The Kings Candlesticks - Family Trees
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Dickson DOWNING [510]
(Abt 1701-1745)
Bridget BALDWIN [511]
(1705-1810)
Nathaniel CHAMBERS [9397]
(Abt 1689-1755)
Katherine WOOLLEY [9398]
(Abt 1694-1758)
Rev George DOWNING [508]
(Abt 1727-1809)
Catherine CHAMBERS [509]
(Abt 1732-1802)

Maria DOWNING [7075]
(1774-1852)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Rev Francis Fortescue KNOTTESFORD [7076]

Maria DOWNING [7075]

  • Born: 25 Jun 1774, Ovington ESS
  • Marriage (1): Rev Francis Fortescue KNOTTESFORD [7076] in 1805
  • Died: 4th Qtr 1852, Stoke By Nayland SFK
  • Buried: 16 Oct 1852, Billersley WAR
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bullet  General Notes:


Maria Fortescue Knottesford
Registration Year: 1852
Registration Quarter: Oct-Nov-Dec
Registration district: Stratford on Avon
Parishes for this Registration District: View Ecclesiastical Parishes associated with this Registration District
Inferred County: Warwickshire
Volume: 6d
Page: 283.

Liveing Archive 152b-c LT13
Poem by her cousin Mathew Bridges upon the deathe of her sister Catherine 4 Aug 1802

To My Dear Cousin
Mrs Knottesford
On the death of her sister.

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
To hang thy harp on the Willow ?
How soft was the Pilgrims sleep
With the saviour's arm for her pillow

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
That home for the laden and weary ?
There repose in heaven is deep
Though the toil of her march was dreary

Hast thou been to the grave to weep ?
Her spirit was hovering o'er thee,
To tell through whom, she was strengthened to seek
Her golden harvest of glory !

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
And did not the minds emotion
Come on like the bailing gales which sweep
O'er the calm of an quiet ocean

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
That bed may be ours tomorrow
So (?) then let us pray for the grace to keep
Lower mean (?) in underlying sorrow

Yet go you to the grave to weep
That thy tears may be tears of gladness
And every grass covered heap
Where believers have fallen asleep
Should banish from those who weep
At last the sting of the sadness
M Bridges.

Maria Fortescue
Last nameKnottesford
Birth year1775
Burial date16 Oct 1852
Age77 y
PlaceBillesley Warwickshire
Warwickshire Burial Index 1538-1900

Maria Knottesford
Death year1852
PlaceBillesley, All Saints
CountyWarwickshire
Record linkhttp://bmsgh-shop.org.uk/index.php?route=product/search&search=I270D
Record setWarwickshire Monumental Inscriptions

bullet  Research Notes:


Little was known of Maria Knottesford nee Downing until the "Liveing Archive" revealed a collection of letters from her.
Some of these have been transcribed by Dr Stan Lapidge, whose scholarly work on the letters of Maria's husband Francis have been a great contribution to understanding this rather unique Victorian family.
Thank you Stan.

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bullet  Other Records



1. Mathew Bridges: Poem to his Cousin Maria in her Grief on the Death of her Sister Frances Elizabeth Downing, Abt 1826.
Liveing Archive 152b-c LT13

To My Dear Cousin
Mrs Knottesford
On the death of her sister (Fanny)
Hast thou been to the grave to weep
To hang thy harp on the Willow ?
How soft was the Pilgrims sleep
With the saviour's arm for her pillow

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
That home for the laden and weary ?
There repose in heaven is deep
Though the toil of her march was dreary

Hast thou been to the grave to weep ?
Her spirit was hovering o'er thee,
To tell through whom, she was strengthened to seek
Her golden harvest of glory !

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
And did not the minds emotion
Come on like the bailing gales which sweep
O'er the calm of an quiet ocean

Hast thou been to the grave to weep
That bed may be ours tomorrow
So (?) then let us pray for the grace to keep
Lower mean (?) in underlying sorrow

Yet go you to the grave to weep
That thy tears may be tears of gladness
And every grass covered heap
Where believers have fallen asleep
Should banish from those who weep
At last the sting of the sadness
M Bridges.



2. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing re Distribution of Frances Elizabeth Downing's effects, 5 Jan 1827.
Liveing Archive 62 a-d LT7
The envelope (which has been torn, and repaired with tape) is addressed to "Mrs E Liveing, Nayland, Suffolk". On the envelope are written the following words, in a different hand: "Jan. 1827 distribution of
F E D's effects"** and also "M F K to C M L Jan 5 1827".
(** Frances Elizabeth Downing)

B.H. Jan[ua]ry 5 - 27
I am anxious, precious Catharine, to reach you before you have any intercourse with Mr Goymer, in order to stay your hand respecting the impressions - half my object in asking for the plate, was to send you plates, as well as provide them for . . . . Keep therefore those you have - & we will also make use of the few remaining to us. I had but an indistinct idea of giving you it - & will again search among my own drawers.
I am really sorry for the confusion about the books - it might have been avoided had I then referred [?] to what I have since found among her papers - the list of those left for you at . . . . When you have an opportunity, & me too, an exchange can be made. At present
Page 2
everything belonging to ourselves, remains untouched, & unlooked at - but, thank you, I have dispatched 5 parcels this week, with remembrances, to Mrs Cardale - Miss Pearson at Oare Miss Thomas Campfield House, Mr Leeds - Miss Wildman, Chilham Castle, Kent - & some one else whom I have forgot - & have 6 more to send.
The thing is so perfectly clear to my mind, now I understand it all, that had I found the other one here, I should have forwarded it just the same. That was mentioned in one of her testamentary papers - this in a memorandum left in her bureau at Bridgetown, dated 1825, wherein she says that Fanny having come into possession of her aunt's watch, she wishes George to have her repeater, & Edward the amethyst ring she usually wore belonging once to our grandfather Charles. She had previously left George, Chambers' Dictionary with the Supplement, - & Edward a diamond ring belonging to our Uncle Baldwin, - & the pictures (yours excepted) to ? & ? both feeling they had an undue proportion, the last time she was here,
Page 3
she wrote & left the above memorandum, desiring that the boys should have the pictures instead. Now, as both your ring, & Edward's, were mentioned in different places as belonging to my grandfather, I conclude they were the same, & that she had forgotten herself, when making the last bequest. But all that I now understand. As however it pleased Him who doeth all things well, to remove from us the pride of a mother's eyes, & the joy of her heart, our precious George! all his legacies devolve on Edward, who besides will have his brother's inheritance of Parental books, etc. He has, therefore, her pictures & her repeating watch, beside his own diamond ring - & I am very very sure, had she lived to alter her own distribution, she would have appropriated either the amethyst, or the diamond one for your eldest boy - they both belonging to that sch? - keep therefore the one you have, unless you prefer the other - the only difference is, the one is now ready for wear - the diamond, being a mourning ring, must be altered for general use.
The spa box was brought from Spa in Germany by Mr Broughton, brother to Mrs Gastin. I was then a child, but he gave one to each of my sisters
Page 4
when he returned - and our aunt Catharine left me hers at her death.
I wrote a long time ago to Mrs Torlesse asking her to draw on Miss Alston for our usual subscriptions. It is very kind of you to supply your precious Aunts We have not heard of the Kings since August - but I hope to send remembrances to Chobham soon, & will tell them of your enquiries.
Mrs Cardale at present resides in Mecklenburgh Square, her son takes Bidford over with the business. Thank you for paying Mrs Walker's carriage - that is to be added to the drops etc. & in her eyes, which I trust dear fathers?
Continued on page 1
discharged, as I begged him last year.
I hope Mr Grimmond has discharged the 30 £?
There is now a good plain cook out of place, if you know of one wanted with good wages.
In great hurry yours & all your own M.F.K.
Thank dear Miss H. for a very kind letter.
John's best love, very glad to hear, such a good account of his brother, & is finally well; only has a cold.

Transcribed: Dr Stanley Lapidge 08/16



3. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing Re George Downing Liveing falling from nursery window, 1 Jun 1830.
Living Archive 63a-d LT7
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Edw Liveing, Nayland, Suffolk". At right angles to that, and in a different handwriting, is written "M F K to C M L June 1 - 1830". And at the top of the envelope, above the address, is written, in a different handwriting, "relating to my fall from nursery window in 1830". Then the word "window" appears to have been written again, but the ink is now faint. After that, the date "1830" appears more clearly, and beneath that there are the initials "G D L".


