the Hawaiian Islands. Volume 1 probably pg 295 under "N"
http://www.archive.org/stream/menofhawaiibeing02sidd/menofhawaiibeing02sidd_djvu.txt
http://archive.org/stream/menofhawaiibeing02sidd/menofhawaiibeing02sidd_djvu.txt

Research Notes:
Thomas is recorded as 26 in the 1920 Census the researcher thinks the actual age was probably 36 which fits.

Image Courtesy of Ka Nupepa Kuokoa - A Hawaiian language newspaper first published 1861.

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii USA, 13 Jan 1920, Waimea Valley Sth Kohola Hawaii. Thomas is recorded as a stepson married aged 26 of part hawaiian race literate born in Hawaii as was his parents he is a peddler of dry goods on his own behalf.

2. Census: USA Hawaii, 4 Apr 1930, Kinsale St Sth Hilo Hawaii. Thomas is recorded as head of house married aged 46 a teacher at a public school living in his own home with a mortgage born Hawaii

Children from this marriage were:

+ 704 M    i. James Kamelini NAHIWA [16515] was born about 1924 in Hawaii.

+ 705 F    ii. Jane Kaomealani NAHIWA [19363] was born on 28 Jan 1924 in Hawaii and died on 26 Nov 2013 in Hawaii at age 89.

+ 706 M    iii. Thomas Joseph Kawalaulu NAHIWA [16516] was born on 17 Aug 1925 in Hawaii and died on 17 Jul 2001 at age 75.

+ 707 M    iv. Walter Kauirla NAHIWA [16517] was born on 23 Nov 1926 in Hawaii and died in Jul 1970 in Hilo Hawaii HI at age 43.

+ 708 F    v. Minerva Paulani NAHIWA [16518] was born on 5 Apr 1928 in Hawaii and died on 22 Nov 2000 in Honolulu Hawaii at age 72.

+ 709 M    vi. Abraham Lincoln NAHIWA [16519] was born on 12 Feb 1930 in Waimea Kohala Hawaii and died on 18 Jan 1932 in Hilo Hawaii HI at age 1.

+ 710 M    vii. Frederick Mohelam NAHIWA [18303] was born on 27 Oct 1931 in Hawaii and died on 13 Nov 1996 in Hilo Hawaii HI at age 65.

Emma next married John HAENA [20039] on 8 Apr 1950 in Hilo Hawaii HI. John died on 24 Sep 1962 in Hilo Hawaii HI.

Marriage Notes:
Source Marriage Certificate


530. Joseph Booth MAERTENS [2757] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 12 Dec 1906 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 11 Jan 1907 in Kohala, HI, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-CF.

Research Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
name: Joseph Booth Maertins
gender: Male
birth date: 12 Dec 1906
birthplace: South Kohala, Hawaii, Hawaii
father's name:Joseph Maertins
mother's name:Lydia Maertins
indexing project (batch) number:I04926-4
system origin:Hawaii-EASy
source film number:1889021
reference number:item 1 p 2
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FW9P-NVM : accessed 13 Jan 2013), Joseph Booth Maertins, 12 Dec 1906.

Joseph Booth Maertens
Birth: Dec. 12, 1906 Death: Jan. 11, 1907 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951)
Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967)
Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22125151 Added by: Susan McKinney Raymond Photos may be scaled. Click on image for full size.
Added: Apr. 12, 2009. Find a Grave



531. Frederick K MAERTENS [16430] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jan 1908 in Puukapu Homestead Sth Kohala HI, died on 4 Aug 1984 in Hilo Hawaii HI at age 76, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. Another name for Frederick was Nappier.

General Notes:
Frederick was the surviving twin with Herman.

Frederick worked at the famous Parker Ranch on the Island of Hawaii.
Ref: Loyal to the Land the Legendry Parker Ranch by Billy Bergin.

Research Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
name: Frederick Maertens
gender: Male
birth date: 23 Jan 1908
birthplace: South Kohala, Hawaii, Hawaii
father's name:Joseph H. Maertens
mother's name:Lydia Maertens
source film number:1889021
reference number:item 1 p 4
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FW9P-NR2 : accessed 22 Jan 2013), Frederick Maertens, 23 Jan 1908.

Fredrick Maertens
Birth: Jan. 23, 1908 Death: Aug. 4, 1984 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951) Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967) Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22125110

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 8 May 1910, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Frederick is recorded as a son aged 2 yrs and 2 months born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Frederick is recorded as a son aged 11 a school boy born Hawaii

3. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Frederick is recorded as Freddy a son not married aged 22 a labourer on a cattle ranch born Hawaii

4. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Frederick is recorded as a son aged 32 not married a stableman for a cattle rancher he worked 51 hours in the previous week his income for the last year was $495 he was born in Hawaii

Frederick married Grace CARIES [20040] on 17 May 1946 in Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Grace was born on 25 Feb 1914 in Ahulola Hawaii, died on 23 Dec 1970 at age 56, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI.

532. Herman K MAERTENS [2758] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jan 1908 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 21 Jun 1908 in Kohala, HI, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-DL.

Research Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
name: Herman Maertens
gender: Male
birth date: 23 Jan 1908
birthplace: South Kohala, Hawaii, Hawaii
father's name:Joseph H. Maertens
mother's name:Lydia Maertens
indexing project (batch) number:I04926-4
system origin:Hawaii-EASy
source film number:1889021
reference number:item 1 p 4
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FW9P-NRP : accessed 20 Feb 2013), Herman Maertens, 23 Jan 1908.

Vital Death Information
Maertins, Herman K.
Date 2 Jun 1908
Location So. Kohala, Hawaii, T. H. <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=13537812258&eid=82032262741>
No description has been added.

533. Katherine Lydia MAERTENS [2759] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 May 1909 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 7 Jul 1940 in Kohala, Kohala, HI at age 31, and was buried on 9 Jul 1940 in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. She was usually called Katalina. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-GX.

Research Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
name: Maertens
gender: Female
birth date: 03 May 1909
birthplace: South Kohala, Hawaii, Hawaii
father's name:Joseph Maertens
mother's name:Lydia Maertens
source film number:1889021
reference number:item 1 p 6
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FW9P-J72 : accessed 23 Feb 2013), Maertens, 03 May 1909.
Note: This entry has been taken to be Katherine Lydia Maertens

Vital Birth Information
Maertens, Katherine Lydia
Date 03 MAY 1909
Location Waimea, So. Kohala, Hawaii, T. H. <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034033&eid=6184578793>
No description has been added

Vital Death Information
Mertin, Katherine Lydia
Date 07 JUL 1940
Location Kohala, Hawaii, T. H.
No description has been added.

Katherine M Bell
Birth: May 3, 1909 Death: Jul. 8, 1940 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951) Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967) Spouse: James K. Bell (1909 - 1964) *Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22124643

Mertin, Katherine Lydia
Burial Information
Date 08 JUL 1940
Location Waimea, So. Kohala, Hawaii, T. H. <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034033&eid=6184578795>
No description has been added.


Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 8 May 1910, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 1 born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Katherine is recorded as a daughter aged 10 a school girl born Hawaii

3. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Katherine is recorded as a daughter not married aged 20 born Hawaii

4. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Katherine is recorded as a daughter married aged 30 born Hawaii

Katalina married James Kamakea BELL [16441] on 9 Apr 1939 in Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. James was born on 7 Oct 1909 in Honolulu Oahu Hawaii and died on 5 Sep 1954 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI at age 44.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. James is recorded as a son-in-law (of Joseph Maertens) aged 30 a labourer in road construction he worked 40 hours in the preceeding week his income for the last year was $516 he was born in Hawaii

The child from this marriage was:

+ 711 M    i. James David K BELL [18294] was born on 30 Jun 1940 in Hawaii and died on 13 Nov 2006 in Hawaii at age 66.


534. Josephine M MAERTENS [16444] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Jan 1911 in Hawaii and died on 17 Dec 1996 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI at age 85.

Research Notes:
Josephine M Hooper, "United States Social Security Death Index"
first name: Josephine
middle name: M
last name: Hooper
birth date: 11 January 1911
social security number: 575-10-4903
place of issuance: Hawaii
last residence: Hawaii, Hawaii
zip code of last residence: 96743
death date: 17 December 1996
estimated age at death: 85
"United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J5X2-52S : accessed 22 Jan 2013), Josephine M Hooper, 17 December 1996; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Josephine M Hooper
Birth: Jan. 11, 1911 Death: Dec. 17, 1996 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951) Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967) Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22124712 Added by: Susan McKinney Raymond

Honolulu Star Bulletin - Obituaries Thursday, December 19 and Friday, December 20, 1996
Josephine M. Hooper , 85, of Waimea, Hawaii, a former U.S. Census Bureau employee, died Tuesday at home. Born in Waimea, she is survived by son Edmund; brother Buddy Maertens; sisters Mabel Davis, Maile Balles, Lydia Webster, Marjorie Berry and Marietta Loughlin; and five grandchildren. Service: 11 a.m. tomorrow at Imiola Congregational Church. Call after 10 a.m. Burial: Maertens Family Plot. Casual attire. No flowers.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Josephine is recorded as a daughter aged 9 a school girl born Hawaii

2. Census: USA Hawaii, 4 Apr 1930, Kinsale St Sth Hilo Hawaii. Josephine Maertens is recorded 4/4/30 at the home of Thomas Nahiwa as a sister-in-law single aged 19 born Hawaii as are her parents.

3. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Josephine is also recorded 10/4/30 as a daughter not married aged 19 born Hawaii

4. Census: USA Hawaii, 5 Apr 1940, Makini St Honolulu Oahu Hawaii. Josephine is recorded as a wife aged 29 she was out of work in the previous week and had been seeking it for the last 26 weeks in the last year she had earned $200 as a packer in a pineapple cannery she was born in Hawaii

Josephine married Edmund Charles HOOPER Snr [16474], son of Charles HOOPER [16476] and Martha [16478], before Nov 1929. Edmund was born on 2 Sep 1904 in Kealia Sth Kona Hawaii and died in Sep 1953 in Hawaii at age 49.

Research Notes:
Edmund Charles Hooper , "Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933"
Name: Edmund Charles Hooper
Gender: Male
Birth date: 02 Sep 1904
Birthplace: KEALIA, SOUTH KONA, HI, Hawaii
Father's name:Charles Edmund Hooper
Mother's name:Martha Kahamoku
Indexing project (batch) number:C00873-7
System origin:Hawaii-EASy
Source film number:1031601
Reference number:Bk 152 cn 37865
Citing this Record:
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FWSZ-M8G : accessed 20 Feb 2013), Edmund Charles Hooper, 02 Sep 1904.

California, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957
Name: Edmund Hooper Arrival Date: 19 Nov 1929 Age: 25 Birth Date: 2 Sep 1904 Birthplace: Hookena, Hawaii, United States Gender: Male Married, Address in US Honolulu HI. Ship Name: Manoa Port of Arrival: San Francisco Port of Departure: Honolulu, Hawaii Archive information (series:roll number): M1410:256

Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1900-1959
Name: Edmund Hooper Age: 26yrs 2 Mths Gender: Male Single (sic) Birth Year: 2 Sep1904 Birthplace: Hawaii Port of Departure: Wilmington, California Departure Date: 16 Nov 1930 Port of Arrival: Honolulu, Hawaii Arrival Date: 22 Nov 1930 Last Residence: Hawaii, Ship name "City of Los Angeles" Source Citation: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, August 1912-November 1954; National Archives Microfilm Publication: A3422; Roll: 112; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787 - 2004; Record Group Number: 85.

Edmund Hooper, "United States Social Security Death Index"
Given Name:Edmund
Surname:Hooper
Birth Date:2 September 1904
Social Security Number:576-10-8919
State:Hawaii
Event Date:September 1953
Age:49
Citing this Record
"United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V3PJ-XNL : accessed 26 Nov 2013), Edmund Hooper, September 1953; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 21 Apr 1910, Government Rd Sth Kona Hawaii. Edmund is recorded as a son aged 5 born Hawaii

2. Census: USA Hawaii, 3 Jan 1920, Kukea South Kona Hawaii. Edmund is recorded as a son aged 15 a school boy born in Hawaii

3. Census: USA Hawaii, 5 Apr 1940, Makini St Honolulu Oahu Hawaii. Edmund is recorded as head of house married aged 35 in the previous week he worked 45 hours as a foreman for the County Parks Dept his annual earnings were $2100 he owned his own house valued at $2200 and was born in Hawaii

The child from this marriage was:

+ 712 M    i. Edmund HOOPER Jnr [16475] .

535. Mabel MAERTENS [16445] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Sep 1912 in Hawaii, died on 26 Oct 1999 in Anacortes Washington USA at age 87, and was buried in Ashes in-urned 1/20/2000, in lot 25, section 13. Oahu Cemetery HI.

Research Notes:
Maertens, Mabel M. (Married name Davis)
Thank you for your inquiry. We are presently changing our website and should be complete soon. Sorry for the inconvenience. According to our burial records, Mabel Davis was born 9/16/1912, died 10/26/1999, ashes in-urned 1/20/2000, in lot#25, section 13. We will attempt to get a photo of a grave marker at a later time.
They were sent her full name, maiden name, husband full name and her birth and death dates prior looking this information up.
Email to Mr. Alan D'Orsay from Oahu Cemetery on 03/07/2013

Maertens, Mabel M. - Death
Vital Death Information
Date
26 OCT 1999
Location
Anacortes, Skagit Co., WA
Ref: http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034821&eid=6184576178

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Mabel is recorded as Mable a daughter aged 7 a school girl born Hawaii

2. Census: USA Hawaii, 4 Apr 1930, Kinsale St Sth Hilo Hawaii. Mabel Maertens is recorded 4/4/30 at the home of Thomas Nahiwa as a sister-in-law single aged 18 born Hawaii as are her parents.

3. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Mabel is recorded 10/04/30 as a daughter not married aged 17 born Hawaii

4. Census: Hawaii US, 2 Apr 1940, Mott Smith Drive Honolulu Hawaii. Mabel is recorded as a wife aged 27 in the preceeding weeek she worked 40 hrs as an attendant at the Town Hospital her income for the last year was $1100 she was born in Hawaii.

Mabel married James Hooper DAVIS Snr [16451] in 1938. James was born about 1888 in Hawaii.

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii US, 2 Apr 1940, Mott Smith Drive Honolulu Hawaii. James H is recorded as head of house married aged 52 in the preceeding weeek he worked 40 hrs as a pump engineer for the Board of Water Supply his income for the last year was $2040 he was living in his own house valued at $6000 and was born in Hawaii.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 713 M    i. James Hooper DAVIS JR [16452] was born on 23 Apr 1938 in Hawaii and died on 17 Jan 2009 in Volcano Hawaii at age 70.


536. Marjorie Hermina MAERTENS [16446] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Mar 1914 in Hawaii, died on 12 Oct 2009 in Phoenix Maricopa Co Arizona at age 95, and was buried in Greenwood Lawn Cemetery Phoenix.

Research Notes:
Majorie Berry, "California, Los Angeles Passenger Lists, 1907-1948"
Name: Majorie Berry
Event Type: Immigration
Event Date: 1937
Event Place: California, United States
Gender: Male (sic)
Age: 46
Birthplace: United States
Ship Name: Lurline
Birth Year (Estimated): 1891
Affiliate Publication Title: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Pedro/Wilmington/Los Angeles, California, June 29, 1907-June 30, 1948
Affiliate Publication Number: M1764
Affiliate Film Number: 75
GS Film number:1734679 <https://familysearch.org/search/record/results>
Digital Folder Number:005014109 <https://familysearch.org/search/record/results>
Image Number: 00205
Citing this Record
"California, Los Angeles Passenger Lists, 1907-1948," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KZQ4-N91 : accessed 22 Nov 2013), Elmer Berry, 1937

Marjorie Hermina Berry 95 resident of Phoenix passed away October 12, 2009. She was born in Waimea Hawaii on March 23, 1914. Marjorie's lineage to Hawaii went back as far as 1769 A.D. She loved to garden and grows flowers from her native state. She was a lifetime member of the Church of Latter Day Saints and enjoyed teaching the hula dance to church children. She is survived by her daughter Lydia Sarah Berry, son Elmer Leroy Berry Jr., 10 stepchildren, sister Marietta "Lola" Cassey Loughrin, sister-in-law Hazel Maertens, and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, special children she helped to raise and many friends.
Marjorie was preceded in death by her husband Elmer Leroy Berry Snr., And John Ralph Llewellyn, brothers Joseph, Herman, Frederick, Joseph L., Alfred Alex, Arthur Conrad, sisters Emma, Josephine, Katharine, Mabel, Maile, Keala and Lydia. Visitation will be held on Friday, October 23 from 6 to 8 PM at the Maryvale Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints 3802 N. 59th Avenue in Phoenix. Funeral services on Saturday, October 24 at 10 AM at the Ward. Arrangements entrusted To Greenwood Memory Lawn.
Ref: Arizona Republic 12 Oct 2009.

Honolulu Star Bulletin Posted May 24, 2009
Marjorie Hermina Berry, 95, of Phoenix, Ariz., died Oct. 12, 2009. Born in Waimea. An avid gardener and devoted member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Survived by daughter, Lydia Barry; son, Elmer Jr., 10 stepchildren, sister, Marietta "Lola" Cassey Loughrin. Visitation 5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Maryvale Ward, Phoenix. Service 10 a.m. Oct. 24 at the church. Arrangements by Greenwood Memory Lawn Mortuary.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Marjorie is recorded as Margarie a daughter aged 5 born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, South Hilo Hilo City Hawaii. Marjorie is recorded as a servant single aged 16 a maid in a private home born Hawaii

3. Census: USA Federal, 5 Apr 1940, Apache co Arizona. Hermina is recorded as a wife race white aged 26 born in Hawaii

Marjorie married Elmer Leroy BERRY of Arizona [16471]. Elmer was born about 1891 in St Johns Arizona.

Research Notes:
Elmer Berry, "California, Los Angeles Passenger Lists, 1907-1948"
Name: Elmer Berry
Immigration Event Date: 1937
Event Place: California, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 46
Birthplace: United States
Ship Name: Lurline
Birth Year (Estimated): 1891
Affiliate Publication Title: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Pedro/Wilmington/Los Angeles, California, June 29, 1907-June 30, 1948
Affiliate Publication Number: M1764
Affiliate Film Number: 75
GS Film number:1734679
Digital Folder Number:005014109
Image Number: 00205
Citing this Record
"California, Los Angeles Passenger Lists, 1907-1948," index and images,
FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KZQ4-N91 : accessed 22 Nov 2013, Elmer Berry, 1937

Elmer was a veteran of WWI

Other Records

1. Census: USA Federal, 5 Apr 1940, Apache co Arizona. Elmer L is recorded as head of house married race white aged 49 a truck driver on a road construction project he worked 33 hours in the last week had worked 38 weeks in 1939 for $660 after being out of work for 80 weeks owns in his own house valued at $600 born in Arizona

Marjorie next married John Ralph LEWELLEN [16481] on 31 Jan 1976. John died on 10 Aug 1992.

Research Notes:
John Lewellen, "United States Social Security Death Index"
Given Name:John
Middle Name:
Surname:Lewellen
Name Suffix:
Birth Date:1 March 1899
Social Security Number:303-38-5587
State:Indiana
Last Place of Residence:Glendale, Maricopa, Arizona
Previous Residence Postal Code:85305
Event Date:10 August 1992
Age:93
Citing this Record
"United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JPLH-23T : accessed 13 Jan 2014), John Lewellen, 10 August 1992; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

This entry is based on this obituary:
Honolulu Star Bulletin - Posted Saturday May 24, 2003
Lydia "Lilly" Maertens Webster , 72, of Waimea, Hawaii, a Leonard's Bakery manager, died Feb. 6, 1998, in California. She was born in Waimea, Hawaii. She is survived by daughter Rosalind Egan and sisters Marietta Loughrin and Marjorie Llewllyen (correctly spelt as used by the family Lewellen). Services held.

John's step-daughter Lydia Sarah Berry confirmed in Nov 2013 to Alan D'Orsay the correct spelling of Lewellen and that he had a family of 10 to a previous wife.



537. Joseph Ludwig MAERTENS [2760] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Nov 1915 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 4 Apr 1940 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii at age 24, and was buried on 5 Apr 1940 in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-KG.

Research Notes:
Joseph L. Maertens
Birth: 1915 Death: 1940 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951) Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967) Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22125139 Added by: Susan McKinney Raymond

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Joseph is recorded as a son aged 4yrs 6 mths born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Joseph is recorded as a son aged 14 born Hawaii

3. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Frederick is recorded as a son aged 24 not married a horse trainer for a cattle rancher he worked 51 hours in the preceeding week his income for the last year was $600 he was born in Hawaii

538. Alfred Alex MAERTENS [2761] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 Jan 1918 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 3 Jul 1919 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii at age 1, and was buried on 3 Jul 1919 in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-LM.

Research Notes:
Alfred A Maertens
Birth: Jan. 26, 1918 Death: Jul. 3, 1919 Family links: Parents: Joseph H. Maertens (1877 - 1951) Lydia Sarah Deverill Maertens (1885 - 1967) Burial: Imiola Church Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Virginia E. (Moniz) Ray... Record added: Oct 12, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22125095 Added by: Susan McKinney Raymond Apr. 12, 2009 Lois Schwartz Added: Mar. 30, 2010

539. Marietta Casey MAERTENS [16447] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born about 1919 in Hawaii. She was usually called Lala.

