THE KING'S CANDLESTICKS: Family Trees
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Capt Robert FENN [198]
(1785-1844)
Harriet LIVEING [227]
(1789-1864)
George ALSTON [61]
(1763-1831)
Anne Margaret VANDERZEE [60]
(1776-1856)
Dr Thomas Harrold FENN M.R.C.S. [1]
(1815-1870)
Maria ALSTON [2]
(1815-1871)

Dr Edward Liveing FENN M.D. [3]
(1843-1907)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10]

2. Edith TODD [14]

Dr Edward Liveing FENN M.D. [3]

  • Born: 20 Aug 1843, Stourbank Nayland SFK
  • Baptised: 6 Oct 1843, Nayland SFK
  • Marriage (1): Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10] on 12 Nov 1872 in West Molesey SRY
  • Marriage (2): Edith TODD [14] on 13 Feb 1892
  • Died: 8 Dec 1907, Nayland SFK at age 64
  • Buried: Nayland Burial Ground

bullet   Cause of his death was heart failure.

picture

bullet  General Notes:


Sponsors at Edward's christening, were Sam Alston, Frederick Hand, Mary K Liveing. Edward was educated at Sherborne School (Head Boy, Capt 1st Eleven) MRCS Kings London 22 Apr 1865, Vienna, MD Edin 1873, MRCP London 1892.

The Sherborne Register 1823-1892.
Entries Aug-Dec 1853.
Fenn Edward Liveing, son of T.H. Fenn, Nayland, Colchester; born 1843; (S.H.), vi, xi, 1860-61; Captain of the Games; left 1861; Warneford Scholar Kings College, London; Physician at Kings College Hospital 1865-67; M.B. 1865; M.D. 1873; Edinburgh University; studied in Berlin & Vienna; Surgeon to Richmond Hospital since 1875.
The Green Richmond Surrey.

University of Edinburgh
Medical Degrees.
Degree of Bachelor of Medicine. Fenn Edward Liveing, England.
Ref: The Caledonian Mercury 2 August 1865.

Edward was a well qualified and published physician, the Medical Times and Gazette of July 4th 1863 Pg 24 records: KING'S COLLEGE, LONDON, Medical Department: Warneford Prizes : Edward Liveing Fenn, 1st Prize.
Ref: Internet 2008

Royal College of Surgeons.
The following gentlemen having undergone the necessary examination for the diploma were admitted members of the college at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 28th. inst., viz . . . . . Edward Liveing Fenn, Nayland, of Kings College.
Ref Ipswich Journal, Saturday May 6 1865.

Nayland
Appointment - Mr Edward Liveing Fenn, who was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons on the 28th ult., has since been elected Resident Physician at Kings College Hospital for Midwifery and the diseases of women and children.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday May 13 1865

In 1868 he returned to assist in his fathers practice at Stourbank Nayland. After his fathers death he sold Stourbank (1873) and moved to Richmond (1872 -74 to the Wardrobe Court until the lease expired*, then 1 Portland Tce.) where he married and practiced for 20 years. His Nayland practice was sold to Dr H D Palmer.
Edward in a letter to his son E V Fenn 30 Jan 1898 mentions seeing Raphael's Transfiguration in the Vatican Gallery in Rome.

Concealment of Birth at Stoke by Nayland.
This article reports on the inquest into the death of a newborn infant, the mother was a patient of Edwards, and his lengthy testimony on the matter is reported verbatim.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 3 April 1869.

Court of Probate
Cook and Goldsmith v Goddard and others.
This is a report of litigation over the disputed Will of the late Dennis Goddard of Stoke by Nayland. Many residents of Nayland gave evidence including Edward, Sam Alston, Reverent Torlesse, etc.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 17 January 1871.

Fenn Edward Liveing M.D. 1 Portland Terrace, The Green, Richmond.
Kelly's Directory of Sussex 1891

A small Hall house, No 16 Fen St Nayland dating from abt 1400 was owned by Edward Fenn by a conveyance dated 7 Mar 1889, he then may have sold it to Prof Liveing?.

At the death of Katherine Fenn, they were living at 1 Portland Tce Richmond. In poor health he left after his second marriage to live at Grey Friars East Hill Colchester. In 1902 he obtained possession of the property "Grooms" he inherited, in Nayland, returning to live there he restored the house renaming it Alston Court. Obituary Alstonania pg 403. Ref article A Julius book one E L Fenn 1998. Will proved at L30,000.

Portrait in possession of E L Fenn Auckland NZ 1998. Pastel at age 8 by Sydney Buck 1854 in possession of Adrian Hopkins Vale View Marnhull Dorset 1998.

MY FATHER, EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Adria Margaret Fenn. 1962.
The eldest son of Dr. Thomas Fenn was born on August 20th, 1843 at Stourbank, Nayland, Suffolk. If today you visited Stourbank garden you would see a tall tree on the lawn, which he used to climb when a little boy. Next door to the house there is a grocer's shop, with the name "Faiers", written over the door. It is kept by a man named, Alec Faiers. My father used to climb over the fence which separated Stourbank and the Faier's yard! to play with Alec Faier's father.
Father must have been a very nice little boy. There is a story that one day he was playing ball with one of his sisters, when her ball went through the window of a cottage, and broke the glass. Instead of running away he knocked at the door of the cottage, explained about the breakage and offered to pay for new glass out of his own pocket money. Father had a very happy childhood with delightful parents. He was number three out of a large family of boys and girls.
When he was old enough he was sent to school at Sherborne a very long way from Suffolk. When he first went there, the railroad was not built all the way and he had to travel partly there by coach. He did very well at School and became Head Boy, Captain of the lst Cricket Eleven, and the winner of a pewter tankard at Fives. There is an old photograph, still in existence of Father in the Sherborne cricket eleven.
At the age of eighteen he went to King's College Hospital to train as a medical student. He took the M.R.C.S. diploma in 1865 and afterwards studied at Vienna and Edinburgh, becoming an M.D. of the latter place. At a much later date he took the Chair at the Annual Dinner of the British Medical Association. He became a physician of King's College Hospital, was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London, and a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London. But he resigned his good appointment at King's College to come home to his native village to help his father, who had been stricken with a serious illness. Father stayed in Nayland four years and took great interest in the social life of the place.
He and his sisters got up penny readings for the villagers, and these were extremely popular. Even in my day they were still spoken about, especially the occasion when the young actors illustrated the tale of "The four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie". And twenty-four real birds flew about the village school over the heads of the delighted audience when the pie was cut.
On the death of my Grandfather my Father left Nayland and went to live in Richmond, selling the village practice. In Richmond, he became a partner to Dr. Julius, in his extensive practice and married Dr. Julius's pretty daughter, Katie.
They had nine children, five of whom lived to be grown up. When Dr. Julius died, Father and Mr. Bateman (Father's brother-in-law) became partners. Father took a great interest in Richmond. He was a member of the municipal Vestry and a churchwarden. His young wife died soon after the death of her youngest child., Edgar.
Father was a very good parent to his motherless boys, though in some ways strict, he had a great sense of humour.
There is a story that he once took Harry, then a very small boy, to be fitted for shoes. Pair after pair were tried on but Harry kept a grim silence and would not say if they were comfortable. The stout old lady who kept the shop, went panting on to her knees, trying on one shoe after another. Father added his entreaties to hers. "Now, Harry, you must say if they are comfortable." At long last Harry remarked solemnly, "They are puce:"
This episode held great amusement for my father. He had the gift of being able to tell a joke in a really amusing way, and he used to tell this story, until he was quite weak with laughter.
In 1892 he married Edith Todd, my own mother, and by her he had three children, Dorothy, who died when a baby, Edward Gerald Palmer, who was killed in Palestine during the First War, and myself.
Father's health not being very good, he resigned from his practice in Richmond, soon after his second marriage and went to live at Grey Friars, Colchester. He became consulting Physician at Colchester Hospital. I remember my mother telling me this little anecdote of him. He was one day walking down the Hospital drive when he came on two men violently quarreling with one another. Father went up to them and tried to settle their dispute. An old doctor was watching the scene from the steps of the Hospital. Afterwards he went up to my Father and said "Blessed are the Peacemakers".
I was a very small child at the Colchester house but I well remember the happy home atmosphere there, with parents devoted to one another, five good natured big brothers, and "Beau" a year older than myself to share our nursery. Father used to tell Beau and me an original story about a little girl called Lucy, who fell from a stile and spilt her basket of strawberries. He read aloud to us, often the books of Mrs. Ewing, or the Pilgrims Progress.
Later on when we all went to live at Nayland, he taught us to play Chess, Cribbage, Backgammon, and Whist. He himself was a great reader and had a large library of books. He particularly liked Dickens and Trollope.
At Colchester, and at Nayland he organized Shakespeare readings amongst his friends and relations. He was a good amateur actor and recited very well, and loved to recite from the Suffolk Ballads. He took the part of "Mr. Primrose" in a play called "Popping the Question" acted at Nayland. I was only a small child at the time but I was allowed up to see it acted in the village schoolroom. At the end, Father was called on to make his bow in his kneebreeches, shirt and three cornered hat, and he certainly gained a truly "deafening applause".
He loved Nayland. He liked to talk to the people, to discover old names he remembered from his boyhood alive in a new generation. He was a churchwarden at the 15th century village church, and attended Church services on weekdays as well as Sundays. He was also a local magistrate, and as a consequence "Meggs" (the coachman whom I dearly loved) wore a cockade in his top hat, when driving the brougham or dogcart.
But Father's true memorial is Alston Court, the old family house he inherited from an aunt. He restored the old house, uncovering beams and hidden carving and having the lovely heraldic glass put back into its original places. He only lived four years in this house he loved so dearly. He had a bad illness during the Spring of 190?, and died nine months later, on December 8th.
His body was buried in the little cemetery on the hill, given to the village by Samuel Alston, the uncle from whom he inherited the house. My mother had a stained glass window put up to his memory in the parish church. One of the figures portrayed in this window is St. Luke, the Beloved Physician,
Well, I can only very inadequately write about my Father's life for I was
only twelve years old when he died. My elder brothers knew him when they were grown up and so could have given a far more comprehensive picture of him.
I will end by a remark made by Charlie when the news came from New Zealand, telling us of the birth of "Edward Liveing Fenn the Second". Well, I only hope he will be as good a man as his grandfather.
Compiled by Adria M. Fenn.

DEATH OF DR E.L. FENN OF NAYLAND.
We regret to have to record the death of Dr. Edward Liveing Fenn, which took place at seven o'clock on Sunday morning at his residence, Alston Court, Nayland. The deceased gentleman, who was well known and universally esteemed, not only in Nayland and Colchester, but throughout a far wider district, was son of the late Dr, Fenn of Nayland, and was born at Stourbank in that parish on August 30, 1818. He was educated at Sherborne College,and afterwards went, to King's, College Hospital in 1861. He took the diploma of M.R.C.S. Eng. in 1865, afterwards studies for a year in Vienna, and in 1873 he became an M.D. of Edinburgh. He held the position of Physician at King's College Hospital (where he had been a distinguished student), be was a member of the Royal College of Physicians, London (1893), a member of the Pathological and Clinical Society of London and also of the British Medical Association.
He resigned his position as physician to King's College Hospital to come home to Nayland to assist his father in practice there and he remained at Nayland for four years,when he went to Richmond, Surrey, where he took over the extensive practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. This practice he carried on for some twenty years with great credit and renown and was consulting physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital. During his residence at Richmond he took a great interest in the public life of the place, he was a member of the municipal vestry, and a churchwarden and he married in 1872 Katharine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace.
Owing to ill health he relinquished practice at Richmond, and came and settled down in Colchester in January 1892, residing at Grey Friars, East Hill. He was shortly afterwards appointed physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, and occupied that position until he retired from practice and left Colchester, in July, 1903, when he was appointed Honorary Physician to the Hospital.
In March 1902, Dr. Fenn inherited Alston Court, Nayland on the death of his aunt, Miss Alston The Alston family have lived in this interesting old house for over 150 years, and when Dr. Fenn left Colchester in 1903 to reside there be took a great interest in its restoration. Among the family papers which he discovered at Alston Court was a valuable and interesting record signed by the famous Dr. Gilberd, of Colchester, which Dr. Fenn presented to the Colchester Town Council, and now hangs near the Gilberd picture in the Moot Hall.
In the autumn of 1892 Dr. Fenn was elected Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and he was President of the East Anglian Division of the British Medical Association in 1898. In February, 1892 his first wife being deceased, he married Edith, second daughter, of Mr Chas. Todd, of Wentworth House, Richmond, who survives him.
Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace and Magistrate for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession, and during his connection with the Essex and Colchester Hospital he was held in very high regard, not only by the medical staff and other officials, but by the patients, while he was also extremely popular among all classes in the borough. He was a devoted member of the Church of England, and was, from 1893 till he left the town, churchwarden of All Saints, taking a keen interest in parochial affairs. At Nayland, as formerly at Colchester, be was foremost it, every good and philanthropic work. He was a member of the Parish Council and of the local Education Authority, and also rendered excellent service in regard to the preservation of footpaths and rights-of-way. In the early part of this year he was taken seriously ill, but, thanks to the skill and care of Dr. Syrett he rallied. About a week ago, however, it became evident that his vital power was failing, and on Sunday morning be quietly passed away, to the deep regret of all who knew him. He leaves five sons by his first marriage, and one son and one daughter by the second marriage. His oldest son, Dr Charles E. Fenn was for some time recently House Surgeon at the Essex and Colchester Hospital and is now in practice in London, another son is an engineer, one is in the Navy, and two are in the Church.

OBITUARY.
EDWARD LIVEING FENN, M.D., M.R.C.P., J.P.,
EX-PRESIDENT OF THE EAST ANGLIAN BRANCH.
DR. E. L. FENN, of Alston Court, Nayland, whose death occurred on December 8th, was the son of the late Dr. Fenn of Nayland, and was born In Nayland on August 20th, 1843 He was educated at Sherborne College, afterwards entered King's College, London, and qualified in 1865. A painstaking and hard-working student he was elected to the office of House-Physician at the hospital. From thence he went to Vienna, where he studied for a year, and, returning to Nayland, he joined his father in practice there. On the death of his father he removed to Richmond, Surrey, in 1871, where he took over the practice of Dr. Julius, of the Old Palace, Richmond, in partnership with the late Mr. Bateman. Here for twenty years he carried on an extensive and highclass practice, and was Physician to the Royal Richmond Hospital.
In November, 1872, he married Katherine Pauline, daughter of Dr. Julius, and resided at the Old Palace. During his residence in Richmond he took great interest in the public life of the place; he was a member of the municipal vestry and a churchwarden at the parish church. Ill health compelled him to relinquish his practice at Richmond, and he settled down in Colchester in Jauusry, 1892, and resided at Grey Friars, East Hill. In February, 1892, he married again, his second wife belng Edith, a daughter of Mr. C. J. Todd, of Richmond, who survives him. ln 1893 he was elected Physician to the Essex and Colchester Hospital, where he remained for ten years, and also took a prominent part in the general management of that institution. He carried on a practice as a consulting physician in the town and neighbourhood, having taken the diploma of M.R.C.P. in 1892. In 1903 he finally retired from practice, and settled down in his old family residence of Alston Court, Nayland.
In October, 1892, Dr. Fenn was Chairman of the annual dinner of King's College Hospital, and in 1898 he was President of the East Anglian Branch of the British Medical Association. A capital public speaker, he filled both these offices with distinction. Dr. Fenn, who was a Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, was a very fine type of man, and unquestionably an honour to his profession. A dignified gentleman, he was universally beloved and esteemed by all who came into contact with him.
British Medical Journal 21 Dec 1907.

THE FUNERAL:
The funeral of the late Dr. Fenn took place at Nayland on Thursday at noon the sad ceremony being attended with every testimony of the great esteem and respect in which the deceased gentleman was held in Nayland and the large district surrounding. All the shops were closed, and the blinds of every house lowered, and the procession was followed to the graveside by a large number of the school children, who had been given a half holiday by the managers, of which body the deceased was chairman. The remains were enclosed in an elm shell within a coffin of polished oak with brass furniture, and on the breast was a heavy brazen cross, on which was inscribed "Edward Liveing Fenn, died 8th December, 1907. Aged 64 years." The coffin was born from Alston Court, which adjoins St. Stephen's Church, on a bier, and was followed by the mourners viz Dr. Charles E. Fenn, Rev. E.V. Fenn, Lieutenant C. D, Fenn, R.N, Mr. E. J. Fenn (sons), Miss Adria Fenn (daughter), Mrs. Hand, Mrs. Cotes, Mrs. Hopkins (sisters), Miss Cotes (niece), Colonel Fenn C.I.E. (brother), Mrs. Harold Fenn, Miss Todd (sisters-in-law) Mr. A. O. Julius, Mr. Gerald Todd; Mr. Algernon Todd (brothers-in-law), Professor Liveing, Mr. W. Liveing (cousins), Captain Smythies R.N, and Miss Johnson. The servants at Alston Court also followed. The large church was quite filled with a sympathetic congregation, among those who attended the service being Dr. Sydney Curl, Dr. Leigh Day, Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Chichester, Dr. Clowes, Dr.E. Worts, Dr. Bassano, Dr. Renny, Mr. A. G. Buck (representing the Essex and Colchester Hospital, Colchester), Dr. Syrett (Nayland), Rev. J. Storr (Little Horkesley), Rev. R. H Wilkinson (Stoke), Capt. Kelso, R.N., Mr. Neville Stud (Great Horkesley), Mr. R. M. B. Otter-Barry (Little Horkesley). Superintendent Peake (Essex County Constabulary Boxford), Rev. E. C. Sawdy (Congregational minister), P S. Bailey, Messrs. Thomas Cuddon, Raymond Cuddon, Wilfred Deaves, A. Y. Littlebury, F. G. Chippington,C. E. Vowing, W. Cook, G. Grimsey, R. Wheeler, T. Webb, P. Biggs, T. Faiers, F. Harding, W. E. Church, A. E. Harvey (Nayland), etc. At the entrance, the cortege was met by the vicar of Nayland, Rev. J. D. Gray, and the surpliced choir in charge I of Mr W. F. Hindes choirmaster, and the service throughout was conducted by the Vicar. At the conclusion of the lesson," blest are the departed " was played, and after the Nunc Dimittis the organist, Mr. G. W. Brooks Mills also played " Now the labourer's task is o'er;" as the recessional. On nearing the graveside the choir sang " On the Resurrection morning," and the scene as the coffin was lowered into the grave, which was lined with white cloth, was most impressive.
The floral tributes, which were very beautiful, bore the following inscriptions : - "In loving memory, from his wife, sons and daughter"; "From the staff at the Essex and Colchester Hospital, with sincere sympathy and kind remembrances of a friend to all, and a much valued colleague " ; " In affectionate remembrances., L., M., and E. "; "In most loving remembrance. of our dear brother Edward, from his sisters" ; With deepest sympathy, from all at Wentworth House"; "In affectionate remembrance, from Arthur and Bessie Julius"; "With sympathy from the maids at Alston Court"; " "With sincere sympathy, from Mr. and Mrs. , W. F. Hindes"," With deepest regret from the groom and gardener at Alston Court"; "With deepest sympathy from Miss E. Johnson " "With heartfelt regret and sympathy, Mr. and Mrs. W. Le G. Gudgeon, Stourbank, Nayland"; "Captain and Mrs. Smythies, The Turrets, Colchester"; "With ;deepest sorrow for the loss of their kind friend, from the teachers and children of the Nayland Council School " ; " With sincere sorrow from the members of the choir", Dr & Mrs. Frank Syrett, Nayland" ; and From Lady Grant Duff, Lexden Park."
The arrangements for the funeral were admirably carried out by Mr. William Deaves, of Nayland.

Managers Minute book for Nayland School in 1907.
Dr. E. L. Fenn was a member of the School Board of Managers at the time of his death. He appears to have been Chairman for up to 3 years, as his signature appears with this title at the end of the minutes for each meeting from July 1904 to Christmas 1906
"1907 December 11th: A special meeting of the Local Managers was held in the school-room this evening. Present W Dudgeon, F. Deane, J. Blyth, W. Norfolk.
Re: Late chairman. Before proceeding to deal with the business of the evening the Vice-Chairman, W Le G. Dudgeon Esq referred in a sympathetic manner to the decease of the chairman (late) Dr. E.L. Fenn. His remarks were very warmly endorsed by the Managers. He moved the following resolution:- that the Managers of the Nayland Council School desire to record their deep sense of the severe loss they have sustained in the death of Dr. E L Fenn, and their heartfelt sympathy with Mrs. Fenn and her family in their heavy sorrow and bitter bereavement. This resolution was seconded by F Deane Esq and supported by Mr. Norfolk and carried by the remainder. That a copy of this resolution be sent to Dr. Chas. Fenn; also that the School be closed on Thursday afternoon, 12th December the date of interment. Agreed.
From:Mary.George Nayland 2003

EXTRACTS from the WILL of EDWARD LIVEING FENN.
Dated 13 Jan 1903 at Colchester ESS.
Appoints Charles Edward Fenn & Arthur Onslow Julius Executors & Trustees.
To my wife L500, all household effects, books, paintings etc, including the oil painting of myself, then to pass to the inheritor of Alston Court (Charles E Fenn)
To Charles E Fenn my diamond ring given to me by my father, my proof engraving of John Hunter.
To Harold L Fenn my gold hunter watch.
To Ernest V Fenn my signet ring.
To my wife during her lifetime my house Alston Court, gardens, pastures, & fennages, being partly freehold and partly copyhold, then at her death to my eldest son Charles.
To my Goddaughter Lucy Dorothea Fenn L100
The residue of his estate to be vested in his Trustees to be invested (some instructions are given) to provide income for his wife, then distributed to his surviving family at her death.
A Codicil is attached dated 26 Jan 1906 noting an advance of L1530 at no interest, to Charles Edward Fenn out of his share of his fathers estate.
Handwritten copy on file - E L Fenn
Proved London 15 Jan 1908 for L30,111-2-1. FHL 1894240 1908 Jan A-L

Buried in the old cemetery Bear St Nayland, his tombstone reads "In loving memory of Edward Liveing Fenn eldest son of Thomas Harrold and Maria Fenn. Who entered into rest Sunday Dec 8th 1907 Aged 64. The free gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom 6-23"

Fenn Edward Liveing of Alston Court Nayland Suffolk MD died 8 December 1907. Probate London 15 January 1908 to Charles Edward Fenn MD & Arthur Onslow Julius solicitor
Effects L30111 2s 1d
National Probate Calendar.

bullet  Research Notes:


Medical Directories;
Dr Edward Liveing Fenn
Kings College Hospital.
M.B. Edinburgh 1865.
Phys.Accouch's Assistant Kings College Hospital 1866.
H P Kings College Hospital 1867
Nayland Assn Kings Col London.
Late H.P. & R.A. Kings Col Hospital.
Author of "Epilepsy" - prize papers read before the Medical Society Kings Col London.
District M.O. Sudbury, Lexden, & Winstree 1871
The Old Palace Richmond in partnership with Bateman 1872
Contributed "Congestion of the Liver" Medical Times Gazette 1868 (1872).
Surgeon Nat. Orphans Home, Ham, and Royal Female Naval School Isleworth 1873 - 1877, 1883.
1 Portland Tce Richmond 1878, 1879, 1883.
Member Pathology Soc. 1879
Surgeon Richmond Hospital 1882, 1883.
Grey Friars Colchester MRCP London 1892, 1893, 1903.