Research Notes:
Marietta Meartens - Birth
Vital Birth Information
Date: 16 Sep 1920 (It is not thought that Marietta & Maile were twins so this date has not been adopted 2013)
File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by:
J. Orr jessicanorr@gmail.com March 5, 2012, 8:26 pm

Meartens, Marietta - Marriage
Marriage Information
Date
circa 1935
Location
Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, T. H.
to George Parker
Description
info from 1940 Census

UNKNOWN NEWSPAPER no date
The marriage of Mrs. Marietta Maertens Parker , daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph H. Maertens of Honolulu, to George Webster, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Reginald Webster of Honolulu, took place last Saturday afternoon at Imiola
church, Waimea, S. Kohala, Hawaii, with the Rev. Herbert Brewster of Honokaa,
Hamakua, Hawaii, former pastor of the Hana (Maui) Hawaiian church, officiating.
Mrs. Isabel Davis, sister of the bride , was the matron of honor.
The best man was Buddy Maertens , brother of the bride.
A luau was held at the Waimea home of the bride after the ceremony. It was
attended by relatives and friends of the newly married couple.
The wedding party returned by plane from Hilo last Sunday evening,
accompanied by Mrs. Jessie Lindsey, cousin of the bride, and Mrs. Mabel Davis, sister of the bride .
The couple are making their home at 100-A Kapahulu Ave.
The bride is a cashier with the Hawaiian Airways.
The bridegroom is associated with the Standard Oil Co. of Calif.
File at: http://files.usgwarchives.net/hi/honolulu/newspapers/websterp31gnw.txt
This file has been created by a form at http://www.genrecords.org/hifiles/

Marietta Meartens - Marriage
Marriage Information
Date
circa 1940
No place has been added.
to Unknown Loughlin
No description has been added.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 19 Jan 1920, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Marietta is recorded as a daughter aged 7 months born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Marietta is recorded as a daughter aged 10 born Hawaii

3. Census: Hawaii, 14 Apr 1940, Oahu Honolulu Hawaii. Marietta is described as a daughter-in-law race caucasian married aged 22 born Hawaii not in work

Lala married George Kuakini Ehune PARKER [16480], son of Clemence PARKER [19158] and Helen [19159], on 25 May 1935. George was born about 1914 and died in Oct 1984 in Honolulu Oahu Hawaii aged about 70.

Research Notes:
This entry is based on the description of Marietta as Marietta Maertens Parker on the report of her marriage to George Webster.

Parker, George - Marriage
Marriage Information
Date
circa 1935
Location
Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, T. H.
to Marietta Maertens
Description
info from 1940 Census

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii, 17 Apr 1930, Oahu Honolulu Hawaii. George is described as a son asiatic hawaiian by race single aged 16 born Hawaii as were his parents, not employed

2. Census: Hawaii, 14 Apr 1940, Oahu Honolulu Hawaii. George is described as a son a part Hawaiian aged 26 he worked 43 hours in the previopus week as an oil utilities salesman. He declared no earnings or work history

The child from this marriage was:

+ 714 M    i. Walter Kukini Maertens PARKER [18289] was born about 1936 in Hawaii.

Lala next married George WEBSTER [16472], son of Reginald WEBSTER [16473], on 1 Jul 1948. George was born on 25 May 1920 and died in Oct 1985 at age 65. They had no children.

General Notes:
Uncertain placement from her mothers obituary in the Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Research Notes:
George Webster , "United States Social Security Death Index"
Given Name: George
Surname: Webster
Birth Date: 25 May 1920
Social Security Number: 576-18-1002
State: Hawaii
Last Place of Residence: Haleiwa, Honolulu, Hawaii
Previous Residence Postal Code: 96712
Event Date: October 1985
Age: 65
"United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JTCN-9Q7 : accessed 12 Mar 2013), George Webster, October 1985.

Lala next married Alan James LOUGHRIN [16456] on 8 Dec 1969. Alan was born in 1918 and died on 8 Jun 1997 at age 79. They had no children.

Research Notes:
Unknown Loughlin - Marriage
Marriage Information
Date circa 1940
No place has been added.
to Marietta Maerteans
No description has been added.

540. Maile Elizabeth MAERTENS [16448] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Sep 1920 in Hawaii, died on 13 Sep 1998 in Poway San Diego CA at age 77, and was buried in Ashes scattered ocean Kawailae Hawaii.

Research Notes:
Social Security Death Index
Name: Maile E. Balles SSN: 575-18-1140 Last Residence: 92064 Poway, San Diego, California, United States of America Born: 16 Sep 1920 Died: 13 Sep 1998 State (Year) SSN issued: Hawaii (Before 1951)
Source Citation: Number: 575-18-1140; Issue State: Hawaii; Issue Date: Before 1951.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.
Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.
Ref: http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=3693&enc=1

Maile Elizabeth Meartens
Vital Death Information
Date 13 Sep 1998
Location Poway, San Diego, California, United States of America
No description has been added.

Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-2012
Name: Maile Elizabeth (maertens) Balles
Publication Date: 17 Sep 1998
Death Date: abt 1998
Age at Death: 77
Birth Date: Abt 1921
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-2012 [database on-line].

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Maile is recorded as a daughter aged 9 born Hawaii

Maile married Edward BALLES [16455] in 1940. Edward was born on 23 Jan 1925 in Pennsylvania USA and died on 15 Apr 1995 in Poway San Diego CA at age 70.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 715 F    i. Elizabeth BALLES [18297] was buried in Poway Ca USA.


541. Florence Keala MAERTENS [2762] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 15 Sep 1922 in Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii, died on 10 Mar 1987 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI at age 64, and was buried in Waimea Catholic Cemetery Sth Kohala Hawaii. Ancestral File Number: 6ZD8-P5.

Research Notes:
Social Security Death Index
Name: Florence Cootey SSN: 576-62-0017 Last Residence: 96743 Kamuela, Hawaii, Hawaii, United States of America Born: 15 Sep 1922 Died: Mar 1987 State (Year) SSN issued: Hawaii (1968)
Source Citation: Number: 576-62-0017; Issue State: Hawaii; Issue Date: 1968.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.
Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

Florence Keala Cootey
Birth: Sep. 15, 1922 Death: Mar. 10, 1987 Burial: Waimea Catholic Cemetery Waimea (Hawaii County) Hawaii County Hawaii, USA Created by: Susan McKinney Raymond Record added: May 11, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 89984548 Added by: Susan McKinney Raymond

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Keala is recorded as a daughter aged 7 born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Florence is recorded as a daughter married aged 17 born Hawaii

Florence married Joseph F COOTEY [16442], son of Frank F COOTEY [13363] and Mary [13364]. Joseph was born on 9 Jul 1911 in Hawaii, died on 16 Apr 1995 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI at age 83, and was buried in Waimea Catholic Cemetery Sth Kohala Hawaii.

Research Notes:
Joseph Cootey in household of Frank F Cootey, "United States Census, 1930"
name: Joseph Cootey
event: Census
event date: 1930
event place: Hilo, Hawaii, Hawaii
gender: Male
age: 18
marital status: Single
race: OC
birthplace: Hawaii
estimated birth year: 1912
immigration year:
relationship to head of household: Son
father's birthplace: California
mother's birthplace: Hawaii
enumeration district number:0024
family number:108
sheet number and letter:7A
line number:9
nara publication:T626, roll 2631
film number:2342365
digital folder number:4661338
image number:00686
Household Gender Age Birthplace
head Frank F Cootey M57 California
wife Mary Cootey F44 Hawaii
daughter Rose Cootey F26 Hawaii
son George Cootey M22 Hawaii
daughter Irene Cootey F20 Hawaii
son Joseph Cootey M18 Hawaii
daughter Isabel Cootey F16 Hawaii
Citing this Record
"United States Census, 1930," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XH18-R6G : accessed 21 Feb 2013), Joseph Cootey in household of Frank F Cootey, Hilo, Hawaii, Hawaii; citing enumeration district (ED) 0024, sheet 7A, family 108, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2631.

Joseph Cootey , "United States Social Security Death Index"
first name: Joseph
last name: Cootey
birth date: 9 July 1911
social security number: 576-05-1876
place of issuance: Hawaii
last residence: Hawaii, Hawaii
zip code of last residence: 96743
death date: 16 April 1995
estimated age at death: 84
"United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JG71-2NT : accessed 21 Feb 2013), Joseph Cootey, 16 April 1995; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Other Records

1. Census: Hawaii US, 7 Apr 1930, Hilo Hawaii HI. Joseph is recorded as a son aged 18 unmarried a stevedore born Hawaii c1912

2. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Joseph is recorded as a son-in-law (of Joseph Maertens) aged 28 a labourer on a cattle ranch he worked 51 hours in the preceeding week his income for the last year was $105 he was born in Hawaii

542. Lydia Pauline MAERTENS [16439] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Dec 1925 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI, died on 6 Feb 1998 in Luguna Niguel California USA at age 72, and was cremated on 2 Jun 1998 in Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. She was usually called Lily.

Research Notes:
Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933
name: Lydia Pauline Maertens
gender: Female
birth date: 13 Dec 1925
birthplace: Kamuela, Waimea, Hawaii
father's name:Joseph Herman Maertens
mother's name:Lydia Deverill
source film number:1031594
reference number:Bk 135 cn 33741
"Hawaii, Births and Christenings, 1852-1933," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FWSH-T13 : accessed 22 Jan 2013), Lydia Pauline Maertens, 13 Dec 1925.

Honolulu Star Bulletin - Posted Saturday May 24, 2003
Lydia "Lilly" Maertens Webster , 72, of Waimea, Hawaii, a Leonard's Bakery manager, died Feb. 6, 1998, in California. She was born in Waimea, Hawaii. She is survived by daughter Rosalind Egan and sisters Marietta Loughrin and Marjorie Llewllyen. Services held.












Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Lydia is recorded as Lily a daughter aged 4 yrs 4 mths born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Lydia is recorded as a daughter aged 14 a school girl born Hawaii

Lily married John Joseph DAMIANO [18291] on 31 May 1947.

Lily next married William Forbes WEBSTER [16457], son of WEBSTER [18292], on 8 Sep 1956 in Honolulu Oahu Hawaii. William was born about 5 Mar 1919 in Scotland, died about 4 Feb 1990 aged about 70, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI.

Research Notes:
Webster family details from Williams mother-in-law's obituary, dates are unproven.

543. Arthur Conrad MAERTENS [16440] (Lydia Sarah DEVERILL332, Alfred Palmer DEVERILL158, Anne Spencer JULIUS84, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 Aug 1927 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI, died on 18 Jan 2000 in Kamuela, South Kohala, HI at age 72, and was buried in Imiola Church Cemetery Kamuela, South Kohala, HI. He was usually called Buddy.

Research Notes:
Arthur B Maertens was born on August 09, 1927 and died on January 18, 2000 at the age of 72. This person last resided in Kamuela, Hawaii in Hawaii County. Arthur B Maertens was assigned the social security number (SSN) of: 575-30-2463.
Ref: http://www.death-record.com/l/176674908/Arthur-B-Maertens

Arthur Buddy Maertens - Burial
Date AFT 18 JAN 2000
Location
Imiola Church Cemetery, Kamuela, Hawaii Co., HI <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=12157030&pid=-324034125&eid=6184578486> No description has been added.

Maertens, Arthur Buddy Conrad Obituary Hawaii Tribune Herald Posted January 21, 2000
Arthur Buddy Conrad Maertens, 72 of Waimea died January 18 at North Hawaii Community Hospital. Born in Waimea, He was a retired equipment operator for the State Forestry Division, former rodeo clown, active in youth football and basketball and a member of Imiola Congregational Church, Hawaii Saddle Club and Panlolo Senior Softball Club.
Friends may call it 11 am to 1 pm. Saturday at Imiola Congregational Church; Service at 1. Internment to follow at the church cemetery. Casual attire. Survived by wife, Hazel J Maertens of Waimea; son, David (Jean) Maertens of Oregon; daughters, Betty (Earl) Spence of Waimea, Mary Lou (Domingo) Gomes of Paauilo; sisters, Marjorie Berry of Arizona, Marietta Loughrin of Honolulu; sister in law, Mary (Joseph) Branco of Honokaa; brother-in-law, George Angelo of Honolulu; 5 grandchildren; 7 great-grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews. Arrangements by Memorial Mortuary.

Other Records

1. Census: US Hawaii, 10 Apr 1930, Waimea Village Sth Kohala Hawaii. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 2 yrs 7 mths born Hawaii

2. Census: US Hawaii, 20 Apr 1940, Waimea Sth Kohala Hawaii. Arthur is recorded as a son aged 12 a school boy born Hawaii

544. Julius Ford PARKER [1057] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1909.

Julius married Christine BRINTON [1058] in 1934.

545. Dorothy Elizabeth PARKER [1060] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1911.

Dorothy married Picton WARLAW [1061] in 1936.

546. Geoffry Frederic PARKER [1062] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1914 and died in 1914.

547. Margaret Constance PARKER [1063] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1915.

548. Katherine Mary PARKER [1064] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1916.

549. Joan Lilian PARKER [1065] (Rev Ernest Julius PARKER336, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1919.

550. Iris Myfanwy PARKER [1067] (Dr Herbert Francis PARKER337, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1907.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 2 Apr 1911, Staffa Lodge Watenden Road Guildford SRY. Iris Myfanwy is recorded as a daughter aged 3 born Guildford SRY

551. Margaret Edna PARKER [1068] (Dr Herbert Francis PARKER337, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1913.

552. Daphne Frances PARKER [1069] (Dr Herbert Francis PARKER337, Harriet Emily JULIUS161, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1911.

553. Hugh Francis HOLME [1076] (Ella BREWIN341, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1912 and was baptised on 6 Jun 1912 in St Mark Peterborough.

554. HOLME [24282] (Ella BREWIN341, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

555. Judith BREWIN [1087] (Rev Francis Henry BREWIN342, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1904.

Judith married Reginald Percy VIVIAN [1088] in 1926.

556. Francis Andrew BREWIN [1091] (Rev Francis Henry BREWIN342, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1907.

General Notes:
Francis recorded crossing to England from Montreal in 1922 and 1923 described as a student, and in 1937 describled as a Barrister.

Francis married Margaret BIGGAR [1092] in 1935.

557. Amea Domville BREWIN [1093] (Rev Francis Henry BREWIN342, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Jan 1909 in Hove SSX and died in 1970 at age 61.

Amea married Woodbury WILLOUGHBY [1094] in 1928. Woodbury was born on 5 Jun 1904 and died on 11 Mar 1964 at age 59.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 716 M    i. Blair WILLOUGHBY [1095] was born on 6 Sep 1929 and died in 1940 at age 11.

558. John Hamilton BREWIN [1096] (Rev Francis Henry BREWIN342, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1911 and died in 1931 at age 20.

559. Rosalind BREWIN [1097] (Rev Francis Henry BREWIN342, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1912.

560. Arthur Herbert BREWIN [1078] (Julius Arthur BREWIN343, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 Jun 1912 in London and died in 1993 in Cirencester GLS at age 81.

General Notes:
Arthur followed in his family's footsteps becoming a Stockbroker

Arthur married Winifred Hazel WOOD [24284]. Winifred was born on 5 Mar 1918 and died on 1 Jun 2011 at age 93.

561. Barbara BREWIN [1079] (Julius Arthur BREWIN343, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Feb 1914 and died on 12 Jul 1984 in Sydenham LND at age 70.

General Notes:
1939 Register
Birchgrove House , Cuckfield R.D., Sussex, England
Barbara Brewin 27 Feb 1914 Female Childrens Nurse (Norland) Single 102 39

Barbara married Pehr Ingmar Aslak RIKBERG [24283] on 14 Sep 1947 in Helsinki Finland. Pehr was born on 17 Sep 1919 in Finland and died in 1993 in Finland at age 74.

562. Peter Julius BREWIN [1081] (Julius Arthur BREWIN343, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1920.

563. Thurstan Berkeley BREWIN [1082] (Julius Arthur BREWIN343, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1921.

Thurstan married Doreen Ruth RICHARDSON [24285]. Doreen was born on 4 Jan 1926 in Reigate SRY and died on 2 Jan 1986 in Glasgow SCT at age 59.

564. John Michael BREWIN [1083] (Julius Arthur BREWIN343, Maria Louisa JULIUS162, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1925.

565. Humphrey Julius STEVENS [1106] (Alfred Julius STEVENS348, Florence JULIUS163, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1907 and died in 1907.

566. Alfred Lancelot Julius STEVENS [1107] (Alfred Julius STEVENS348, Florence JULIUS163, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1908.

Alfred married Veronique Eudora EDWARDS-JESSOP [1108] in 1934.

567. Mary Julius STEVENS [1109] (Alfred Julius STEVENS348, Florence JULIUS163, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1911.

Mary married John Anthony HUNT [1110] in 1934.

568. Michael Marlow Julius STEVENS [1111] (Alfred Julius STEVENS348, Florence JULIUS163, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1915.

569. John Osmond Julius STEVENS [1112] (Alfred Julius STEVENS348, Florence JULIUS163, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1913.

John married Kathleen FORMAN [1113] in 1937. Kathleen was born in 1911.

570. Stella MORRIS [1128] (Maynard Denny MORRIS359, Ellen Georgina JULIUS164, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1914 and died in 1921 at age 7.


571. Maynard Gordon MORRIS [1129] (Maynard Denny MORRIS359, Ellen Georgina JULIUS164, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 24 Oct 1915 in Winnipeg CAN and died on 22 Feb 1980 in Los Angeles CA USA at age 64.

General Notes:
Name:Maynard G Morris
Birth Year:1915
Race:White, citizen (White)
State of Residence:California
County or City:Los Angeles
Enlistment Date:13 Nov 1942
Enlistment State:California
Enlistment City:Fresno
Branch:Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code:Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Grade:Private
Grade Code:Private
Term of Enlistment:Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component:Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source:Civil Life
Education:3 years of high school
Civil Occupation:Semiskilled occupations in production of glass and glass products
Marital Status:Single, with dependents
Height:70
Weight:179
Ref U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 Ancestry

California Death Index
Maynard Gordon Morris.
Death: 22 Feb 1980 in Los Angeles California.
Birth: 24 Oct 1915 Canada
Mothers Name: Jackson
Ref: Family Search

Other Records

1. Census: California USA, 1930, 701 Gregory Los Angeles CA USA. Gordon M is recorded as a son aged 14 his race is white he attends school and can read & write and was born in Canada, his parents in the Irish Free State. He immigrated to the US in 1924 but is an alien, speaks English and is not employed.

572. Patrica MORRIS [1133] (Rev Cecil White MORRIS361, Ellen Georgina JULIUS164, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1934.


573. Diana Cecil MORRIS [22764] (Rev Cecil White MORRIS361, Ellen Georgina JULIUS164, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jun 1936, died on 7 Mar 2008 in Tawa WTN at age 71, and was cremated on 2 Dec 2008 in Whenua Tapu Cemetery, WTN NZ.

General Notes:
Surname. CRAIG
Forenames. Diana Cecil
Age. 71 Years
Date of Death. 7 Mar 2008
Place of Death. 28 Ranui Terrace Tawa
Funeral Director Name. Ninness Funeral Home, P O Box 50347, PORIRUA 5240
Cemetery Name. WHENUA TAPU CEMETERY, State Highway 1, Pukerua Bay
Location: Eastern Division, Memorial Garden, Row F Plot 26
Map Reference WT2
Date of ashes burial. 2 Dec 2008
Date of Headstone Photograph 3 Dec 2012

In Loving Mamory Of
Diana Cecil Craig
nee Morris
23 Jun 1936 - 7 Mar 2008
Much loved partner of Graham Ellett
Treasured Mum of Amanda, Stephen,
Miles & Tali and Duncan.
Dearest grandma of Caleb & Riley.
Dearly Missed - Always In Our Hearts

Diana married Graham Frank ELLETT [22765].

Diana next married CRAIG [22766].

574. Florence Edith MOORE [1044] (Constance Marion Isabelle JULIUS362, Henry John169, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1907.

Florence married William DALY [1045] in 1933.

575. George JULIUS [10031] (Constance Marion Isabelle JULIUS362, Henry John169, Henry Richard M.A. (Rev)85, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 24 Aug 1909 in Queensland Aust.


576. Muriel Gataker JULIUS [856] (Reginald Hampton367, Charles Archibald171, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 24 Sep 1906 in Sandgate Brisbane AUS.

General Notes:
Muriel and her sisters attended a small private school called "Leumeah" in Auchenflower for many years, at Chelmer they had a pony called Mickey a sulky and bicycles which she never learned to ride.

Muriel's father and his business were involved with the WWII Pacific war effort and the American Army in Queensland. Muriel worked at General McArthur's headquarters.

Muriel and her father, sailed 17 Aug 1948 from London to Sydney, 1st class, on board the Straithaird. Her occupation was described as domestic duties.
Ref: Findmypast.co.uk

Their neighbours the McDonalds had 6 children and lifelong friendships were formed. Muriel lived at her family home "Milden" 92 Thorne St Kangaroo Point Brisbane then sold it in 1967 when she moved to 10 Sandford Plc St Lucia Brisbane.

Letter by Muriel to Archibald Julius enclosing family records.
92 Thorn St
Kangaroo Point
Brisbane.
28-4-54.
Dear Cousin Arch,
Madge rang this morning and asked me to let you have the enclosed family "Records" and I am very pleased to do so and expect you may find many bits of interest. They were compiled by Daddy's mother and seem to cover several branches of the family - many of course I've never heard of. We've found them amongst some of Dad's papers etc when going thro his things last year, and I took them to show Madge as I know she'd be interested as she'd told us about the Family Tree Sir George had compiled. Are you doing something of the same sort? I'd be interested in seeing what you compile later if you would care to let us have a look. There is unfortunately a lot we don't know about members of the family, but it seems Grandma made a study of it and Laura had a lot of information from here and there.
I hope all your folk are well - we called in to see Jack last week at Kallangua. Mum and I had been up to . . . . . for a couple of weeks so as a road runs by we called in on Jack on the way. He is looking fit again and busy doing things about this little place. Mum was also talking to Manga yesterday so we have been an touch with them all recently. Mum I'm glad to say is much better at present - she's suffered quite a reaction after dad's death, and is really only now getting back to normal after all the shock.
Regards to all, and with kindest remembrances - I think the last time we met was at Auntie's 100th celebration.
Yours sincerely,
Muriel.

Muriel wrote a number of letters on the history of her family, see her father Reginald's notes.

Muriel wrote the booklet Family Jottings, Julius, Gataker, & LJ in 1985 - see under Books on this website

From Muriel Gataker Julius to her nephew Philip John Bucknell.
Pip dear - you asked me to tell you more about your grandfather, Reginald Hampton Julius - it is a pity you did not know him longer as he died when you are about 13 years of age. He was a man of "high degree" he came from a family with a father, an academic and schoolmaster and I would say of by no means a commercial business background, so his achievements in the business field were all by his own initiatives and endeavours, and true to the Julius motto "By Virtue and Industry I Shall Flourish".
As you know he was originally in the Customs Department in Maryborough and then was transferred to Brisbane. With ambitions and not wanting to remain a public servant, he purchased a Customs and Carrying company, Wright Heaton & Co. with (I believe) financial assistance from mother's father, grandfather Charles Gataker (Maryborough) in 1906. A partner in this original firm was (Mr) Paul and he was the husband of one of Dad's cousins, Ettie Roehricht (see the Hampton family tree). This was not a very satisfactory partnership and I believe Dad bought Paul out, at quite a hardship financially. Eventually in 1913 a new partnership was formed with Herbert Luya, who ran a similar small business in South Brisbane, under the name of Luya Ltd, which handled the carrying work of the Sea Foam Flour Co. Sth Brisbane. A brother Harry Luya was a partner in Sea Foam. The partnership of Luya Julius was a very happy one, the two being great friends and complemented each other, Herb was the "outside" man and RHJ the "inside" man, meaning that Herb supervised the carriers and the fleet (at that time, all horses) and Dad the customs and insurance and the office. Herbert was a bachelor and lived at the Bellevue Hotel down George Street opposite Parliament House, and where the wedding reception of Roy Stanley Bucknell and Margaret Hampton Julius was held in 1935. Herb was like a fairy uncle to we three girls, always gave us super presents, and Mr Luya's Box of Chocolates" at Xmas time was always awaited with glee and anticipation! In 1915 they brought the premises at 95 Eagle Street (I don't know where they operated from prior to then) and the partnership flourished in most happy circumstances. A great blow befell in 1930 with the death of Herb. It is not recorded in the Family Jottings but this was a tragedy. At the time the firm was agents for the original Australian National Airways, and one night at the Bellevue one of the pilots was in the bar drinking (presumably rather heavily) and Herb then called the pilot outside to speak to him, and remonstrated with him. Words followed and the pilot either struck or pushed Herb and he fell to the pavement and cracked his skull on the curb. He died as a result of this. No action was taken against the pilot by his family, they did not want any publicity I believe.
Also at the Bellevue at the same time lived Dr and Mrs John Joseph Luddy who was of course known to Herb Luya. Dr Luddy cared for Dad who suffered severe shock at his partner's death. Dr Luddy became a friend, and the family doctor for many years until his death.
RHJ was a man of high principles, great business acumen and rose to the top of his field. He became President of the Master Carriers Association in Brisbane. He had insight, uncanny at times, and this was demonstrated many times. At the office the boys would say "never be surprised at what the boss may ask you". One time he suspected the then Accountant, so he set a trap, and caught him out "fiddling" the books. Another time I can remember, on a Saturday afternoon he was sitting on the verandah at home at Wilston when he jumped up and said "something is wrong at Kingaroy". It so happened that a truck taking up goods had gone over on the Blackbutt Range and the driver of the truck, Bert Abbott, was injured and the goods wrecked. Dad was on the job immediately, got another truck and had the goods "duplicated" and all delivered to consignees by Monday morning! The driver was deeply unconscious in Ipswich Hospital and about to go onto the operating table when he had this stopped. On consultation with Dr Luddy the patient was brought to Brisbane to the Mater Hospital and Dr Luddy took over. Abbott completely recovered and in time able to continue in his job in charge of the Depot at Dutton Park.
How a hunch was more than a hunch.
Another incident, when you were a little boy in Melbourne, it was the custom for us to pack up the Melbourne Xmas parcel" this was given to Ted Elcock in the office to dispatch to Melbourne. A day or so later Dad called Ted into his office and said "where is the Melbourne parcel" Ted said it is on so-and-so ship which is sailing tomorrow. Dad told him to get the parcel off that ship and send it by rail - why?. A few days afterwards Ted came and said, Boss about that Melbourne parcel, the ship went down off Newcastle last night. Why did our RHJ change his mind - another hunch?
Some "quick actions" I can remember in the early days of ANA when using the Eagle Farm aerodrome, a plane was on the way from Sydney and a phone call came from somebody at Grafton who had seen the plane fly over, and he reported that the plane "only had one wheel" so panic, in case it crashed on landing at Eagle Farm. Dad had large signs printed on the runway "do not land - one wheel missing, and also had the Fire Brigade standing by, in case. But it was all wrong, the plane had two wheels, and landed safely.
Another aeroplane incident, in flood conditions and water everywhere, Dad was dashing out to Archerfield (this was later the aerodrome) and driving near Yeerongpilly through deepwater over the road the car got swept off into a deep gutter and almost totally submerged Dad had to struggle with the door to get an open and get out and swim! There was a picture in the paper of the car on its side with just the tip of the black hood showing, that was the old Master Buick, which eventually got hauled out and cleaned and it went good as gold.
I remember in 1924 he said to Mum at the breakfast table, I had a very vivid dream last night, in fact more than a dream. My mother came to me and said "my son I want you to come", so off Dad went to England by ship (no aeroplanes overseas in those days) and during his stay there his Father died of angina. Grandfather Julius had left Granville Maryborough in 1902 and returned to England with the family (except RHJ) so he had not seen them for a long time, he found things financially in a mess, I gather there was no pension or superannuation as Grandfather had retired or resigned from the Education Department here. So from then on Dad helped support them and I can remember that "money for England" going every quarter, and this he continued all his life (and which we carried on afterwards). Grandma, Aunt Edith Hampton (her sister), aunt Muriel and Char (Charlotte) Brown who had always lived with them, came out to Brisbane about 1930 (1931) and bought a house at Bowen Hills, but they didn't stay long and went back to England.
In his family life Dad was a caring and loving father, times in the early days were a struggle, and money not exactly plentiful. I have mentioned in the Family Jottings that one wet and cold night he pawned his overcoat to get the train fare back to Sandgate to his wife and baby (me)! We originally lived at Sandgate, in Swan Street. I was born in Sandgate, and this also is where Mums friendship with Carrie Dear was formed. Carrie lived with her father, the station master in a house just behind ours and I was a constant visitor there when I was tiny, (we left Sandgate when I was about 3 I think, in later years Carrie was the contact with Bucknells, being a family cousin)
Then we moved to Auchenflower, Ridley Street, where Margaret and Barbara were born. Margaret was a poor sickly little baby, she contracted whooping cough from the nurse who attended mother, the little might nearly died, but was saved by Dr Jefferis Turner, a noted children's specialist. He also was related, having married another Roericht cousin Hilda. We all went to Lumeah Private school, formed by a Miss Elsie Brabazon. Dad and Mum helped her a lot to set up this school, held originally in her own house, and later a school block was built next door. Dad was also instrumental in arranging for Sunday School and Church Services which were held in the school building.
After Auchenflower we moved to Chelmer, across the river and "good fresh air" for the benefit of the children! We had a big house a tennis court was built, and we had a pony and trap to start with (a Buick car came some years later). Friendship started here with the McDonald family who lived across the back paddock! a family of 5 girls and 2 boys, and we had great times together playing tennis and picnics out in Mr Mac's car (we didn't have the car them). The pony we had was called Mickey, a spirited and speedy little animal. Here poor Dad nearly got killed, kicked by Mickey. There was a shed at the back of the tennis court where Mickey was housed. Dad was trying to take her rug off her one morning and something upset the pony, who kicked and there was a terrific noise and I looked out to see dad staggering out of the shed with his hands over his head. Fortunately, though badly bruised, there was no serious damage to his head.
The next house we had was at Vardon Street Wilston where the Zoellers live. Mrs Zoellers, Buster's mother was a sister of Herb Luya, Dad was very involved in the C. of E. Wilston, and was Rector's Warden for many years, and was instrumental in getting a committee formed to organise the building of St Albans Church. He on occasions "took the services" there during absences of a Rector, and was organist for a short time. Margaret and Roy were married in this church in 1935.
After Vardon Street, we had a home in Mars Street still in Wilston where we remained until about 1944, when we went to Thorn Street, Kangaroo Point. You know that house, and we remained there until the death of RHJ in 1952 and MGDJ in 1965.
Ref: Pip Bucknell 2015

Muriel sold the family home "Milden" in 1967 and moved to 10 Sandford Place St Lucia Brisbane QLD.

Research Notes:
Image Courtesy Pip Bucknell 2016



577. Margaret Hampton JULIUS [857] (Reginald Hampton367, Charles Archibald171, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Sep 1910 in Auchenflower Brisbane AUS and died on 22 Sep 1999 in Caloundra Qld. at age 88.

Medical Notes:
Margaret contracted whooping cough aged a few days, from the nurse who attended her birth and was a delicate baby, From a letter by her sister Muriel.



Margaret married Roy Stanley BUCKNELL [5057], son of Horace Oswald BUCKNELL [22554] and Frances Maude BELCHER [22588], on 5 Mar 1935 in Wilston C. Of E. Brisbane Aust. Roy was born on 8 Jan 1907 in Goulburn NSW and died on 22 Nov 1993 in Buderim Queensland at age 86.

General Notes:
Roy was educated at Barker College, Sydney, where he was dux in 1923, he went on to Sydney University to study medicine. In 1925 He joined the Royal Exchange Assurance Fire Reinsurance Department, until in 1935 he became Manager of the Insurance Department of Luya Julius Pty Ltd. Following this he returned to Royal Exchange before taking up an appointment as Manager of Harvey Trinder (Vic) Pty Ltd, insurance brokers, working his way up through the company to become Chairman and Managing Director. He involved himself in a number of community activities and was a Freemason.

The Bucknell Julius Link
With a tribute to Reginald Hampton Julius as I knew him
by R.S. Bucknell
February 1985.
All things have a beginning and at that beginning the consequences are seldom known.
My first position in the commercial world was as the most junior clerk in the service of the Royal Exchange Assurance, in those days at 77 Pitt Street Sydney. This was in February 1925.
In 1927 I was fortunate enough to be appointed to a newly created position, to inspect certain entries in the books in the Capital City offices of the various companies which were under the management of the Royal Exchange. One of these companies was the Sea Insurance Company Ltd, Brisbane, whose chief agents and attorneys were Luya Julius Pty. Ltd. Before my first visit to Brisbane, talking to my mother, I made mention of this name, which immediately sparked a memory in her mind, "that must be the Mr Julius who is Carrie's friend". Such is the hand of fate, and mother wrote to Carrie, and I duly made contact with this quite unbelievable character, an elderly spinster, and not very close relative of my mother, a person of over flowing love. She introduced me to Mr R H Julius and also to his family. RHJ was a man of great kindness; he took me under his wing, and this is how the two families came to be linked, when on 5 March 1935 at St Albans Church, Wilston, it was my great good fortune to be married by the Rev P E Demuth to Margaret Hampton, second daughter of Mr and Mrs R H Julius, and so RHJ became my father-in-law.
At this distance I can only look back and recall from memory much of the man who was to be such an influence on my life. I worked under him as Insurance Manager for two years, 1936/37.
What I write therefore is not documented, and is not in any way a complete history, but is an attempt to paint a picture of a man as I knew him, with the help of the things that others told me; to be Reg Julius's son-in-law opened many doors.
He was educated at his father's school and was a brilliant student. One of his essays in my possession, shows him to be a lover of, and master of the English language. He won a scholarship to Maryborough Grammar School where he completed his schooling. He was a very good musician, and would sit at his piano, without music, and play classical pieces from memory. He had quite a collection of classical phonograph records. He played cricket for the Maryborough club, and also enjoyed tennis. He became an enthusiastic Freemason and was appointed as Senior Grand Lodge Officer. He was a strong supporter of the Church of England; and was for many years Rector's Warden at St Albans, Wilston, and was instrumental in having the present church built.
The family history tells of his early life, from the time he became a partner with H.E. Luya in what started as a partnership when Luya joined RHJ in 1913. I hardly knew Luya, but he too was a legend and in all their 17 years together they did not have a single quarrel.
Luya Julius was a Customs Agent and Carrying firm, and RHJ was always in the forefront of this industry, taking active part in the Master Carriers Association, becoming its President. In the Brisbane Chamber of Commerce he also rose to be President. It was arising from these associations, that he represented Brisbane at a meeting in Melbourne where he first met his Melbourne opposite number William Mortill of the Melbourne Carrying Company. A lifelong friendship came from this of which further mention will be made later.
In his own firm or Company as it became through the years, he was also in the forefront. He started of course with horse-drawn vehicles, but soon achieved a number of firsts:
First to cease horses, and become wholly motorised.
First to use diesel powered vehicles.
First to use an articulated trailer.
First to use a tanker.
But there was progress in other directions to, as road transport steadily made inroads into freight haulage, previously a virtual monopoly of the State Railway System, the Government in 1930 introduced a punitive tax system on road transport. The master carriers met, and there were calls of "fight to the death" and calls to "surrender". But not RHJ. He went back to his office, called for maps which showed rail and road systems, saw the long winding rail connections between Kingaroy and Nanango around the Blackbutt Range and saw the short haul road for the same destinations. He went to the Transport Minister, and a contract was the result whereby all goods to or from Brisbane and Kingaroy whether the customer chose Luya Julius or the Railways would be carried by the co-ordinated system. A similar deal was made for Murwillumbah and Tweed Heads and offices were set up at Kingaroy and Murwillumbah.
General Motors.
From the first vehicle bought into Queensland by General Motors, RHJ had secured for Luya Julius a contract for the customs and cartilage work for this great multinational. It was a matter of great pride that when GMH entered into a similar Australia wide contract with a southern firm, that contract held the words "excluding Queensland" and their work never left Luya Julius.
The Firm.
It started thus -
R H Julius was a customs clerk in Maryborough, and was transferred to Customs House, Brisbane in 1902. In 1905 or 1906 he purchased (with financial assistance of Grandfather Gataker) a small carrying and customs agency firm called Wright Heaton & Co. He took into partnership with him a cousin (by marriage) named (Mr) Paul, so the firm of Paul Julius & Co began. Paul did not prove to be a very good partner (on one occasion he purchased a lorry and two horses, one of which was blind) and the partnership was dissolved, or RHJ bought him out (I incline to the latter) with great financial strain on RHJ who, in the following years, worked very hard and long hours almost resulting in a complete breakdown. . . . . .
After some years a new partnership was formed in 1913, with Herbert Luya, who was Luya Ltd, a similar, small carrying firm in South Brisbane which handled the cartage of flour from Sea Foam Flour Mills, so Luya Julius Pty Ltd was formed. The friendship with H E Luya was a great joy to the Julius family and he and RHJ worked together as a wonderful team and the Company flourished. The premises at 95 Eagle Street were purchased in 1915 and the company operated there until 1982 when many premises in Eagle Street were resumed for development 95 Eagle Street and other buildings are now demolished and a large "Riverside" Development is being undertaken on the old sites.
For many years RHJ served the Master Carriers Association and rose to be President. Again, in the Brisbane Chamber of Commerce, he became President.
In 1918 when attending an Australian Master Carriers Association conference in Melbourne, he contracted influenza, an epidemic which was sweeping Melbourne at the time. He was befriended by Bill Mortill of the Melbourne Carrying Company who was also at the conference. He took him into his home and engaged a private nurse to care for him. A long friendship continued with Bill, who lived to the ripe old age of 99, in Melbourne, and retained friendship with other members of the family.
Originally the fleet comprised all horse-drawn vehicles. Dutton Park was the stables and lorry depot, and a paddock property was bought at Hyde Road Yeronga, on the River, to spell the horses at week ends. The fleet expanded, and in 1924 the first motor trucks were purchased, 3 Internationals, and from then on started the phasing out of the remaining horses. In 1926, 3 GMC trucks, two 3 Tonners and one 5 ton "Big Brute" were purchased from General Motors Corp, who planed to open an assembly plant in Brisbane. Luya Julius became their contractors for Brisbane and this association has continued to the present day. GM cars were imported in CKD (completely knocked down) packs, and delivered to the Valley assembly plant. Later body panels and complete bodies were manufactured by Holden in South Australia, and delivered to the plant from interstate wharves.
Other Company activities:
Imports from overseas, particularly cars from the USA provided substantial amount of customs work and cartage, interstate cargoes arrived by ship to city wharves for transport to city warehouses. Cartage of Sea Foam flour, deliveries for Perkins brewery, transhipment of overseas cargoes for northern ports for Birt & Co, shipments of South Queensland butter into the United Kingdom, wool and hides etc, some of many other contracts.
Luya Julius were attorneys for the L'Union Insurance Company, subsequently replaced by Sea Insurance, now Sun Alliance. Luya Julius were also Queensland managers and agents for the first Australian National Airways1, with Kingsford Smith and Ulm and their planes Southern Cross, Southern Cloud etc. A service to Kingaroy was instituted, which was later converted to co-ordinated service with rail and road link through Esk and Nanango. Bulk sugar and molasses were handled for the Colonial Sugar Refineries mills from Condong N S W, Maryborough and Nambour. Large tonnages of maize were carried from Roma Street rail for shipment to Melbourne, bulk grain was carted to ships loading at Brisbane and Gladstone. Bulk fertiliser was also handled and bagged peanuts from Kingaroy (see photo, held in annex at Bunderim). They handled clearance and cartage of Woolworths cargo from wharf and rail to bulk depots, and delivering to local stores. Luya Julius entered into a joint venture with the Archibald Brothers (of Sea Foam flour) in a passenger service to the South Coast, the Blue and Red Line. After withdrawal from this, the purchase of Broadbent's was effected and the name Broadbent's was retained as a separate subsidiary of Luya Julius.
Roma Oil.
RHJ was a shareholder and a director (I think) in Roma Oil, Queensland, a project which did not really get off the ground successfully, but he was very enthusiastic about the venture and always declared "there Is oil there" he had a rack on his office table, with bottles of the "good oil".
With the arrival of the USA forces in Australia in 1942, Luya Julius became responsible for the coordination and delivery of a large flow of supplies for them, from wharves to storages. They were also responsible for the payment of civilian employees of US engaged in the handling of the stores and equipment.2
With the development of containerisation of overseas and interstate cargoes, links were established with Australian National Line and Fleetways.
With the increase of the fleet, up to 230 vehicles, four wheel drives etc, Dutton Park became too small, and a larger establishment was set up at Casey Ridge, which is a very modern setup, and was officially opened by the Premier in June 1974 (and to which no member of the Julius family was ever invited to be present) in due course the Dutton Park property was sold.
H E Luya died in 1930, and his death was a terrible business and personal loss for RHJ. After this, W H Green (then accountant) was made a director. Members of the Luya family joined the company, H L Zoeller in 1924 and A F Luya at the time of the purchase of Broadbents, and he managed that subsidiary.
RHJ remained active in the business until his death in 1952 when Bill Green became Managing Director until his death in 1963. Then Zoeller and Luya and Gordon Fraser (a member of the staff for many years) and E D Summerson became the directors.
Some loyal members of the firm for many years come to my mind:
Bill Green - Accountant, Director and Managing Director.
Bert Newton - in charge of Cartage Depot.
Frank Bradfield - Customs Department.
(These usually referred to as "The 3 Boys", they gave a silver vase so inscribed "From the Three Boys" to Mum and Dad for their silver wedding anniversary.)
Bert Abbott - in the old days of horses and the start of the motors, he lived in a Company house adjoining the Dutton Park property.
Big Harry von Doran - a lorry driver, with his favourite horse called "Blue Whiskers"
Lenny Doren - (Harry's brother) Little Lenny in the office Eagle St.
Ted Elcock - who started in the firm as a boy and spent his entire business life with Luya Julius. He rose to become head of the Cartage section of the business after Bert Newton.
Mr Lock - always called Mr Lock, Insurance Manager
Jack Lewis - came to Luya Julius from General Motors, in charge of all motor vehicles and repairs are Dutton Park until he retired.
Mavis Sullivan (later Carter and now O'Sullivan) became company secretary.
Dorrie Miller - head typist for many years straight out of Technical College.
The company went public in 1965 and became Luya Julius Ltd and traded on the stock exchange the first time.
Subsidiary companies were L J Country Pty Ltd, Grain Movers Pty Ltd, Eljay Bulk Pty Ltd, Liquid Bulk Pty Ltd, Eljay Workshops Pty Ltd, Dutton Storage Pty Ltd, Bulk Foods Transport Pty Ltd, Broadbents Carriers Pty Ltd, Broadbents Storage Pty Ltd, Broadbents Bulk Pty
Fleetways
When Fleetways purchased the company in 1967 for $1.5 million the name of Luya Julius Ltd was retained for use in Queensland. 95 Eagle Street was sold in 1982 for the "Riverside" development and the Queensland administration headquarters for the company are now at the Acacia Ridge property.
Ref: R S Bucknell 1985.
Footnotes:
1. Australian National Airways was formed in 1929 by Charles Kingsford Smith, & C.T.P. Ulm with two further directors Sir Frederick Stewart and Reginald Julius, a Brisbane to Sydney service was started on 1 Jan 1930, and in June 1930 the service was extended to Melbourne, later Launceston. Luya Julius arranged booking services in Queensland. The airline was well supported and in profit when on the 21 March 1931 it lost an aircraft, the Southern Cloud, in bad weather over the Snowy Mountains. The aircraft was not found for 27 years, the airline did not survive as a result of the crash, Australias first, closing later that year.
A silver inkstand from Ulm inscribed "To Reg in appreciation of your staunch friendship with Charles 16/2/35" remains in the family to this day - 2015.
2. A Luya Julius truck happened to be on a Brisbane wharf when the first of the US supply ships started unloading, contact was made to assist. This was a huge undertaking for Luya Julius and secured the company financially and profitably over the war years, lifting its profile in the business community considerably.