Colchester Medical Society Records;
Elected to Society 4 Aug 1868.
Resigned 3 Oct 1871.
Re-Elected 18 Oct 1892.
President 1896.
Resigned Nov 1903.
Member of the Ipswich & District Clinical Soc. 1905 - 1907.

Letter to Dr Edward Liveing [100].
Grey Friars
Colchester
June 13, 1899.
My dear Edward,
I hope you are getting on well, and that the pennance you are undergoing will give you permanent relief.
My wife and I enjoyed our two days in Cambridge very much, the Professor was most kind and showed us a great deal that was interesting - we also went to the races one evening. When we left we spent our last two days at Hunstanton. I went through the pedigree . . . . . a week or two back, and made some corrections; when you are well enough to do the same I think you will find that he is foggy on the following points.
John son of the ancestor by his 1st wife did not die unmarried having 3 children (Chas: Alston's paper wrong).
Jacob the youngest son, of Wrens Polstead b (probably) 1696, died 1760 and therefore was not buried in 1757 we may hope.
His son Jacob died November 28, 1757.
His grandson Jacob born 1758 died 1778 w no portrait of him exists as articled to his Uncle Sam Alston no portrait of him exists.
Mary widow of Sam Alston was buried at Nayland not Edwardstone
Mary Downing died 1842 not 1843.
Sarah Alston died 1837.
Anna Maria Alston born at Nayland not Edwardstone.
Harriett Alston born Nayland not Edwardstone
William Alston died at Norwich February 6, 1839.
Ann widow of George Alston died February 1856 buried in vault at Nayland
These were some of the points I noticed and corrected - you may find others.
Your affectionate cousin
Edw L Fenn

Transcription of letter, Dr Ed. L. Fenn to Rev Edmund Farrer about the restoration of Alston Court:
Grey Frairs Colchester.
7 Feb 1903.
Re. access to Alston Court Nayland under renovation.
You and your friend are quite welcome to look around the old shell, for there has been such a large amount of substantial repair required that we have not yet reached the more decorative stage. e.g. There is no glass and not many floors in yet. Next to the picturesque courtyard with its carved beams, the Hall will be when restored an interesting feature, the north wall has bulged and the iron beams of the ceiling rusting out were so insecure, I have determined to set up again the original open roof, the beam with carved Kingpost and braces still stands and the remains of a shaft leading up to a spandrel may be seen on the north wall.
The Hall also presents an example of what began to take place at the end of the 15th century by the cutting of from the main hall of a private parlour for the use of the Master and his family, when they no longer dined with the household in the Hall. The small doorway at one end of the partition remains, the window in this inner hall which has been building for centurys (?) was completely glazed when we opened it but the lead was so soft I had it all taken out that it might be releaded. The bessemer beam over the fireplace in the inner hall is the original one which we found bricked up in the wall, but the fireplace and chimney were so insecure I had to rebuild them. In the dining room adjoining where there is at present no floor and the fireplace is lumbered up with the oak rafters from the Hall roof you will note the massive ceiling and the fireplace is the original size, tho rebuilt for the same reason as the inner hall one, the bessemer beam here is a new one the old one having been badly burnt some few years back. The paneling of this room is at least 120 years later than the building and was not introduced till 1631. If you strike a match you may be able to see on the beam between the windows on the east side a little oak figure 13 inches high in the habit of a Flemish soldier in the time of Edward IV. The room was I believe originally hung with painted cloth, a good large fragment of which I shall possess. You will remember how Falstaff try's to console Mrs Quickly for the loss of her tapestry by telling her instead she can have the story of the . . . . . or German hunting or . . . . . work to . . . . .
signed
Edw Fenn
Ref: HD526/101/1 Bury RO.

Essex County Standard Office.
Colchester
January 28, 1904
The following letter, and Essex County Standard newspaper article are contained in a small envelope addressed to Dr Fenn dated 28th of January 1904.
Letter File 2007

Essex County Standard Office
Colchester.
Jan 28th 1904
Telegrams: "County Standard" Colchester
TELEPHONE NO. 42A

Dear Sir,
The document which you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of an article to appear in this week's E. CS. It is to be supplemented by some notes, I venture to keep the document in my safe, hoping that you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester, who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted, and framed and placed in the Town Hall.
In great haste,
Yours faithfully,
W Gurlinly Benham

Discovery of an autograph of Dr William Gilbert, of Colchester.
By the courtesy of Dr E. L. Fenn late of Colchester, and now of Alston Court Nayland, we are enabled to publish the following document, which Dr Fenn has discovered amongst some papers in his possession.

To all Christian people to whom this present writinge shall come William Gilbert of London Esq sendeth greetings to our Lord God everlasting.
Whereas Richard Roberts of London, Tanner can now by his deede of bargaine and sale bearing date of the date hereof all the consideracion therein mencioned hath gyven graunted feoffed bargained and released unto the foresaid William Gilbert his heirs and assignes forever, all his right title clayme and interest with (sic) ever he hadd, hath, or by any meanes, may have in the capitall messuage and rents to the said capital messuage on the part of the North and Sowth with all orchardes and gardens thereunto belonginge with thappertanaunces scituat, lying, and beinge in the parish of St Martyn in Colchester, abuttinge as in and by the said deed more att lardge yt doth and maye appeare.
Now Knowe yee me the said William Gilbert to have made an ordayned and thee's presents in my steade and place putt and constituted my welbeloved in Christ Robert Middleton of Colchester, aforesaid, gentlemen, my true and lawfull Attorney to enter for me, and in my name into the said capital, messuage, rents and other the premises with thappurtanaunces or into any partt or parcell thereof, and the full and peceable possession and seizon thereof, for me, and in my name to take according to the forme and effect, of the saide deed and bargaine and sale, GYVINGE and hereby grauntinge under my said Attorney my full power and authoritie in execucion of the premisses as fully as evey thinge is the lawe will the same permit, and as if I were sceft (sic) were there personaly present, ratefienge, confirminge, and allowinge all, and whatsoever my saide Attorney for me and in my name shall, lawfully doe it cawse to be done in about the said premises, by virtue of their presents.

In witness whereof to this my present writinge, I, the saide William Gilbert have sett my hande and seale.
Dated the One and Twentith daie of Aprill in the Eighth and Thirteenth yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of God, Quene of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faithe, scilicet 1596.
W. Gylbert.
Sealed and delivered to the use of the said Robert Myddleton in the presence of me. Ambrose Gilbert, Leonard Wallworth scr.

This document is of great value and interest as bearing the autograph signature of the great scientist and "first electrician" Only one or two other signatures of Dr William Gilbert are known to exist. Further reference to the subject will be found in our "Colchester and County Notes".

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bullet  Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as a son aged 7 a scholar born Nayland SFK

2. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Sherborne School Sherborne DOR. Edward is described as a pupil unmarried aged 17 a scholar born Nayland ESS

3. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Bear St Nayland SFK. Edward is recorded as Head of House aged 27 unmarried general practitioner MB Edin. LRCP Lon. MRSC Eng. born Nayland SFK

4. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is described as the head of the house, a Physician MD Edin., married, 37yrs, born Nayland SFK.
Also resident in the home were his wife and family and Mary C Julius his sister-in-law, plus 5 staff:
Maria Satchell, cook, unmarried, 50yrs.
Ada L Saxon, parlormaid, unmarried, 30yrs.
Catherine A Collier, nurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
Amelia Mann, undernurse, unmarried, 28yrs.
George King, page, unmarried, 15yrs.

5. Census: England, 5 Apr 1891, 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY. Edward is recorded as head of house widower aged 47 medical practitioner/surgeon. Also in the house were 4 children and 4 servants.

6. Census: England, 31 Mar 1901, 81 High St Colchester ESS. Edward is recorded as head of house aged 57 married a physician/surgeon born Nayland SFK.
Also in the house were his wife and family, plus a cook, a house maid, parlor maid, and a nurse.



7. Edward L Fenn, Mid 19th C, Sherborne School & Richmond SRY.



8. Edward's Letters 1: To His Son Harry, Dated 27 Mar 1890, 12 Jul 1890. (See original letters on right).
March 27, 1890
My dear Harry.
I have lost the country post so you will not get this very early, but I can not let the day pass without writing to wish you very many happy returns of your birthday, and you shall have a present when
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you come home If there is anything you want, tell me and I will see if I can manage it.
I expect you and Charlie will come home on the same day, and he wants to know if he may walk home, but I have told him he must let me know first how many miles it is and the exact road, he is thinking of coming by
W. Hammond gives you a good report, and therefore I hope you will have a happy holidays, for it is only when you have worked well, that you can feel you have earned your holidays.
Billy Barton was very excited yesterday
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because his colour (Oxford) won the boat race.
Goodbye,
From your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.


Richmond
Saturday afternoon.
July 12, 1890
My dear Harry.
Our dear auntie Polly died this afternoon, she became so weak and weary at last that she prayed to be at rest.
You boys have good reason to mourn for her
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for ever since your own dear mother died. Auntie Polly has done her very best to fill her place and help you one and all that you might miss her as little as possible and we must never forget her.
Goodbye, my dear boy
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This short letter is in a black rimmed envelope addressed; Master H L Fenn, Malvern House, River, North Dover.



9. Edward's Letters 2: To His Sons Harry & Van, Dated 24 and 28 Sept 1890, 28 Oct 1890.
Richmond
September 24, 1890
Wednesday evening.
My dear Harry.
I hope you have recovered from ill effects of both wasps and cricket ball both punishments must have been very unpleasant. It is a pity
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you had not "Sequah" near at hand to cure you.
Our great excitement here was the thunderstorm yesterday, three houses were struck in Richmond. But the worst was Mrs Brewin's house at Strawberry hill, the children were in the nursery and Mrs Brewin and her friend were in the front drawing-room. When the lightning struck the chimney filled the nursery with sulphurous smoke and threw down the ceiling in the back drawing-room, yet no one was in the least injured. The storm raged for an hour. Cyril, nurse and Baa took refuge at Miss
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Quirks as Cyril could not come back from school during the storm.
Your portraits have not yet come, you shall have some of them when they are ready.
Vandy is removed into the upper fifth. Tip cut his foot with some glass the other day, he bled a good deal on the terrace that but is well now.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.

Richmond
September 28, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am sending you the proofs of the photographs they are all good, but the two I liked best 5888B and 5889A. You may keep these and give any of them away if he wish to do,
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when Bertha comes home, she might like one. I think Tip comes out greatly. I hope your back has got quite well: Winnie Bateman fell down in the Park yesterday and broke her arm a second time. They had all come with Cyril and Baa up into the park for tea and games and this was one of the results. Cyril is in the upper school now, which is very nice to him. Billy is going to church tomorrow morning, (it being the feast of St Michael and all Angels), with Miss Annie Proctor, nurse is to sit in another pew.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter was on black edged mourning paper.

My dear Van
I expect Mr Allen has told you, you are to come home next Saturday for an exeat until Monday at 11. Aunt Annie wants you to dine at her house with Cyril that she may see something
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of you in the afternoon and you will come down after tea. I am glad to hear you are working well and making the most of your opportunities. Billy goes every day to Miss Proctor for his lessons, Bible reading, saying hymns and catechism etc, he is quite at home at the vicarage: I dare say you will go in there with them next Sunday.
You made one great mistake in your letter you say "he will no what that means" fancy spelling know, no - shocking
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Goodbye dear boy
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Richmond
October 28, 1890



10. Edward's Letters 3: To Son Harry, Dated 28 Oct 1890, 4 Nov 1890.
My dear Harry
A few lines only to thank you for your letter, and to say I am very pleased to hear you have done well in arithmetic. I have not seen squeak, but I have heard his coach, trumpeting along
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in the distance: I hope someday you will be a better doctor than he is, for he is only a quack.
Van is coming home on Saturday for the mid-term exeat, and he and Cyril are to dine and spend the afternoon at auntie Annie: I hear that Jack Bateman has broken his arm again. His bones must give very easily.
Billy Barton is wearing a Scotch camp on Sundays, which pleases him mightily.
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I take Tip for a long run every afternoon, he is miserable if he thinks he is not to go and won't lose sight of me for a moment. He is rather noisy, each time I start from the house, which is not always pleasant.
Goodbye, dear boy
Your affectionate father,
Edward L. Fenn.
October 28, 1890
This letter in a small envelope was addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House, River, Dover and is damaged.

My dear Harry
I hope you have received the hamper safely, cookie was to take it to Victoria this afternoon. I enclose you nine stamps for your letters. Did I tell you that when Dolly went to
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the dentist a week or so ago he pulled out the wrong tooth by mistake. It was most unfortunate. Yesterday Cyril had his mid-term holiday, and he and nurse and Billy went to the Crystal Palace. They enjoyed their day very much Vandy also ahead his exeat from Saturday to Sunday morning.
Auntie Annie, and Win are going to Harrowgate on Friday, the latter had her arm taken out of the splints yesterday. I do not want you to write to many letters so the week, you write
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to auntie Ada you need not write home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Richmond
November 4, 1890.



11. Edward's Letters 4: To His Son Harry, Dated 17 Nov 1890, 25 Feb 1891, 4 Mar 1891.
Richmond
November 17, 1890
My dear Harry.
I am glad to hear that you were not bitten by the mad dog, I suppose all the animals it bit have been killed, and the poor children properly treated. Do you recognize
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the photograph is it the same man you saw at River and Harrogate? I think he must have emptied all our pockets here by this time, and that he will soon be moving somewhere else.
Vandy's mid-term report was quite a good one it said, "a very good worker who has been making good progress, especially of late, his Latin grammar is especially good".
The new Mayor and Corporation are going to the parish church next Sunday morning for a special service. Sir Whitaker Ellis is our Mayor. Now that I have given up my open carriage Tip misses his regular
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afternoon run and has to be content with a walk with Billy in the morning and up to Thatchers with Robert in the afternoon.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
Wednesday evening.
February 25, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I do not think I have written to you for some time, so must send you a few lines tonight to let you know I have not forgotten you. I hope you have not been having such terrible fogs as we have been
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enduring here. Last evening I left Ham Common about six o'clock and we crept along to Petersham but near Barnham Corner see nothing and I had to get out of my carriage and lead one of the horses all the way home I had to walk close to the edge of the footpath to find my way.
Baa went today to the vicarage for the first time since his chickenpox. I have no doubt, they made a great fuss of him. He tells me he saw all four Miss Proctors
Tip seems quite to have recovered the loss of his toenail. I think he had bent it backwards in a scuffle with Pickles,
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and we had to send him to the dog doctor who removed it for him.
Work carefully at your mathematics, English and French are very important for examinations.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Richmond
March 4, 1891.
My dear Harry.
I enclose you 1/- worth of stamps. Charlie wrote last week to say an enormous hole had appeared in his trousers and he must have a new pair as these were past mending, so I was obliged to say
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he might, as I was afraid otherwise he might be going about like a Highlander in a kilt.
I have just recovered from a sharp attack of asthma, had to keep my bed all Monday but I have been out on my round today.
You will soon be enjoying the pleasant spring walks and lambs, birds nests and flowers, though you will see more of these at the beginning of next term, as we may expect plenty of cold wind yet.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



12. Edward's Letters 5: To His Sons Harry & Van, Dated 27 Mar 1891, 10 Mar 1893.
Richmond
March 27, 1891.
My dear Harry.
Very many happy returns of your birthday to you - I am still up in my bedroom but getting on gradually and I hope next week to be able to get away to the south of France for two or three weeks and I may see
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you before I start.
Goodbye, dear boy.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is in a small envelope and addressed to: Master H. L. Fenn, Malvern House River, Nr Dover

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 10 1893
My dear Van
You will be glad to hear that baby is better, I think I may say that today is the first day we have felt at all happy about her
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since she was taken ill last Wednesday week. I had your report last week and was very much pleased with it, you were top for the month and doing well in all your subjects so I hope you will get into the first class for one term before you leave.
Uncle George Hand has been appointed captain of the Shannon lying in Bantry Bay, he is not at all pleased as he wanted another ship which is stationed at Harwich near his
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house at Dedham. I am afraid you will not see much of Cyril at Easter he breaks up so late, it is very unfortunate.
With Mater's love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



13. Edward's Letters 6: To His Son Van, Dated 21 Sep 1893, 7 May 1895, 12 May 1895.
Grey Friars
Colchester
September 21, 1893
My dear Van
I am sending off today the following books:
1 Hamilton - algebra
2 Pendleburgh - arithmetic
3 Bradley - composition
4 Creighton - history
5 Stedmans - French exams
A classical atlas which will I daresay do as well as the . . . .
So you
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must order revisers Greek Testament, Benrose(?) Latin verse book, Baureres(?) French grammar.
Glad to get your letter and to know you are comfortably settled. Tell us next about your journey did you go through the Box tunnel? How long did you wait at Taunton etc? Is there a Mrs Thornton?
Would love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn
You ought to get the books on Saturday

Grey Friars
May 7, 1895
My dear Van
I quite meant to have written to you yesterday to tell you we have neither of the books you want so you must get them. Harry and Cyril took away Hall and Knight algebra one of which was doubtless yours.
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I am glad you like your new study and that you will make good use of it I have no doubt. When Harry last wrote he and two friends were going to make the ascent of the Roche de Naye mountain, 6430 feet high and he says he has been catching some beautiful fish in the lake.
Mr and Mrs Brown have gone away for three weeks and they are going to stay at Oxford with Mrs B's sister.
I drove Edgar over to Dedham last Friday in the dogcart and we had tea with Aunt Annie it was very dusty and windy on the road. As I am writing now in the study clouds
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of dust continue to roll by, we very much want some beautiful showers of rain to lay the dust and make the vegetables grow.
Edgar is delighted with Miss Peachey
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
May 12, 1895
My dear Van
You are doubtless enjoying the real summer weather, but here we very much want rain, for nothing will grow in the kitchen garden until we get some reviving showers. Charlie Todd bought Miss Winch down here on Friday
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they stayed one night she seemed to be very pleasant and good-natured but does not talk much. Next Friday (DV) Mr Todd comes down and stays over the Sunday.
Have you heard of Harry's near escape on the mountain? As I do not think you have I will quote his words:
"I and some other chaps began to go up the Rocke de Naye all went well until we got up about 5000 feet then we had to go up steep slopes covered with frozen snow the snow was very hard and it was also freezing hard, well we ascended by dint of hard work cutting our way up them, after we had gone up about 100 yards (I forgot to tell you these slopes were covered with huge rocks) we walked along the top of the slope under a huge set of rocks, after a bit we had to get round one, three of the boys got round and then I came I got half way when just as I was bringing my right
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foot round to another step my left foot and the step gave way, immediately I began to go down these tremendous slopes at a terrific pace, I crashed through between two trees and then down I went getting faster and faster if it was possible. I pressed my alpine stock head hard down on the snow it made no difference except to keep my head from going down head foremost well at last I crashed on to a rock and rolled over 6 feet to the ground on the other side and would you believe it I was none the worse for it except very much bruised cut and shaken. I went down quite 80 feet it was steeper than the slope in front of the drawing-room window"
He says if he had fallen a little further he would have been dashed to pieces over the precipice.
Thank God for preserving him I say
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



14. Edward's Letters 7: To His Son Van, Dated 26 June 1895, 27 Apr 1896, 8 May 1896.
Littlehampton
June 26, 1895
My dear Van
We have reached the end of our very pleasant holiday and return home tomorrow (DV). I see the Saijemans(?) still flourish on the beach both Mr and Ben. Last Saturday Charlie came down and stayed until Monday morning going back
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by the 7:42. Sunday afternoon he and I went for a long walk through Arundel Park, we were very hurried returning to the station and after walking along 5 miles an hour for the last half hour (downhill most of the way) we got into the station just in time to see the train steam out; so we sat an hour and cooled ourselves. C goes in for his examination tomorrow, he is rather anxious but I am very hopeful he will pass all right this time. Your report has come and is satisfactory as you are top in form, but bad in French and still improving in mathematics, you must stick close to the latter as mathematics help to make the mind clear and logical.
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I should think you are old enough now to enjoy some of Prescott's histories e.g. The Conquest of Mexico or Peru or The History of Columbus by Sir Arthur Helps.
I enclose you six stamps which will last you to the end of the term. Harry sent me a good group of Mr Masson and his pupils this morning, He comes home on the 20th.
Love from Mater Edgar and Bobo
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
April 27, 1896
My dear Van
I do not think you have been vaccinated since you were a baby so it will be safer for you to take this opportunity to be done again, the smallpox epidemic
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seems to be spreading in different parts of England owing to the culpable neglect of vaccination.
Mr Brown came back from Oldham later on Saturday evening to take the duty yesterday - we gave him some supper on his arrival but he slept at the Rectory - he came in again last evening and left early this morning on his return to Oldham, they expect to be away three weeks
I missed your help very much with the Easter offering book and am getting on very slowly I'm afraid.
Edgar went with me to the evening service yesterday as there was no one to go with him to St Botolph's in the afternoon. I think he likes Miss Collings as well as he did Miss
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Peachy. We are having the windows on the garden side of the house painted for the woodwork was beginning to decay from want of paint to keep out the wet.
Bo and Adria are very well, they have what used to be our bedroom for their night nursery now
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
May 8, 1896
My dear Van
I suppose you have by this time settled down to the regular routine of work. I see you left Jason behind you I do not know whether it was intentional or not but keep up your reading of all kinds of literature. I hope the shirts arrived in Tiverton in safety
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Charlie's shoes never reached him, I am afraid you must have tied the address label on carelessly and that it got pulled off in transit. I wrote to the P.O. about it but they wanted to know what day and hour you posted it and that I could not tell them - I suppose you do not remember.
The old house at Nayland had a narrow escape of being burned down yesterday Aunt Margaret happened by chance to go into the kitchen about three o'clock in the afternoon and saw the beam just above the fireplace in a blaze, she quickly called Wisby(?) and they ran for Mr Deaves and his men and with buckets of water they fortunately put it out, if it had gone on for another 10 minutes I believe all the old part of the house would
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have been burnt to the ground - I was at Nayland yesterday and saw the burnt beam and the kitchen was in a frightful mess from soot and dirt and water. Mary gets slowly weaker and weaker and has at times a good deal of pain but she is very patient. Adria is rather fretty with Tish coming
All here send their love to you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