578. Barbara Collet JULIUS [858] (Reginald Hampton367, Charles Archibald171, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Jun 1912 in Auchenflower Brisbane AUS.

General Notes:
Barbara is recorded in the 1980 Queensland Electoral Roll resident of Greenslopes Bowman.

Barbara married Robert Henry BOWEN [5060] in 1946 in Wilston C. Of E. Brisbane Aust. Robert was born on 4 Nov 1899 in Brisbane Australia and died in Apr 1981 in Brisbane Australia at age 81.

579. George Julius ARMSTRONG [5066] (Ethel Florence JULIUS372, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 Jul 1910 and died on 3 Jan 1986 at age 75.

580. Kathleen Frances ARMSTRONG [5067] (Ethel Florence JULIUS372, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 May 1913 and died on 21 Oct 2002 at age 89.

Kathleen married HILL [11444].

581. Cecily Ruth ARMSTRONG [5068] (Ethel Florence JULIUS372, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 17 Jan 1918 and died on 2 Oct 1997 at age 79.

Cecily married HANSEN [11441].

582. Shirley Elizabeth ARMSTRONG [5069] (Ethel Florence JULIUS372, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 30 May 1920 and died about 2000 aged about 80.

Shirley married HUDDLESTONE [11442].

583. Stephen Thorpe ARMSTRONG [11443] (Ethel Florence JULIUS372, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 Jun 1925 and died on 27 Oct 1983 at age 58.

584. Edith Pettinger NEWTON [2677] (Edith Constance JULIUS373, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Jun 1915 in Akaroa NZ and died on 9 Jan 2006 in Te Kauwhata Auckland at age 90. Another name for Edith was Polly.

General Notes:
Edith was living at Te Kauwhata NZ - 1999.

Edith married Arthur SCOTT [2678] on 7 Jul 1936 in Mangapiko Valley Waikato NZ. The marriage ended in divorced 1947. Arthur was born on 7 Dec 1908 in Thames NZ and died on 10 Sep 1985 in Titahi Bay Wellington NZ at age 76.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 717 F    i. Edith Alice SCOTT [2679] was born on 30 Jun 1938 in Huntly N.Z. and died on 29 Aug 2006 in Turua Thames NZ at age 68.

+ 718 M    ii. Edward SCOTT [10000] was born in 1943 in Huntly N.Z. and died in 1943 in Huntly N.Z.

585. Robert Brabbyn NEWTON [2689] (Edith Constance JULIUS373, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Sep 1916 and died on 12 Mar 1982 in Whenuakite Coromandel N.Z. at age 65.

Robert married Mildred Margaret JENNINGS [2690] on 25 Feb 1950.

586. John Anthony NEWTON [2691] (Edith Constance JULIUS373, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 21 Jul 1919 in Hamilton N.Z. and died on 23 Jun 1921 at age 1.

587. Eric Julius NEWTON [2692] (Edith Constance JULIUS373, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 7 Oct 1923 in Ngaruawahia N.Z. and died on 16 Jun 1973 at age 49. The cause of his death was cancer.

Eric married Mary-Ellen ANDERSON [2693] on 26 Oct 1957.

588. Thomas Stanford JULIUS [5071] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Aug 1909, died on 8 Jun 1911 in Rockhampton at age 1, and was buried in Rockhampton Cemetery.

General Notes:
Death - Thomas Stanford 8 Jun 1911, mother Kathleen Mary Julius, no father given.
Queensland Federation Index. NZSOG

589. Vernon Joseph ARMSTRONG [5072] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1916.

590. Mary Louise ARMSTRONG [5073] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1917.

591. Steven ARMSTRONG [5074] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1918.

592. Julius ARMSTRONG [5075] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1920.

593. Dorothy Francis ARMSTRONG [5076] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1922.

594. Ruth Madeline ARMSTRONG [5077] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1926 and died in 1926.

595. Marjorie ARMSTRONG [5078] (Kathleen Mary JULIUS374, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1927.

596. Lucy Josephine BARRETT [5079] (Lucy Isabel JULIUS376, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1924.

597. Margaret Isabel BARRETT [5080] (Lucy Isabel JULIUS376, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Oct 1925 in Akaroa NZ, died on 3 Sep 1994 in Akaroa NZ at age 68, and was buried in Duvauchelle Akaroa NZ.

Margaret married Stanley John KINGSTON [17527] on 16 Aug 1944 in Akaroa NZ. Stanley was born on 7 Nov 1916 and died in 1996 at age 80.

598. David Charles BARRETT [5081] (Lucy Isabel JULIUS376, Alfred Henry (Canon)172, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1926.

599. Richard SIMMERS [7404] (Frances Eleanor JULIUS380, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

600. Mary SIMMERS [7405] (Frances Eleanor JULIUS380, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

601. Penelope SIMMERS [7406] (Frances Eleanor JULIUS380, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
Penelope was a physiotherapist, Gloria Julius [891] met her in Brisbane when Penelope was visiting family when she was returning from England to NZ.

602. Elizabeth SIMMERS [7407] (Frances Eleanor JULIUS380, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

603. Alison SIMMERS [7408] (Frances Eleanor JULIUS380, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).


604. Alice Louise JULIUS [886] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 14 Jul 1908 in Bathurst N.S.W., was baptised in Bathurst N.S.W., died on 5 Dec 1983 in Inverell N.S.W. at age 75, and was buried on 7 Dec 1983 in Inverell N.S.W.

General Notes:
Alice after leaving school did clerical work for W M Cooper & Nephews at the Ottery Mine later transferring to their head office in Sydney. During WW2 there was a shortage of male workers, so Alice returned home to the family property at Elouera to work. She became affectionately known as Lottie the Landgirl, a nickname that stuck. After the war she returned to clerical work. Alice was also a member of the Supreme Grand Chapter of Scotland Order of the Eastern Star as treasurer and auditor.
(The Order of the Eastern Star brought into organisational form the means of providing for the welfare of the wives, mothers, daughters, widows and sisters of Master Masons.)

Alice did not marry.



605. Ralph Cowper JULIUS [887] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 25 Apr 1911 in Bathurst N.S.W., was baptised in Bathurst N.S.W., died on 1 Oct 1995 in Emmaville NSW at age 84, and was buried on 6 Oct 1995 in Ashford NSW.

General Notes:
Ralph from leaving school worked on his fathers grazing run "Eloura" between Ashford and Emmaville. He and his brother Jack were responsible for erecting many miles of fencing on the property which contained some very rugged country.
During the Depression the Ottery tin and arsenic mine at Tent Hill, near Emmaville, was closed by the parent company. Ralph became a partner with his father Archibald, and brother Jack, in taking over the lease of the mine where he worked the underground jackhammer.
Ralph joined the Australian Infantry Force (A.I.F.) in 1940, was posted overseas, where he became a prisoner of war in February 1941 in Singapore.
He worked on the infamous Burma Railway and was to be shipped to Japan on the "Hell Ship" which was sunk by the Americans with most on board drowning. However as he was suffering from both berri-berri and malaria he was thrown into Changi prison and left for dead by the Japanese. In later life he was known to say that he "wouldn't die to please the bastards" and so went on not only to survive, but to marry twice, have five sons, ten grandchildren and six great grandchildren,
After the war Ralph worked at Cobar Mines underground as a machine man for a short period before to taking up land at Ashford under the Soldiers Settlement Scheme in 1945. He sold the property and retired to live in Ashford in the 1980's

Medical Notes:
Ralph became an insulin dependant diabetic.

Ralph married Isabel Margaret HENDERSON [4462] on 28 Dec 1946 in Brisbane Australia. Isabel was born on 7 Feb 1897 and died on 30 Jul 1954 in "Taviton" Ashford N.S.W. at age 57.

606. John (Jack) Franklin JULIUS [888] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Apr 1913 in Sydney NSW Australia, died on 28 Apr 1983 in Inverell N.S.W. at age 70, and was buried on 6 May 1983 in Ashford NSW.

General Notes:
Jack worked on "Eloura" from leaving school until 1933/35 when he went into partnership with his father and brother Ralph at the Ottery Tin & Arsenic Mine.
Joined the A.I.F. 1941-45, served in the Middle East, on the Owen Stanley Trail, New Guinea and Borneo. Took up land at Ashford under the Soldiers Settlement Scheme in 1945.
Jack eventually lost his sight due to diabetes and died at the H N McLean nursing home in Inverell. His sister Gloria remembers his burial was delayed by floods when a drought broke at that time.

Medical Notes:
Jack became an insulin dependent diabetic, unfortunately losing his eyesight to the disease.

John married Ivy Caroline JEFFRIES (BELL) [4470] on 12 Dec 1958. Ivy was born on 21 Dec 1906, died in 1972 at age 66, and was buried in Ashford NSW.

Research Notes:
Beryl Jeffrey [4463] was Ivy's daughter.



607. Henry (Harry) George Archibald JULIUS [889] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 16 Jan 1916 in Sydney NSW Australia, was baptised on 18 Dec 1916 in St Pauls Emmaville NSW, died on 27 Dec 1998 in Yamba-gunya Ashford NSW at age 82, and was buried in Ashford NSW.

General Notes:
Harry left school in 1932 and worked his fathers run "Eloura", assisting at times at the Ottery mine, and studying with the Kingsford Smith Correspondence School. In 1937 he went mining, working for Burma Malay Tin Pty Ltd and the Golden Plateau gold mine at Cracow Queensland, while completing a 5 year mining course with the International Correspondence School.

Enlisted in 1941 with the Royal Aust Airforce he trained as a pilot and instructor in blind flying, he was demobbed in 1943 to join New Occidental Gold Mines NL at Cobar, to assist with the production of copper for the War effort. After the war he rose to Underground Manager then Supervisor of the mines before taking up residence of a Soldiers Settlers block "Strathsevern" at Ashford.

Harry entered Local Government as Councillor of the Ashford Shire in December 1950 serving on the council until August 1961.

Mining though appears to have been Harry's first love he took up a lease at Ruby Hill at tin mine in Ashford (1960), then was mine manager at Halls Peak Ltd Armidale (silver,lead,zinc,copper,sapphires), then back to tin in 1971 at Tent Hill east of Emmaville.

William Cooper & Nephews (Australia) Ltd
Ottery Mine
Tent Hill via Deepwater
NSW
1st April 1937
Though It May Concern.
This is to certify that the bearer Mr H G A Julius is 21 years old, and has been in my employ ever since leaving school.
For the majority of that time he has been in charge of a grazing property that I own, and he has shown the ability, in the many and varied classes of work that he has had to perform, which included full responsibility in letting out ring barking, and clearing contracts, and generally arranging the work on the property.
He is handy with most pools, and has erected a windmill, and has sunk and timbered a well for same, built to large corrugated iron tanks, built to large sheds for machinery and hay, drives a tractor for general farming work etc etc. He also erected and incline tramline on the above mining property, for carrying tracks off ore to the top of the 820 foot high ore bin.
This land has ability he is a non-smoker and a teetotaler, to anyone requiring his services, I can recommend him with every confidence.
Yours faithfully
A C Julius
Manager

Burma-Malay Tin Ltd.
Moore Street,
Emmaville,
5th April 1941.
To Whom It May Concern
This is to certify that the bearer, Harry Julius, was employed as underground Foreman by the above company from the date of commencement of operations at the Ottery Mine on the 27th of June 38 to the date of completion of operations on the 22nd May 40.
During this period the main shaft was sunk 100' from No2 to No3 level, 510' of driving down on No3 level, 160' of winzing and 100' of rising completed in various parts of the mine in addition to the stoping of ore for the requirements of 10 head battery working 11 shifts a week.
Julius is a good thinker, has displayed excellent organising ability, is tactful and can handle men, himself a good miner and expert machine man. He is young and ambitious and is now studying for the Mine Managers examination.
He has had the advantage of a good training in mining matters under the guidance of his father Mr A. C. Julius, who is a Certified Mine Manager.
Since leaving the employee of Burma-Malay Tin Ltd he has been engaged in sinking a shaft on the Vegetable Creek Deep Lead under contract for a Company of which I am a Director. The shaft is 912' on and underlie off 1 in 2'2". Julius took over at 566' the shaft then being in hard slate: from 760' the sinking was in soft decomposed slate. The contract included all underground and surface labour for working three shifts, seven days per week in addition to the supply of all stores &c, with the exception of mine timber and firewood.
Julius is to be complemented on the manner in which he organised and handled this job. He is of temperate habits and can be relied upon in positions of trust to the utmost degree, being perfectly honest and conscientious.
I have much pleasure in recommending him to anyone requiring his services.
. . . . . J.P.
Mine Manager.

From 421021 LAC. Julius H. G. A
To: Chief ground instructor, Central flying School.
Date: 31.12.42
Ref: Release from RAAF
Reference postgram P775 herewith application release from RAAF
My reasons for such action is that I was found medically unfit during my flying course which was then terminated.
In the interim I made application to undergo a Link Trainer Instructors Course and during that time I was flying and after my flying ceased the New Occidental Gold Mines No Liability Company made application through the Man Power authorities, which was supported by the Chief Inspector of Mines Mr Slalter for my release from the RAAF. I refused whilst undergoing my flying course, but on cessation of flying, after much consideration and persuasion from the Mines Department to respectfully request my release from the RAAF
It is with much regret that I request that this application be given favourable consideration but it is thought by the Mines Department and myself that my services to the country better utilised in the mining sphere, rather than that of a Link Trainer Instructor.
Signed H.G.A. Julius

New Occidental Gold Mines NL
Cobar NSW
17 July 1944
The Chief Inspector of Mines
Mines Department
Sydney
Dear Sir,
This is to certify that Mr H G A Julius after being released from the RAAF has been employed by this company since the eighth of February 1943, in various capacities.
For 3 months as a Miner, and for 2 months as Shift Boss in New Occidental, and during the past 12 months, as Mine Foreman at New Cobar.
Mr Julius has proved himself to be thoroughly competent, conscientious, and of strictly sober habits.
Yours faithfully
Chas E Blackett
General Manager.

Elouera
Ashford
14 Jan 1946
S R Heferen Esq
M L A
Parliament House
Sydney NSW
Dear Sir,
During the recent or, all my four sons served in the services, three of them now have their discharge from the army, the fourth an ex-POW from Singapore is in Brisbane and expects to get his discharge about the end of this month.
Their respective ages are 34, 32, 30, and 28 years, they have all had experience in farming and grazing in the Ashwood District and they are all practical men.
Three of them and probably for wish to start in the grazing and farming industry as soon as possible.
With this object in view, three of them have already made application on form one for a " Qualification Certificate" to apply for land.
The Under Secretary for Land has sent them printed particulars re assistance to be given to ex-servicemen one clause of which reads as follows " a group of three or more servicemen, in agreement with a land owner, may submit a proposal for acquisition of farms from that owner, if the proposal is approved, the Crown will purchase the land etc etc"
My wish is to help my son's to make a success of their venture when they start on the land, and I can only do this effectively, with machinery, plant, and stock if the land they get is in fairly close proximity to my grazing property.
Such a property, now belonging to Mrs W. Dunlop of "Tavinton" Ashford is now for sale, and is situated only 3 miles from my property on the Severn River. I have written to Mrs Dunlop re this matter and am enclosing herewith her reply and particulars of the property.
Two of my sons have made a thorough inspection of the land and feel confident that they could make a fair living off it and pay the 21/2% rental that would be due on perpetual lease.
Personally I feel confident that these lads would make successful primary producers, if given the help mentioned in the printed matter they received from the Under Secretary for Lands and we would be very much obliged if you could do anything to help them to this end, and let them know what procedure to take.
Thanking you in anticipation.
Yours faithfully
A. C. Julius
for and on behalf of Ralph C. Julius, John F. Julius, Henry G. Julius, and Gordon E. Julius.

Ministerial Room
Parliament House
Sydney 22nd of January 1946
Mr A. C. Julius
Elouera
Ashford.
Dear Mr Julius,
I have for acknowledgement your communication seeking further information in regard to rehabilitation of your sons under the Soldiers Settlement Scheme in accordance with the Bill just recently passed by Parliament.
I have noted that you have in mind the purchase of a property owned by Mr Dunlop, and along with your letter and information in regard to this matter I will place same before the Minister and ask that full information be supplied to you.
I am sure that the Minister will give favourable consideration to the purchase of an estate to accommodate your son's providing such an estate would be sufficient for a home maintenance area for each individual son.
On receipt of advice from the Minister I will communicate with you again will stop
yours faithfully,
Roy Heferen.

Elouera
Ashford
1 Feb 1946
Roy Heferen MLA
Parliament House
Sydney NSW
Dear Sir
Yours of 22nd ultimo to hand, and many thanks for your prompt reply to my letter of the 14th ultimo.
Since writing you I have received word from my fourth son, who is at present working in Cobar, and he is also keen to join in the land venture with the other three lads, he has a good position on the mines at present, but the excessive heat is too much for his wife and young family, this particular lad is a good leader and will be a great acquisition to the party.
With kind regards and again thanking you for what you are doing for the boys.
Yours faithfully,
A. C. Julius.

Ministerial Room
Parliament House
Sydney 11th of February 1946
Mr A. C. Julius
Eloura
Ashford.
Dear Mr Julius:
I acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 1st inst., informing me that your fourth son is interested in the Soldier Settlement Scheme, and that he is at present working in Cobar.
I might point out that all soldiers who are endeavouring to obtain land under the Soldier Settlement Scheme must have the necessary qualification certificate. However, you have not made it clear whether you'll stand is a soldier in accordance with the Act, but your three sons, as previously mentioned, would be qualified to purchase a property under the Act, and I sincerely hope that they will be in a position to submit a proposal to the Lands Department at an early date.
Should the fourth son be qualified, he will also be eligible, and the minister is very keen to assist a family arrangement such as you contemplate.
Thanking you for your kind remarks.
I am,
Yours faithfully
Roy Heferen.

New South Wales.
Department of Mines.
Mudgee Box 69
17/4/46
To Whom It May Concern:-
Since taking over the Mid-West district from the late Mr Warren, Senior Inspector of Mines, in August 1942, I have paid periodical visits of inspection to the New Occidental group of mines at Cobar.
During this period of 31/2 years Mr H. Julius has been employed in all three mines, Chesney, New Cobar, and New Occidental, Shift Boss, Foreman and Assistant Underground Superintendent.
As Assistant Superintendent Mr Julius has been in charge of the extensive development programme at the New Occidental Mine, consisting of sinking the main shaft to 1927ft excavating for the underground crushing station and new loading station.
During his period as Foreman in charge at the New Cobar Mine Mr Julius was given a free hand and during the 16 months he was there he developed the mine so that production was more than doubled and he improved the ventilation and the general working conditions to such an extent that this mine was frequently quoted as an example to the Foreman and Shift Bosses at Chesney and New Occidental as to how a mine should be run regarding hygiene and safety.
Mr Julius showed ability in handling the staff and men under him and it was noticed that during his term in charge at New Cobar man from there strongly resented being transferred to either of the other mines belonging to the Company.
Mr Julius has always shown an appreciation of what may be termed good housekeeping underground, not only to comply with Mines Inspection Act but also as a dividend payer in as much as it keeps down expensive accidents and keeps employees more contented and therefore more efficient.
In 1944 Mr Julius obtained his Mine Managers Certificate, being placed second in order of merit of those who sat for the examination in New South Wales.
Mr Julius was a pilot in the RAAF but received his discharge due to eye trouble.
Douglas Wilson
Inspector of Mines.

Harry served his community as a Bushfire Captain 1950 - 69. He received a Police award for his work in supervising the recovery of a murder victim from a deep well (160 ft) on "Bulla" station near Cobar.

Tragically Harry was killed while fighting bush fires when the machine he was driving overturned and crushed him.

THE INVERELL TIMES
January 1999
OBITUARY
HENRY (HARRY) JULIUS
The late Henry George Archibald Julius, who was tragically killed on December 27, 1998, while fighting a bushfire was born on January 16, 1916, at Redfern in Sydney. Harry, as he was best known, was the son of Archibald and Clara Julius, who lived at Tent Hill. There he attended primary school before two years schooling at Emmaville. Harry left school at 14 to manage his fathers property "Eloura" at Ashford.
At the age of 17 he left "Eloura" and travelled to Cracow in north Queensland, where he gained employment as a miner for two years.
On returning to Emmaville he worked on the Ottery Mine at Tent Hill and the Deep Lead Mine west of Emmaville.
From the time of leaving school he furthered his own education with numerous correspondence courses while still working full-time.
With mine management his ultimate goal, he achieved the highest marks in NSW and at the age of 28 became the youngest mine manager in Australia.
In 1941 he joined the RAAF and due to his leadership ability he was trained as a fighter pilot. But due to his B1 eyes he couldn't judge depths, so he was then trained as a bomber pilot and went onto achieve the rank of fight sergeant.
He married Dorothy Drake in Tamworth in 1942 and was discharged from the RAAF in 1943 at the request of the Mines Department to become the underground mine manager of the three Cobar mines. Harry and his two elder brothers, Ralph and Jack, obtained the first three, soldier settlement blocks in NSW after the Second World War.
In May 1948 he and his family moved to "Strathsevern" Ashford.
In 1950 he was elected a councilor on the Ashford Shire, where he served until 1961. In 1957, Harry introduced the first Merryville sheep into the Ashford area, where they have proved to be highly successful. In 1961 he returned to tin mining at Ruby Hill, which was on his father's property "Eloura", where he and his son George, mined for nine years. In 1980 they took up a mining lease at Tent Hill, where Harry had lived and attended school 60 years prior as a boy.
Harry and George successfully mined tin until 1985 when the tin market collapsed. After that Harry spent the rest of his life at "Strathsevern", Ashford, running his properties in conjunction with his son George, a partnership lasting over 37 years until his untimely death. Harry was predeceased by his wife Dot in 1996 and is survived by his daughter Eileen Porritt of Inverell, and son George of "Strathsevern", Ashford, as well as seven grandchildren and five great grandchildren. He is also survived by his sister, Gloria Lowrey of Inverell, and brother Gordon (Bink) Julius of Brisbane. His brothers Ralph and Jack, both of Ashford, and a sister Alice, of Inverell, predeceased him.