15. Edward's Letters 8: To His Son Van, Dated 20 May 1896, 15 July 1896, 13 Sept 1896.
Grey Friars
Colchester
May 20, 1896
My dear Van
I was going to send you a paper giving an account of the great fire at Richmond but Linnie has frustrated me - it must have been a terrific affair. You will be sorry to
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hear that poor Mary died in the hospital last Saturday after much sad suffering born with great patience and resignation. We buried her yesterday just at the foot of little Dorothy's grave. The Webbs at the cemetery two your servants (sic), and two nurses from the hospital and myself followed her to the grave. We shall greatly miss her for she was a good faithful friend and servant of the old school.
I am glad you have moved into a better bedroom, I hope you
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are going to have a try for the prose or verse prize it is always good practice to go in and even if you do not win.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Wentworth House
Richmond Green S. W.
July 15, 1896
My dear Van
We have had a very warm week at Richmond and the heat has been rather too much for Bow who has been very poorly for two days - we have seen a good many old friends since we arrived. The opening of
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the new ward at the hospital brought together a great many, and yesterday there was a diocesan missionary gathering at Sir Whitaker Ellis's house where I saw others.
Florence takes the children by the waterside generally as it is cooler there than anywhere else and Bow delights in seeing the trains go over the bridge.
Charlie dined here on Monday, he rode over from Thames Ditton on his bicycle and as he was entering Richmond he ran into a dustcart owing to some mutual dodging and bent his machine which he had to leave behind and return by train.
I have been to the Sherborne commemoration this year so cannot go to Tiverton
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tho Mr Thornton sent me a card of invitation to luncheon; I hope you all have a good day.
I am so disappointed at Cyril's complete collapse at his exam; that I feel very hopeless about him - but I must try and get him another nomination for a last chance if I can.
With love to you from Mater and all here
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
September 13, 1896
My dear Van
I enclose the health certificate, if Mr Chase has any reason to suppose you have been exposed to infection during the past week I shall trust to his communicating the fact to Mr Thornton.
I am afraid the weather
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has been very unsettled with you as it has been here but I dare say you have enjoyed the novelty of your surroundings. I attended a luncheon yesterday at the new School recently built by the Roman Catholics here; Cardinal Vaughan presided and made a very sensible speech. I was introduced to him and had a few minutes conversation, later on I drove over to Nayland to see Mr Palmer's patient and managed 10 minutes with Aunt Margaret, but we shall go over and see her again on her birthday next Friday.
There will be a vacancy at Paxman's works before Christmas so I must devise something for Harry to do until then.
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Aunt Isabella is I believe still at Clacton and we rather talk of going over there on Tuesday for the afternoon and so give Grace a blow of fresh air. We went to a concert on Thursday given by Arthur Roberts it was very amusing.
We are I am glad to say all well here - Bo still calls out for Annie sometimes.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn.



16. Edward's Letters 9: To His Son Van, Dated 27 Sep 1896, 21 Oct 1896, 15 Nov 1896.
57 Marine Parade
Great Yarmouth
September 27, 1896
My dear Van
Mater and I came down here last Friday and we hope to stay until Tuesday week. Mr and Mrs Todd propose joining us here tomorrow, we are most fortunate in our apartment nice large rooms facing the sea, very clean, cooking good etc. Bo was very sad when
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we left home crying after us "Bobo cab to". Grace and Miss Ethel Auchinclass(?) are staying at Grey Friars to keep house and look after the babys and Harry. The latter has had a bad cold with a bad asthma and inflamed eyes - he was getting better however when we left. He goes up to 45 Great Marlborough St on Wednesday from month and then goes on to Wentworth House until Christmas, as he is going to attend classes at King's College for one term before he begins a course of practical engineering at Paxman's works. We went to St Nicholas Church this morning for a grand thanks-
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giving service for the Queen's long reign, it is you know the largest parish church in England it was quite full - the Mayor and Corporation, the Norfolk Regiment, an artillery contingent, sailors, police, and the general public filled every seat in the church. They say there were about 4000 in the church, we had a grand special service with the band, the Vicar of Yarmouth preached a stirring sermon we both enjoyed it greatly, after the
. . . . congregation had dispersed Mater and I stayed for a quiet celebration of the Holy Communion.
With love from us both
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
October 21, 1896
My dear Van
I thought the enclosed toast list drawn up my Mr Benham with humorous drawings of ancient and modern Colchester might amuse you. Observe the oysters being offered to Cunbeliuos(?) also the Roman soldiers devouring them and slaves opening them
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in front, then old King Cole etc etc. I enjoyed the banquet yesterday for Lord Roseberry spoke exceedingly well and with great earnestness.
Gilbert who you see on one of the oyster shells was a natural philosopher who live in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I and discovered a good deal in connection with magnetism which has finally developed into the electric light which they talk of introducing into Colchester. Gilbert was buried in Trinity Church here
Cyril tells me that old Foster has retired from school work and that Minnie is now the head, I hope
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all this will not affect his passing.
The babies are very flourishing they are crawling at a tremendous pace now, and will soon walk expect
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 15, 1896
My dear Van
Your report was quite satisfactory though Francis still points out your weak points as I daresay he often does to you. He says your work is well prepar21 Oct 1896ed
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and that composition occasionally shows more life. Your essay writing is weak, that you wander from your subject. Mathematical report that you always try your best, I hope as you read more both prose and verse your powers of composition will develop.
I am afraid Cyril's chances are very small in December Mr Foster says he works steadily but is so dreadfully slow, so in examination he is nowhere.
Mater and I went yesterday to a matinee at the theatre and saw the "Sign of the Cross" it was really very well put on and
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the subject was treated quite reverently; the scene lies in the time of Nero and the catastrophe is brought about by the young Christian girl converting Marcus the Roman prefect who was in love with her to Christianity, and they passed hand-in-hand from the dungeon to the amphitheatre and the lions.
Harry you know is at Wentworth house now, greatly enjoying himself
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



17. Edward's Letters 10: To His Son Van, Dated 29 Nov 1896, 5 Feb 1897, 11 Feb 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
November 29, 1896
My dear Van
How dreadfully soon you break up this term we seem hardly to have settled down quietly from the effects of the summer holidays and here you and Cyril we will be upon us in about a fortnight.
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Cyril passed his medical all safely and now for the real text I hope most on sincerely he may succeed though my hopes are very faint I am afraid. I cannot expect him to do more than his best however.
We had our Shakespeare reading party last Thursday the arrangements much the same as when we had two years ago. The bow window in the drawing room a bank of flowers for the stage, tea in the study, and supper in the dining room. Everyone said it was a most brilliant evening so we were repaid for our trouble.
Harry is teaching Mabel and Adria Todd to ride a bicycle, I believe
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they can both manage it pretty well. Mr Weir of Horksley died last Monday after a short illness, I saw him two or three times with Mr Palmer.
With love from Mater and the family upstairs
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
February 5, 1897
My dear Van
I am afraid you have not had many letters as yet so I will send you a short one this evening. Harry has began his work very well and is I think quite interested in what he has to do - it has been a bad week for him to begin work at 6:30 a.m. wot - wot - wot
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his alarm goes off at six and he makes himself a cup of cocoa before he starts on his bicycle. A paper was given him today to fill up with the other workmen to say how many hours work he had done, I believe he put some 26 hours as he did not begin until after breakfast on Tuesday.
Aunt Lucy has settled Lewis at Stubbington - the Fosters seem to think that Cyril has been dull and slow over his work ever since he had the measles, I think I must make some enquiries about Epsom College for him after Easter, they have a good modern side there, and it seems useless for him to do any more classics. I hope you will do well in your exam and it will be nice clearing off "Little Jo" before you go up to the University
Have you heard that Aunt Lucy has taken a house at Midhurst close to Aunt Margaret and I think she could not have done better - very pretty
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& healthy. Rees is at a private tutor at Bramley near Guildford.
Mater and I went to London on Wednesday to a matinee of "Under the Red Robe" we enjoyed it very much but the roads were like running rivers and we went straight from the station to the theatre and back again
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
February 11 1897?
My dear Van
Harry asked me to enclose some more photos to make yours . . . . . complete.
Edgar is doing more work now and Mr Brown comes to him twice a week - Mr Todd is lending him a leg rest for his plaster of paris leg is very heavy, and his thigh aches at times.
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I have asked Mr Fry the house surgeon and one of Harry's friends Mr Kennedy to dine with us on the 21st and I have taken stalls at the theatre so we shall go there afterwards and see the "The French Maid" which they tell me is very amusing.
I hope to go to London before it is over to see the performance of Julius Caesar at Her Majesty's Theatre.
I hope you are in the minority in the vote on the Civilisation v Barbarism debate you have only to read the accounts given by any traveller in the uncivilised countries to see the squalor misery and suffering endured by the "noble untutored savage" I go with Tennyson, better a year of Europe than a cycle in Cathay or words to that effect.
Harry reads Bardolph next Tuesday, I hope we shall be able to get his hands clean before he goes.
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"Beau" goes with his mother to a children's party at Miss Peachey's tomorrow - a conjurer is expected - I hope Beau will sit still.
Last night he was put to bed but was not asleep so Florence said, shall I take you in my arms and rock you off in the next room, "Oh Nannie says B how can you take a poor little boy out of his warm bed I think you had better go into the next room and do your work" so she did and in a minute or two she heard him snoring.
I hear from Harrogate that Aunt Ada has been very unwell but is getting better.
Love from Mater and babies
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



18. Edward's Letters 11: To His Son Van, Dated 5 Mar 1897, 19 Mar 1897, 17 May 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
March 5, 1897
My dear Van
We were much interested in your budget postcard, quite a little book. I suppose you experienced a very heavy gale last Tuesday, as its chief force seems to have expended itself on the south and west coasts.
We had gone that evening
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to a Shakespeare reading at Miss Lockwood's and at 10:30 when we were about to start it was blowing and raining great guns; three sets of people had come on foot the Hunt's the Curtis's and the Mitchell's so we sent our carriage two journeys before we started ourselves. One gentleman the curate at St Giles in walking down the garden path to the carriage had his hat blown off and of course he saw it no more for it was pitch dark.
I walked over to Nayland this morning and sat for three quarters of an hour with Aunt Margaret who looks wonderfully well, she walks better than she did and has got as far as Mr Rees on the Stoke Road. I had luncheon with the Palmers and came back in the omnibus.
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Cyril had a preliminary test 10 days ago and did much better than he has done before so we must still hope on. Aunt Annie stayed here two night's last week, one night we went to the theatre and saw Arthur Roberts and the next night we had two of Harry's fellow pupils Mr Seeker and Mr Jones - Preece had an engagement and could not come, Dr and Miss Mitchelson and a neice and young Mr Larsen. Our new organist Mr Tyndall came in after dinner and played I had the old piano tuned for the occasion
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Colchester
March 19, 1897
My dear Van
Your report arrived a few days ago, good in most respects but poor Mr Francis still groans over your composition tho you have cheered him a little even in this for he says "composition"
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shows a little more vigour multiply this still more and use the great models more and dictionaries less". I daresay he tells you how to try and do this, we used to be told to read a paragraph of Cicero again and again until we knew it by heart or at any rate had fully grasped the method of expression.
Cyril goes to London next Tuesday for the examination returning to Stubbington on Saturday and his holidays begin on April 6, a week before yours unfortunately. We are expecting Mr and Mrs Todd next Thursday to stay with us until the following Tuesday they want to see the grandchildren.
Edgar's leg has been so troublesome the muscles starting when he walked that he has gone back to the irons and gets on more comfortably now.
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There was a long report about the Post Office affairs in the Morning Post a few days after your debate - if it had appeared a little sooner it would have a afforded you material for your speech. Mr Hales from Ardleigh is to take Canon Irvine's place and my old school fellow Mr Ball from Mersea goes to Ardleigh.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
The two men injured on North Hill are getting on well

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Thames Embankment
May 17, 1897
My dear Van
Here we came last Thursday and hope to stay for a week returning home next Friday. The weather meant well for it changed the day we arrived, I am not sure so long as it was fine that I should not have preferred it to be rather cooler. We are making a round of the theatres we have seen Ellen Terry in "Mme St Gene" and we have been to the opera once Faust. Tonight we are going to see "The Physician" on Friday met Simon
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at Wentworth House and met meet Mr and Mrs Gergun and baby - the last pretty little mite, but certainly a mite - on Sunday morning I was not well so we stayed at home and Uncle Harold called and so fortunately we saw him - in the afternoon we went to Richmond, the Mater stopped at Wentworth House while I went on to him to see the Bishop of Christ Church and found him not feeling well but I sat with him in his room for some time - Aunt Alice was staying in London so I only saw Polly and Ethel the latter was very anxious to meet you but I told her that she had no chance of doing so unless she called upon you at Tiverton
Uncle Arthur [59] and Bunt Bessie took me all over the place, all very nice, a long garden plus two pigs, plus horse and pony, plus a chicken run. I thought it all very nice and comfortable especially in the summer. Today we had been looking in the shop windows and then went to the Guildhall, where we met Mr Todd to see the collection of pictures by painters of the Victorian age. We left Harry with a bad cold which became asthmatic after we left so that he had to go on
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the sick list - the babies we hear keep very well.
Cyril tells me they all drew lots as to who should go to see the Jubilee Procession, he lost I am pleased to say for the losers were to go to the Naval Review at Spithead which will be much better for him.
How about the Latin dictionary you must get a new one if you fail to get a second hand one, it's a good plan to get one half bound, it is so much stronger than cloth. With love from Mater who thanks you for your letter
I remain
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn.



19. Edward's Letters 12: To His Son Van, Dated 19 May 1897, 16 Jun 1897, 2 Jul 1897.
The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
May 19, 1897
Dear Van
I have just seen a second-hand large White and Riddle Latin English dictionary clean and good order 9/6 - if you have not ordered one I think you had better send me a line by return and I will buy it and send it down to you. I shall just have time as we go home on Friday.
Charlie dines with us tonight and we go to see "Saucy Sally"! Tomorrow Aunt Isabella and Dolly
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dine with us and we go to see "Seats of the Mighty"
Mater is waiting for me
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

White Hart Hotel
Reigate
Surrey
Wednesday, June 16, 1897?
My dear Van
Here came Mater and I last Monday to stay with Mr and Mrs Todd and tomorrow is the wedding day and home we go (DV) on Friday. Bertie and Nellie Evered drove over and paid us a short visit last evening Horley is
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about 4 miles from Reigate.
I believe there is to be a large gathering at this wedding feast. This is a nice old-fashioned country Inn our sitting-room looks into the garden with a French window opening on to the lawn. Yesterday we had a very pretty drive through the lanes to Cheapsted about 5 miles to the north of this. Mater and I propose returning to Grey Friars on Friday Mr Gwyon(?) has not heard of a curacy yet but yesterday we went to see a vicar near Norwood, but I am not sure if Mr G. will take it.
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I hear that Edgar is enjoying his visit at Richmond immensely, he spent three hours at the vicarage one day and is to go again to have tea with the vicar.
With love from Mater and self
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
July 2, 1897
My dear Van
You seem to have had a very spirited celebration on Jubilee day, I should have liked to see the ring of beacons
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handing on the good news from hill to hill.
Cyril wrote us a capital account of the naval review - he seems to have thoroughly enjoyed himself - he went over the "Renown" and the "Eldorado", the Prince of Wales sent word on board for the cadets to splice the mainbrace, and then he ordered them a glass of port wine all round.
Edgar will come home next Tuesday (Mater's writing) he seems to have enjoyed himself in the immensely - he went to see the river fete, they were in a nice garden and saw it very well and to crown all did not get back till 10:30!!
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Your friend Mr Minchin had lunch and tea here last Thursday this Thursday we had a garden party about 35 or 40 people - croquet . . . . . (in abundance) ices and strawberries were the chief attraction with two exceptions viz Bo and Chick who appeared in white from head to foot (E.L.F's writing) and were much admired. Harry is on the sick list today
With love from us all
Yours affectionately
Mater and Father



20. Edward's Letters 13: To His Son Van, Dated 22 Jul 1897, 1 Oct 1897, 10 Oct 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
July 22, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I suppose you will not know the result of your examination for some time - I trust you have passed - at any rate I am sure that you have done your best. Have you heard from Aunt Ada at all about going to Harrowgate this year she mentioned it to me some months back but not lately.
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Today we have the National School Festival at the Holly Trees I think it will be fine - yesterday for about two hours we had a big thunderstorm and deluge of rain; though not so badly as Ipswich where much damage was done and two boys and a pony killed
The Swimming Match day here is fixed at August 12 Harry is rather excited about it as he hopes to win the plates under water, Cyril I hear swam his test distance but his style was not so inelegant that they would not pass him. Florence is away for two weeks one of which has expired I am thankful to say for we have both babies in our room
Page 3
and our nights owing to Beau's company are, to put it mildly, lively, Chick is very good until 6 a.m. when she wakes up for sports and pastimes
I took the chair last Monday at a SPG Missionary meeting, after it we received the Bishop of . . . . . and about a dozen of our friends had tea in the garden
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

7 Cavendish Place
Eastbourne
October 1, 1897
My dear Van
I hope you had a comfortable journey with no mishaps on Tuesday. We enjoyed rather a tedious one for the 12:42 was very slow and tiresome up to Chelmsford and then we had 11/2 hours to wait at London Bridge, so first of all we had some luncheon and then walked across to the
Page 2
Southwark pro Cathedral i.e. St Saviour's Church which has been lately so beautifully restored. We had a carriage to ourselves most of the way down here, our rooms are very comfortable and close to the sea. Eastbourne is a much larger place than I thought it was they have built so many fine private houses at the west end. We amuse ourselves chiefly in walking and sitting about by the seafront. This morning Mater declining the treat, I rode on one of the Char-a-bangs (motorised transport) to Beachy Head. I enjoyed it all very much as you wind up the hillside you get a very good bird's eye view of the place and when you get to the top the precipitous chalk cliffs are very grand.
I expect you escaped the thunderstorm of Wednesday night, Harry said it was heavy at Colchester, one very sharp clap even waking up Beau but he was not at all alarmed.
We propose going to Wentworth House next Thursday and so home on Friday in time for Chicks
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Happy Tea
With love from the Mater
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
October 10, 1897(?)
My dear Van
I enclose 2/6 so that you can put your name down for 5/- for the bookcase.
When your turn for reading the lessons comes round, try and get away somewhere where it you can read them out aloud, it makes such a difference
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when you come to read them out in Chapel - the verses sound so much more familiar if you have heard the sound of the words before - merely running your eye over the chapter is of little help compared with the previous recital aloud - remember it is almost impossible to be too slow - slowness, distinctness and proper emphasis are the points for a beginner to cultivate.
We enjoyed our two visits very much and we enjoyed lovely weather both at Eastbourne and Richmond. Mr Todd, Mater, Mabel and I went to the Victorian era exhibition at Earls Court and enjoyed it very much - the animated photographs are very wonderful - you see
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the horses in the (diamond) Jubilee procession (22 June 1897) walking along and tossing their heads and the people waving hats and handkerchiefs - the only thing as thrown on the screen is an exact representation of what took place(sic).
Charlie has settled down comfortably at:
6 Alexandra Place
Jesmond
Newcastle on Tyne
With love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn



21. Edward's Letters 14: To His Son Van, Dated 5 Nov 1897, 30 Nov 1897, 16 Dec 1897.
Grey Friars
Colchester
November 5, 1897
My dear Van
We are enjoying? dull cold north-east winds and skies - I expect you are warmer or wetter in Devon.
Yesterday Mater and I with Florence and the two babies drove to Nayland for them to plant their
Page 2
Jubilee trees in Aunt Margaret's garden. The gardener had prepared two get capacious holes into which they descended with their little spades and with his help they soon securely planted two apple trees, they then adjourned to the ancient kitchen and enjoyed a hearty and substantial tea. Aunt M was I thought very lame. Tomorrow Harry goes to the Macandrews for a bicycle "Hare and Hounds" Mary Macandrew and he to be the hares.
I have obtained your certificate of birth if you should want it for Cambridge, I have
Page 3
heard nothing from Mr Francis as yet - ought I to write to him or do you think he has settled the matter? Mr Brown thinks Edgar might begin Greek soon
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
I do not think I ever congratulated you on getting full marks for your holiday prep. You deserved your Tennyson.

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 30 1897
My dear Van
I suppose you are now in the midst of the exam; I hope the papers will suit you and that you will make a fair show. You will return, I presume, by the same route as you went on Friday so we shall not see anything of
Page 2
you, but you will get a whiff of East Anglian air.
I do not think you remember your cousin Launcelot Giles he entered Christchurch last October. When you go into residence you will make his acquaintance. I believe his father is to be the new Professor of Chinese at Cambridge, curiously the professorship of Chinese at Oxford fell vacant yesterday; I expect Uncle Herbert would rather have gone there if he had known it was so soon to be vacant, for his wife's relations live there and his father was an Oxford man; still having Lance at Christ's may be an attraction though on the other hand Lionel is at Wadham.
Beau is much better now and has gone for his first walk today - he has had two drives
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already. Mr Tanner from St John's College, Cambridge lectures here tonight upon "The Dissolution of the Monasteries" with Limelight illustrations.
Edgar has not begun Greek yet so now I suppose it will be postponed until next term.
I am very sorry to see the death of Archdeacon Jones-Bateman at Zanzibar, he was a pillar in the central African mission
Love from all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
P. S. you will remember to give the porter who let you lodgings a tip, 1/- ? Ask Chase what.

address defaced
December 16, 1897
My dear Van
I enclose 25/- for your travelling expenses I think you come back on the 20th?
We are expecting Cyril this evening. Mater and I enjoyed our
Page 2
two days at Richmond we spent the major part of Tuesday in London roaming through the shops.
I was sorry to miss Lionel Giles who was coming to stay with Aunt Isabella last evening, he took a first on Monday at Oxford - he is at Dedham. Charlie comes down by boat from Newcastle on the 22nd he talks of going to Richmond on the 28th
With love
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn



22. Edward's Letters 15: To His Son Van, Dated 30 Jan 1898, 19 Feb 1898, 2 Mar 1898.
Grey Friday's
Colchester
January 30, 1898
My dear Van
Many thanks for sending us the "Navy and Army" it is an interesting number, I could not however recognize Cyril amongst those splicing the mainbrace though the cadet on the left hand of the picture looked like him.
Edgar is carried down to the playroom every day now and is getting on happily I
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hope. Harry took a spin around Dedham, Stoke and Nayland and used yesterday afternoon and he(?) saw and had a little talk with Aunt Annie in Dedham Street and Ann Margaret gave him some tea before he left Nayland.
The Bishop of Colchester preached at our church this morning a quiet thoughtful sermon on the Transfiguration; the picture of this by Raphael, engraving of which you are familiar with, struck me when I saw it in the Vatican Gallery at Rome as one of the most beautiful pictures in Italy the colouring of our Lord's face was so wonderful.
I have nearly got to the last page of Tennyson's life and the more one reads him the more one is astonished at
Page 3
his great genius and what a mine of philosophy and religion is buried in his poems only to be dug out by careful study. I advise you to continue to read him and to commit pages which strike you as beautiful to memory. Those who knew him say that he is - far and away - the only English poet to be ranked alongside Shakespeare
With love from us all at home
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 19, 1898
My dear Van
Many happy returns of your birthday and may you ever grow in grace and wisdom and usefulness as the years recur.
I hope you are fairly
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well again but do not use your eyes to soon if they show any sign of weakness. I am sending you a watch chain and spade guinea attached I thought your watch would last a short time longer you have taken good care of it and will deserve another someday. Grace is staying here and Mr Todd comes (DV) next Friday for four or five days and he will escort her back.
Next Monday Mr Fry H S at the hospital
Page 3
and Mr Kennedy a fellow pupil of Harry's dine with us and we are going to the theatre afterwards to see the "French Maid"
I had a long day in London on Wednesday and saw Uncle Ernest in his room at the Guards Hospital
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
March 2, 1898
My dear Van
I have been hoping to hear from you as you ought to be fairly convalescent by this time but perhaps your eyes are weak and the doctor thinks you had better not use them.
The Britannia is quite disorganised, 180 cases
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of either measles mumps or whooping cough fortunately he is not down with either, I fancy indeed that he has had all three.
Mr Todd and Grace left us yesterday the Grand Papa was pleased with Beau and Chick who were very good friends especially when he shook his box of sweets at them.
I have bought a bath chair and a carrying chair for Edgar, as he will probably not be able to use his foot in walking for another year nearly, I think they will be very useful and helpful for him.
What a snowstorm you seem to have had at Tiverton and indeed in all the west and south of England, here we have not had a flake. Cyril and two other cadets won a prize for modelling a Sphinx in snow - the other prize was won by some cadets who modelled a Man of War
Mr Minchin and Mr Ingram
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had luncheon with us on Monday, the former as usual wanted to hear about you and Tiverton.
With love from Mater and boys
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn



23. Edward's Letters 16: To His Son Van, Dated 20 Mar 1898, 16 Nov 1898, 4 Feb 1898.
Grey Friars
Colchester
March 20, 1898
My dear Van
I suppose you have quite shaken down into regular work again, I hope to some extent you will be able to make up for lost time. Cyril has migrated to "Sick Quarters" Ford Hill Dartmouth a victim to mumps and I am sorry he has had this
Page 2
interference with his regular work but I hope particularly it may not prevent his being confirmed as I had an idea it was fixed for the end of this month.
Harry is better but will not go back to work for a few more days in fact he may go to Richmond on Friday for the boat race and come back on Sunday night and then return to the workshop on Monday he looks thin and pulled own - Fancy that great baby's 21st birthday is next Monday week. Today is Dolly's 21st I sent her a pearl ring.
I am just going to take Edgar across to the children's afternoon service in his bath chair.
Page 3
5:45 p.m. the babies have just gone to bed. Edgar and I managed very well I went quarter of an hour before service began and placed him in his chair next to the font and I sat in Denton's pew by his side, after the first part of the service was over Mr Brown told the children about some Chinese mission work.
Next Tuesday week Mr Garwood is going to lecture us on his explorations in Spitzbergen illustrated by lantern views - I am in the chair so I am afraid I shall be too near to see well
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
Colchester
November 16, 1898
My dear Van
I enclose your certificate of birth if it is returned to you take care of it and bring it home with you. I wrote to Mr Francis 10 days
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ago asking amongst other things what arrangements were made for your lodgings whilst you are in Cambridge I have not however heard from him.
Beau has been very poorly since Saturday with a fever and stomach upset he is however better today and will I have no doubt soon pick up again. Mater and I are going up to London tomorrow (DV) to see
Page 3
Hamlet at the Lyceum - I believe Forbes Robertson is particularly good as Hamlet.
Tonight we're going to a lecture in the Corn Exchange by the Very Rev the Dean of Ely "Life in a Benedictine monastery in the 14th century"
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
February 4, 1899(?)
My dear Van
I see Harry has placed these photos on my table, so I send them on, there are some more to come yet I understand, but the man seems to be very slow in printing them off. We want some cold weather now to keep back the buds and bloom otherwise I am
Page 2
afraid the March frosts will do us great damage.
Harry went with us to Shakespeare reading and read a small part very well and he is asked to go to the next at General Montague's where we to read Henry IV Pt 1.
I am reading the life of Jowett just now, late Master of Balliol College he was a great tutor in his day and made his men stick to scholarship translating and re-translating Latin, Greek and English. I believe . . . . . to prose and verse will pay you better than anything else. Work with Mr Tatum? and get all you can out of him. I am very anxious that you should succeed at the University and an hour or more brisk walk every day and a longer stretch on Saturday will greatly
Page 3
keep you in health and for the rest - study study study your classical authors - your future position in life depends so much on your work now and a little self-denial in the way of pleasure is in all respects good discipline for you.
I believe you're doing your best but I don't think that all out-of-school hours must be given up to relaxation and amusement, until the June exam is over you ought give up everything to work and so command success.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn



24. Edward's Letters 17: Telegram & Letter To His Son Van, Dated 15 Jun 1901.
Post Office Telegraphs.
June 15, 1901
Handed in at Colchester 10:48am
Received Cambridge 11:20am
To - Finn Sydney College Cambridge warmest congratulations on your success
Edward L. Fenn
Telegram is in a brown envelope addressed to: Finn Sidney Coll Cambridge.

Saturday morning
June 15, 1901
My dear Van
Your telegram was most welcome and your success has given me the greatest pleasure. You owe the good class you have taken more to your own diligence and steady perseverance than to any natural brilliant gifts and therefore it is all the more
Page 2
to your credit. I have no doubt you will continue to do your best in the future. The training which leads up to the class is invaluable, but it is character and the high standard a man sets before himself in his life's work which makes a man useful and honoured in his generation and brings him peace of mind at the end.
I enclose the bedders tip so that you may have it ready on Tuesday
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
(The term "bedder" is short for "bedmaker" and is a housekeeper in a college of the University of Cambridge).



25. Edward's Letters 18: Two Postcards To His Son Van, Dated 11 Aug 1901, 14 Aug 1901.
Colchester
August 11, 1901
I hope Charlie will find his letter from chief office at Berne safe to poste restante Zermatt tho I daresay my letters would arrive before the letters of advice.
I follow you day by day in my minds eye the scenes visiting very vividly before me as I have gone over all the ground myself, tho when I was last on the Riffel there was only one small wooden hotel on the Riffelberg. Harry Hand is coming to spend the day with Edgar on Tuesday, we all went to St James this morning, I explained to C that I thought you ought to reserve three pounds in your pockets at the time you start from Riffel to see you home. Hope your luggage is safe
ELF
Postcard addressed to:
E. V. Fenn Esq
The Riffel Alp Hotel
Zermatt
Switzerland

Colchester
August 14, 1901
Very pleased to hear good accounts from all as far as Rhone glacier - you have had some good walks and you ought to return refreshed in mind and body. It is 39 years this month since I walked over Firka, we turned off there over Grimsel to meyring(?) on over the Oberland, but you have a finer prospect before you at Zermatt, where I am glad you will be staying the rest of your time, as it is well to avoid the dusty roads as much as possible. Harry Hand has been yesterday with Edgar here is growing a big sturdy fellow. I have opened a letter for you from Northcote(?) asking you to go over next Saturday, I have replied properly. There is a letter for Harry from Mrs Leatham to tell her woes that Agnes has had to lose her leg.
E. L. F.
Postcard addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
Hotel Riffelalp
Zermatt
Switzerland.



26. Edward's Letters 19: To His Son Van, Dated 10 Sep 1902, 3 Jun 1903 at his Ordination.
Colchester
September 10, 1902
My dear Van
I enclose P O O for 5 pounds payable to E V Fenn. Cyril was gated because he did not arrive by 9 a.m. a foolish hour we disregarded for it meant that the lad must sleep in London or Greenwich the night before - I do not think the punishment weighed very
Page 2
heavily on him and it gave him time to study his surroundings in the college and settle himself in his room. These sorts of regulations show an inconsiderate want of common sense on the part of the officials.
Like you I enjoyed reading the life of Walsham, how very much a simple minded earnest man.
We are expecting Mabel and Adria on Friday to pay us a visit they have not been here for more than a day or two at a time for a long while. Mr Todd has been staying with the Routh's in Wiltshire, Donhead St Mary, somewhere between Salisbury and Shaftesbury I believe.
I bought a large basket of most delicious greengages from Nayland yesterday - being alone I use the bus in and out. They are beginning to tile the new wing so I hope the clouds will hold up until the process
Page 3
is completed. We shall shortly look more ruinous than ever as the hall roof has to be taken down and renewed. Mr Brown is home again and was told the first day of his arrival the Fenns are going, and Mr Locke has brought Grey Friars and is going to live there, the relief of hearing there was no truth in the last half of the statement partly mitigated his grief about the first I think
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn

Grey Friars
June 3, 1903
My dear Van
Your two cases were dispatched this afternoon so I hope by Monday at the latest you will hear of their arrival at Rock. I always look forward to being in the church when you were ordained but the fortunes of war have carried you so very far away that I have
Page 2
reluctantly abandoned the idea. I am much obliged to Mrs Chase for her kind invitation, but with the strain of the Nayland house business and this house - valuers, auctioneers, architects and lawyers all press upon me just now - I do not feel my mind is sufficiently disengaged to go away for the inside of a week.
You are much in our thoughts this Ember-tide week of course and I often think what a pleasure it would have been to your mother to see you consecrated for the work of the church. At one time she hoped very much Charlie would have entered the ministry, so I know what her feeling would have been
Pages 3
about you. Her early death has been an untold loss to you boys, for she possessed a rare and holy mind, with much good judgement and dislike to all exaggeration about sacred subjects. If those who are passed away can follow our earthly actions be assured that her loving spirit will not be far from you next Sunday. With much love and good wishes for your happiness and usefulness in your sacred career
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
Thursday morning: Many thanks for Wells list and letter
Stamped envelope addressed to:
E. Vanderzee Fenn Esq
C/o Archdeacon Cornish
Kenwyn Vicarage
Truro.



27. Edward's Letters 20: To His Sons Van & Harry (in NZ), Dated 25 Mar 1906, 18 Apr 1906, 2 May 1906.
Nayland
March 25, 1906
My dear Van
Charlie and Cyril met Harry Edgar and myself at Fenchurch Street station on Thursday morning and we travelled down to Tilbury Pier whence a tender took us off to the ship moored in mid-river. Harry was . . . . . off to share a cabin with a Mr Morris at 51, who seems likely to prove a fairly agreeable cabin mate if he does not talk too much; he was going out to Wellington with very indefinite views as to his future.
It was a trying ordeal for all of us saying goodbye to the Emmigrant. Personally I felt that my goodbye was likely to be a final one as he must have years of hard work before him before I(sic) can hope to make an assured position for himself.
But we must leave the future and I only hope he may find work to suit him which will enable him to build up a home for himself, as it is in a happy home life that the largest amount of happiness is to be found in this world.
Harry posted a few lines to me at Plymouth - all well
Yours affectionately
Edward L. Fenn.
This letter is on two sides of a sheet folded, stamped, sealed with adhesive flaps and addressed to:
Rev E. Vanderzee Fenn.
Rock
St Minver
Cornwall

Alston Court
Nayland
April 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
We were very thankful to learn that your uncle got safe to land after the accident with the propeller, as on such a stormy rocky coast the vessel may easily have been wrecked. I have not heard anything of the bride yet, I suppose she ought to have arrived in England by this time. Nothing startling has happened here since you left, which would interest you. I have bought a horse, which will I hope turnout well: she is a blue roan, young and too fast at present, not having done any regular work and
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I think she has the makings of a strong useful brougham horse if we are only fairly lucky with her.
Cyril spent Easter with us, on the bank holiday he went over to Shirley and stayed the night. The first Lieutenant sending him home the next morning, in his motor car, which Cyril enjoyed very much, fairly humming along at 30 miles an hour sometimes. After lunch and I drove him and . . . . and Bob to Bures station and he went down to Portsmouth by an evening train. Edgar returns to Oxford the day after tomorrow, W. and Mrs Dudgeon, have presented a pair of large brass pedestal candlesticks to stand in the sanctuary they look exceedingly well and were placed in position for the first time on Easter Sunday. W. Todd has been spending a fortnight at Exmouth, with the Ren . . . They all seem to have enjoyed themselves very much up to yesterday, the weather having been delightful, but the last two days have been just as disagreeable, dull high northwest wind and clouds of dust.
I expect you are at present feeling rather astray, you will of course consult uncle Churchill before coming to any decision, he knows New Zealand now and he is gifted
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with sober judgement and plenty of good common sense. We are looking forward to your next letter to tell us how you got on with your seemed "chum" Your first experience was most unpleasant the fact of a man of 51 emigrating with no definite object in view looked fishy as if in fact, his friends were sending him out in the hope of something turning up for him at a distance from home. I have always understood that life on board a big liner is the worst place for a dipsomaniac and the temptations and opportunities to nip simply endless.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland.
May 2, 1906
My dear Harry.
I expect by the time this reaches you, you will be beginning to feel quite an old New Zealander. News is a very scarce commodity with us in Nayland, and the horse (house?) goes on satisfactorily on the whole, and his daily getting into better condition.
The Dudgeons are going to Germany 10 days or a fortnight and the Grays were
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going to the sea but their son Arthur has reached England from Uganda, where he has been studying the sleeping sickness so they are staying at home to receive him.
Tom Fenn is also expected home in a fortnight on furlough this week. He has been away on the Indian station for five years, I believe, and he has I think qualified for First Mate now. He is a very good steady fellow, though not brilliant.
I opened the enclosed letter as I thought it might be open to misapprehension if the writer waited four months for an answer without knowing the whys or wherefores. . . . . I have written to Ethel and told her of your move, and then I have forded her letter to you.
Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, and the next day Bob returns to his school. Mrs Dudgeon, and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment for the middle of June, but we are at a loss for actors, with all your young man away, and as in the days of Terquin, old men and boys will have to man the walls I suppose.
I have not heard anything of
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Mrs Hansell yet, but very likely when I go to London on Friday, I may see uncle Arthur and hear some news from him. Mrs Knott celebrated her 89th birthday last Monday, and talks are paying us a visit in the summer with Mr Todd.
We're hoping shortly to get a letter from you, posted at Cape Town. We value your letters now very highly, for absence draws the bonds of family affection nearer, I think.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



28. Edward's Letters 22: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 May 1906, 23 May 1906, 6 June 1906.
Alston Court,
Nayland.
May 9th 1906
My Dear Harry.
We were very pleased to receive your letter posted at Cape Town and to know that so far all was well with you, I am particularly glad that ultimately you got a pleasant cabin companion. By the time this starts, you will, I suppose be in sight of New Zealand shores. I hope before long, you may see your way to take up some work and feel your way towards your future career. I am sure you will find your uncle, a wise counsellor in what you ought to do.
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News with us at Nayland is an almost unknown factor, and family news stands in almost the same category. Tom Fenn was expected home a few days back, having been away for five years. He is a very steady good fellow, I believe, and will be sure to rise in due time, to the command of his ship, he hopes his next ship will be one going from London to India and back and not a continuous Indian coaster.
Edgar got up early on the first of May and went to hear the Magdalen choir sing the may hymns is at the top of Magdalen Tower. Bob says they have seven new boys at the school this term, a very happy addition to their numbers. Mrs Dudlen and the Mater are trying to get up a dramatic entertainment here towards the end of June, with Charlie's help they may finally pull it off. These entertainments are always a source of great anxiety, where you depend upon outside help, which has a way of failing you at the last moment. The most important person writing in the cheerful vein "I have no doubt
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you will have no difficulty in supplying my place" etc I'm pretty certain to have to step into some gap at the last moment, I think I don't ha ha want to do. Our spring cleaning in January, glad to say, is drawing rapidly to a close now, it is an excellent institution, for a show house like this, but a vacation of spirit, while it lasts.
And now good-bye dear boy, and with love from all of us at home.
Believe me.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.

Nayland
May 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I thought you would like to have the enclosed letter as I know you are still interested in the family at Clinton, Lewis's great success will please you.
It will be a long time before we can hope to receive a New Zealand letter from you, but we are anxiously looking forward to hearing that your long voyage has been safely accomplished and of your first impressions, but don't be in a hurry to make up your mind about anything.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying at Bembridge, Isle of Wight and Dolly seems to be gaining strength her mother thinks, but is still very soon tired. Aunt Annie has gone to stay with aunt Lucy at Westgate, Harold's death is ever with her and she is depressed and sleepless. I hope the change of surroundings may do her good as we did ask her here, and she may come later on but I dare say she rather.
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shrinks from the Dedham neighbourhood, where so much of his early life was passed. She and uncle George, have bought a house near Gunnersbury Station, with more rooms and comfort than Brook Green affords them. I hope the move will not be too fatiguing for poor
Uncle Henry has been suffering so much lately that he has just submitted to an exploratory operation on his abdomen and Aunt Ada sent me a card this morning saying that it was over and she believed the result was hopeful for the future outlook but that she would send me more particulars in a few days time. The great success of George's operation, no doubt encouraged your uncle to see what surgery could do for him, as medicine failed to relieve him from the attacks of abdominal pain, which have been occurring so frequently in this past six months. I am anxious to hear what Aunt Ada's first impressions of Miss Pearl Lavinia Mason were, as I believe she and her mother are now in England, and they hoped to meet aunt Ada the beginning of this month.
We had a curious instance before us the other day, how lost things are sometimes found Mr Craig, bought me a letter addressed to the vicarage Nayland from the Secretary of Lloyd's shipping register saying that a piece of plate had been picked up which was part of a presentation to a Captain T G Fenn, who they found from their register was born in Nayland 1846, and could the vicar, tell them if any representative of the family was still living there. It turns out that Aunt Margaret was being driven about the . . . . in a trailer by Dick last month, and after one of his rides she discovered that she had lost her watch chain and locket, the jewellery was probably picked up by some seafaring man who seeing the market was inscribed to Capt T G Fenn, with an address from the passengers of the
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"Waihora", with an engraving of the ship, thought that he can could probably be traced through Lloyd's and so wrote to them with success, you see. Curiously, Tom Fenn, who has just returned from India, saw the old
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"Waihora" in Bombay harbour where she had been sold to a native company.
Tom, Lucy and Frank looked Cyril up last week and had luncheon with him at the Naval barracks. Tom has to stay from a month in London this summer to pass for his captains Certificate and Frank goes in for his second try for Assistant Paymaster on June 19. Lionel and Val Giles are both fathers, the former called his daughter, Sylvia Sarah and the latter his Margaret Saint or at least I presume he did not put Giles in twice.
Mrs Davidson Mater and Miss Gray are trying to arrange a theatrical entertainment for the end of next month. Mrs Davidson's one idea seems to be to introduce to the public's notice, a Denham and a Bunbury in "A Pair of Lunatics" all other pieces seem to be left to chance and, if Charlie does not come down to help there will be a fiasco.
With much love from Mater and Adria.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1906
My dear Harry.
I do not know when we ought to expect a line from Hobart but we are still hoping to hear of you from the port. Algernon Todd spent the Whitsuntide with us and fortunately he had delightful weather which he enjoyed sauntering about the grounds, and on Monday I took him for a nice drive around Boxted and Langham. We were expecting Cyril to come up from Portsmouth yesterday that as he had found he could only get two clear days before joining the 'Barfleur" for the . . . . . he thought it best to postpone his holiday
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they were over (sic). He has been again acting as Master of a Ceremonies the Admiral at Portsmouth sent him out to Spit Head one day to receive the new Japanese man of war Kahima on his behalf. Cyril flew his pendant on the bow of the steam launch, was received on board by a guard of honour presenting arms, piped over the side, bugle sounding attention. The Captain escorted him to his cabin, where they had a long yarn and the Captain spoke English very fluently. In the evening the Japs were entertained onshore Cyril and the Jap Lieutenant next to him got very chummy and exchanged names. The Jap looking very puzzled at Cyril's flourishing signature. Last Friday he delivered his lecture to the Signal School and Officers of the Post on long-distance signalling. He says he got through all right, and was congratulated afterwards on. We began our rehearsals today for the theatricals of the 26th. I play the part of an old beau, because they could not get anyone else to take it. It is against my will, as I find it difficult now to remember the words but with the assistance of Edgar the prompter, I hope to pull through.
I think I told you that Aunt Annie Hand is about to remove into a new house at Chiswick. I am afraid it will be a great effort for her. Your uncle Henry has just undergone an operation in London, and I'm glad to hear from Aunt Ada that he is getting on well. The operation took place about a fortnight ago, so
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we may fairly conclude he will soon be about again.
Van hopes to get a fortnight's holiday towards the end of July and is thinking of paying Holland a visit, especially Delft the home of his ancestor Vanderzee. If Cyril is at home at that time it would be nice for them to go together.
Charles Routh's portrait in pink hunting coat etc is in the Academy this year well placed on the line. It was kept a profound secret until discovered on the walls of the Academy. I hope your uncle and aunt are well give them my love and with love from us all.
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