Research Notes:
Harry wrote this of his father.
Archibald Cowper Julius
Born Crowfield, Suffolk England.
At the age of 1 year he sailed from England with his parents on the sailing ship Ethel, landed at Hobart months later his father spent some time in Tasmania teaching in his profession as a Minister of the Anglican Church. Later they moved to Gayndah in Central Queensland for a few years. School days: At the age of around 9 years he had an escapade with two neighbors children who were in the habit of getting over 'the fence and steeling eggs, young Archie, knew of hens nest with a number of bad eggs, he waited on their next visit for eggs, bombarding the fence as they hurriedly retreated, spraying the two robbers with rotten eggs. The father appeared in a terrible rage threatening terrible affixation on young Archie, his mother Alice kept him in secure confinement until she could arrange for his departure to his Uncle Charlie Julius headmaster Maryborough Grammar School. He attended the above school under strict discipline, which Uncle Charlie handed out, until he graduated to the Gatton Agricultural College commencing school in the first year the college opened. After about 3 years at Gatton he was expelled for a prank he and another student committed by putting a pig in Professor Shelton's' office. The professor gave the two a firm dressing down in front of the class and expelled them. A young student Lesley Wilson stood up and addressed Professor Shelton taking out his watch and gave the Professor three minutes to change his mind as young Lesley pointed out that the punishment excessively outweighed the crime. The two lads were subsequently let off, the other lad stayed on but Archie now 18 years of age decided he had indeed done wrong and should accept the expulsion. Lesley Wilson ultimately became one of Queensland's Governors. My father spoke of several other things that happened at the College during his sojourns; but it would take too long at this stage to go into them. At the age of 18 years he decided that, though he had a good farming education, he had not the means to purchase a farm, so set out carrying his swag to the Copper mines at Mt. Garnet in the hope that some day he would find himself so capitalized to get his farm. At the time he reached Mt. Garnet, he felt hot and dived into a dam to cool off, he had great difficulty in getting out, as he then felt desperately sick, he was put into the Mt. Garnet Hospital which at that time was only a very large tent. He had contracted typhoid fever, and barely made a recovery, the doctor used to come along every second day and all he used to say to young Archie was "What! Are you still here!" There was a glass of milk put on a box beside his bed with a piece of cardboard over it to keep out the flies. He never had the strength to pick it up and no body ever bothered to help him. Archie carried scars for the rest of his life where his shin bone, cheek bones, shoulder blades and hip bones broke through the skin from bed sores. One day he felt himself recovering from the fever, so decided he had to get away from the Tent Hospital he steadily made his passage to the roadside and sat on a log. A bakers bread cart came along. Dad asked him for a lift back to town, the baker said wait there I am delivering bread to and Italian Charcoal B s camp and I will pick you up on the way back. The baker took him to a Hotel and asked the proprietor if he would take care of him until he had recovered and gained his strength. Young Archie had only a five pound note (L.5.00.0) left and asked the publican would he let him know when it cut out. Of course L.5.00.0 in those days, 1898, was quite a lot of money today (1993) it would be approximately 4000% more in other words about 40 x 10 = $400.00. The publican was very good and really put him in top order by the time his money ran out, with of course the kind and loving help of a young Irish Immigrant named Molly O'Rielly who worked the Hotel, she cut his food up on his plate and feed him till he gained enough strength to manage the job himself. Molly O'Rielly had booked a passage to Australia when the sailing ship at that time came through Torres-Strait and down to Townsville, she said, "Is this Australia?" "Yes." Was the answer, so she picked up her baggage and was making shorewards, when she was told "No, you don't get off here you're booked to Sydney." "No." Was her reply. "I came to Australia. If this is Australia that's all I want." Our Dad never forgot Molly and her kindness to him, he always spoke of her with immense gratitude. Another story he often related, after his recovery he got work and became quite strong. There was a little Chinaman who used to carry two baskets of vegetables from his gardens once a week from Smiths Creek where he had his garden, to Mt. Garnet a distance of about ten miles (17km) at a trot. Dad thought, "Gee, if a little Chinaman can do that it must not be very heavy, so in front of his mate he tried to pick up the two baskets of vegetables and they didn't even leave the ground, to his great amazement, at what the little Chinaman's strength must have been. He next moved down to the Herberton tin fields while there told the story where he was working on the windlass sinking a shaft, when a Trooper rode upon his horse and inquired of a certain Sid Palfry worked there. Dads reply was yes! and called out to Sid who was working in the bottom of the shaft. Sid you better get on the bucket and come up you have a visitor. Once arriving at the top of the shaft the Trooper handed Sid a photo of a young lady from Emmaville in New South Wales and said "Do you know this person?" Sids reply was "Yes". (It appeared Sid had left the young lady in the photo with an infant and had absconded to North Queensland where the Law had eventually caught up with him). After some time Archie left the Herberton fields with a friend named Charlie McKenzie they headed south down the Burdehein River, it was in flood at the time and the travelers were hot from the summer heat and walking, they had to cross the river to they bundled all of their gear each carrying his own and crossed the river. Dad said to Charlie, "A pity we couldn't swim the river, has got a good fresh and it would be easier then walking." Charlie would not be in it, but volunteered to carry the Dad's gear if he wanted to swim, so that is what happened, Archie floated down with the current while Charlie labored along the river bank carrying the swags. They eventually arrived at a small town and went into the Pub for a cool drink. Archie was accosted by a slightly inebriated customer, claiming that Archie was a good poor bastard, at which Archie dropped him with a punch. Charlie McKenzie said, "You should not have done that, he meant no harm." Dad exclaimed "That is a fighting word, nobody calls me that and gets away with it!" Archie and his friend eventually moved down through Bega where whaling was going on he told us many stories about Bega and Whaling and one day while on the wharf a large sling of farm produce was being loaded onto a boat, the winch driver took the sling up, dropped it suddenly, then raised it again this time the contents of dozens of cases of eggs was pouring out of the sling all over the wharf Dad thought "Some poor farmers are going to be at great loss, by this kind of carelessness." They moved down into Gippsland always prospecting. They told a story while in Gippsland one night it was raining and he had no cover, to decided to crawl into a large hollow log out of the rain, the log turned out to be the home of a badger, so he pushed his saddle and gear up the log so as to keep the badger in. Eventually he moved back into Western New South Wales to the Copper Mines at Mount Hope, Condobolin, Shuttletons etc. He found plenty of work in this area, he worked on the Shuttleton mines as an assayer. At this time he started studying Mining Engineering with the International Correspondence School. He advanced into surveying as well. While here he met his wife to be Clara Anne the daughter of Harry and Louise Evans a Copper Smelterman at Mount Hope. Assay was a bit unhealthy he lost a lot of weight due to the cyanide fumes from the constant use of cyanide which is an important ingredient in Copper Assaying as well as is many other minerals such as gold, silver etc. He moved onto Crowl Creek Copper Mine as Assayer and surveyed, his boss here was Joe Armstrong the Mine Manager. While at Crowl Creek he sat for his Mine Managers Certificate. It was about this time that he and mother were married, May 15th 1907. With his Mine Managers' Certificate he took on small Mines Manager, such as Green Sw=p out of Bathurst. Napoleons Reef, Gympie, Queensland he managed a mine there called Block 17. One of the interesting stories of Gympie, there had been a very large flood previously in the Mary River although all of the mines on the Main line of reef were connected between the different mining company leases, there was a strict rule that every mine shaft had to have heavy doors that could be quickly closed over the shafts and sealed to prevent such a flood in the Mary River breaking over its banks and flooding the Mines. During a large flood one shaft was not covered and sealed in time, the water poured down this shaft and as the water built up in all of the other mines the air pressure became so great that the water tight doors started to blow off letting in even greater volumes of water sealing the fate of all mines on the main line of reef. The famous Scottish, one of the biggest and richest of the Gympie mines was drowned with the rest of them. Block 17 however was not on the main line reef and was not drowned, though there was very little survey records to show how close other mines workings were. Archie Julius made strict rules regarding mining procedures such as a long pilot hole was always kept well ahead of each work face. No blasting was to take place above any other workman this meant that firing procedure was timed from the bottom up, the higher levels firing last. One day a miner came into Dad's office, he wanted his pay. Dad asked him what his trouble was and his reply was, "There is water to west of us, and water to the East and the bloody lakes of Killarney to the South want to get out." There never was any fatality in Dad's time. Dad was then offered the job as General Manager of the C.S.A. stands for the three miners who found it a Cornishman. a Scotchman and an Australian. At that time the mine was very high in copper, silver and lead, due to a of the Sulphides down to Sulphide lode area, this actually means the surface area over the millennium has had its sulphur content dissolved oxidized and the copper, lead and silver moved downwards having leaving the lode area now called Gossan to the secondary enriched area and under that is the Sulphides. A railway was put down seven miles to the mine to bring in mine supplies and limestone which was necessary as a flux in the process of smelting out valuable minerals and carting out the crude concentrate of copper etc. Known at this stage as Matt, it was sent to Cockle Creek Port Kembla for further refining and extraction of the several minerals. While at Cobar, Dad used to send mother and all of us kids to Sydney each year during the very hot summer, that was the period Gordon and I were born, my birth place and time was 16-1-1916 at 216 Cleveland Street, Sydney. Father Pickett a Catholic Priest used to visit Dad a lot, while the C.S.A. was going, Father Pickett had a seismograph installed in a tunnel in the C.S.A. mine recording tide and earthquake movements of the earths crust, before Father Pickett put his instruments into the C. S.A. Mine he had then installed at the Fort Bourke Mine until it closed down, in later years I, H.G.A. Julius was Manager of the Fort Bourke mine 1943-44 then known as the New Cobar Mine and I often looked into Father Picketts old Seismograph stations where all the doors were sealed in with dark green velvet to prevent any interference from mine operations such as blasting etc. The Mine caught on fire in 1918-19 the shafts and the mine were sealed off to prevent oxy ladened air getting to feed the fire, the slopes were the ore had been removed was heavily timbered with 14"x14" Oregon timbers,, by the way the mine could import this Oregon timber from Seattle U.S.A. cheaper to the mine at Cobar than they could cut timber around Cobar for mine timber, delivered. The weight of the roof of the mine in some places caused the 14"x14" to flatten out considerably which made it very splintery and burnt well. The biggest problem was how ever the sulphur in the Ore it self caught on fire. Father A.C. Julius with several volunteers used to go down the mine at certain intervals with Oxygen Masks called proto masks to check the fire, to see if they were actually controlling the fire. Some areas were safe of poisonous gases to test they carried canaries small birds in cages if the bird dropped dead, they switched on their proto masks, these little birds became difficult to get, there were plentyof cats around so Dad tried cats in a cage, they were unreliable, when the birds dropped dead there was no visible-sign of distress with the cats. Next Dad had eldest brother-Ralph and other lads gfthe niine-staffcatchiAg-the-cornrwa,.->- sparrows under a box propped up with a stick with a string attached and wheat placed under the box. When sufficient number of sparrows were feeding the boys pulled the string, down came the box capturing some sparrows each time of which the boys received three pence or sixpence each. By 1919 all hope of stopping the fire was given up and the mine was closed down. Next Dad inspected several Managers jobs a gold mine prospect at Hanging Rock? Tin Dredges at Tingha and the Ottery Arsenic Mine Tent Hill near Emmaville Northern NSW. He settled for the arsenic mine, William Cooper and Nephews the sheep and cattle dip manufacturers who wanted good white arsenic for the dip products had obtained the mine leases from a Mrs Victor Leggo. Coopers had tried out the Arsenic trioxide from the Willuna gold mine in West Australia, it was a by product from the process called calcining the ore to rid if of sulphur and arsenic before the gold milling process. This arsenic however proved unsuitable because the Antimony content caused the dip to come out as a purple colour instead of the nice yellow colour of their preferred product which at that time was being made in Birkhaustead England from arsenic Coopers were producing from their mines in Portugal. The Ottery Arsenic was of a very high quality being 99.8% As03 (Arsenic Trioxide) this produced a very high quality sheep dip. The purple sheep dip was not acceptable to the wool growers, it just had to be yellow. I will never forget on a trip that my father took me to Sydney with him on one of his many trips wherein he was a consultant to Coopers manufacturing works as well as the Ottery Mine Manager. I was left in the company of some workers who were packaging dip while Dad was accompanying their factory manager, a Mr. Rollo, around the works, ongoing home that night to 21 Great Buckingham Street where my Grandmother, Dads mother-in-law lived, "We always stayed with Grandma Evans when we went to Sydney." I said to Dad, a funny thing happened when I was with the men at the packing room. I said they filled a very great number of Coopers yellow packages called Littler Dip, then they filled an even smaller number of packets with Quibbles Dip brand on them all out of the one thing, he said "Yes, that's right, Coopers bought out the Dip manufacturers Little, Quibbles and Royal Cattle Dips, and because the different wool growers claimed that Quibbles or Littler the dips they always used were ever so much better than Coopers sheep dip, Coopers had to keep printing the dip packets to suit the requirements of different wool growers beliefs, even though the different packets were always filled out of the same dip bin. Back to the erection of the Arsenic recovery plant, at the Ottery Mine. A Mr. Williamson, Coopers top man came out from Birkhamstead to get the whole system started he had previously set up the works in Portugal where the site was flap, the Ottery was on the side of a very steep hill, this however was an advantage because it helped in the up draft of the hot gases of arsenic etc. through the furnaces and cooling chambers where the Arsenic gases cooled out to granular crystals all over the inside of the cooling chambers. There were four banks of cooling chambers, each of 26 chambers, two sets on the west side handled the crude arsenic which carried impurities of iron oxide dust making the crude arsenic a rusty colour. On the east side of the crude chambers there were two more banks each with 26 chambers, they were for refining the crude to the 99.8% Trioxide As0 3 product. At the head of the four banks of cooling chambers a common flue carried the remaining smoke from the sulphur fueled Coarse Ore Furnace and the combination of the wood and sulphur fueled Fine Ore Rotary Furnace smoke to a common large brick stack at the top of the hill most of the brick work and stack are still there today, an important draw relic to be observed by modern day tourists. It was a very busy time for Arch Julius from August 1920 when he started the works, he bought bricks from all the brick manufacturers around, he even set up a brick manufacturing works in the old Glen, in smelting sheds in lower ground below our house at Tent Hill, 2 miles south of the Ottery Mine itself, there were 2 brick kilns where the bricks were baked after being formed from local clay passed through a machine that made every brick exactly the same, then dried on pallets before being methodically stacked by men into the kilns which were fired with wood, this firing process went on for several days, then allowed to cool out, the reason for two kilns was to allow a constant flow of bricks to be made and fired. However, there was some industrial trouble with the local bricks, there were 22 (twenty two) brick layers on the job, their spokesman, name Jack Love, claimed that the local bricks were no good, that no man could lay more than 400 bricks a day. Dad pointed out to him the bricks even if they were as he said no good, they still had to be used as bricks were in short supply. A.C. as every one called Dad in those days tried hard to get the brick layers to lay the bricks on contract, so much per 100 bricks, this proved very difficult to convince them as they claimed no man could lay more than 400 per day. However, in the long run A.C. won out because the schedule was getting behind with so few bricks being laid each day, the men eventually did the laying on contract and they averaged 2000 bricks per day each. I have lots of photos showing the progress of their work. Our Dad had a plate glass camera, and did all of his own photography. There is over 450,000 bricks laid in the whole program. When the works were partly established, Mr. Williamson had to leave, I think he went to Canada after the Ottery and then back to England, but Dad said to him, "As you know this is the first time on this type of ore extraction what if the system doesn't work. I may not know what to do?" Mr. Williamson's only remark was, "Son, when that time comes I know you will have no troubles solving them, you are that sought of fellow, as it happened Mr. Williamson was right. A.C. had no trouble to solve any problem that came his way. When the first economic depression came in the late 1929 period, the mine had to close down due to the drop off in world prices of raw materials. The price of time oxide fell to 22/6 per unit and Coopers were able to import Arsenic Trioxide from Ticomma in America through Seattle a by product from gold mines in north west USA, shipping companies brought it across for next to nothing as ballast in their boats. The mine closed down in 1929 on a two-year suspension of labour conditions, the price of tin kept falling until it reached 18/6 per unit. By the way I had better mention the fact about tin that I am now mentioning. The N04 lode on the Ottery was mainly a time lode however it did carry arsenic as well. This lode was worked by the Tent Hill smelting company, the ore was roasted on wood in the open, the system was as follows a layer of logs on the ground, a layer of ore, then another layer of wood then ore and so on until it was a fair big stack. This was fired, the sulphur and arsenic was given off as fumes which cooled out and the arsenic fell to the ground everywhere, the thesis calcined ore with the tin oxide was carted by horse and dray to the tin battery at Ten Hill where it was crushed by a fifteen head stamper mill, it then was gravity was had over . . . . . tables and Cornish . . . . . the tin Oxide then was carted about forty yards to the two furnace tin smelter, where it was reduced to whit tine ingots of 99.5% Sn0 before smelting the tin oxide would assay around 70% SnO Z with the use of carbon as a flux in the furnace caused one part of the oxygen to be given off. The carbon used was locally burnt wood reduced to Charcoal. Each batch that went into the furnace was 3 tons of Tin Oxide to 1 ton of charcoal as a flux using wood as furnace fuel. Let me go back to A.C.'s time, after he had the arsenic works up and running the price of tin on the world market improved by the 1925-26 era. A.C. went to Mount Bishop in Tasmania and it rained for 21 days he was there; he was amazed that the men never stopped work when it rained, they used rain coats, as it rained so much they could not stop work, otherwise they would never get anything done. He came back, went around several old mines at Torrington and bought up tin milling machinery, had a site prepared below arsenic works and to the west. It was a gravity plant, ten one ton stamps known as a 10 head battery, there were a couple of Cornish type grinding pans, where the coarser particles after the Hydraulic Classifiers removed the two finer grades the battery material went to two different banks of tables those handling the medium grade and those handling the fine grade of material, as I said earlier the coarse went straight into the Cornish grinding pans, the treated material again went into hydraulic classifiers then to the two systems of tables one for the medium one for the fine. At the bottom of the gravity mill the tin was dried and sent up to the store room. As the price of tin was too low, it was held, waiting for the price to rise this did not happen. Consequently the tin oxide, 26 tons of it lay in the store for at least a year before the works closed down, for the 2 years of labour suspension and for a few years after that and was eventually sold when the price got to 26/- per unit. Some people may wonder what this unit price means, a unit of tin is I % of purity and percentage of 1 ton or now 1 tonne, this means tin oxide may vary from say 60% Sn0 2 to say up to 76.%% SnO Z that is the percentage of metal purity, and a unit by weight is 1% of 1 ton 22.4lbs or 1% of 1 tonne is 22.041bs if the price is given as is always quoted at 70% if assay of purity is less than 70% the price per ton is reduced, if however it is higher than 70% a premium is paid, say the assay is 70% and the unit price of tin today is $71.00 per unit you would multiply $71 x 70% = $4970.00 dollar per tonne if it were $71 of 70% + 6.5% premium @ 7.5 cents per unit above 70% you would have this figure $70.00 + 7.50 x 6% = &$71.45 per unit now we have $71.45 x 76.5 = $5,465.925 per tonne a difference of $495.925 per tonne more. When the legal period of labour suspension was over the Company holding the Mining leases were obliged to commence work with labour or loose their lease. The price for tin and arsenic wasn't sufficient to encourage Coopers and Nephews to resume, so A.C. tried to encourage the men who worked on the mine previously to work it on tribute it was not good enough for them to take on either, probably none of them were capable of running it management wise. So A.C. and my 2 elder brothers Ralph Cowper and John Franklyn Julius jointly took over the mine and treatment works on tribute during the two years the mine was closed, A.C. carried on looking after and attending to all business requirements but on a reduced salary by 505. On tribute he lost the other 505 of his original salary paid by William Cooper and Nephews. Coopers paid A.C. $23.00 ton on rail Deepwater which was still above the Arsenic they were importing from Tocoma USA The Julius tributers got under way, to cut cost the air compressor and jack hammers were dispensed with, all mining was done by hand drilling (hammer and tap) A.C. hand sharpened all stuff for drilling, mining went on underground until a sufficient supply of ore was stored underground for a run of the furnace. A.C. told those men whom he employed that the money had to come out of the ground before anyone could collect any wages, although this was not the case, A.C. kept sufficient working funds to pay all men on a fortnightly basis. When sufficient tonnage of ore was ready to haul, one boiler was fired to operate the winding engine and the crusher. A.C. drove the winding engine the boys trucked the ore up to the shaft plant and sent it up to the surface in the cages hauled by the winding engine driven by A.C. one man took then off at the top brace of the shaft and trucked it across an elevated tram line to the crushing plant bin. Here one man shoveled the ore into a jaw crusher A.C. set up a screening plant attached to the seining jaw of the crusher which gave sufficient shaking to sieve the fines from the coarse material falling into different ore gins the crusher was driven by a engine working at the same time as the winding engine. When all of the ore was raised to the surface and crushed the furnace of 8 kilos was lit, the ore burnt on the sulphur content, this ore was the coarse material about 3/4" to 2" mesh. The fires under 3/4" mesh had to go to the rotary furnace using wood as fuel, but was complimented by the sulphur content as well, the rotary furnace turned at a very slow pace, ore fed in the top center onto a cone that went down in steps, placed at several intervals, around the revolving cone there was fixed baffles that pushed the burning ore down to the next step or bench as it moved or revolved. This was necessary to get air into the fine mass, it arrived on like this until it arrived at the bottom of the cone and then into pits to cool out before going over the dump the arsenic having been removed along with the coarse ore. The 8 kiln units had approx. one ton of calcium and as soon as a few red hot stones showed, the doors were replaced and clayed up to keep the air tight only enough air was allowed in through 1/2" diameter holes in the door a series of wooden plugs were used in the holes to obtain the correct amount of air into the bottom of the kilns. After the combined ore was drawn off the bottom, a plate door at the top was drawn out to let the next batch of fresh ore dropped into the furnace kilns. During the early stages in 1932 & 33 Dad and the two boys would drive out to the Mine leaving home in the buggy drawn by a horse at 6:00 am they would put one ton of ore into each of the 8 hoppers over the kilns, then remove an equal amount of burnt ore from the bottom, then drop the new charge as it was known all of this work would be completed by 8:00 am. They would then go home to Mother and breakfast. A.C. would pick up the mail at 9:00 am then the three of them would return to the Ottery in the buggy, prepare a new shot of charges for the drop, then prepare another 8 charges and get home for tea by 5:00 pm, have a short lay down, get into the buggy be back at the mine to drop the next charge at midnight, this work went on nonstop until all or ore in reserve had been processed on a 7 days a week process.
They would go back mining again until the arsenic c on the crude side had cooled out, then working a 2 x 12 hour shifts the boys would refine the arsenic, this was not hard but very tedious and constant, however one had to be very careful no to get contaminated with the white arsenic as it caused great irritation called .Pickle, absolute cleanliness was the virtue. When the price of tin rose sufficient A.C. had the tin recovery mill put back into order this meant a few extra men being employed during this our youngest brother Gordon Evans went into the staff as apprentice to the Engineer Tom Roberts, a highly competent and versatile man. At this point I was brought back from "Elouera" Dads sheep property which I was running to erect an incline tram way to the top of the Ore bin feeding the Mill Stampers so as all ore from the arsenic plant could be transferred direct to the tin milling plant instead of as previously sent over the dump, of coarse a very large amount of calcined ore did go through the tin battery and mill back in William Cooper and Nephews time prior to close even in 1929 from the very large calcine dumps. At this point I had better go back to 1923. Gloria Elaine arrived into the family 4-1-23 also this was the year A.C. bought his first farming property that he had so long waited for from his days at Gatton Agricultural College. Gloria arrived with beautiful red or should I say auburn hair, a distinct throw back in genes to Isabelle Maria Gilder the wife of Dr George Charles Julius. I have been told that every generation of Julius' have produced some red heads from the genes of Isabella Maria Gilder ever since. The property that A.C. purchased was totally undeveloped. We started from scratch as it were, Dad and Mother selected the name of "Elouera" for the property this name was derived, I think, from the little village where we resided on the C.S.A. Mine when Dad was General Manager there. The first job on "Elouera" was a small residence A_C. took 2 of his carpenters they were also the Coopers as well George Mitchellmore and John McMahon along with a third man Charlie Stanford the Mine Blacksmith, indeed a very hardy man he was and over the period of several weekends, a comfortable, but durable housing set up was built, not so good as one would see in this day and age. It was clad with galvanized corrugated iron and lined with heshing, and grooved floor and a large open fire place, cooking was done in a camp oven, as the years progressed and the lard developed, so did the house expand, next was attached a kitchen with a real wood stove, then a bedroom, later cam a large room we called the bunk house. Next came the wool shed this was about in the year 1926 to 1927. Charlie Lamfrnacie Dad's special carpenter at the Ottery who built and repaired tin dressing tables etc. designed a special roof for the wool shed, the shed like everything else had to be cheap, it was built with all round timber using Ironbark for posts and fencing, black Cypress pine for rafters perlines and girls , the perlines and girts were faced by adzes one flat surface to receive the Iron roofing and walls, it was indeed a very substantial building, still there working as good as ever in 1993 and it will be in service as a wool shearing shed for a long time to come. All of the timber was cut by we four boys on "Elouera" and swigged to the shed site from the bush by horses, the horse that did most of the work was a Suffolk Punch, his general work was pulling the buggy, but he was useful in lots of other jobs, we called him Punch, there was a job he used to do very well, that was pulling a small tiller or cultivator down the rows of corn, of course he did have one weakness if you asked too much of him with a heavy load he would "joey", that means to a horse NO. A.C. did employ men from time to time fencing ring barking and suckering the timber to kill out such growth so as grass could grow for sheep. "Elouera" was a little over 5,000 acres with a southern frontage of seven miles to the Severn River we never went short of fish meals when ever we felt like fish, in the early days all you could catch was Murray Cod, then for some reason they became very scarce, Catt-fish took over, and you could catch big hauls of them. When "Elouera" was reaching a fair degree of development up to 3,000 sheep and some cattle were running on the property, the country produced good quality wool, up to 100 acres of basaltic soil was farmed, with hay and grain being stored for winter and bad times when stock feed was scarce. In the beginning of the farming activities around 1933 and 1934 we worked a three team of draught horses for ploughing etc., Ottery was paying little better when on tin as well as sevenic by 1935 then A.C. bought a Massey Harris tractor, a five furrow mould board plough and 12 run seed and fertilizing combine, this certainly speeded up the farming process, draught horses were utilized to work the 6ft cut mower, and hay rake. Later after my time a hay bailer was introduced, under the supervision of Gordon Evans. By this time I had left the farm 1936 and went north to Queensland mining at the Golden Plateau Mine. Dad, Mother and Gordon worked the farm a large new homestead was built and many more hay sheds. Gordon was being the chief stockman and hard worker around the place. Gloria was nursing at Inverell District Hospital and Alice worked in Sydney with Williams Cooper and Nephews. By this time Adolph Hitler was starting his stormy career and disturbing the peace of Europe. Ralph, Jack and myself joined the Australian fighting forces, Gordon remained home as some body had to look after Eloura besides A.C. and Mother. Alice came home and helped as well, she became known on the farm by Dad as Lofty the land girl, short "Lofty". We better go back to the Ottery Mine and Tent Hill. I was talking about the incline tramline to the top of the ore bin feed to the stampers. By this time quite a lot more men came onto the staff. Charlie (Darky) Stanford came back and took over the blacksmithing and drilling sharpening from Dad. Teddy Marsh a Qualified Engine driver took over from Dad all of this work, as I mentioned Tom Roberts came on as Chief Engineer, Gordon as his apprentice, Arthur Peweter as a miner, Tom McMahon had been with A.C. all of the time, and Sid Coltheart Dad's original mill Superintendent before the 1929 Closure came back to look after the tin concentration process. Even so, careful watch by management (A.C.) was still very evident and necessary, hard mining was still the name of the day Teddy Marsh the engine driver went below on hammer and tap, Darky Stanford after he had sharpened all of the steel went below ground in the evening on to the hammer and tap. A little story about Darky at this point is worthy of mention. Darky always had a bucket of water boiling on his forge on completion of drill sharpening ready for the men when they came up from underground for Crib Time, crib is the term used for miners lunch, one day a piece of newspaper that he used to lift the hot bucket of water off the forge dropped into the boiling water, by the time he fished it out, it had left a strange taste to the water out of the bucket to make their tea, Arthur Pevetea tasted his and apparently thought that there had been something in his cup "perhaps a cockroach or something that caused the queer taste, so through it out. Teddy March did the same, at this point Darky said. "Listen men, I had a mishap with the bucket of water today. I dropped one of Jack's (Julius) socks into the boiling water, it may give the tea a funny taste today. By this time around 1934 things were improving there was more money coming in and A.C. ended the tribute and commenced operations on behalf of William Cooper and Nephews to sell the Ottery, lock, stock and barrel to Burma Maley Tin Mining Company. Their plan was to sink the main shaft a further 100 feet deeper to No.3 level, drive a tunnel along the No.4 lode about 500 feet to connect by raising to meet a winder coming down from a very good pocket of tin arsenic ore on No.2 level. The prospect looked good, at his time I (H.J.) was working as a miner in the Golden Plateau Mine at Cracow in Central Queensland. With my friend Max McCallroe came down to build up a team to sink the shaft this further 100 feet and do the development work in 1938. As the mine promoter for Burma Malay Lionel Leece did not have a Mine Managers Certificate A.C. was called upon to spend two days per week for an approximate fee to take care of the Management Certificate a requirement of the New South Wales Mining Act, A.C. agreed to do this arrangement for a period of several months to enable Lionel Leece time to get some appropriate certificate so as he could manage his own right as A.C. by this time in life he wanted to retire to his farm and farm forget all about the mining business. On a night of the 3rd of September 1939 I was at a dance in the local hall at Tent Hill, when the revellers were hushed to hear the announcement that Britain and France had declared war on Germany. Although we all expected it to happen for some time, I might say when the announcement was made it made for a great silence and sober conversation, the war we knew was on and it would indeed change the lives of so many of us. However work carried on at the Ottery Mine for some time, the rich pocket of ore did not develop as was expected below the No.2 level the ore was mined out, a drought was on at the time causing the dam that supplied water to the Boilers producing steam got very low and the mine had to lay off most of the men. During my sojourn I had been appointed underground mine foreman. While there was sufficient water to supply water to the boiler for another fortnight Lionel Leece asked if Max McCaul and I would try and push up a raise on the middle section of the ore body in the hope we could pick up the bottom extent of this lode. We followed the time lode veins up to about 25 feet before the boiler feed water cut out and found nothing worth while in the way of anything valuable. The drought did not break for sometime and this was the end of mine. It closed down for good. Back to "Eloura" and A.C., he and Gordon carried on right through the war years, wool prices were set at 1 shilling per the average, Great Britain agreed to pay for all the wool Australia produced, but it had to be stock piled around Australia as it was too dangerous to ship because German Raiders, food and war supplies were more important under war conditions. After the war the wool was put back into the Auction System, and disposed of over several years. Great Britain getting back her outlay and shared with the Wool Growers any profits over and above their outlay and costs. A. C. and Mother wanted to retire, `Tloura" was bought from Dad by Gordon, Dad and Mother bought a house in Granville Street, Inverell in 1952. A.C. only enjoyed his retirement for a short period getting ill, he passed away November 1954 at the age of 74 years. A few days before the end he told be that he had had a full and very useful life, he was very happy to reach the age of 74 years that he was waiting to get a message from his creator, because of his religious background and bringing up and that he had been told by others in their last days where in they claimed to have received a message from the almighty, he said I am waiting to hear something, but so far nothing has come through to my knowledge, he never got the message he had been waiting for. Right up to the last days I found him although weak in body he was strong in mind with his full faculties. Throughout out life he gave his share to humanity he maintained the highest principles he served on the Hospital Boards in the different communities in which he dwelt, he was a long time member of the Freemasonry rising to the ranks of Grand Lodger Officers. He supported local sports events as such to the extent that his working obligations would permit his the necessary time. Clara Ann followed him nine years later. Written by Henry George Archibald Julius "Strathsevern" Ashford 1993.