29. Edward's Letters 23: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 5 Jul 1906, 18 Jul 1906, 26 Jul 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
July 5, 1906
My dear Harry.
We are all very pleased to receive your first New Zealand letter, and to learn your first present impressions of your surroundings. I daresay uncle Churchill thinks it is best for you to see the various sides of New Zealand life before you settle definitely down to one or the other. In many ways, the sheep farmer life is a healthier and perhaps offers a better prospect
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for your future, when having learnt your business, you are able to invest a little money in the concern.
I have great confidence that your uncle's wise experience of New Zealand life and ways and your own fund of common sense will together work out some career, which will lead to your happiness. You must not expect prosperity, will come very quickly, though unfortunately years are slipping away from you, however be patient and hopeful and stick manfully to whatever you begin in.
Our village theatricals on the 26th ult were a great success we had first "A case for eviction" said played by Charlie, Mrs . . . . . . and Miss Williams, I thought it was a capital piece and well performed. Miss K. Lockwood, dying a few days before Miss Lockwood could not of course take any part, but it had been arranged some little time before that Miss W. should be her understudy. Then we had "A pair of lunatics" Mr Bunlay acting Denham from the . . . . . also well done, and we wound up with a dear piece, which I dear say you know, called "Popping the question" Miss Grey, Mrs Dudson , Miss Denham, Miss Johnson, is is a Mr Wilkinson and myself. The afternoon, a first class well behaved audience, but in the evening
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the two rooms were crowded and the fun was fast and furious. Any joke being seized by the audience and roared at we took 19 pounds a record take, and a record audience.
An attack of asthma, on Ree's part and the sudden flight to Canada on the part of Edward (the wherefore of which I have not yet learnt) prevented aunt Lucy and her party coming to us as they had arranged. I have written to Polly Hansell, to try and fit in a short visit here before she and her husband return to New Zealand. Charlie and a friend are going to Norway for two or three weeks hiking at the end of this month. Uncle Henry has gone back to Harrogate, his progress is somewhat slow. Thank aunt Alice you next see her for her letter and say I hope to write to her before long.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
July 18, 1906
My dear Harry.
Before you receive this letter, you will have had a little insight into New Zealand life and I'm wondering how you think you will like it. We have been having Van and Cyril with us lately, but the latter joins the Dido on Friday the 20th, Cyril does not think it is likely to be a long appointment. She is a second-class cruiser in the home waters . . . . he is glad to go on a small ship for a time he will probably be attached to her for signaling duties.
Van is going to Midhurst at the end of the week to stay with aunt Lucy, who has taken a home there
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for two months, and from there he goes on to aunt Ada at Harrowgate for a few days, he expects to meet the Hansell's there and they propose coming on to us for a few days about the 10th of August. I'm glad there is a chance of our seeing Polly before she returns to New Zealand. Uncle Henry is better but still quite an invalid, George Hunt is expected home very soon and will I suppose stay until after his wedding in September. I hear that Edith Giles is engaged to a Mr Bobby Reid, whom Van rather thinks he knew at Tiverton. She is staying with Val in the Punjab. when she met Mr Reid, an army man. I hope he is worthy of her for she is as you know, very sweet girl of a gentle disposition and deserves the best of husbands.
Edgar has been staying at Wentworth house, from whence he visits "Lords" or the "Oval" almost daily according to his letters. He returns today, (the 19th) and will cross Cyril on the railroad. He
I was very pleased to hear this morning, that Frank Fenn has passed for the paymasters . . . , he failed in his first attempt, but passed in 16th out of 20 the successful ones on that occasion so that he now has his life career open before him. We are thinking
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of having the Sunday School treat in our meadow this year. I thought some of the villagers would like to walk around our garden, courtyard etc. It could be a change from the field at the back of Greys house. Van and Beau and Giles would all be home to help entertain. I expect a photographer next week to spend three days in Nayland taking views of the house for publication in the architectural review. The difficulty is to get a proper account written for Blomfield is a very poor hand at descriptive writing.
With best love from everybody at home
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston court.
Nayland
July 26, 1906
My dear Harry.
Your letter of the eighth of June was very welcome, and you have given us an interesting account of your start on the Holme Station. I too am sorry that it turned out to be so difficult to get you into any good position in the engineering world, but in a way I do not at all think you will find the training you have had will be thrown away. There is no knowing even in your present, pastoral life, what useful work, you may yet find falling in your way, which may greatly improve your position. At any rate, if your health keeps
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all right qualify yourself as well as you can to become in your own turn a clever sheep master. I want to see you in the course of a few years able to marry and settle down with a small property of your own. I am very glad that you liked Mr Elworthy, the caravan arrangement will I daresay not be disagreeable for a while and is much pleasanter of view than barrack life with the "omne gatherum"
It is a strange thing how often one is struck with the smallness of the world. Here is your cousin Audrey in New Zealand, engaged to a girl who is through her aunt, Mrs Charles Bowen connected with Great Horksley. I remember Mrs Bowen's father Canon Markham as rector of Great Horksley though I was only a child when he died, but we used to enjoy going to the school feast in his time. Audrey is a lucky fellow to gain the affection of such a nice girl as I hear she is. We are expecting Miss Fanny Torlesse to luncheon here today. She has been staying at Stoke, a few days and leaves tomorrow. I think I told you that Edward Hopkins has gone out with a friend to seek his fortune in Toronto, I expect
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Lewis will follow him out as soon as he is 23, and his own master.
Van is enjoying himself at Midhurst, with his young cousins Lucy, Jo, and Frank. (perhaps Tom, if he is successful in his exam this week) Rees also, and Lewis. He goes on to Harrowgate tomorrow and will pick Bob up at Victoria on Tuesday on his way home. We are having the school treat in our field on the first and I want the villagers to come in between five and seven and give them an opportunity of seeing the house. I am afraid we cannot run to a band, but I am having the flag hoisted and the bells rung to cheer everybody up.
With love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



30. Edward's Letters 24: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 Aug 1906, 16 Aug 1906, 23 Aug 1906.
Alston Court
Nayland
August 9, 1906
My dear Harry
It is difficult to imagine that you are passing through a winter wet and cold . . . . . while we are just dried up with heat as we have not had any rain worth mentioning in the district since the spring. When you write remember I like to hear all the details of your daily life and work nothing is too trivial to interest me. Where expecting the Hansell's tomorrow so I shall learn all about the Holme Station at first hand from Polly when she is here. We are expecting a run of visitors as Mr Todd and Mrs Knott come next Wednesday when they leave Aunt Lucy and Rees follow in September . . . . . . . to come into the country

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in the winter that we have to . . . . . our few visitors in during the summer months. Charlie's fishing trip to Norway was rather marred by wet but on the whole he enjoyed it very much: Dr Drake left for his holiday the day after Charlie's return so probably he became busy immediately and had no time to regret that his holiday was not a longer one. I heard from Cyril a day or two ago from Invergordon near Cromarty the Dido with the Channel fleet is touring round the coast feted and entertained by the various important towns . . . . . . as they progress round the island.
Van is making enquiries about curacy in Surrey which he could take up after Xmas but whether the Vicar . . . wait so long removing remains to be seen, on the other hand curates are very scarce in the market; I know Corbett has been waiting months to . . . . One. The great event here last week has been the school treat which was held in my meadows I tried to liven it up a little by having the flag hoisted in and the bells rung between five and seven, I also let it be known that the house would be on view, I was kept busily employed conducting parties round for about two hours of the afternoon. Roberts and his assistants had a busy time serving tea and light refreshments to all and any who wanted them and his table seemed to be thronged most of the evening
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. . . . . the general opinion was that it was the best treat Nayland has known for many years. Today we are going to the Stoke flower show as usual but I do not intend to stay long we received our invitation to George Hand's wedding yesterday it is fixed for September 5 at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception will be at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Although she is rather a grand young lady according to Aunt Ada's ideas yet she likes her and hopes she will realise that she is marrying a poor man and to be happy must accommodate herself to her surroundings.
With love from as all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
This letter has been badly defaced with punch holes! making it impossible to read fully

Alston Court
Nayland
August 16, 1906
My dear Harry
I'm afraid from what uncle Churchill reported you have experienced an attack of your old enemy, asthma at Pareora, I hope it may only prove to be a passing bout as anything like a frequent occurrence would drive you elsewhere, as there is no comfort in life or ability for exertion when asthma is to the fore. I believe you will not find the work to strenuous, if you are not weighed down by this trouble, but I shall be anxious to hear how you fare in this respect. Polly Hansell and her husband left us two days ago, we enjoyed their
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short visit very much. She is quite unchanged, and as sweet as ever, I was very much taken with him also and I think they may be mutually congratulated on their respective choices. Polly showed us an Elworthy group, they must be a strikingly fine pair she looks very handsome, and he a giant in build with a kind benevolent face.
Mater, and I are going up to George Hunt's wedding (DV) on September 5. He is to be married at St Margaret's Westminster and the reception is to be held at the Grand hotel afterwards. We are giving him a pretty little pair of silver sweetmeat dishes for his dinner table.
Mr Todd and Mrs Knott? arrived yesterday, they both seem very well considering their respective ages, 88 and 89, at any rate they have splendid appetites. Dick and Tom Fenn and making a bicycle tour and hope to reach Nayland tomorrow, I dare say they will stay a night or two here. Tom goes back to India in October. He prefers working altogether on that side of the Suez Canal, and not going from England to Bombay. He unfortunately failed to pass his Masters exam and will have to try again in India. Frank has been appointed to H. M. S. "London" on the Mediterranean station and sails almost immediately. The "Dido" with Cyril on board is cruising round the coast of Scotland just now being
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feted wherever they put in, he thinks the cruise will be prolonged into the New Year. Van is nibbling at curacy at Cuckfield in Sussex, a place, with almost 2500 inhabitants, but I don't know if the vicar will be able to wait for him as he does not want to leave St Nineveh until the end of the year. Hobday? was curate at Cuckfield or near to it for a time I believe, and speaks well of the place.
The Mater tells me that she is writing to you by this mail so I will close with best love to you and all good wishes for your health.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
August 23, 1906
My dear Harry.
I have not left myself time to write at any length this week, but send you a few lines to greet you. I shall be anxious until I hear that your asthma has gone its so terribly crippling. You had just commenced an attack when your uncle, Churchill was last in Pareora. We are passing through a second spell of hot weather and the rain holds off, all ponds are empty and I live in constant anxiety about the depth of your well.
Cyril says the "Dido" is being very hospitably entertained round the coast. The last call was Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, very royally entertained them, making the officers free of his grounds and fishing. In return they took him and his Duchess out to the sea for a day and showed them some guns firing. Mr Todd and Mrs Nock? are still with us, and aunt Lucy and Rees come on the fourth prox to be followed like Gerald and then our guest season ends.
I think, very likely Edgar will spend 10 days with Van next month before he returns to Oxford. I think visits away from home are good for his mind. Mater and I go to George Hunt's wedding at St Margaret's Westminster on the first prox and to the reception at the Grand Hotel afterwards. Aunt Isabella and Dudley are going to the hotel in Hindhead shortly to see if the air will help to set up Dolly.
Goodbye,
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Addressed: H L Fenn Esq C/o A S Elworthy Esq Holme Station Pareora nr Timaru NZ, written on both sides of a sheet, folded and closed with adhesive flaps.



31. Edward's Letters 25: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 29 Aug 1906,13 Sep 1906, 20 Sep 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
August 29, 1906 (to sail on the 31st).
My dear Harold.
I was glad to hear a better account of you in the letter of birthday congratulations which you kindly sent and which arrived punctually on the 26th as you foretold. I was much relieved to hear that your attack of asthma, though sharp was brief.
Mr Todd, and Mrs Knott left us this morning having been with us a fortnight, the weather has been perfect for them, and the walls (sic) provided a fair supply of plums greengages and figs to their great delight as they are both fruit lovers. Our next
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visitors will be aunt Lucy and Rees who come next week, and then Gerald. After that I think Mater and I may go away for the inside of a week and visit Stratford on Avon, Warwick, Kenilworth, Coventry and Leamington, as they all literally a stones throw from one another so to say. Adria has gone back to her grandpa for a week's visit at Richmond, and will return with us (DV) after George Hunts wedding at which Mater and I hope to be present.
We went yesterday to a garden party at Edwardstone Hall, (Colonel Corrie), a most delightful garden of smooth lawns, yew clipped hedges and fine trees. I daresay you remember driving to Edwardstone with Charlie and me and photographing the church soon after we went to Colchester. I forget whether I told you Edgar thought of paying Van a visit in the last half of September. I think it is a very good for him to go about and make new acquaintances, and develop his brainpower. We are getting rather uneasy about the water supply here. We have virtually had no rain for three months. the lawn in the field looks as brown and dusty is the high road and it is difficult to keep things growing without incessant watering. I think both Edgar
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and Beau would take first-class honours if there was an examination on the respective feats and merits of English cricketers, they spend so much time over the accomplishments of these gentlemen, however it is a most useful topic of conversation.
The officers of the Dido had a splendid time at Dunrobin where the Duke of Sutherland, entertained them and made them free of his fishing preserves etc.
Your accounts of the details of your daily routine are full of interest to us.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
September 13, 1906
My dear Harry.
I suppose the Mater gave you an account of George Hunt's wedding last week. I was glad that we were able to go as it gave me an opportunity of meeting scattered members of the Julius family including Ellie Julius from Tilford, Polly Hansel and her husband, Hunts, Bateman's and their party. George rather thinks of following in his father's footsteps and working in Harrogate, during the summer months, I think he might do well here and also keep in touch with his parents and others.
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Edgar has gone down to St Minerva for a fortnight, I think he will find Cyril there for a card from him to Adria tells us that he has got leave for a few days and was going to see Van. It will be nice for the three to meet and visit some of the . . . . . of that coast together. Aunt Lucy and Rees left us yesterday, they stayed with us a little more than a week. Rees is rather a funny they lad, but brighter in his manner than I suspected. He is looking out for a berth, his brother Edward has joined some friends and gone on to Toronto, where as far as I can understand they have started an agency for the sale of patented medicines. To his mother's surprise appeared in England last week on "business" and he meant to have returned within the week, but the boats were full, so he will have perforce to stay until next week. Gerald comes down on a visit tomorrow, and when he goes I think our season for visitors closes. I take Bob up to London next week en-route to school and Mrs Johnson returns on the same day (21st) Rain clouds mock us with great promises, but no rain comes, we have only had a very few showers this May and long for a soaker. I am thankful to say my well continues to give a good supply for if it gave out we should be in a fix. Rumours are flying about, that the Grays
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are again talking of retiring. The last place favoured by them is Westgate. He has not mentioned the subject however, to me. Frank Fenn has joined the "London" at Malta, where he proved himself a good sailor, having only experienced a few hours of "mal-de-mer" wrote altogether very happily about his surroundings.
Tom and Dick on their return ride from Nayland had no mishap until they reached Cowdray Park in the evening when a stag suddenly charged Tom's light, he pulled up dead and Dick ran into him and his bicycle was crumpled up, but Dick only got a shaking himself.
I hope you're keeping well and feel interested in the work of your sheep run.
With love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
September 20, 1906
My dear Harold,
I must certainly get into the way of calling you by your proper name, which is more dignified, and in accordance with your age. I was glad to receive your letter of August the eighth last Sunday (September 16) as it tells us you are a well and that you are able to write in good spirits, both which points are a great comfort to me. If only you enjoy a good health I think this farming life will offer more happiness than the engineering; but you are at any rate qualifying for either as opportunities for advancement offer themselves.
Van has been entertaining both Cyril and
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Edgar lately, they were both anxious to see St Minver before Van left, which as you know, he probably will at Christmas. Whether his overtures in the direction of Cuckfield will come to anything is at present uncertain. Gerald is spending about a fortnight with us, as he had not made any other special plans for his holiday. Since he came the hot weather has broken up, and the much longed for rain has arrived, of course much as we were glad to see it, staying in the house is a little dull for Gerald. However, we have so far, always gone out somewhere, one part of the day.
We had a visit two days ago from Mr Kempe the architect and rather famous stained-glass man. He was delighted with the old house and the stained-glass we could show him; I enjoyed my talk with him. The day after tomorrow, I take Bob to Victoria enroute of the school and Miss Johnson returns tomorrow, so we shall soon settle down to our quiet routine again.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly have gone to Eastbourne for two or three weeks. Dolly picks up her strength, very slowly.
Yesterday Gerald and I drove over in the dogcart to Gifford Hall and called upon old Mr Britain (?) he was very genial and took us over the house, showing us the tapestry room, which I had forgotten and the kitchen in which I never penetrated before.
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The poor old man is very lonely, his chief companion, being as he pathetically said his pipe, his book, and his dog 'Tip". I fancy, his daughter-in-law rather tires of him. The old man said to a lady who was calling upon him. "I have lived too long"
Gerald has cycled to day to East Bergholt and Brantham to see Constable's other alter pieces.
We play bowls every day after tea as a little amusement for Gerald and the children.
Love from us all
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



32. Edward's Letters 26: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 27 Sep 1906, 4 Oct 1906.
Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
September 27, 1906
My dear Harold.
In the first place, led me say that I sincerely hope that Ada Elworthy has recovered from the painful and dangerous affliction of the ear of which you told us in your last letter.
I daresay you will find the riding rather trying and painful at present, that tenderness of skin however will soon pass away, and you will get tough like the rest of your colleagues. I am very glad to hear that you are settling down to the farming life
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as I think when you have gained experience and have flocks of your own you may start a very happy home for yourself and your posterity. People in the old country are always striving after money, and less and less work, whereas the happiness life is the working busy life.
Gerald went home yesterday after paying us a fortnight's visit, the weather was pleasant and I think he enjoyed his country outing.
Edgar stayed a fortnight with Van and proceeded last Tuesday, (1y 25) to Westgate when he proposes staying a week with Aunt Lucy. These little changes of climate and company, are I think good for both his body and brain. Charlie talks of running down for a few days in the first week of October, I think he is getting on very well in his work at Streatham, getting a new patient of his own occasionally, which is all he can expect at present.
The photographs of his old house, done by Mr Brocksee for the architectural review, have turned out as good as could be wished. Now comes my part the letterpress, which
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with such scanty material to hand is no easy task, but I do not know of anyone who could undertake it, I if I shirk the undertaking. Adria does a little preparation, now in the evening, a tray of sustenance being taken in for her and Miss Johnson, when that is over.
I see you're Archbishop, or is he only primate, Neville has just married, a Miss Fines - Clinton, a relation doubtless of W. Fines - Clinton, who used to be at Burlington House School, Richmond.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
This letter is enclosed in a small envelope addressed: H L. Fenn Esq c/o A S Elworthy, Pareora, Timaru, New Zealand

Alston Court
Nayland
October 4, 1906
My dear Harold.
The advent of Nayland fair reminds us that the Autumn has well set in again, and the pig killing season commenced in the village. The steam organ with the American galloping horses is fixed, as usual within a few feet of the schoolroom windows but as the business of the day does not commence until the afternoon lessons are nearly over, it does not really
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interfere much with lessons. Edgar returned home last evening, having enjoyed a fortnight with Van and a week at aunt Lucy's very much. Lewis, Rees and Kitty were all at home, Edgar and Lewis went over one Saturday afternoon and took Bob out and divided their time between Ramsgate and Margate and Westgate. We are half expecting Charlie down for a few days, but we feel no certainty in his arrangements until the last moment arrives and he appears. After Edgar has returned to Oxford Mater and I may go up to London for a few days and refresh ourselves with a few plays, as we never go up to a matinee now. Aunt Isabella and Dolly are still staying in Eastbourne. The latter does not get on very satisfactorily, I believe her powers of digestions are at fault, it must be nearly a year since she began to go downhill. Mr Todd was presented with a handsome piece of plate by the Wax Chandlers company last month to commemorate this connection of 50 years with the company. Gerald selected a
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new kind of American beaten silver work, very artistic I believe, but I think the old gentleman would have preferred something he understood better with an inscription upon it.
I suppose you are living within your income and have not had to touch your nest egg in the bank at Christchurch. Charlie expects to put by 50 pounds his first year. This will not bad as there are always special expenses on first starting a house.
Love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
When you can send us any pictures or photographs of persons or places about you wish your like to see them.
ELF.