Medical Notes: Harry suffered several heart attacks, and had had 7 heart bypasses at St Andrews Hospital Brisbane, by Oct 1993. He also had two knee replacements.



Henry married Dorothy Elizabeth WOODS Nee Drake [4471], daughter of George Henry DRAKE [9598] and Mary Jane HAILES [9599], on 28 Dec 1942 in Tamworth. Dorothy was born on 30 Jan 1917 in Bankstown Sydney and died on 6 Sep 1996 in Inverell N.S.W. at age 79.

General Notes:
Dorothy was a city person, she worked hard at the farm but found it a lonely life on the land.

Correspondence School
Blackfriars
30th of November 1953.
Dear Mrs Julius,
I wish to thank you sincerely for all the trouble which you have gone through to prove that George was doing his own work.
Imagine how I felt when I returned after 21/2 days illness to know that George's work had been queried. I did not feel very happy, Mrs Julius, as you can see, I was like George under a shadow re - my class work. I showed George is writing on his blue for to try to help, but I needed your help - so that is the reason for my letter to you.
Strange, that everything proved that I was doing my work correctly and above all that the honesty of a pupil was upheld - Please explain this to George, for me Mrs Julius.
Would you thank Mr Hamilton Foster and Mr Yardley for their assistance in this matter too
again, thanking you for your great help and wishing you and your family the happiest of all Christmas Seasons
Yours sincerely
A Coster



608. Gordon Evans JULIUS [890] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Feb 1918 in Sydney NSW Australia, was baptised on 31 May 1929 in St Pauls Emmadale N.S.W., died on 1 Jan 2000 in Brisbane General Hospital Aust. at age 81, and was buried on 6 Jan 2000. He was usually called Bink.

General Notes:
Bink worked the Ottery Mine until the family moved to Elouera. During WW2 he managed the farm until 1954 when he bought it from his father. He then sold it in 1958 when he went into the manufacture of ornamental concrete blocks at Ashford and Maroochydore.

He bought a property at Obi Obi Valley, then one at Toogoolawah. He worked for his brother Harry when Harry and his son reopened the tin mine at Tent Hill Emmaville. He retired to Ashford but still helped out on the families properties at Sabrina and Strathsevern, he kept bees.

His sister Gloria writes (2005)
"Bink, also worked the Ottery Mine until the family moved to Elouera. During WW2 he managed Elouera. I have recently read all my father's diaries (1939-1954) where he describes Gordon as being in great demand by the local farmers as he had a talent for veterinary work. He was also an expert horse breaker. He passed on to George [4473] a lot of his animal husbandry experience. He worked at Elouera until he sold it in 1958. Next he worked making bricks and manufacturing swimming pools in Maroochydore Queensland. He was definitely a jack of all trades."

Gordon was cremated

Bink married Norma Elizabeth PIKE [4477] on 11 Nov 1950 in Brisbane Australia. Norma was born in 1919, died on 6 Nov 2006 at age 87, and was cremated in Albany Creek Cemetery Brisbane.

General Notes:
Norma was formerly of Moolooaba.


The child from this marriage was:

+ 719 F    i. Susanne JULIUS [4480] was born on 6 Jun 1953 and died on 6 Jun 1953.


609. Gloria Elaine JULIUS [891] (Archibald Cowper 381, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 4 Jan 1923 in Sydney NSW Australia, was baptised in Sydney NSW Australia, and died on 10 Oct 2008 in Sydney NSW Australia at age 85.

General Notes:
Gloria left home at 18 to train as a nurse, she qualified as a double certificated registered nurse, working mainly in country hospitals, where Gloria recalls one had to be resourceful. She had many "hairy experiences" including rat plagues, electric generator failures etc. She worked for a time at Texas (Queensland) before moving to Moruya (NSW) where they all expected her to be an American (from Texas).
Promoted she served as Matron at two further hospitals until she retired on the 25 March 1980 then Director of Nursing (Matron) at McLean Retirement Village in Inverell NSW.

Edward Fenn had the very great pleasure to meet Gloria in 2005 and her girls, nicer people you could not hope to meet.



Gloria married Daniel Thomas Kevin LOWREY [4476], son of John Joseph LOWREY [7409] and Maude Mary MANNIX [7410], on 18 May 1957 in The Valley Brisbane Aust. Daniel was born on 16 Sep 1914, died on 21 Apr 2000 in Nepean Hospital at age 85, and was buried in Pinegrove Michinbury NSW (ashes).

610. Thomas JAMES [19502] (Constance Isabel JULIUS382, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

611. John JAMES [19503] (Constance Isabel JULIUS382, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1). He was usually called Bink.

Bink married Una [19504].

612. Elizabeth Helen JULIUS [896] (John 383, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 3 Jun 1919 in New Farm Brisbane, was baptised on 14 Jul 1919 in St John Cathedral Brisbane Qld, died on 14 Aug 2010 in Sth Brisbane Qld at age 91, and was cremated on 20 Aug 2010 in Mt Thompson Memorial Gdns Brisbane. She was usually called Beth.

General Notes:
EULOGY read by John Dicks and Helen Macintosh at the Funeral Service held at St Stephen's Anglican Church, Coorparoo, on Friday 20 August, 2010 for their mother, ELIZABETH HELEN DICKS.

John:Elizabeth Helen Julius was born on 3rd June, 1919 in a small private hospital in Barker Street, New Farm. She was the first child of John (known as Jack) and Isabel Jane (known as Belle) Julius. Mum was baptised on 14 July in St John's Cathedral before the family returned to the cattle property 'Dovedale' outside Boompa (near Maryborough) where Mum's father was manager.

Mum's Brother John Stewart was born in Maryborough on 29th November 1921 and the family continued to live at 'Dovedale' until 1926 when they returned to Brisbane. Mum, who had been taught by correspondence at 'Dovedale', started school in Brisbane at the Misses Stephensons' establishment at New Farm. She then attended Sunnybank State School for a short while, returning to New Farm and the Misses McKenzies' school. At about the age of 11, Mum and her family moved to Laidley in the Lockyer Valley where she and Uncle John attended the Laidley Central State School before she travelled for two years by rail motor to the Gatton State High School completing Junior in 1935.

Helen:Mum then came to Brisbane to undertake a secretarial course at Stott's College. While at Stott's she boarded with family friends. She commenced work at Robert Harper & Co where she remained only a short time because Stott's invited her back to teach shorthand to girls almost her own age. Later she moved to a position at the National Mutual Insurance Company where she continued right up until the time of her marriage.

Mum's family returned to Brisbane in the late 1930s and built a new home named 'Southery' in Hethorn Street, Coorparoo. At the wedding of a friend's older sister in 1940 she met a Coorparoo chap named Henry Gordon Dicks and a friendship ensued despite the fact that he parted his hair down the middle and wore two-tone brogue shoes! Mum soon fixed these bad habits!

John:Mum and Dad became engaged in 1941. Dad's parents wanted him to complete his electrical engineering studies before he and mum were married, but after a three year engagement they took the plunge on 16 December 1944 at St. Andrew's Church of England, South Brisbane with a modest reception at the Red Cross Café. They planned to go to Sydney for their honeymoon, but with wartime petrol rationing putting a stop to this, they ended up going to Caloundra by train! Their first home was a flat in High Street, Windsor and Dad finally finished his studies - obtaining better marks after his marriage than before!

After a while at Windsor, Mum and Dad bought Mum's grandmother's home at 148 Kennedy Terrace, Red Hill. I, Henry John, was born on the morning of 6th February, 1948 and by lunchtime, Mum was wondering why Dad hadn't come to visit. It turns out that nobody at the hospital had phoned him to tell him he had a son! During their years at Red Hill, Mum joined with a group of local ladies who played tennis on Tuesdays. They continued to play until the 1980s and after that still met regularly for lunch in the city until only a few years ago. She became actively involved at St Barnabas' Anglican Church where she joined the Mothers' Union. In 2008 Mum was very proud to be awarded her Mothers' Union 50 year membership badge. I commenced at the Ithaca Creek State School in 1954. On 7th June 1956 Helen Mary was born, and again Dad had to be telephoned to be informed of the arrival of his child - this time he was working on a job in Theodore in country Queensland.
Dad's business relocated from the City to Woolloongabba in 1956. He found crossing from Red Hill to the Southside through the Normanby in peak hour traffic a real pain so he and Mum decided to move closer to Woolloongabba. Imagine what Dad would think of the traffic today! In June 1959, when I was 11 and Helen 3, we moved to 19 Spica Street, Coorparoo. I started at Churchie immediately, and so began Mum's almost 50 year association with the school. The family became parishioners here at St. Stephen's, commencing another 50 year association. Mum joined the Holland Park Red Cross Branch and was a very hard working member of this dedicated group of ladies. Over the ensuing years she received her Long Service Award and three bars, indicating over 40 years of service. She also did volunteer work with the wives of Dad's fellow Rotary Club members and she and Dad had lots of fun with Rotary friends. She continued to return to Red Hill for tennis on Tuesdays and all other days of the week were taken up with Church work, Red Cross, Meals on Wheels and school tuckshops. Dad also took up sailing and the crew and families of Trevor Early's 'Sonda' became probably their dearest friends.

Helen:Every August for 20 years our family holidayed at the dearly loved 'Kalara' at Miami on the Gold Coast. We have so many happy memories of great carefree times in the old fibro beach shack, many of them spent with our Uncle John, Aunty Daph and their three daughters Elizabeth, Penelope and Susan.
After two years at St. Stephen's kindergarten, I started at the Coorparoo State School in 1962. John completed senior in 1965 and commenced his electrical apprenticeship with Dad as well as studying Engineering at QIT at night. I moved on to St. Margaret's at Albion in 1968 and so began Mum's next tuckshop career! John joined the regular Army in 1970 and I completed Senior in 1973. During my senior year, Mum and Dad enjoyed a wonderful, long-awaited overseas trip. Many of you will be well aware of Mum's great love of cricket and she was thrilled to visit Lord's and Old Trafford during their travels.
In 1974 I commenced my Arts degree at the University of Queensland and John married Lyn at the Churchie Chapel in November of that year. Mum and Dad first joined the Liberal Party in the early 1970s and were very active supporters. For several elections, Mum was Booth Captain at the Scout Hall in Eva Street, Coorparoo where the workers for the other side often said she had an unfair advantage because she knew everyone who came to vote! She was so well known and liked in the Coorparoo area. Two weeks ago Mum cast her postal vote for tomorrow's federal election. Her interest in politics and all current events never diminished.

John:Mum and Dad's first grandchild, Henry Michael was born on 29 January, 1976 followed by Angela Jane exactly three years later. This was convenient as each January after Michael's birth meant a birthday road trip to wherever my family and I were posted - complete with Dad's comprehensive range of spare parts for his car! Mum had her second overseas trip in 1980 commencing with a Mothers' Union tour of Europe (sharing a room with great friends Edna Early and Edith James), then meeting up with Dad and Helen in London. Helen married Andy at Churchie Chapel in October 1981. Mum and Dad had several other shorter trips within Australia and over to New Zealand with friends Trevor and Edna Early and Ed and Margaret Scott in the early 1980s. Dad continued to work as an engineering consultant during his retirement. His untimely death on 28 May, 1984 was a terrible shock. Mum was so strong for everyone and we can only imagine how it felt for her to lose her husband of nearly 40 years. She continued on at Spica Street for four more years, during which time she welcomed the arrival of grandson Alexander Andrew Gordon on 16 April, 1985 and her namesake, Elizabeth Helen Mary on 28 July 1987.

1988 began Mum's next 20 year association with Churchie when Michael commenced Grade 8. In December of that year, after over 29 years at Spica Street, Mum moved to her unit at 'Lorelei' in Mackay Street, Coorparoo. Mum's fifth grandchild, William Douglas John arrived on 8th August 1990. While at Mackay Street, Mum continued her busy lifestyle and enjoyed several trips away with great friend Edna Early.
Her tireless devotion to the Liberal Party was rewarded in 1993 with a Meritorious Service Award. 1993 also saw Michael follow me into the Army. 1994 began on a very sad note with the sudden passing of Mum's only brother, our Uncle John. They had a close relationship all their lives punctuated only by his service overseas during the Second World War. To us he was a fabulous uncle and an even better friend.

Helen:Mum was an avid card player. She enjoyed all kinds of card games, especially Solo and Poker. She taught all her grandchildren to play poker and there were many fiercely fought contests. However, sometimes she underestimated the skill of those she had taught. On one occasion she rather rashly bet her car on what looked like an unbeatable hand only to lose it to William who was then about five or six! He has always claimed that the old silver Ford Laser is his!

Mum enjoyed another overseas trip to Los Angeles, Disneyland and Canada with Andy, our children and me in 1995. Her total support of all her grandchildren's activities saw her at endless concerts, sporting matches, Speech Nights and more recently (and very proudly), tertiary graduations. Each of Mum's grandchildren shared a wonderful individual relationship with her. She followed with great interest their lives as adults:

Michael & Alicia's life in Sydney and the building of their new home;
Angela's travels and physiotherapy work;
Alexander the mechanical engineer - so like our Dad;
Elizabeth the Prep teacher and her tales from the classroom; and
William's Law and Commerce studies and his passion for playing the drums.

Right up to the end of last week she was thrilled to hear and respond in her inimitable way to

"Gidday Granny!" from Michael,
"Hi Gran - it's me, Ang!" from Angela,
"Hi Gran… Good thanks Gran!" from Alexander,
"Gidday Hot Stuff! What's Goss?" from Elizabeth and
"On ya Narg!" from William.

John:For about a year before her final house move, Mum enjoyed having granddaughter Angela living with her at Mackay Street. Angela enjoyed being spoilt, however, she was embarrassed when she revealed in the lunchroom at work her lovingly prepared miniature triangle sandwiches in their recycled paper bag! By mid 2007, Mum was in need of a little support in her day-to-day activities, so she decided to make the move to a serviced apartment at Aveo Taringa Retirement Village. She made many new friends at Taringa and thoroughly enjoyed her lifestyle there. The lack of such an outstanding facility in the Coorparoo area was the only downside, but the move did not stop her from returning often for Mothers' Union meetings, lunches with old Red Cross friends and visits to other friends in her beloved Coorparoo.

Helen:In June last year Mum reached the milestone of her 90th birthday. Many of you here today enjoyed celebrating it with her. We all felt so proud and privileged to be able to mark such a significant event with such an outstanding lady. One more huge celebration lay ahead for Mum with the marriage of her eldest grandson, Michael to Alicia in February this year. The famous organisation known as the Dicks and Macintosh Travelling Circus headed off to Sydney and the whole family enjoyed a wonderful weekend together with Mum our shining light both in the air and on the ground!

John:Thank you all for being here today to celebrate the life of Elizabeth Helen Dicks.
In particular we want to acknowledge:

Dr Tyson Doneley - Mum's GP for at least the last 30 years;
The staff of Ward 9 North at the Mater Private Hospital;
The fabulous staff of the Aveo Taringa Retirement Village; and
Fr David Johnstone.

Thank you too to all those wonderful people who have visited us, phoned, emailed, sent flowers and so kindly brought us beautiful food over the past two weeks.

Helen:In Mum's last week she was surrounded constantly by her loving family and four other special people to whom she was so very close -
our cousin Elizabeth, Toni Given, Julie Henderson, and Dean Waters.

John:We are so proud of our Mum and her 91 remarkable years. She gave so much to so many. Hers was a life centred on family, friends and her faith.

Thank you.



Beth married Henry Gordon DICKS [4930], son of Henry Isaac DICKS [19506] and Lillian Gladys May FAIRLEY [19507], on 16 Dec 1944 in St Andrew Sth Brisbane QLD. Gordon was born on 9 Oct 1921 in Ipswich Queensland AU, died on 28 May 1984 at age 62, and was cremated on 30 May 1984 in Mt Thompson Memorial Gdns Brisbane. He was usually called Gordon.

Research Notes:
Gordon's funeral was held at St Stephen's Anglican Church, Coorparoo, Queensland on 30 May, 1984 followed by cremation and burial at Mt Thompson Memorial Gardens.



613. John Stewart JULIUS [897] (John 383, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Nov 1921 and died on 10 Jan 1994 at age 72.

General Notes:
John served in WWII leaving in 1941 for Airforce training in Canada.

SUNDAY MAIL BRISBANE 6th July 1988.
John Julius can see Australians flying to London by rocket. The man called the "Father of Queensland Travel Industry or "Father J" says "It will be supersonic first and then the rocket and I won't be here to see it" John retired from the industry and his job as a director of Jetset Tours in Q'land this week and renowned for his wisdom and sound advice.
John began his career in travel during the war when he was one of the Australian Airmen fighting in the European theatre. He was a navigator in Iceland and then North Ireland doing coastal command work. Then it was back to do the farming at Eight Mile Plains, taking over from his father on the farm.
But the call of the air was too strong and he joined Aust. National Airlines in 1955 as Traffic Officer. He joined Carlton Travel Bureau in 1957. It was called Carlton because it operated from the foyer of the Carlton Hotel. Queen St., Brisbane. Carlton Travel became Carlton Astronaut and is now Jetset Tour.
John said he's glad he's getting out of the travel game The competition is more intense. A lot of character has gone out of the business and the characters a disappearing too. There's no fun any more. It used to be a glamourous industry, but not any longer its too much like hard work. John says there won't be such things as cheap fares until they can find an alternative fuel for the airlines. But they'll find it, I don't think we'll ever have to go back to sailing ships!.



John married Daphne Jane RICHARDSON [4482] in 1945. Daphne was born on 9 Apr 1922, died on 14 Apr 2009 at age 87, and was buried on 20 Apr 2009.

General Notes:
Daphne and John eloped to marry as Daphne's parents objected to her marrying a "callow Antipodean Bank clerk"

Daphne was late of Tamborine in 2009.

614. Margaret Constance Silvia BEAVER [25103] (Constance Mary DAVIDSON385, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 18 Sep 1921 in Burwood NSW.

General Notes:
Margaret Constance Silvia Beaver
Birth Date: 18 Sep 1921
Birth Place: Burwood New South Wales
Year Range: 1939 - 1948
Enlistment Place: Paddington New South Wales
Service number: NF460048
Next of Kin: Frederick Beaver
Series Description: B884:
Army Citizen Military Forces

615. Grace Elizabeth BEAVER [25104] (Constance Mary DAVIDSON385, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

General Notes:
1954 New South Wales Electoral Rolls Parramatta Eastwood.
1624 Cottam Eric Reuben, 77 Hannah Street, Beecroft, telephone technician, M.
1626 Cottam Grace Elizabeth, 77 Hannah Street, Beecroft, home duties, F.

Eric and Grace Cotham are recorded in the 1980 the Electoral Rolls for Landsborough, Fisher, Queensland. Eric is recorded as a farmer.

Grace married Eric Reuben COTTAM [25105]. Eric was born on 25 Jun 1925 in Lakemba NSW.

General Notes:
Eric Reuben Cottam
Birth Date: 28 Jun 1925
Birth Place: Lakemba New South Wales
Year Range: 1939 - 1948
Enlistment Place: Sydney
Service number: 446027
Next of Kin: George Cottam
Description: A9301: RAAF, NCOs and Other Ranks

616. Helen BEAVER [25106] (Constance Mary DAVIDSON385, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

617. Katherine BEAVER [25107] (Constance Mary DAVIDSON385, Arthur Cowper (Rev)173, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).


618. Dorothea Marion [Gilly] BIDDLE [5093] (Charlotte Mayor JULIUS386, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 23 Mar 1915, died about 1960 in Brisbane Australia aged about 45, and was buried in Albany Creek Crematorium Brisbane.

General Notes:
Dorothea was given away at her marriage by Lionel Percy Julius, her uncle.



Dorothea married Charles THIELE [5094] in Apr 1949 in Brisbane Australia. Charles died in 1987 in Brisbane Australia.

General Notes:
Charles worked for the State Stores Brisbane



619. Marion Olive JULIUS [908] (Lionel Percy391, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 27 Jun 1924 in Murgon Qld. and died on 3 Oct 1991 in Brisbane Australia at age 67.

Marion married Arthur John CRUMMER [4947] in 1946. Arthur was born in 1919.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 720 M    i. Robert John CRUMMER [4948] was born in 1947, died in 1971 in Camoweal Qld. at age 24, and was buried in Albany Creek Crematorium Brisbane.

Marion next married Arthur John Robert WALSH [4949] in 1954. Arthur was born in 1919 and died in 1982 at age 63.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 721 F    i. Elizabeth Ann WALSH [4954] was born in 1959 in Nanango Qld and died in 1988 at age 29.


620. Stanford Lionel JULIUS [909] (Lionel Percy391, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 13 Jul 1928 in Murgon Qld., was baptised on 28 Jul 1928 in Christ Church Murgon, died on 16 Aug 1980 in Kingscliff N.S.W. at age 52, and was buried on 19 Aug 1980 in Mt Thompson Crematorium Brisbane. The cause of his death was was a Myocardial Infaction.

General Notes:
Stanford started his school life at Stanmore, later going to Monto. He was among the first children to be taught carpentry and metalwork. He passed scholarship at Milton, Brisbane, and went on to do Commercial Junior at Brisbane Commercial High School. He started work as a clerk and pay clerk while studying accountancy.
He joined the Air Force in January 1950 where he served almost 7 years as an engine fitter in Malaya, Japan, and Korea in 77 Squadron. In April-May 1951 at Iwakuni, Japan, he was the first member of the R.A.A.F. to be sucked into an engine nacelle of a Meteor Jet Aircraft. No safety guards were fitted as they were among equipment yet to arrive from England. The Department of Veteran Affairs has recognized that the accident had effects on him that led to his early death.
He was discharged in October 1956 at his own request, on his fathers death. Until 1959, he spent his life doing what he dearly loved, fishing with his Uncle Martin, a professional fisherman. He obtained a job as assistant accountant to a Brisbane based company where he stayed for 15 years.
Most holidays were spent at the beach where, as they grew older, the children shared their fathers love for fishing. Another relaxation was a love of sport and Stan spent many years as Assistant Treasurer of the Brothers St. Brendans Rugby League Club, where his son played all his Junior football.
Stan's last job was with the State Government Works Department, and it was whilst on annual holidays that he died of a heart attack doing what he loved most, on the way to catch the big ones at Kingscliffe, New South Wales.
STANFORD LIONEL JULIUS :
Number A11726
Date of Entry : 16th Jan 1950
Date of Separation : 26th Oct. 1956
Rank : Leading Aircraftman
Decorations, Medals, Commendations :Korea Medal ; United Nations Service Medal General Service Medal [Malaya Clasp] ;Returned from Active Service Badge.



621. Charlotte Eva BLOW [5101] (Ruby Marie JULIUS392, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 Oct 1929 in Hillcrest Hospital Rockhampton, died on 16 Feb 2010 in Brisbane Australia at age 80, and was buried in Albany Creek Crematorium Brisbane.

General Notes:
Charlotte attended school at the Rockhampton Girls Grammar School. Her father was a cricket umpire and Charlotte often acted as the official scorer. It was at one of these matches, she met her husband Frank who was a wicket keeper, he was from Bouldercombe. After their marriage in 1950, Charlotte and Frank moved to Brisbane from Rockhampton and purchased a house at Brighton, Brisbane.



Charlotte married Francis Clarence PERSHOUSE [5102], son of Clarance PERSHOUSE [13665] and Anne [13666], on 22 Apr 1950 in St Pauls Nth Rockhampton Qld. Francis was born on 8 Feb 1921 in Rockhampton QLD and died on 27 Apr 1992 in Brisbane Australia at age 71.

General Notes:
Frank worked as a civilian Storeman for the Army at Banyo then Meandah Depots and continued to play cricket for many years with Charlotte still doing the scoring.

Queensland Electoral Rolls.
Lilley, Sandgate.
Francis Clarence Pershouse, Bayview Rd, Brighton. Storeman.
Charlotte Eva Pershouse, Bayview Rd, Brighton. Home Duties.



622. Joan Margaret JULIUS [914] (Cyril Norman393, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Oct 1924 in Gympie Queensland, was baptised in Gympie Queensland, died on 26 Feb 1998 in Prince Charles Hospital Brisbane at age 73, and was cremated on 3 Mar 1998 in Albany Creek Crematorium Brisbane.

General Notes:
Joans ashes were interred 25 May 1998 at site 56, HAMS Sydney Rose Garden Albany Creek Brisbane.

Waters Joan Margaret - 26.02.1998. Sadly missed, remembered always. Jim, Irene, Tracy, Mark and families.
The Courier Mail 26 Feb 2008

Joan married Matthew James WATERS [4956], son of Vivian WATERS [11240] and Violet CURTIS [11241], on 8 Apr 1950 in St Patricks Gympie Queensland. Matthew was born on 27 Jan 1924 in Gympie Queensland.

General Notes:
Mathew served in WWII as a leading aircraftman No. 150762. He enlisted on 20 Oct 1943 in Brisbane and was discharged on 26 Mar 1946 from RAAF Station Garbutt

623. Kevin Francis JULIUS [915] (Cyril Norman393, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Jan 1928 in Gympie Queensland, was baptised in Gympie Queensland, and died on 7 May 2000 in Gold Coast Queensland at age 72.

General Notes:
Kevin served as a Leading Signalman on HMAS Murchison during the Korean War. He later worked as a clerk for the Dept of Defence in Canberra Aust.



624. Thora May JULIUS [918] (Archibald Armstrong394, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 May 1920 in Roma Queensland and died on 19 Dec 1987 in Brisbane Australia at age 67.

General Notes:
They had 2 children.

Thora married Gwydir Gus WARD [4498] in 1941. Gwydir was born in 1915 and died on 9 Aug 1977 at age 62.

625. Vernon Armstrong JULIUS [919] (Archibald Armstrong394, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 29 Aug 1923, died on 14 Jan 1974 in Princes Alexander Hospital Brisbane at age 50, and was buried in Hammond Lawn Cemetery Brisbane. The cause of his death was a cerebral haemorrhage.

General Notes:
Vernard lived with his Aunt & Uncle, Lotte and Ben at Eagle Farm Brisbane for many years. Worked night shift at the Brisbane Post Office and out West as a woolpresser.
Returning to Brisbane he worked at Army Disposal at Cannon Hill. He had a wonderful memory especially for figures. Vernon did not marry.

626. Stanford John JULIUS [920] (Archibald Armstrong394, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 20 Aug 1924 in Roma Queensland and died on 16 Sep 1926 in Roma Queensland at age 2.


627. Mona Joyce JULIUS [921] (Archibald Armstrong394, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 5 May 1926 and died on 21 Dec 1981 in Brisbane Australia at age 55.

General Notes:
Mona's second name may be May.

Mona married Mervyn Desmond COOK [4500] in 1952. Mervyn was born in 1915 and died in 1976 at age 61.

Research Notes:
Mervyn's birth date may be 1925.



628. Keith William Kelynack HARVEY [5132] (Gwendoline Ivy JULIUS395, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 15 Jun 1917 in Folder Nursing Home Power St Gympie, died on 2 May 1995 in Maryborough Qld Aust. at age 77, and was buried on 5 May 1995 in Pioneer Chapel Crematorium Maryborough.

General Notes:
Keith was a butcher.



629. Gwendoline Joyce (Cis) HARVEY [5161] (Gwendoline Ivy JULIUS395, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 26 Feb 1921 in Folder Nursing Home Power St Gympie, died on 12 Jun 1991 in Tingoora Qld. at age 70, and was buried on 14 Jun 1991 in Wondai Qld.

General Notes:
Cis was a registered nurse.

Gwendoline married Reginald Bertie BIRT [5162] on 12 Jun 1948 in Gympie Queensland. Reginald was born on 3 Mar 1923, was baptised in 1923 in Woolooga Qld., died on 7 Aug 1993 in Kingaroy Qld at age 70, and was buried on 10 Aug 1993 in Wondai Qld..

630. Alan Julius HARVEY [5174] (Gwendoline Ivy JULIUS395, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 18 Dec 1928 in Dudley Hosp Mugon Qld., was baptised on 11 Feb 1929 in Methodist Church Murgon, died on 11 Feb 1929 in Dudley Hosp Mugon Qld., and was buried on 12 Feb 1929 in Murgon Cemetery.

General Notes:
Births.
Harvey: at the Dudley Private Hospital, Murgon, on December 18, 2 Mr and Mrs WK Harvey, a son.

Deaths.
Harvey. On February 11, at the Dudley Private Hospital, Murgon. Alan Julius, beloved son of W K Harvey, Murgon. Aged 8 weeks. "Thy will be done"

631. Doreen May JULIUS [4941] (Stanley Villiers397, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 1 Sep 1928 in Gympie Queensland, died on 1 Sep 1928, and was buried in 1928 in Gympie Cemetery.


632. Valmai Marie JULIUS [4937] (Stanley Villiers397, Stanford Percy174, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 11 Apr 1941 in "Hanlonia" Crescent Rd. Gympie, was baptised on 20 Sep 1943 in St Peters Gympie, and died on 19 Jun 2012 in Hervey Bay Qld at age 71. She was usually called Val.

General Notes:
Valmai was a registered nurse, she has researched the Julius family and produced an extensive Family Tree which is an important contribution to this record.

Marj Larsen writes of her sister Val in 2012.
Val trained as a nurse in Brisbane and had three certificates for General, Midwifery, and Child Welfare. She loved to travel and went overseas and nursed in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and the Lebanon. Then after a time she went to New Guinea where she met a young bank "Johnny" by the name of Peter Hancock. They returned to Australia to start a familly having two boys. The family continued to travel (Peter being a Bank Manager), to Mudgee, Nyngan, Guyra all in NSW then Weipa, Marreba, Warwick, Gympie and Hervey Bay in Queensland.
In 1990 Val departed for West Australia and Northern Territory nursing then did a trip overseas investergating her Family Tree. She nursed again at Brisbane for a time with many trips in between, then she sold up and moved to Hervey Bay.
It was during her time there that she was diagnosed with multiple myloma and underwent intensive treatment, she was very brave and positive throughout. Finally despite her fight to overcome her disease she passed away peacefully at 8am on the 19th of June.

633. Rosalind Hull DE RENZY-MARTIN [1345] (Winifred Grace Alicia HULL400, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1913.

634. Frances Elizabeth DE RENZY-MARTIN [1346] (Winifred Grace Alicia HULL400, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1916.

635. David Alfred DE RENZY-MARTIN [1347] (Winifred Grace Alicia HULL400, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1921.

636. Angela Helen DE RENZY-MARTIN [1348] (Winifred Grace Alicia HULL400, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1921.

637. Margaret Frederica ROBERTS [1352] (Millicent Mary Blanche HULL401, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1904 and died in 1905 at age 1.

638. Frederick Charles Archibald ROBERTS [1353] (Millicent Mary Blanche HULL401, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1906 and died in 1910 at age 4.

639. Cicely Mary ROBERTS [1354] (Millicent Mary Blanche HULL401, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1912 and died in 1936 at age 24.

Cicely married Edward Molesworth SYKES [1355], son of Brig Gen Sir Percy SYKES [1509], in 1935.

640. Marjorie Eileen ROBERTS [1356] (Millicent Mary Blanche HULL401, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1914.

641. Victor Robert Hull FERGUSON [1358] (Millicent Mary Blanche HULL401, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1918.

642. Frances Blanche Hermione HULL [1361] (Capt Leonard Stewart Benson HULL402, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1913.

643. Charles Edward Wetherall HULL [1362] (Capt Leonard Stewart Benson HULL402, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1917.

644. Eileen Nora HULL [1368] (Capt Hubert Charles Edward HULL404, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1915.

645. Fenella BOYLE [1371] (Isabel Julia HULL405, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1918.

646. Jean Isabel BOYLE [1372] (Isabel Julia HULL405, Fanny Maria JULIUS175, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1919.

647. David Morgan THOMPSON [1381] (John Archibald Julius THOMPSON410, Blanche Emily JULIUS176, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1929.

648. George Julius CLARK [23886] (Ivan Julius CLARK411, Lucy Adelaide JULIUS177, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

649. Michael CLARK [23888] (Archibald Cowper CLARK412, Lucy Adelaide JULIUS177, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

650. Peter CLARK [23889] (Archibald Cowper CLARK412, Lucy Adelaide JULIUS177, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

651. Jean CLARK [23892] (Malcolm CLARK413, Lucy Adelaide JULIUS177, Archibald Aeneas (Rev)86, George Charles (Dr)43, William John12, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1).

Jean married Charles van den BROEK D'OBRENAN [23893] in 1946.

652. Edward JULIUS [724] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 10 Jan 1868, died on 9 Aug 1951 at age 83, and was buried in Sydney Crematorium.

General Notes:
NOTICE.
Having Sold my Right, Title and Interest
in and to the Business known as the
PERTH COFFEE TAVERN, Howick-street,
to my Son, Mr. EDWARD JULIUS, all DEBTS
due by and to the Firm will be settled by
him.
WILLIAM WARNER JULIUS.
I beg to say that having PURCHASED the
above, I am prepared to carry on the Business
with energy, and, I trust, with satisfaction to
my Patrons.
EDWARD JULIUS.
Ref: Western Australian 27 Feb 1894

1901 NSW P.O. Directory.
Julius Edward, dairy, Byangum Murwillumbah NSW

Edward was Conservator of Forests for South Australia, he retired in 1935.