33. Edward's Letters 27: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 11 Oct 1906, 25 Oct 1906, 2 Nov 1906.
Alston Court
Nayland
October 11, 1906
My dear Harold.
As week by week rolls by this has I wonder what I can find of any interest to you and I am afraid you will conclude that my stock of news is of the slenderest
Edgar leaves us tomorrow for Oxford, I hope he is deriving some good from it all but I cannot at present see much result in his conversation or interests, some of this however must be ascribed to shyness. I shall be anxious to hear the result of Vans interviews
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with Canon Cooper of Cuckfield. Van was to spend the day there yesterday and sleep at Streatham tonight ready to make an early start for Wadebridge? tomorrow morning. Charlie comes to us tomorrow a few days change, and then next week, all being well Mater and I talk of staying in London for a week before the winter sets in. I feel an inclination to go to a few theatres and see what is going on just now on the boards. Did I tell you that Mr Docksee has sent me copies of the plates he took of this house, I think they are splendidly done and I hope the editor of the architectural review will not keep me very long in suspense before publishing them. I hope to send you a copy of the review when they are published in it.
Uncle Harold talks now of settling some were in Worcestershire, where he can hire 700 acres of shooting with the house,
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Alston's regimental quarters in South Africa were burned down in lately h is is servants pluckily managed to save most of his belongings but lost their own. Do you begin to feel fairly at home in the saddle now. I hope the New Zealand horses are not buck jumpers like the Australian. It must require a world of practice to ride such animals.
Adria had 12 presents on her birthday, her dog goes on very satisfactorily and is a pleasant companion out walking, a great contrast to her predecessor.
Love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Colchester
October 25, 1906
My dear Harold.
I think I told you last week that Charlie spent a few days with us. He was rather tormented with toothache, and in consequence, pain. Dal . . . . . two visits and got rid of some broken stumps and returned home in peace.
Van hopes to begin work at Cuckfield the first Sunday in January, he was favourably impressed with the old vicar Canon Cooper.
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The Dido is floating around Ireland, returning to Portsmouth early in December I believe. Cyril was very pleased with the way the Dido's came out in a recent examination on signaling and wireless telegraphy four Dido's being bracketed first. He has a voluntary class in the evening for instruction in fleet manoeuvres, and he says some of the men are very keen on it. He says Bantry Bay is a wretched place, barren rocks onshore, and nearly always blowing and raining at sea.
Mater and I begin our London visit, the day after tomorrow and if our purse holds out hope to stay a week. We have not been able to begin our Shakespeare readings yet, as our company is rather scattered. Little John Syrett has just been operated on for appendicitis 10 days ago and is I believe going on well The choral class begins its winter course on November the sixth. Having agreed to become an honourable member of the ancient order of Foresters, Stoke by Nayland Lodge, Dudgeon, Gray,
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Carruthers?, Wilkinson, and myself are to be ceremoniously admitted at a special Lodge to be held at the White Heart this evening. No branding with the hot poker I hope.
W. B. Spurling is to be Mayor of Colchester next year. He is rather an old sheep, but will do his best I daresay. I can hardly imagine him presiding on the bench or speaking anywhere. Adria's dancing class has been altered to a Friday, which is very inconvenient for me is that it is my Boxford day; on these two accounts I have declined the Oyster feast, which takes place tomorrow (Friday). Mr Haldane is to be the chief guest.
With love from us all.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street
Victoria Embankment
Nov 2 1906
My dear Harold.
Mater and I thought we required a week in town, where we might refresh ourselves with a few sights and theatres. We have enjoyed some of the latter very much, especially a fine performance of "A Winter's Tale" One day, we had Grace and Mabel Todd and Mrs Syrett to luncheon here and took them to see the "Man from Blankneys" with Charles Hautrey in the chief role, it was very amusing. We returned after
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the matinee to Richmond and dined there to see the old gentleman, who keeps wonderfully well. Yesterday Aunt Isabella and Dolly lunched with us and went to see a musical piece at the Vaudeville. Mrs Syrett is staying in town, at a surgical home, with little John, who has just been successfully operated on for appendicitis. The only drawback to the enjoyment of our visit has been a very rainy atmosphere at intervals, but often the dry season, but after the dry season, we have had this year, the rain is very acceptable.
We are looking forward to your account of the wedding, I wonder if the Hansells will come down for it. I hope if she does, she will bring her snapshots with her and show these to you. I hear that George Hand and is giving up his curacy at King's Lynn wishing for a change of a Vicar, it only points the moral as we all anticipated, that it was foolish for a young Curate, to take a house and furnish it. At any rate, I should say his father must think so. I hear that Frank Fenn is very happy on his ship in the Mediterranean. Bob wrote the other day, to say he was carrying his arm in a sling, as he had injured the muscles about the shoulder by a heavy fall at football, but it was getting all right again.
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Adria is learning a kind of hornpipe dance at her class and does the club exercise, she has not knocked any other child on the head yet.
Mr Todd was to dine at the Wax Chandlers last night, as it was the anniversary of his jubilee as a member of the Court. He has been on the livery, however, for 63 years.
I hope all is well with you and that you continue happy and interested in your work.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
(Letter written on the Hotel note paper).



34. Edward's Letters 28: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 8 Nov 1906, 16 Nov 1906, 22 Nov 1906.
Nayland
November 8, 1906
My dear Harold.
Your last two letters have been full of interest, the routine of your own life, and the account of the wedding afforded us a good deal of interesting reading. Your meeting with Mrs Acland was curious, I think she must have been one of the younger girls, as I think, the eldest became a nurse, and joined a sisterhood. You would know her because she would have a slight blue scar line under her lower lip, the result of a
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fall on to the top bar of the fireplace. You certainly were in luck about your rig out, first that you found some good Samaritan ready to lend and then that all the articles fitted you so well. As we had not been away since last December, when we went to the birthday dinner party, Mater and I have been spending a week in London, and as I think you know we were neither of us very well, and the weather unsettled, so our chief amusement was theatre going, and this we enjoyed very much managing to see seventh plays in six days! Grace Mabel and Mrs Syrett? lunched with us one day and went to a matinee afterwards and Aunt Isabella and Dolly another day. The latter still looks thin and cannot do much
Mrs Cooper Van's new vicaress to be is a sister of Mrs Buckley-Paget whom I think you have met when they were staying at Gt Horksley rectory. The world is not such a very big place, after all, as you have already experienced. I quite agree with you that as soon as you have regained sufficient experience it will be well to make a start on a small scale on your account if you can find a steady hard-working man like Hobbs to join you. I am sure the Elworthy's would do their best to advise you.
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I sincerely hope the new secretary will turn out to be of a pleasant and hospitable disposition, and show a disposition to help him that he may be drawn to you. The temper of his wife is of almost more importance!
Miss Proctor passed away last week, at the age of 86. Miss Mary will now be moving into a small house, Poor "Gilly" has had an asthmatic bronchial attack, which he does not shake off and talks of coming home for a time to try to get rid of his cough.
With love from us all
Yours affectionately,
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland.
November 16, 1906
My dear Harold.
Many members of the family will probably be sending you their Christmas good wishes by this mail, so I too must send you every good wish of the season for your health and happiness. I believe helped by your zeal and steadiness there is every prospect that you will in time carve out of yourself
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a happy and successful career in the young country of your adoption. Communication between us, by letter is after all a very satisfactory means of keeping in touch with one another, for personally, how little we see of each other, who are working in the same country. I see Van or Cyril once, or maybe twice in the year. So I feel that you are not much further removed from us than the rest. I am sure at home in the present day, young men think a great deal too much about sports athletics and having a good time. Whereas in the colony you have to think and apply yourselves a good deal more to work, which brings to you, a much more lasting and satisfactory kind of happiness when the stress of work is over and you can enjoy some leisure. I feel with you a great deal depends on Mr Elworthy's choice of a new secretary as to your personal comfort. I particularly hope he may have a
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nice minded lady for a wife, who will be willing to welcome you to her house as a friend when she gets to know you.
I am sending your wedding letter round to the brothers and shall be always ready to do so as I can quite understand you feel to fatigued at the end of your day to write much. Aunt Ada was much interested in seeing it and your photographs. They have just moved from Harrogate, finally, I have no doubt, and gone into lodging at Brighton for a couple of months (47 Devonshire Place) where they can meditate upon their future plans. Uncle Henry seems to be much better.
A hot Christmas must seem rather unnatural to you brought up as you were on Dicken's descriptions and pictures
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.

Nayland
November 22, 1906
My dear Harold.
My paper looks as if I contemplated along letter, whereas I am writing on this paper, which I do not like because my stock has run out. It seems curious to think of you enjoying? a hot Christmas, with sunshine and roses. It cannot seem quite like Christmas to you, I should think. We now wish you however a happy New Year and I hope it will be a prosperous one to. Edgar went
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back to Oxford, three days ago, and looking much better and with very little cough left. I think his exam begins on Monday week he does not seem at all nervous as to the result. I think he works pretty steadily Bob had his shoulder examined with the Rontegen rays. The injury was found of no import the bruising of the shoulder muscles seemed to be the cause of the partial movement.
The Wentworth house dinner party is fixed for December the 18th. It will be as crowded as ever, I am afraid for the . . . . . . . . be waylaid on the way from school and . . . . to the dinner. Did I tell you, the Rouths are going to lease Wandsworth in the spring and go further into the country a place at Wendover in Bucks. Uncle Hanover has also taken over a house with shooting about 2 miles from Kidderminster. Your letter and card (Timaru) of the 10th has just arrived. It looks a nice clean town. I am sorry you were not able to go in for the service when uncle Churchill.
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preached but duty stands first of course. I was most sad about the new secretarial arrangements, but one never knows what good may perchance come of it like you go up to the Homestead. Do you ever get a chance at the . . . . . well all these pleasures will come again to you by and by I have no doubt.
Mrs Marshal shook her shook her head the other day when I met her about Bertie's prospects - poor she thought.
With much love from all at home.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn



35. Edward's Letters 29: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 29 Nov 1906, 6 Dec 1906, 20 Dec 1906.
Nayland,
November 29, 1906
My dear Harold,
The week seems to come round very quickly, without bringing any news to send on to you and I daresay to one so busily employed as you fortunately, as they flying still quicker. A rumour reached me recently that your cousin, Bertha was engaged to one of the younger Elworthy's and I am wondering if we shall have as confirmed by you, perhaps it is your clothier?.
Edgar, has had no more trouble with his cough since he returned to Oxford, and he
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is I believe sitting for the first part of his final this week. Did you hear that Bob is to be present at the birthday dinner party this year, which has been fixed for Wednesday the 18th. the dinner that he returns from Broadstairs. He is rather young to begin such festivities, and I only hope he will not be too much upset the next day for us to travel home.
Old Miss Stopford was found dead in her bed last week. She was 86, but looked years younger, being always so upright with a fresh complexion. I expect you remember her for she is sat at one in of your pew in the parish church.
I am glad that this change of secretary into foreman and clerk is taking place in the summer as you will have time to look about and see how you can accommodate yourself to the new arrangement. Keep your head up, however, and do not drop into a lower circle. After all, your present life is not likely to continue very long as you will, I hope soon acquire sufficient experience to venture onto a farm of your own with a good partner to assist. I don't know much about Charlie's
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progress at Streatham, but I hope and believe he is getting on as well as we can expect. It takes a long time to build up a practice, and he has hampered himself for some years to come up with periodic payments of purchase money. At present I think the sailor is the best off as he knows exactly what his monthly payments will be, and there can be no happiness if he does not live within his income.
Good bye
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
December 6, 1906
My dear Harold
By the time you receive this Christmas (your first hot Christmas) will be passed and the New Year at hand so I wish you with all my heart a very happy and successful New Year. Life after all is so short that it does not much matter where we live, if only we can find work congenial to our tastes, and with a fair prospect of offering us a profitable career. Edgar
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comes down tomorrow for the Christmas vacation. He was passed in the first half of his finals, taking up the other half in June of next year when he will be qualified for a BA. But then comes the rub, what next?
I heard this morning that uncle Billy has some serious mischief internally, which will necessitate an immediate operation. He has been looking so very well lately that I am inclined to think there has been some exaggeration as to its impact, but we shall know more about it in the day or two. They are of course very much upset and highly anxious about it at Bridge house.
Tell us a little more about the three Elworthy brothers when you write, their characters and temperament, are they all doing well, like your "Boss" is Ella nice to deal with. I hear that Edward Hopkins is hopeful about his business in Toronto, though I cannot explain it - he seems as he seems to be an agent for the importation of English goods into Canada, it sounds rather a big order, but I dare say, means very little.
Louie Howard was married in the same church at Calcutta, that she was baptised in, her husband, Mr Ede is a tea planter in Assam I believe. Miss Louise Round told me yesterday, when I met her in the street that Mr Brown missed me very much and that she hoped I was going back again
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and did I know they had the nuns there now? so you see, she is very much as you left her.
I think uncle Harold and wife and Olive are going to Monte Carlo or some neighbouring resort for the Christmastide. I suppose he will retire altogether from the Army in February next and settled down as a country gentleman, near Kidderminster for shooting and motor car-ing.
With our united love.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
December 20, 1906
My dear Harry (Harold).
Long ere you will receive these few lines Christmas will have come and gone. We shall all think of you on Tuesday and drink your good health. Wishing you every prosperity in your adopted home, like everything it will require patience and perseverance, and I hope you will not be disheartened by present disagreeables. I presumely (sic) you're not
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saying anything to the contrary, that you are the only gentleman pupil on the run.
Mater, and I returned from our annual Richmond visit last evening. Mr Todd was very happy and well, looking more like a man of 70 and one of 88. The Hooper's and Dolton's were guests as usual. A wet to fog or Scotch mist reigned supreme most of the time we were there, so we could not get about very much.
Uncle Billy has had some sharp attack of obstruction inside but he was better when I saw him, though he was looking thin, and I think there is reason to fear a repetition of his troubles. Charlie had supper on Sunday evening at Wentworth house he was looking well, but confessed it was slow disappointing work building up a practice, but I told him we all have had the same experience. Van and Cyril hope to stay a few days with us early in the New Year. Miss Johnson, left us this morning for the Christmas
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holidays. So Adria now has leisure to follow Beau about like a shadow Aunt Margaret has happy letters from Frank on the Mediterranean station, he seems to have taken quite kindly to the sea, I am thankful to say. Bob has brought back his class prize for classics, I am pleased to say, he has also done better in mathematics than he has done in previous terms.
God bless you my dear boy in the coming year.
Believe me always.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



36. Edward's Letters 30: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 3 Jan 1907, 17 Jan 1907, 24 Jan 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
January 3, 1907
My dear Harold,
We were very pleased and surprised to receive your Christmas greeting on Christmas morning. It was very remarkable that it could be so well hit off from the other side of the world. Your photograph was an excellent one, you look fatter in the face than when you left England, and certainly you seem to have enjoyed good health in New Zealand, barring, the
Page 2
one attack of asthma on your arrival in Timaru, or rather I should say Pareora. Cyril has got three weeks leave after rejoining. We shall in all probability not see much of him for two years as after their cruise on the Spanish coast in February or March, then the payoff, and at once recommission probably for East India or China Station.
He and Charlie are going this evening to the winter dance at the Masonic Hall. I am surprised at Charlie's taking the trouble to come from Streatham for the one night, I hope there is no attraction in that quarter. We expect Van this evening for a week's visit, before taking up his new work in Cuckfield. Our friends all tell us that it is a charming spot, and the church, one of the finest in Sussex, I wish the rector was not so old but I hope Van will be able to stay on there some years. Cyril brought a little fox terrier back with him. Jenie has given him a very friendly welcome and they tear about together. We had a very heavy fall of snow on Boxing Day, and this morning. the floods are rising rapidly our further meadow is covered to a large extent with water and Beau
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is giving his boat a sail on the wide expanse.
The two children with Edgar's assistance, composed and acted a play on Christmas night entitled, "The last of the Highwaymen" It was carried through with great spirit. Uncle Billy has been very unwell with some internal stoppage, but I hear he has weathered the storm this time, but I fear of further trouble by and by
With much love from us all,
Your affectionate father,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court,
Nayland
January 17, 1907
My Dear Harold,
It was a relief to hear that you were to have all your meals in the cottage, instead of the cook-shop, as it sounds quite a decent and comfortable arrangement for you.
I daresay you are not sorry that the very busy shearing time is over, for it must have been a prolonged strain for the workers and an anxious time for the scorer. I am glad you saw George Julius, when he was
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over. I don't suppose you have seen him since he was in shirt and knickers. The day after I had your letter about him and his voting machine, I saw the enclosed account of a similar invention of a voting machine by a Signor Boggiano, was it one of those curious coincidences re matters of invention or did Boggiano hear of Georges invention to patent such a machine: I expect it was just a coincidence, but nevertheless very annoying for George and his company, because Boggiano may have anticipated their patents rights in Europe.
We went to some family theatricals at Little Horksley School, two days since, a W. Brodie, who acted there two years ago was splendid as the cabman as found in a . . . . . . W. Wilkinson is getting up some at Stoke from Shrove Tuesday. Last night, our servants had their party. They numbered about 20 and our young people acted a character to amuse them . . . . . . . the first scene was an excerpt from Box and Cox, Box (Edgar)
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Cox (Bob), Miss Vinder Vox (Adria) was a character added that for Adria's sake, Miss Osmham (maid), Mrs Bouncer (girl) The next scene, had a burglar entering the servant, Miss Denham's room and stealing plated etc, two old ladies were represented by Cyril and Edgar and the last scene was a quack doctor, his patients - they all did well, but Cyril was the life of the whole affair. The servants and their friends were immensely amused, our Christmas gaieties are over now, and schoolwork begins again on Tuesday.
This painful scrawl is owing to my intense desire to go to sleep. I have fallen off several times whilst trying to write what I have done.
Yours affectionately,
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
January 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
Bob returned to his school two days ago, and Cyril leaves us today, spending two nights with Charlie before rejoining the Dido, and this exodus makes us feel that the Christmas holidays are over and that we are now fall back once more into our quiet routine country life. I think you heard of our children's party magic lantern and visit of Mother Goose with presents. Since then our servants had there's, they mustered 20 all told. Our young people with Miss Denholm's help acted a charade in three scenes. The first was
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taken from Box and Cox, the second was a burglar piece, Cyril and Edgar were two old ladies, Adria, the next-door neighbour got up wonderfully in coat and artificial nose, and Bob the burglar: Cyril was particularly good at a timid old lady: the third scene was a quack doctor, (Cyril) and his patients, whom he professed to cure of their rheumatic afflictions by means of mesmerism, but he mixed them up and got them all wrong and there was a general rumpus. The word was rheu-matic (room-attic) true to the ear, but quite modern phonetic spelling. I thought they all acted with great spirit. I was Captain Drawer. We went recently to Little Horksley for a matinee theatricals set up by the Alten-Barry's is in aid of their coal club, their friends in the neighbourhood rallied round well and they sold 70 half crown tickets, they also gave two cheap evening performances.
Last night, we had a Shakespeare reading at Mrs Dudgeon's the play being Taming the Shrew. Mr Gray, taking Petruchio and Mrs Dudgeon, Catherine. We are enjoying (?) just now, a second cold snap with a piercing north-east wind. It is this latter, which makes the cold so penetrating, wrap up as you
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may, but I do not suppose it will last long. I have not sent you any paper, because Van told me that he had arranged for your having the Daily Mail, I believe for a year, if you wish for anything else, I shall be pleased however to arrange for its transmission.
I wish you would tell me about what you would like me to give you for your birthday, you have so little room, I imagine, that a hint would be very acceptable.
Uncle Billy is I believe better, but I have not heard very much of him since Christmas. Uncle Henry and aunt Ada remain at Brighton, until spring at any rate, I expect.
I hope you're keeping well and that you continue to be interested in your work, getting, I hope, a grasp of the ins and outs of sheep farming.
Love from all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



37. Edward's Letters 31: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 4 Mar 1907, 14 Mar 1907, 4 Apr 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
March 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
I am too late for your birthday I am sorry to think but the intention is the same viz to wish you very many happy returns of the anniversary and may you in the course of time build up a happy and prosperous family in your new country. Miss Torlesse writing to me the other day and asked me to tell you how pleased she was to hear such good accounts of you and that you were well. I'm getting on, by degrees, I am thankful to say, feel very well in myself and can walk about fairly well. My speech however is still spluttering and difficult
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and eating and drinking are not easy, but I must have patience and am very thankful that I am as well as I am. Do you ever get into Christchurch, I suppose it is beyond a bicycle ride. Your letters are a great pleasure to me. Jack Bateman has given up trying to pass the Edinburgh exams and he is doing locum-tenens work which is very good for him he would never have been happy or successful at Richmond so it is much better for him. Guy is married he was in hospital in Toronto and fell in love with his nurse and she foolishly accepted him. If she is a sensible person it may be a very good thing for Guy to have someone to look after him and keep him straight. Charlie has been getting some patients of his own lately, which has greatly pleased him. I am hoping to see Cyril shortly as he is back in Chatham (from Portugal), he sent a wireless message . . . . . to . . . . . Isle of Wight to say he was coming up channel. Van paid his bishop, a visit at Chichester last week he was in to great a hurry to please Van by the brevity of the visit enabled Van to run up to up to . . . . . Place at Brighton between the incoming and out going trains and see Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada. Uncle Henry has not been so well the last month, I am afraid both he and Mr Bateman suffer a good deal.
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We are rejoicing in the first appearance of spring flowers. I am sitting in my dressing room today for the first time it makes a pleasant change from bed room during the day hours.
With our united love and good wishes for your health and happiness.
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
March 14, 1907
My dear Harold.
You're very welcome bundle of letters arrived yesterday. So glad to hear that you are able to share and stand the hard work of the harvest field. All previous personal experience of farming operations will be of service hereafter, when you have your own hands to direct. I am getting on slowly, but to the doctor's satisfaction, as a matter of fact a stroke like mine leaves you very different to what it found you. The articulation of my words is thick and not ready, but my mind is clear and I am not paralysed in arm or leg. So I have much to be thankful for, but to what extent I am going to recover is I think very doubtful. I heard two days ago of the not unexpected death of Mr Bateman. He had a malignant growth near the bowel, which
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obstructed all passage through it; they operated at first they thought successfully, but two days later, his strength collapsed and he passed away in a few hours. Poor Aunt Annie is nearly heartbroken; they were devoted to one another; but it was a merciful release for him from a life of her helpless suffering. When you write again explain the mystery of your postscript we cannot imagine who Louisa is who has an anecdote to tell about her father; stockings.(sic)
Edgar goes to Wentworth House tomorrow for a fortnight, so he will just be in time to see the boat race. It promises to be a good race, though the Cantab's are rather the favourites; one of Dr Burns sons is rowing in their boat. Van hopes to come and see me in a few days after Easter and Cyril was here last week calling on his way to join the Vernon at Portsmouth where he has gone for a course in wireless telegraphy. I am glad to see my son's in turn when they can come for my time may be very short. Whether you and I will meet again in this world God only knows, nor does it much matter so long as you live soberly and uprightly following in the steps of your saintly mother for a life so spent is the only thing that brings a man happiness at the last.
Goodbye, and God bless you dear boy in the daily prayers of your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Nayland
April 4, 1907
My dear Harold.
We received a capital letter and illustrated sheet from you last week. Uncle Churchill must have had the sun full in his face for him to make such faces as he was doing. Bishop Wilson was good but he seems to be ageing in appearance, the effect no doubt of climate and anxiety.
With the exception of an attack of giddiness and convulsive tremors in the left arm ten days ago I have gone on steadily improving but Syrett is very nervous about giving me leave to do anything in the way of exertion, but I hope to get more rope given me by degrees. I go out in a bath-chair now, the Dudgeons have lent me a very nice one that belonged to Lady Dalhousie.
Van has been here for three days. He is much
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more under vicarial discipline than he was at St Miniva. This is a good thing to him I am sure for a beginner St Miniver ways were to easy-going. Edgar and Bob come home tomorrow, and Grace Todd came down with them. This is Edgar's last term, and what to do for him when he gets his B.A. I don't know. Charlie was going to Richmond last evening to take Willy to a dance organised by old Mrs Ball for her nephew and nieces very spirited for an old lady of 80. Mr and Mrs Gray are just off to Westgate for a fortnight, and the Dudgeons are going to Seton South Devon, Billy has been sleepless and nervous lately owing to the excitement of our parish council elections. Has Bertha given Percy leave to go and hunt in Africa? Corbert goes to his new living at Wanstead next week I believe, he and his family have had various presents given by friends and parishioners are library table, a brooch, a purse with 105 pounds seven shillings etc. The Ma . . . . . are having electric light installation laid in at Westwood, with engine and dynamos, water pumping apparatus and exotic bathroom. They have not been able to let our dell(?) as yet.
I hope to sell my horse and carriage before long for now that I cannot drive myself in the dogcart there is no pleasure in keeping my own. I can hire a variety of close carriages when we require them at much less cost than keeping a man 2 horses of our own. I am only anxious for Megg's future, situations in or near Nayland are scarce. I was very glad to hear that your asthma did not hang about you badly for long this time and I hope you have been able to manage the dipping operations
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without any great fatigue or distress of breathing. Cyril got his certificate all right at the end of his short 3 weeks course A most disastrous one for him as he has two watches, his purse with three pounds in it and sundry details in the way of gloves, tobacco etc, stolen out of his cabin whilst on board - at the same time as you lost your watch and glasses.
Goodbye with love from as all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn



38. Edward's Letters 32: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 11 Apr 1907, 18 Apr 1907, 1 May 1907.
Alston Court.
Nayland
Colchester
April 11, 1907
My dear Harry or Harold (old habits die hard)
I hope the dipping has gone on successfully, I suspect it was better for you than the dusty harvesting, and it was a new experience to. I am going on very well until a week ago, when I had a sudden shaking spasmodic attack of the left side, which has weakened me a bit but I am picking up again. Dr Ferrier has kindly promised to come down one day next week and overhaul me.
I trust you have had some good rains before now, New Zealand and Australian droughts are terrible scourges and must bring ruin to thousands when they come round. Grace is staying here for 10 days and Aunt Isabella and Dolly are in
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lodgings at Gowings for a week or so. They are going on then to Cuckfield for a short visit, if Van can get them lodgings. Edgar made a long visit to Wentworth house before he came home, it gave him a nice opportunity of seeing his relations in that neighbourhood. Aunt Annie is trying to dispose of the last six years of her lease of Bridge house. She tells me she has had a nice letter from Guy and his wife in Toronto they must pay a surgery assistant at the hospital there much better than they would in England, or Guy could never support a wife on his pay. Dr Syrett has gone for a weeks holiday into South Devon with the Dudgeons. Cyril has had no tidings of his watch's so it must be regarded as a dead loss doubtless. Ask Uncle Churchill to chose you one when you decide to replace yours. I expect your visits to Christchurch are few and far between. I hope Ella and boy are doing well.
I am sending off a box today containing a pair of pince-nez for you. I have not opened it, but possibly there may be both distance and reading glasses as I was not sure what kind you wanted, and cannot remember when I ordered. If it is not right you must let me know after you have examined them. Charlie tells us he is going to a Shakespearean, fancy dress ball, his character to be Sir Walter Raleigh in green velvet trunk hose, feathers and jewel velvet cap. All very smart evidently.
I see my writing is getting very shaky so think I had better give over as they do not like me to tire myself writing letters etc.
With much love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
April 18, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're going on well now, no asthma and unpleasant sheep washing experiences. I am going on quietly in the right direction I believe, though I am kept in rather a state of uncertainty by having experienced one or two slighter fits of an epileptic form character, my speech, the muscles of the left side of my face and my left arm all being affected. Dr Ferrier, kindly came down last Saturday to see me and gave me a hopeful prognosis, but good as this is I feel it is all very uncertain and that no one can be very sure of his opinion.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are staying at Gowing's lodgings for a week or two. I enjoy my chats with Aunt Isabella.
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I am glad to hear that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge House, the club next door, having taken it and she has taken a house called the Retreat down Friars Lane, where Chancellor used to live, there is a convenient walled garden, where Dolly can keep her chickens, and the girls will not annoy their neighbours with their musical practices.
Cyril has been rather troubled with sciatica in both legs at the same time, which has been rather bad for him. He went to Wentworth House for five days and seen all the better for the change, he will be very glad when they leave Sheerness. My mind is much exercised about Edgar's future. I think house of business . . . . . suit him, if I could hear of any clerkship, I suppose Mr Elworthy does not want a bookkeeper or trustworthy clerk. I should think he could soon be trained but not being able to ride would be a serious drawback. I must try to get him something in the city I suppose, or as a junior master in a preparatory school perhaps.
Dr Syrett has just bought a new and more powerful motor car; he and Mr Wilkinson went to Coventry for it and brought it home, via Rugby, Northampton, Bedford, Cambridge, and Haverhill about 2 miles the side of Haverhill it suddenly stopped dead, no petrol - their tank had not been properly filled before starting fortunately, a bicyclist came up who road back to Haverhill and had some oil sent out, but it was un-pleasant sitting in the on the hedge side in the pitch dark on a cold night he was very glad of the companionship of Mr Wilkinson. Have you had any tidings of your lost watch or field glasses.
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Cyril has heard nothing of his watch and watches, even Edgar has joined the band of losers, I sent him up P.O. 15/- to Wentworth house a fortnight since, he never received it and the order was cashed by someone who must have abstracted it.
Nayland is quite a deserted village just now, the Dudgeons at Seaton in South Devon, and the Gray's at Westgate. Edward Hopkins has dissolved partnership with his man, and is again seeking a post. Rees has gone to Scarborough upon what sounds like a wild goose chase. Those boys pick up with any plausible traveller they may meet and get taken in of course. It is a good thing to believe in yourself but you must be as cautious as the serpent in your dealings with strangers.
With much love from us all.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.
Uncle Harold, Aunt Bertha and Olive have gone down to their new house at Wolverley near Kidderminster.

Alston court.
Nayland
May 1, 1907
My dear Harold,
Your letter and photo of 6000 sheep in the . . . . reached us a few days ago. I was most interested in your account of the sheep dipping procedure. Am thankful to hear that you are keeping well I hope you will have a good time at Christchurch and see (sic) the exhibition will be a nice change for you and one you will deserve after your recent labours.
Edward Hopkins is home again, bothering everybody to get him into a berth. I think Canada was too hard for him. He had not gone through your in engineering mechanics training which, although it was very hard for you at the time has been of great value to you in your present labourers employment. It will all turn up trumps to you by and by.
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Aunt Isabella and Dolly have been at Gowing's Lodgings for the last month and Grace has been staying here so we have had quite a nice gathering during the Easter holidays. Now Miss Johnson has returned and Bob goes back at the end of the week
I continue to gain strength in my left side but my head soon gets confused if I have business matters to attend to like the Stoke and Melford club accounts. I can walk four or five times round the garden without much fatigue, and for greater distances I go in my bath chair.
I am very sorry that you are so cut off from church privileges but at any rate keep yourself well in hand until you are more fortunately situated. It is such a comfort in middle life to look back and feel that you had an upright, cleanly life in your younger years. There is nothing that brings you more satisfaction and peace of mind, than the recollections of that as years advance.
I was very grieved to hear that Percy Elworthy's engagement to Bertha has been broken off. How was it. Had they not seen enough of each other beforehand, so as to have proper opportunities to knowing each other's peculiarities. It is a most unfortunate time for the girls to be coming to England. Uncle Arthur has let his house was three months Aunt Ann . . . . is about to change her house and besides she has no heart for gaiety just now. I am not able to entertain anybody and Uncle Henry is too unwell to be depended upon and has no house as they are living in lodgings at Richmond or Brighton at present. Everybody will be very disappointed as the New Zealand rail and relate relatives are always warmly welcomed and their visits much appreciated.
This letter was unsigned



39. Edward's Letters 33: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 7 May 1907, 23 May 1907.
Nayland
Wednesday,
May 7, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think I may rightly report that the last week has been one of slight improvement in my walking, though I still require a balancing arm on one side with my stick on the other. I suppose Ada and Bertha will be due in about 10 days or a fortnight I wish the families over here were better able to entertain them but as you know, we are all in rather an unusual unsettled state just now in trouble or moving house etc.
Aunt Annie has not been able to let Bridge house, yet, nor hear of a cheaper one that would suit her and her family. Aunt Isabella left the yesterday she has been staying in the village six weeks, I have seen more of her than I have done since her return from India. I have much enjoyed my chats with her reliving
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old memories with her. I heard Eden Everett yesterday about your glasses, and he says that I ordered two pairs a month ago to be sent to you. I am quite puzzled, I hope I shall shortly hear from you that you have received them and then it will be all right. I don't want to send them to you twice. I get very confused often now about matters of business and waiting for an answer from New Zealand is a long business.
A picture of some of you on the "Tongariro" taken from the tender at Tilbury, puzzled me at first, and I thought you were the young man you were the young (sic) leaning on his elbow, whispering into the. . . . . man's ear. I was glad afterwards, to discover you more for on the right-hand of Miss B. The first man had to cunning a smile but was really absurdly like you. I'm . . . . your . . . . . one best.
Aunt Annie, has not got Bridge House of her hands yet which is rather a worry, nor has she found a cheaper one large enough for herself and family. Charlie says that Jack has grown a beard and looks ruffian in consequence. Cyril is off shortly for a tour around about Norway. Bob has had rather a shock being told by Mr Sinclair in Ipswich that he must wear spectacles continuously, except at hockey when it is considered dangerous so Cyril will be the only were the only glassless one amongst you, and it is lucky for him in his profession.
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The Routhes go to their new home at Wendover in Bucks this week, and Uncle Harold is supposed to have got into his new house Wolverly Kidderminster about fortnight ago, though I am afraid it is far from being ready for them. He has . . . . . . . a Humber motorcar, which is very useful in the country.
Has Ella ever said anything to you about Bertha it must be most uncomfortable for her. I gathered from you that he seems such a good sort, how came he not to know his own mind better. I am very sorry about it. Is Bertha very different to her sweet . . . . . . . sisters, if not Percy has lost a good thing and wife.
Goodbye and God bless you, dear boy.
Your affectionate father's.
Edward L. Fenn

Nayland
May 23, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was very pleased to get your letter written from Christchurch, I think at the end of your holiday, it was fortunate you had George for a companion and Uncle Churchill was up in the mountains. The exhibition must have been very enjoyable.
Although you have the . . . . . . . winter weather before you it is not your first taste of it so you know what to expect and can provide clothing according to your needs. I hope "Bob" will turn out well, it is good idea to make her train some young ones for you and it will pay you well I should think even if hereafter it you did not keep them all. Charlie has gone in a parrot, supposed to be a talker. I suppose we ought to get some news of the travellers soon.
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I have not much to tell you about myself, improving I think I may say, but soon tired especially with business accounts. I am getting free however of all my trust matters as quickly as I can I cannot trust myself with the accounts now and the correspondence worries me. I shall hope to go about and see my friends more when the dentist has fitted me with a new plate as I am at present plateless which makes me talk worse than I need otherwise do.
I spend an hour in the garden in the afternoon, if it be warm enough. My dressing is slow in the morning, Mr Gowing comes to wash and dress me every morning as I require a good deal of assistance in these operations.
I am sending you a copy of the architectural review with an illustrated account of Alston Court. They may might have made a better selection of plates, especially I should have liked to have seen the library or drawing room instead of southeast corner of the courtyard as we already have one of east side and one of the north-east corner of west. But what is most tiresome is that they evidently did not know what a treasure they had of this old house, for they only printed the usual few, they sell
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to the trade and the issue was sold out on the third day. I have had great difficulty in acquiring copies, even now (sic) have not got nearly enough for my wants - I wanted to give away a good number to my friends and relations and say there stupidity is very vexatious.
We are in the midst of spring cleaning, and I have had a line from Cyril to say he has been put on half pay for a time for the economy and it is most trying to him, and poor economy when he was so busy with his wireless telegraphy. Everything is going to the dogs under our present government. Rumours are again flying about that Gray is going to retire, Mrs G. worries him and he is much more desirous of going on with his work as long as he can. I am anxious because I enjoy his sermon and general teaching and we might very easily get someone like Walls of Boxted or Rawlinson of Wiston, etc. Like you I enjoy a good service and sermon at the church I am glad you heard uncle C ("him"deleted) preach on Easter day,
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I think there is a better prospect of business it seems in New Zealand than in England. I don't think the old country made a good impression upon the Colonials and old Botha managed to go of with his pockets for the money a loan of 5 million I believe guaranteed by we poor folk at home. Mr Taylor, Mater's uncle Frank was buried yesterday at Blackheath. He was Mrs Todd's only brother.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn.



40. Edward's Letters 34: To His Son Harry in NZ, Dated 28 May 1907, 6 June 1907, 20 June 1907.
Alston Court.
Nayland
May 28th 1907
My dear Harold,
You're number of the architectural review, ought to go off tomorrow. I believe by parcel post. It has been very annoying, only being able to get such a few copies. I call it a pretty . . . . . concern, not accustomed to deal with such an interesting gem as Alston court and so they only published their usual numbers for the trade. We are expecting to hear from Ada or Bertha tomorrow as to their engagements, and when they would like to come to us with so many of their relatives unable to receive them just now I am afraid it will not be easy
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for them to make out a nice list of hostess to last them on until January. Aunt Ada, who saw them last week told me that they were two very nice girls, and that Bertha did not wear the air of a bitter young lady. I hope you are keeping well and fit for plenty of hard work in the coming winter. We were rather astonished a day or two ago, to hear from Cyril that he had been discharged on half pay a stupid administrative muddle for he was busy with large classes he was instructing in signaling and wireless telegraphy . . . . . on the fourth day . . . . . the Admirals head got clearer (?) and he was appointed to the Warrior Channel Fleet, and much bigger ship than the Widow. Mrs Dudgeon has immediately pounced on him for summer theatricals and . . . . . his part very willingly - but now Cyril will . . . . . service and they must get on as well as they can. Charlie is coming down to help to their great delight unless he cant find a substitute . . . . . try his hand.
Jessie had a litter of six puppies yesterday, great excitement on Adria's part, but I do not suppose many will survive long. I want to put down my stable as now that I cannot drive the dogcart myself I see no pleasure in keeping my own horse, merely to be driven occasionally with brougham and . . . . . hired out . . . . . serve just as well at much less cost.
Keep a supply of postcards by you so that when you dont feel inclined to write you may send me a few lines on a card. I like to hear from you pretty often, I am going on a very, well, I think but soon get tired especially by figures or calculations. I hope to field more like myself when . . . . . has fitted me up comfortably with what T M Clark . . . . . euphemistically to call "dentures" I am very glad to hear
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that Aunt Annie has got rid of Bridge house, to a . . . . . . . . . . I think to open Terrace Gardens there, and she is hoping to secure a good house in the Avenue . . . . . . . . . . near the railway bridge and close to the landing place of two Ferry boats. I think by crossing the river she gets a larger and better hose for her money than she could do in Richmond and they want a fair sized garden for Winnies chickens and plenty of bedrooms, probably Mrs H. . . . . the patient will stay with them if they have a house with a sufficient number of rooms.
Wishing you every happiness and success in your career (in which you must steadily persevere
Believe me
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
June 6, 1907
My dear Harold.
I hope you're not finding any bad affect left behind by your hunting cropper, wire mixed with fencing is not fair and very dangerous for the riders.
Bessie Julius saw the girls the other day and they astonished her by telling her they were going to commence a three months training course of nursing at St Bartholomew's on Aug 1 and they hope to come to her when this was over. So I am afraid the dull month of November will have began by the time they can reach us. I know Ada has been thinking of going through such a course for a long time past, and I suppose Bertha's broken heart has driven her with the same service. I don't much like the work for young girls, but it is the fashion nowadays.
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Aunt Annie Hand came to us yesterday for a few days, she arrived quite exhausted after spending six hours in the train. She had been paying a visit to Lyme churchyard. Would you care to have the Essex Standard sent on to you sometimes when I should remember it. I don't think foreign newspapers publish(?) too much.
The young folk here are working hard at their parts and holding frequent rehearsals, here or at the Dudgeons, 3 plays "A Voyage Benoit", "Poor Pillicuddy" and "Miss Flipper's Holiday". Actors; Mr Wilkinson, Mr Williams, Dr Syrett, Charlie, Miss Gray, Miss Denholm, Miss Gresham, Miss Williams, Miss Johnson.
The Bishop of Colchester commemoration of his golden wedding day he had a golden challis and paten presented to him by the clergy of the diocese and a golden goblet and cover by the city of Chelmsford, and parishioners of St Mary's.
I am thankful to say I still progress slowly on the way to recovery, but my mouth both for speaking and eating hangs fire. I have not found your Mr Agne very successful in fitting me out with a new plate. In reply to a little wedding present we see sent Phoebe Storr, she mentioned a George Adams and says they are all so fond of him than they are lost to imagine how they managed to get along without him before. They have changed his name to Brownie now.
Cyril likes his new appointment to the "Warrior" very well I think, he has Chatham again for headquarters. He will miss his uncle Harold, now, however, they are not yet settled in their new house, nor has he got a chauffeur yet who can drive at all safely.
I am afraid I must shorten my letter this week, for I have an inflamed eye and letter writing tires me more than it used to do.
With love from us both
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court.
Nayland
Suffolk
June 20, 1907
My dear Harold.
Your letter of May 9, reached me this morning, and it gave me great pleasure to receive it and know that you are keeping well. I am very thankful to say that I have been going on well with only just two convulsive seizures of which to head, chiefly in my left arm and side of my face. Dr Ferrier kindly came down and examined me with the opthalmascope(?) report very encouraging. I am of course still very shaky and have more difficulty in letter writing. Sometimes, I am afraid making sad nonsense of my sentences.
Mr DeVere's(?) photos came out beautiful prints and a copy was
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posted out to you, some little time back, May 29 I think. So it should reach you, I hope in due time, and you can show the modern New Zealanders what the old country can do in domestic architectural works. I cannot send in the original photos away as I only have one copy, and they very fragile.
I am quite sure that you have done your best during your first year, . . . . . Everything was so new to you and the manual work so unusually hard work for you . . . . . should be of great assistance to you, and prepared you for the hard physical work you have had to do.
I often thank God for your steadiness and determination to stick to your work, and do your best to qualify yourself of the work that lies before you and I trust you may in time build up a happy home for yourself. That your character is being formed upon good principles. assure me that you will do well . . . . . I am sure Arthur Elworthy is a good man to work with.
Let me know when you get it that the bank . . . . . . difficulty about crediting you with the 20 pounds I sent you a cheque for. I was not certain, they might not require me to send it through the Bank of New Zealand in London.
Aunt Annie has sold the lease of the Bridge House at Richmond(?) - a lucky stroke as it . . . . . . . . . to sell - a public house at the back and bridge and steep slope in front most it most difficult to find and purchase. A man from Hammersmith has brought it I believe and will convert it with tea gardens.
Aunt A has taken a house in St Margaret's Avenue, close to the ferry landing place. so she can get over to Ariah(?) Lane immediately and so to Richmond. We are so surprised to hear that the girls are going into St Bartholomew's nursing training home. I wish they had left it for two or three more years before plunging into this unpleasant work, and it is a great strain upon the strengths of young girls.
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I see my sentences are becoming confused so will leave this to Mater to finish the page.
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.
My dear Harry
It is quite time for your dear father, to have his afternoon nap, and I am winding up for him. I have just read him off to sleep first your letters always give him so much pleasure. The weather has been rather against him so very changeable, but I think if it once get settled and he is able to be out more he will get stronger.
Charlie is coming next Monday (June 24) he is taking part in the Nayland Dramatic Entertainment July 27 Miss Johnson is also acting the proceeds are to go to the Cricket Club
Much love from us all.
You're very affectionate.
Mater.