Research Notes:
This Edward Julius could not have been the illigitimate son of Richard Julius.

Edward married Mary Louise CLARKE [725], daughter of Thomas CLARKE [12021] and Mary GILLESPIE [12022], in 1900 in Murwillumbah N.S.W. Mary was born on 11 Jan 1871 and died on 24 Jan 1951 at age 80.

General Notes:
1936 Electoral Roll Milsons Point Nth Sydney: Marie Louise was recorded as home duties of 50 Kirribilli Ave
Ancestry

1937 Electoral Roll Milsons Point Nth Sydney: Marie Louise was recorded as home duties of 50 Kirribilli Ave
Ancestry


Children from this marriage were:

+ 722 M    i. Charles Francis William Warner JULIUS [726] was born in 1910, died on 29 Nov 1965 in Port Moresby P.N.G. at age 55, and was buried in Cremated Sydney Aust.

+ 723 M    ii. William Warner JULIUS [11214] .

653. Lydia JULIUS [727] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1869 and died in 1870 in N.S.W. at age 1.

654. Margaret JULIUS [728] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1870, died in 1920 at age 50, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W.

General Notes:
A Miss M Julius aged 29 arrived in Victoria March 1901 aboard the Medic from Britain.
Ref PROV - Unassisted Immigration to Victoria 1852-1923

Margaret married John Hutchinson McCOLLUM [729] on 10 Oct 1888 in Cudgen N.S.W. John was born in 1859, died in 1933 at age 74, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W..

General Notes:
John and Margaret were married at the home of William Warner Julius

John was an inspector of schools from 1902 - 1909.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 724 M    i. Malcolm John McCOLLUM [9607] was born on 24 Aug 1889 in Cudgen N.S.W.

+ 725 F    ii. Daisy Sara McCOLLUM [9608] was born in 1891 in Western Australia and died on 26 Feb 1963 at age 72.

+ 726 M    iii. William Edward McCOLLUM [9609] was born on 12 Sep 1897 in Perth WA and died on 26 May 1988 in Lismore NSW at age 90.

+ 727 F    iv. Margaret McCOLLUM [9610] was born in 1900 in Perth WA and died on 8 Jun 1996 in Lismore NSW at age 96.

+ 728 M    v. Armour Andrew McCOLLUM [9611] was born in 1904 in Perth WA and died on 4 Jan 1984 in Kingscliff N.S.W. at age 80.

655. William Warner JULIUS [4943] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1871 in NSW Aust and died in 1871 in N.S.W.

General Notes:
Williams death was registered in Sydney Ref: 1042. Son of William W & Sarah J. Ancestry

656. Isabella JULIUS [732] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Jul 1872 and died in 1872 in N.S.W.

657. Thomas Ellis JULIUS [4944] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1873 and died in 1874 in N.S.W. at age 1.

658. Elizabeth JULIUS [730] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Nov 1875 and died in 1951 at age 76.

General Notes:
Elizabeth was a teacher at East Perth School 1899, Headmistress Subiaco Infants 1899 to 1901. Assistant at Perth Infants 1902.
She was living at Armagh Street, Victoria Park 1903 - 1904.

1910 Electoral Roll Canning Freemantle: Elizabeth was a teacher of Armagh St Victoria Park
Ancestry

Elizabeth married John Hutchinson McCOLLUM [729] after 1910. John was born in 1859, died in 1933 at age 74, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W..

General Notes:
John and Margaret were married at the home of William Warner Julius

John was an inspector of schools from 1902 - 1909.

659. Eleanor JULIUS [733] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 28 Feb 1878.

General Notes:
Eleanor Julius taught at Karridale, near Augusta, Western Australia in 1900 and Donnybrook, near Bunbury, Western Australia in 1901 to 1903. It was unusual at that time for women to keep teaching after they married.
Unidentified source.

Eleanor married Frederick LINCK [734] in 1901. Frederick was born in 1870 and died in 1919 at age 49.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 729 M    i. Frederick William Julius LINCK Lt K.R.R.C. (Old 60Th) [12770] .

+ 730 F    ii. Dr. Brenda Elizabeth LINCK [12771] .

660. Charles Fox JULIUS [735] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born in 1879, died on 28 Nov 1909 in Grafton Hospital NSW at age 30, and was buried in South Grafton Cemetery N.S.W.

General Notes:
Charles was a dairy farmer at Bucca Creek, he died on the 28th November, 1909, aged 31, in Grafton Hospital after 52 days of suffering from internal injuries received in a farming accident.
Ref: The following information was written and supplied by Harold Rudder, son of Hannah (Dammerel) and Leonard Rudder. From "Look-At-Me-Now" book by Benjamin J Holder.

Charles married Matilda Jane DAMMEREL [736], daughter of George DAMMEREL [18604] and Sarah PRIOR [18605], on 25 Apr 1905. Matilda was born on 24 Oct 1876, died in 1956 at age 80, and was buried in Rose Garden Botany Sydney.

General Notes:
When Matilda's husband was killed she was left with two small children, William Warner known as "Warner" aged two, and Doreen Hope, ten months. Later Matilda married Albert Johnson, they had two children, Albert and Athol.
Ref: The following information was written and supplied by Harold Rudder, son of Hannah (Dammerel) and Leonard Rudder. From "Look-At-Me-Now" book by Benjamin J Holder.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 731 F    i. Doreen Hope JULIUS [737] was born in 1906.

+ 732 M    ii. Major William Warner JULIUS [739] was born on 17 Jan 1909 in Grafton NSW Australia, died on 23 Jan 1942 in Malaya at age 33, and was buried in Kranji War Cemetery. Headstone In Singapore.


661. Francis Henry JULIUS J P [740] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Jul 1881 in 4 Belmont Tce Paddington Sydney, died on 26 Feb 1964 in Cudgen N.S.W. at age 82, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W. The cause of his death was by suicide at his home in Cudgen.

General Notes:
Soon after his birth Frank and his mother sailed north from Sydney, were rowed ashore at Wommin Bay, travelling overland 3 or 4 miles to Cudgen.

Frank served in the Boer War, private number 272, he was a member of the Fifth Contingent (Mounted Infantry) 1901 - 1902.
He left from Freemantle on the 6th March 1901 on the transport ship "Devon" and arrived at Durban on the 28th of March. There were 14 officers 207 other ranks and 239 horses under the command of J. S. Royston DSO. The fifth contingent left Durban on the 7th of April 1902 arriving in Freemantle on the 29th April, they were disbanded on the 17th of May.
Frank may have been in the 6th Contingent leaving on the Ulstermore arriving 29 th April ?

Early History of Cudgen Sugar Plantation and Mill.
By Frank H. Julius.
When the C.S.R. Company decided to erect a sugar mill on the Macleay about 1870, my father William Warner Julius, purchased three of the best farms on that river to grow sugarcane.
When the C.S.R. transferred the mill to Harwood Island on the Clarence, my father sold the Macleay Farms, and decided to purchase Harry Clark's selection at Cudgen. This was about 1875. My father paid clerk L12 10 0. per acre for his farm which at that time was practically all virgin scrub.
My father decided to build his own sugar mill, and work commenced immediately on both projects. The clearing of the land and the building of the mill as well as the planting of the cane in preparation for the first crushing, which took place in 1880, two years earlier than at Condongg (mill).
At the time, Cudgen was the busiest place on this river. About 500 men were employed in the mill and on the plantation. Abbotsford Mill, at Tumbulgum, owned by three men, Messrs Pringle, Shankey and Byrne, was also operating, but proved a failure, and growers in that area, and on the river flats above Murwillumbah transferred their cane to the Condong Mill. Frost at that time took a heavy toll on cane crops, which were mostly non-resistant.
Mr Issacs, the first manager at Condong, approached my father at this stage with an offer to purchase the whole of his cane crops grown on the Cudgen plantation at 10/-per ton, including inverse of was the harvesting and the milling of it at Condong. My father turned down this offer and accepted an offer from two Victorians, Messes John Robb and J. J. Casey. John Robb was at that time a wealthy Victorian, accredited a millionaire. He was a railway contractor and connected with building and banking companies. It included in his projects was the construction of a railway line from Cairns to Atherton, in north Queensland, and Robbs Jetty at Fremantle, prior to the construction of the breakwater there. Casey was a judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria.
Guilfoyle House.
The plantation had been extended at that time to include the lands held by the Guilfoyle family, who held between them approximately 1280 ac., some of the richest part of Cudgen.
The home of the Guilfoyle's was situated in the most beautiful part of Cudgen, it was a home in bungalow style, with a shingle roof, with a view of the ocean from Byron Bay to Fingal and Cook Island. The timber used in the construction of this home was grown on the plantation, and comprised cedar, beech, teak, rosewood, etc. Its orchard and gardens were some of the finest in Australia, and contained some of the rarest fruits and plants to be found anywhere. These gardens and orchard were established by two of the greatest botanists the world has ever known, Baron Von Mueller, who has by talking machine K.C.M.G. and William Guilfoyle.
As a result of the depression in the 90's my father was compelled to sell his interest in the mill and plantation at Cudgen, and later the property was sold to the C.S.R. after the last crushing went through in 1911, 31 years after the first crushing.
This was the only mill in New South Wales with its own cane the supply, and the only one to carry on through the depression in NSW except the three Mills owned by C.S.R. Coy., at Harwood, Broadwater, and Condong.
When the C.S.R. purchased the Cudgen plantation in 1911, I wrote to the general manager about our old Homestead block. In response to my letter, Mr Dowling, the C.S.R. Coy. first cane inspector at Condong (father of Admiral Dowling, who was born and received his first education at Condong) came to see me and told me I could have this part of the plantation.
This is where I have raised my own family, and where the Julius is a reached the fourth generation, thanks to the wonderful assistance given at all times to us by the management and staff of that great company C.S.R.
Ref: News Paper article.

EXTRACTS FROM A LETTER BY HIS SISTER ELEANOR :
Francis fought in the Boer War, 1899 to 1902 when he returned he commenced dairy farming on the Tweed River. N. S. W.
In 1904, he commenced growing paspalum seed for export ; paspalum was the new variety of perennial grass discovered in Australia by accident. Believed to have been sent from South America with samples of other seeds it was thrown into the yard of the Municipal Council Chambers at Lismore on the Richmond River where it made such luxurious growth there that it was feared it would become a pest.
From there it spread rapidly throughout the North Coast, not only on the hills but particularly in the reclamation of the vast areas of swamplands which up to that time were considered useless land.
The ease with which these lands were subjugated contributed in great measure to the success of the newly established North Coast Factory at Byron Bay which was very soon the largest Butter Factory in the world.
Practical experience with paspalum grass proved to Francis its value as a commercial proposition, this was a time of economic boom not only in Australia, but to other cattle countries throughout the world.
With this in view, he sent samples of the seed to firms in Transvaal, Orange Free State, Cape Province and Natal ; the capital towns of New Zealand and also to San Francisco and South America from whence it originated. From this beginning a trade was built throughout the world to supply Paspalum Seed.
This trade was considered, at the time by the Manager of the Bank of New South Wales in Murwillumbah to be the most remarkable business of his many years' banking experience. Orders amounting to many thousand pounds for this seed were collected by the Bank from firms all over the world, and in no instance did any of these orders miscarry.
The trade was of great benefit to the countries concerned, particularly to New Zealand, which is now known as the "worlds' dairy farm", and to which most of the paspalum seed grown on the North Coast of New South Wales was exported.
Two years prior to the Great War [1914] Francis purchased the old Julius family homestead at the Cudgen Sugar Plantation from the Colonial Sugar Refining Co. They had purchased the plantation from the executors of the estate of his father, William.
Francis also purchased a large adjoining swamp for the purpose of running a Jersey Stud herd in conjunction with the growing of sugar. Both these ventures proved successful. Stock bred in the Cudgen Jersey Stud found their way all over New South Wales, and were numerous winners of butter-fat prizes, and Championships for breed and Best Cow.
Grassland farming has been extensively practiced on this property and much of the success in the butter production on the farm in due to the annual renovation of the pastures, and to stall feeding of the dairy herd during the three winter months. Cudgen Jersey Stud has influenced the leading herds of the Tweed River particularly through the supply of herd sires.
Francis sold the Stud in 1941 as his son had enlisted and he was unable to manage the property by himself.

Cudgen
9 July 1954
A C Julius
53 Granville St
Inverell NSW
Dear Mr Julius,
I've been away from Cudgen for a month or so, hence the delay in replying to your letter. However, I'm afraid I can't help you regarding the J. A. Julius you mention, only to say he would not be one of this branch of the Julius family of which I am now the Head, my two older brothers having passed on, leaving a younger brother and me. My oldest brother Edward only had one son, Charles, who was educated at St Peter's Adelaide and Sydney Uni. The next brother, Charles had a son and daughter. The son Warner, was educated at Grafton High and Duntroon Military College, he was killed while serving as Battery Commander in Malaya with the . . . . . 8th Division, he was a wonderful soldier. My two sons also served in the last war, and are now managing this property. I am glad to have heard from you and may look you up on my next trip that way, when my daughter lived near Glen Innes on a sheep property, we frequently made trips out there, but not during the winter.
With kind regards
Yours sincerely
F H Julius.

The Varied Career Of Frank Julius.
The names of Julius and Cudgen have been linked together for more than 80 years and the death of Mr F. H. Julius on February 25 closed a chapter in the history and development of the district.
Though not actually born in Cudgen, Frank was brought at a very tender age by boat from Sydney to Wommin be where mother and child were taken ashore in a rowing boat.
He was one of the 13 children of Mr and Mrs W. W. Julius, pioneers of Cudgen. His father a cane grower owned one of the first sugar mills in the district. Frank's first schooling was that Chinderah in a shingle roofed slab building; then he went to Sydney, and Fort Street School.
The family left Cudgen during this period and went to the goldfields in Western Australia and Frank went to school in Perth. He joined the family in their search for gold and from Coolgardie, though under age, enlisted to go to the Boer war.
In 1902 he went to Coffs Harbour and took up land at Bucca Creek for a short period, going in 1903 two Byangum where he worked at scrub felling and planting paspalum. While at Byangum he met Miss Irene Clarke, daughter of, Mr Thomas Clark, farmer and road contractor of the Tweed district, and later married her.
He bought a farm at Tumbuigam and still being interested in the paspalum seed, pioneered the seed harvesting industry. At that time harvesting was done by hand by reaping and sweating on the seed of the seed heads. Mr Julius discovered that a better quality product could be harvested by what came to be known as the handshaking method. This comprised vigorously shaking the bundles of ripe seed heads as they stood in the paddock and catching the seed which fell off, in a wide shallow dish put on the ground under the seed heads.
Moving into Murwillumbah, he concentrated on the paspalum seed industry and retired from this when New Zealand which was then the principal export market, placed an embargo on grass seed from tick quarantine areas in N.S.W. In 1914 Mr Julius brought back the old family home at Cudgen and went in for dairying. He built up the Cudgen Jersey Stud, and was known up and down the coast for his fine stock. He gave up dairying later and took up cane growing in which industry his sons are still engaged.
Mr Julius was a member of the Land Board where his knowledge was greatly valued and a Justice of the Peace for many years. He was greatly interested in his fellow man, and of a most generous disposition. He donated the recreation reserve to Cudgen and started the lower Tweed Pony Club being always a lover of horses. Patron of the Kingcliffe R.S.L. for 12(?) years and member of Tweed Historical Society represent some of his varied interests.
Of the original family the only survivors are a sister, Mrs Jeanette Hatton of Nedlands, W.A. and a brother Jack at Coffs Harbour. Mr Julius's wife died 10 years ago and he is survived by his family of five children. Sons are Roy and Jack, both of Cudgen, and the daughters, Mrs Paterson of Sydney, Mrs Paddon of Condong, and Mrs Burnley of Lismore.
Mr Julius who was in his 82nd year had as his housekeeper after his wife's death, her sister Miss Clarke, who had lived with them for many years. His old nurse who cared for him as a child is in her 101st year. She is Mrs Ritchie of Southport.
Ref: Unidentified newspaper, (.?.News) dated Friday, March 6, 1964.

AGCI lists Francis Henry Julius 23 Mar 1964 Murwillumbah Cudgen Will/Administration Newspaper Society of Genealogists of NSW Ref NC SER 3/3/367



Francis married Irene Elizabeth Love CLARKE [741], daughter of Thomas CLARKE [12021] and Mary GILLESPIE [12022], on 8 Jun 1909. Irene was born on 14 Aug 1882, died on 10 Oct 1953 in Cudgen N.S.W. at age 71, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W..

Marriage Notes:
Alternative marriage date 1910

General Notes:
OBITUARY
MRS. IRENE JULIUS
The funeral of the late Mrs. Irene Elizabeth Julius, wife of Mr. Francis Henry Julius, of Cudgen, moved from All Saints' Church of England, Murwillumbah, last Saturday to the Church of England portion of the new general cemetery, after a service which commenced at 4 p.m. Rev. L. Sanders, of Tweed Heads, officiated at the church and graveside. The cortege was exceptionally large and representative and the floral tributes were numerous. Messrs. M. Turnock, H. Paddon (son-in-law), H. Small, J. Julius (son), D. Hansen, F. Burley (son-in-law) were pall-bearers and Messrs. R. Price, W. Dinsey, A. Duncan, R. Hornidge, R. McPhail and H. Davis carried the wreaths.
Ref: Northern Star Lismore, NSW Fri 16 Oct 1953

Julius Recalls Pioneering Times
The death of Mrs Irene Elizabeth Julius, wife of Mr Frances Julius, at their home at Cudgen on Saturday, severed a link in the chain of one of the Tweed's oldest pioneering family's.
Mrs Julius was the youngest daughter of Mr Thomas Clark, who came to the Tweed in 1864, and selected the well-known property Oakbank, 320 acres of standing scrub, situated near the junction of the South and Middle arms of the Tweed River. . . . .
Mrs Julius was born at Oakbank 70 years ago, being the youngest of 11 children. She is survived by her husband Mr F. H. Julius of Cudgen, two sons, Ray and Jack, of Cudgen, three daughters, Mrs C. Patterson (Una) of Sydney; Mrs H. Paddon
(Winnie) of Condong; and Mrs F. Burley (Jean) of Wyrallah; also 11 grandchildren.
. . . . . Mrs Julius was confirmed and married in All Saints Church of England, Murwillumbah, and had resided at Cudgen for the past 40 years. She was always a staunch supporter of her church, and an inspiration to all. Her sister, Miss S. Clarke had lived and worked with Mrs Julius all her life, and together they built up a very strong family union, which has become a Tweed River name. The untiring attention given to the late Mrs Julius during her last illness by members of the family was considered an inspiration of kindness and thought. . . . .
Ref: Newspaper report

Research Notes:
Irene was a sister of Mrs Marie Louise Julius.

The IGI shows a marriage between Francis Henry Julius and Irene Elizabeth Love Clarke 8 June 1910 Murwillumba (second entry shows Tweed River) NSW no source - needs searching


Children from this marriage were:

+ 733 F    i. Una Elizabeth JULIUS [742] was born in 1910.

+ 734 F    ii. Winifred Irene JULIUS [745] was born on 11 Dec 1911 in Murwillumbah N.S.W., died on 24 Apr 2001 in Murwillumbah N.S.W. at age 89, and was buried in Murwillumbah N.S.W.

+ 735 M    iii. Royston Archibald Edward JULIUS [744] was born on 24 Jul 1913 in Cudgen N.S.W. and died on 30 Sep.

+ 736 F    iv. Jean Stella JULIUS [747] was born in Sep 1914 and died in 1988 at age 74.

+ 737 M    v. John Francis JULIUS [748] was born on 22 Jan 1917 in Their Farmhouse At Cudgen, died on 30 Sep 1989 in Pvt Hospital Tweed Heads at age 72, and was buried on 3 Oct 1989 in Murwillumbah N.S.W.

662. Gertrude Sarah JULIUS [749] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Oct 1883, died in 1904 at age 21, and was buried in Jan 1905 in Bowral NSW.

General Notes:
Gertrude was a pupil teacher at Subiaco Infants School 1899.

AGCI records Gertrude Sarah Julius 10 Jan 1905 Bowral NSW Death Cemetry Transcript C of E Society of Genealogists of NSW Ref NSAG B7/11/179 P97

663. Anne Jeannette JULIUS [754] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 9 May 1885 in Cudgen N.S.W., was baptised in Cudgen N.S.W., died on 24 Aug 1975 in Perth Western Aust. at age 90, and was buried on 29 Aug 1975 in Anglican Section Karrakatta Cemetery WA. The cause of her death was cerebrovascular event.

General Notes:
Anne Julius was the cook at the Plague Hospital, Perth in 1900.
http://www.woodmanpointquarantinestation.com/the_plague_hospital.html

Anne was assistant cook at a Freemantle hospital in 1903 - 1904.

1905 Annie was teaching in Perth.

1910 Electoral Roll Canning Freemantle: Annie was a spinster of Armagh St Victoria Park
Ancestry

Anne married George HATTON [755] on 15 Jan 1914 in Beaconsfield WA. George was born in 1880 and died on 24 Aug 1975 in Parkside Lodge Sth Perth WA at age 95.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 738 M    i. James T HATTON [5216] was born in 1915.


664. William John JULIUS [750] (William Warner415, Edward183, William96, Richard56, Julius Caesar23, William of Basseterre6, William R N (Capt)3, John of St Kitts West Indies1) was born on 19 Oct 1887 in Cudgen N.S.W. and died on 31 Mar 1970 in Nambour Qld at age 82.

General Notes:
William was a cadet in the Chief Auditors, and Accountants section of the Railways 1903-05.

1910 Electoral Roll Canning Freemantle: William was a clerk of Armagh St Victoria Park
Ancestry

William served overseas in WW1

William was late of Woombye Qld., formerly of Cudgen.

William married Gladys WILLIAMS [751] in 1920. Gladys was born in 1893.

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