41. Edward's Letters 35: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 4 July 1907, 24 July 1907, 8 Aug 1907.
Nayland
July 4, 1907
Mater wrote to you yesterday I believe and I am only sending a few lines in my own writing as a postscript so to speak. I cannot say much about progress, as I do not think it is within measure or continuous, but I am thankful . . . . . I am not any worse, nor have I had any reoccurrence of the convulsive attacks. Adria with Miss Johnson and the little Syretts are staying at Felixstowe but the weather so far has been cold and wet.
I was very pleased to hear that Edgar has passed his final exam for the Oxford B.A.
It is a great pleasure to me to have such good account of you that your health is good and that you stick steadily to your work.
God grant, we may one day be spared to meet again . . . .
Ever your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn
Postcard

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
July 24, 1907
My dear Harold.
The weather has at last changed at little and we are enjoying the commencement of a little summer warmth, nearly all July was cold and wet, and we were rarely without a fire in the evening. I continue to gain strength, but I am worried with a good deal of pain in my right leg, however, I live in hope of improvement. We have enjoyed visits from Mr Todd and Mabel, Charlie, Van and Edgar during the past month. Bob returns home on the 30th.
I hope I hope your work is going on well and that you feel you are a getting hold of the details of New Zealand farming. I believe Ada and Bertha enter upon the hospital nursing course next week, but we have not heard anything of them yet from themselves directly, so can tell you nothing about them of interest.
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I am asking Van to go on for me as I am soon tired of writing. Perhaps this tires me more than anything else, but don't shorten your letters in proportion as I always enjoy hearing of view and from you.
In Van's writing.
Many thanks for your last letter which reached me a week or so ago, I am at home just now for part of my summer holiday. I had to divide it up, this year and opted a week first of all at St Minver with the Bucknalls at the beginning of the month and Tuesday last I came down to Nayland to spend a fortnight or so at home. Edgar has gone off to Richmond and Charlie (also on holiday) is we don't know where: but I'm hoping to see him down here this week. Robert comes on Tuesday from school. We are looking forward to the Sunday School treat which has been fixed for this afternoon. Miss Johnson, Adrian and I hope to attend. It takes place at the vicarage this year.
I am afraid I shall not see Ada and Bertha during their stay in England. They are not coming to Nayland until later in the year and I do not suppose they will be near Cuckfield.
Uncle Henry and Aunt Ada will be coming back to Brighton in the autumn, I always in my visits to Devonshire Place, which take place periodically when they are there. Did I tell you how on one occasion Aunt Ada and I saw Professor Cyril diving off the pier on a bicycle.
I have just purchased a new tire for the back wheel of your old machine. This is the first big sum I have spent on it. It still travels well, although it looks a bit rusty in parts from being out in all weathers, and not getting cleaned as often and as it should. I hope it will not be long
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before you are able to get a bicycle yourself. We have not had news of Cyril has some time, but he is I fancy cruising about in the Channel with the home Fleet on HMS Warrior.
We saw the Prince of Wales, dashing through Head Street yesterday in a motorcar. It reminded me of the day when you and Cyril and I saw the present king on his way to the station when you were returning to school.
The Colchester sports, I see are fixed for next month but too late for me to go to them, I have not had a bathe and the old baths for a long time. A letter has just arrived from Cyril. He is at Chatham, and he sends us a photo of himself and fellow officers taken on board. Now I must leave room for father to wind up.
In ELF's writing
Van having kindly filled up my lacking brain for me.
I now remain.
Your affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
August 8, 1907
My dear Harold.
I was glad to receive your letter yesterday, dated June 24 in which you mentioned that you came to have sole charge of the electric shearing machine. It is also nice to hear it you are going to turn your old business to account, and it ought to pay you well after a time besides giving you a better position on the station. Your "Boss" seems to be a fine rider, generally coming in first in the steeplechase. I will let you know when the girls have decided when they will come to Nayland.
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November ish I expect be the month a dull month for a country visit, but it seems to suit their other engagements. But we are not likely to hear whether Charlie or Van or Cyril are home just then, but the latter is always uncertain now so we much hope for some help for him(?) Charlie and Mr Fuller came down in the motorcar a fortnight ago and that very evening, just after their arrival I had an attack the first one since February. It was a short affair and left no paralysis afterwards, but I was unconcious and slightly convulsed, while it lasted. I hope I shall not feel any worse for it in a little while but a relapse was very disappointing having had no return since February.
Aunt Annie and Margery are staying at Mr Gowings for a week and afterwards Margery goes to Holland with Lottie Alston on a sketching expedition
With with every good wish for your health and happiness.
Believe me, ever
Yr affectionate father.
Edward L Fenn.



42. Edward's Letters 36: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 9 Aug 1907, 15 Aug 1907, 3 Sep 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
August 9, 1907
My dear Harry.
I think Van helped me with my last letter but I hope to manage better today and write to you myself. I have felt better and more like myself, for the last week or so now I am still weak in limb and forgetful in mind.
Aunt Annie Hand has been staying in Nayland for three weeks partly in lodgings and partly here. And next week, Aunt Lucy and Margaret and Kitty Hopkins come for a fortnight so I am not deserted by
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my relations. We are trying for a post as a junior master in a preparatory school for Edgar. It could be bad for him to be hanging about here doing nothing, so the sooner he gets something to do the better. For a month or until we hear of something he is going to stay with Van at Cuckfield
I hope your coaching about your shearing machine has gone off satisfactorily and that you feel quite competent now to direct your workers under you, you are no doubt right not to undertake too much mechanics work as you want to become an adept at farming generally in all its branches. I hope someday you will meet with some one with whom you can join forces, but go slowly and require more years and experience before investing money in the matter.
I am very much hoping to be able to take my seat upon the bench at its next sitting at the end of September, but I cannot help feeling rather nervous at appearing at any public function. We have found five wasps nests in the garden and field and hope we have now destroyed them all. Mr Taylor stayed two nights with us and gave Bob the character of being a good steady worker, but neither quick nor clever So he follows in his elder brother's footsteps, but it is a very good character for a boy to be good and tidy at his work. I am afraid, his mother would not like him to emigrate, but personally I think the openings in the new world are better than in the old. But you miss the amenities
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of life, music etc, and the church privileges of the old country.
Thank you for writing so regularly, your letters, give me great pleasure.
With love from us all
Believe me
Your affectionate father.
Edward L. Fenn

Postcard
Nayland
August 15, 1907?
My dear H.
A card is better than nothing, as a greeting to you. I am going on fairly well but very soon get tired. Aunt Annie comes to us tomorrow. George Sumner and Maggie go on their various ways then. I think you are right as to your future to aim at a thorough all round knowledge of farming with an eye to your future and not stick to one depart (sic) to exclusively. Your reports of your work, are a great comfort to me and I have great confidence in your future progress.
E. L. F.

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 3, 1907
My dear Harold
I sincerely trust you are quite well now for your account of yourself tormented with asthma and boils made me very sorry for you in immersed in your work and no one to look after you. I do not know of anything that does much good for either complaint unless it be sometimes a change of residence -- going up to higher ground for instance, but you cannot . . . . . beforehand it is a
Page 2
matter of experiment. A tablespoonful of yeast taken three times a day in a little beer or water (I don't know if it is nasty or not) is said to be of considerable use in checking their repetition.
I have been going on more satisfactorily for the last month past, gaining strength and no return of the fits. I walk up the village sometimes though to no great extent. Edgar is trying for an appointment as a junior master in a preparatory school - I think he will do if only he can show enough force of character to control the boys. Taylor does not think that Bob has much chance of winning an entrance scholarship in a public school and so we must let him plod on in the usual course. Taylor says he is a very steady worker and a favourite amongst his schoolfellows and developing into a good cricketer.
Although your letters are very welcome don't bother to write when you are seedy but try and send a postcard if you can just to tell me how your. Our prayers go with you in your life and work
Believe me ever
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
September 4
Your letter of July 23 just received - glad to hear you are rather better and that you have seen a doctor about the boils - sharpened little wooden matches dipped in carbolic and glycerine equal parts and then rolled in fingers and thumb and tell until the vesicle onto top of
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the boil is perforated is the base is the best thing I know of to destroy the germ and stop the repetition.
We shall anxiously look out for your next card.



43. Edward's Letters 37: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 12 Sept 1907, 26 Sept 1907, 23 Oct 1907.
Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 12, 1907
My dear Harold
I was much relieved to have a better account from you about asthma and boils. I too am going on fairly well and the weather being finer and warmer has been much in my favour. I hope New Zealand has enjoyed some nice rains - we have been full of garden parties here but all out holiday pursuits are coming to an end and we are thinking more of school, and serious occupations. Edgar has not heard of any opening yet but he must be patient cheerful. I hope you're Uncle
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Churchill's . . . . . up the West Coast has been satisfactory and that he suffered no mishaps by land or flood. Aunt Margaret returned to Eastbourne on Tuesday . . . . . and I think Aunt Lucy and Kitty return early next week. Aunt Isabella and Willie are staying at the Isle of White: Tolland Bay(?). I shall be glad to have a card from you and I hope be cheered about you.
Are the prospects hopeful for the year . . . . I suppose in your specialty of sheep farming you cannot tell much until the lambing season is on. I must ask Mater to finish this finally. I am so helpless in better writing by . . . . When you have share received it let me know the amount of your doctors bill as I should like to settle it for you
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn
In Mater's is writing
My dear Harry
At last I am sending you Adria's photo you must not think she really looks like that though she has grown very much, very nearly as tall as me - but her face has not that heavy expression. Your dear father has been decidedly better during the last month and he says himself that he feels better which is lovely to hear.
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Beau's holidays are coming to an end and he returns to Broadstairs, 22nd inst - they have all had very happy holidays with of course heaps of cricket -if they are enjoying Kitty Hopkins company she seems a nice girl. We are sorry about the asthma I do hope it has quite gone by now.
Much love from us all
Your very affectionate
Mater

Alston court
Nayland
Suffolk
September 26, 1907
My dear Harold
I wish I was on telephone to Pareora and could therefore hear before I write how you are. I trust that asthma and boils are things of the past. I have not been very grand just the last week a tendency to spit blood obliging me to be careful about my exertion. But I do not believe it means much more than nose bleeding in the wrong place.
Edgar is my chief anxiety just now, it seems so difficult to get him into any work. Employers are afraid of his arm leading to great a hindrance to his usefulness. Have you heard from Charlie that he called upon that little nurses as he calls them and he thinks
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that they have had about enough of it already and will not be sorry when December 1 arrives. They paid him a return visit one Sunday afternoon and had tea at Streatham Place. I saw very good photos enlarged at gallons a day at Gowan's the other day showing the octagonal font in Stoke and a view beyond between two of the pillars beyond showing the stained-glass panel to the memory of Mr Torlesse. I bought it and gave it to Miss Fanny Torlesse to remind her of her father and of your baptism. She was very pleased to have it.
Are field glasses useful to you, as Christmas is coming on and I should like to give you something really useful, your last pair was taken and that made me think you might like to have them replaced but I shall be glad of any suggestion from you if there is anything you would prefer.
I hope the electrical shearing change will add a nice little bit to your wages you have been so careful with your money that you ought to be able to plant a nice little nest egg for the future
I do not think I can write any more today I am in the bed and writing fatigues me
Believe me all ways
Your affectionate father
Edward L Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
Suffolk
October 23, 1907
My dear Harold
I am delighted to know by your last letter that the boils are apparently on the wain in severity(?), are you and your chum occupying the Elworthy's dining room now, is the young men in the office. I congratulate you on the possession of such a fine dog as "Black Darkie" Aunt Isabella and Dolly are here just now and Gerald has just gone the New Zealanders are still coming the first week in November I believe (Charlie suggested) but they keep changing their plans so that we are still uncertain as to when we shall really see them but these repeated delays mean
Page 2
that they have driven their visit off to the worst months in the year . . . . . when we shall probably have neither weather nor visitors . . . . . and none of the sons at home except Edgar who having failed to obtain the post he was trying for will be our only helper in guiding the visitors about. Edgar has also tried for a stool in a bank but one of his duties was to reach over and arrange the big ledgers at the opening and closing of the bank and his left-hand was too crippled to manage this office work with such . . . . heavy lifting . . . . . or a tutorship. I lost my Oyster Feast this year and I must remember to send you a Standard to shake up your remembrance of Colchester Worthies.
For myself I remain the status quo pretty well, weakened chiefly in my walking. I seldom go beyond the garden . . . . . in a bath-chair as my left . . . . . 3 weeks and uncertain in walking
Whenever I see our little flocks of 200 or 300 sheep strolling down the road I think of your thousands on the open prairie is and think what a very different job it must be but you are only going back to the earliest times on earth shepherds everywhere. Have you been so lucky as to hear any music of late I am so glad whenever you get the opportunity to hear some music or a play etc for sheep farming must be very monotonous but may turn up very lucrative, in the end you may yet get the opportunity opportunity (sic) of enjoying all these things
With love from us all
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn



44. Edward's Last Letters 37: To His Son Harry In NZ, Dated 30 Oct 1907, 13 Nov 1907, 21 Nov 1907.
Nayland
Wednesday October 30, 1907
My dear Harry
I will begin my letter a day before the proper day in case I am not up to writing tomorrow. I am so sorry to hear that you are still enduring the boils I really did hope they were more decidedly on the wane. Resin(?) ointment smeared on linen and a piece of rag outside ought to help you pressure is nearly always helpful on top of these horrors. I am glad you have acquired another good dog they are such a necessity in your life.
Aunt Isabella and Dolly are spending a fortnight with us. Nayland is all in excitement today as a menagerie pays us a visit tomorrow procession followed by an exhibition tent in a big tent. I heard that Henry is shortly leaving the White Hart to start a wine merchants in Colchester. The weather has been very unsettled
Page 2
on the whole, September was very fine Oct
. . . . so but is going out wet(?)
I expect your paddocks are frightfully muddy however these will dry and come off. I am sending you another watch for your Christmas present for I have quite forgotten if I sent you one or not after you lost yours in the spring. Our deaf parlourmaid makes all manner of awkward mistakes but we best wait a little longer to see if she can improve because she has several good points.
Poor Edgar cannot . . . . . . of a tutorship yet which seemed just the thing when the man thought he had better choose one with more experience - quite unnecessary with such young pupils 101/2 to 13 he kept his name on Gilberts(?) list but he has had no luck yet, his arm poor fellow cripples him in all directions. No news of Ada and Bertha coming yet they are going sometime between . . . . . and Xmas to Aunt Ada who has now come back to Brighton with Uncle Henry. I hear that Charlie is taking up your daily(?) paper from Van for the next 12 months do you crave any books from time to time or are you to sleepy for evening reading boils and asthma . . . . . may perhaps rather . . . . . to a novel.
I have been going on fairly well lately but am very staggering at times especially if I start off at all quickly before I have got my balance correctly
Our united love and best wishes for the coming Xmas, fill up your next letter with an account of your life's daily routine are you still being looked after in Mr Elworthy's house or are you altogether in your own quarters and what are these quarters I don't know it at all just now where you sleep and live
Oct 31.
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Do you pay for your sheepdog yourself or does the Boss look upon a dog as a part of a necessary outfit for looking after his sheep. I suppose you must get them to know to obey you and you only.
I seem to have ended my letter twice so accept our united love again
Your affectionate father
Edward L. Fenn

Alston Court
Nayland
November 13, 1907 12:15 p.m.
My dear Harold.
I was very glad to hear from you this morning and that you were able to give a good account of yourself. You are reaping the benefit now of facing weathers and duties, wherever, they may call you. I know, I quite realise you live a very hard life, but it is a wholesome, manly, and it is so difficult to . . . . . alone in England. I believe there will get to you, this will get to you . . . . . about Christmas . . . . . any of our letters so you must accept our . . . . . good Xmas wishes for the year, I am sending you a key less watch for a present in place of the one you lost,
Page 2
as I forget whether you ever placed replaced your lost one. I hope to send a card photo also. Mr Gowers first was a failure, and the NZ girls are here for a week and if I could have entertained them I would have persuaded them to stay longer - but this all falls on Edgar's shoulders. They go on next to Aunt Ada's at Brighton, I am sorry so many of their relations are hors-de-combat just now when we are all anxious to entertain them. They are both very pleasant, good looking delightful girls Ada has her mothers voice and very delicate pretty features Bertha is rater like . . . . . They showed me the large Julius group taken I believe shortly before they left New Zealand it was very interesting as it included all the married daughters and their children and then their mother and the Bishop and the sons-in-law so it was a very comprehensive picture. Bertha has plenty of spirit in her and energy, the girls and Edgar were all nearly shot out of the dogcart yesterday they had kept Molly (the horse) waiting and she was restless having only been clipped a day or two before and felt cold so she began to jump herself up and down to warm herself, poor Edgar . . . . . no firm hold Bertha slid down onto the mat in front on her knees but was not discomposed in the least - they both behaved like born horsewomen. I suppose they have a good deal of practice in NZ and showed no nervousness. I feel I know your life etc much better since I have talked with A & B it all seems more lifelike, they give you great credit for your perseverance
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and say you are sure to succeed as you have learnt your year work from the beginning
We all wish you every good Xmas wish with happiness and success in your life progess. I am glad you heard Faust the music is such a treat and must be so refreshing amidst your work. Edgar has had no luck yet in his search for a tutorship for a small boy but he must have patience applicants all seem to be afraid of his arm. I think tho except for games it makes no difference its his ability to do all that is wanted . . . . . .
Though still very weak in my leg I am fairly well in myself only I walk very little now and trust more to my bathchair
With much love from us all
Yr affectionate father
Edward L Fenn
My writing is very shaky

Nayland
November 21, 1907
My dear Harold
Xmas has passed but I can still wish you all good wishes for the year ahead for the new year - I hope this superintending of the shearing house and machinery will not only give you some responsible work undercover but a decided increase of pounds shillings and pence for you want to save and keep keeping with an eye to your future. We enjoyed the . . . . . .visit the girls were able to spare us they were so much in request that we had to be contented with rather a short visit, they are very nice girls and I like them both very much Edgar was in love with both of them and rarely took his eyes from them whilst they were here they took
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part in . . . . . the Choir Society practice . . . . . . whether or no on the strength of this Edgar joined the club this year as an active bass.
The girls are making a long stay in Europe . . . . . they proceed next to Wiesbaden I believe and they have still got . . . . . to do. Uncle Arthur is still most poorly he still sees double and he has someone one and has someone to go up and up to London with him it will probably get right again when the blood the result of the blow is all absorbed
Maters writing
I am finishing this for your father as he stopped writing to go out for a hour before luncheon in his bath-chair we all went by the Stoke Road and the sea and the sun was very bright so he found it very pleasant he was able to go over to Roberts yesterday afternoon to be present with Mr Dudgeon at the distribution of "Cole's Loaf" 170 loaves were given away to the poor of Nayland. They seemed very pleased to see your father there.
He has been pretty well lately I wish he could gain more strength but they say cases like this are always very slow
I had a nice letter from Ada today she and Bertha are now at Brighton with the Hunts
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the same post brought news of the death of my aunt Elizabeth she had not been very well but they thought was getting better but a bad heart attack came on last Monday and she died (quite peacefully) at 10 o'clock the following Wednesday morning, my dear father will miss her very much I fear
Beau writes they are getting up a play at school he is to be Dame Rumple an old woman he is getting quite a swell at football. I do hope so much your asthma has left you
Much love from us all
Yours very affectionately
Mater.



45. From Essex County Office Colchester.: Re Dr William Gilbert 1544-1603, 28 Jan 1904.
Essex County Standard Office
Colchester
January 28 1904
Dear Sir
The document you have discovered is of the greatest value and interest to Colchester, which does not possess an autograph of its most famous townsman. I enclose a proof of the article to appear in this weeks E.C.S. it is to be supplemented by some notes.
I venture to keep the document in my safe hoping you will kindly allow it to be presented to the Town Council of Colchester who will I am sure have it very carefully resized, mounted and framed and placed in the Town Hall
In great haste
Yours Faithfully
W Gurnly-Benham
Stamped envelope addressed to:
Dr Fenn
Alston Court
Nayland
Nr Colchester.

Discovery Of An Autograph Of Dr William Gilbert Of Colchester.
By the courtesy of Dr E.L. Fenn, late of Colchester, and now of Alston Court, Nayland, we are enabled to publish the following document, which Dr Fenn has discovered amongst some papers in his possession:

To all Christian people to whom this present writing shall come William Gilbert of London Esquire, sendeth greetings in our Lord God everlastinge. Whereas Richard Roberts of London Tanner, by his deede of bargaine and sale bearing date the day of the date hereof, for the consideracion therein mencioned hath gyven graunted feoffed, bargained and released unto the foresaid William Gilbert, his heires and assigns for ever, all his right title, clayme, and Interest, with (sic) ever he hadd, hath, or by any meanes may have in the capitall messuage and tenement and rents to the said capitall messuage on the part of the North and Sowth with all orchardes and gardens thereunto belonginge, with thappurtenances, scituat, lyenge, and beinge in the parishe of St Martyn in Colchester, abuttinge, as in and by the saide deed more att lardge yt doth and maye appeare.
NOW KNOWE ye me, the said William Gilbert, to have made and ordayned, and thee's presents in my steade and place putt and constituted my well beloved in Christ Robert Middleton, of Colchester, aforesaid, gentlemen, my true and lawfull Attorney, to enter for me and in my name, into the said capitall, messuage, rents and other the premises with thappurtenances or into any partt or parcell thereof and the full and peceble possession and seizon thereof, for me, and in my name to take, accordinge to the forme and effect, of the saide deed of bargaine, and sale, GYVINGE and hereby grauntinge unto my saide Attorney my full power and authoritie in execucion of the premisses as fully in evey thinge as the lawe will the same permit and suffer, and as if I my sceft (sic) were there personaly present, ratefienge, confirminge, and allowinge all, and whatsoever my saide Attorney for me and in my name shall lawfully do or cawse to be done, in or aboute the said premises, by vertue of their presents.
IN WITNES whereof, to this my present writinge, I, the saide William Gilbert have sett my hande and seale.
Dated the One and Twentith day of Aprill, in the Eight and Thirtieth yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lady Elisabeth by the grace of God Quene of England, Fraunce and Ireland, defendour of the faithe scilicet 1596
W GYLBERT
Sealed and delivered to the use of the said Robert Myddleton in the presence of me.
Ambrose GILBERT
Leonard Wallworth scr.
This document is of great value and interest as bearing the autograph signature of the great scientist and "first electrician." Only one or two other signatures of Dr William Gilbert are known to exist. Further reference to the subject will be found in our "Colchester and County Notes".


picture

Edward married Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10] [MRIN: 47], daughter of Dr Frederick Gilder JULIUS MD FRCS [50] and Ellen Hannah SMITH [49], on 12 Nov 1872 in West Molesey SRY. (Katharine Pauline JULIUS [10] was born on 27 Nov 1850 in Richmond SRY, baptised on 27 Dec 1850 in St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY, died on 15 Apr 1886 in 1 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY and was buried on 20 Apr 1886 in Richmond.). The cause of her death was T.B.


picture

Edward next married Edith TODD [14] [MRIN: 50], daughter of Charles John TODD [536] and Elizabeth Anne [8221], on 13 Feb 1892. (Edith TODD [14] was born about 1858 in Kensington MDX and died on 22 Dec 1938.)


Copyright © and all rights reserved to Edward Liveing Fenn and all other contributors of personal data. No personal data to be used without attribution or for commercial purposes. Interested persons who wish to share this data are welcome to contact edward@thekingscandlesticks.com to arrange same and be given the details


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