If anything could have made you dearer to me my precious Catharine than you were before, your tenderness in communicating this wonderful deliverance, even before composure could be resumed, must do so. In reading the accounts my head turned quite giddy! Surely that sweet child is reserved for some remarkable purpose. It may be only to draw the hearts of his parents nearer to God by a miracle of love. Oh my C., cannot, will not, He who has so shown his power over their bodies, save & renew the souls of these dear ones, if in persevering prayer, & sure confidence, you give them to Him? He seems to have given you an earnest of it. The whole is so remarkable, that some purpose must be intended by it. A very striking [?] mercy to my mind, is its not having been permitted before your confinement!
In the course of a fortnight, I entreat you give me another line to record the further
Page 2
mercy of our God in the effects upon yourself, your dear mother, & the dear child. I am still anxious lest the fright should affect you as a nurse. But have I not been taught to escape from fears! Sweet elucidation of that passage, "Yea, I say unto you, that in Heaven their angels always behold the face of my Father." You say he fell into the yard - but was it on grass or stones? Did he scream, or was he not sensible of his own danger? I really think the whole miraculous - yet the first & last of these queries might under a less favourable result, have proved mitigating mercies.
I can write just now on no other subject, yes - we all will "bless the Lord with you, & magnify his name together" - we all feel for & with you - & all send tenderest love - when I sent off my last on Saturday, how very little did I then suppose what you were then suffering!

Your own M F K

Tuesday June 1

Ref: Transcribed Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016



4. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 25 Jun 1838, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 64a-d LT7
The envelope is addressed to:
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Colchester

On the envelope is written, in a different handwriting, the following:
M F K - C M L
25 June 1838
Coronation Festivities
Mrs Downing recovery fr[om] illness
Prospect of J Dewe's obtaining a living in Norfolk - & marriage

The envelope has the following postmarks:
(1)In a circle, in red ink, "G 26JU26 1838"
(2)In red ink, "Colchester Penny Post", and
(3)In red ink, and in a circle, "Stratford on Avon JU 25 1838".


Alveston Manor
June 25 - 1838

My dearest Kate,
We were delighted & thankful to hear the result of your long projected bazaar - & of the merciful improvement in your beloved mother's health! Now, your nursery is itself again, & the children I have no doubt, as pleased in their way & degree, to welcome Grandmama again, as you to see, or I to hear of her convalescence!
When you write again, please to tell me two things - what sums you have obtained by private sale, & what is still deficient in the required amount for church, endowment etc.? We have been employed for 4 bazaars this spring, & refused a fifth - at present we are working for one near Derby - for Mrs Ross's schools - Dewe's sister - & soon we must set to for Stratford church, which is about undergoing thorough repairs, refitting etc. - the estimate is [MFK has left a blank here] & all to be raised on the voluntary system. You will find, as we have found, solicitations freely [?]
Page 2
made in all directions from those who have worked for you - a tax that sometimes imposes more than you well know how to pay.
What are you preparing for the Coronation? We are to have a dinner for the poor at Alveston on the village green - beef, plum-puddings, small beer, & 1 qt of ale each for the men with a pipe. They are to assemble at 4 o'clock & be all in their own homes before 9. At Stratford, a Sermon [?] with a procession of the School to Church - then a dinner, beef & pudding, for 3,000 men, women, & children - L200 have been collected to defray the expense. Edward had the promise of a ticket for the Abbey from Ld Palmerston through a mutual friend at Oxford - but some present [?] object secured it from him & he has only secured a standing on the scaffolding on the top of a house in Parliament Street, which when we left Oxford he had not decided whether to accept, or come to our rustic Gala's [sic] in Warwickshire - I need not say to a mother what is my wish on the occasion! I believe I did tell you that he passed through the schools with especial commendation for his divinity examination. When he afterwards came to us, he was so urgent for our all going to visit him before he left, that finding he would otherwise be hurt, his father kindly consented to go, & we staid in Oxford from Friday to Tuesday, entertained by him, or two others, each day. He had taken his B.A. degree the week before, & looked remarkably well in his Batchelors [sic] gown. I was really thankful we went, because his friends are all
Page 3
respectable, proper persons - & he is evidently respected by his superiors, & by his equals. The President of Magdalen, his own Warden, & the Tutors spoke highly of him - & all this satisfaction, so valuable to a parent's heart, we could not have ascertained [?] but by going thither.
Our own operations, dear C. are very uncertain indeed. We did calculate on going out the last week in July - but while Dewe was staying here the week before last, he received intimation that one of the Queens Coll[ege] incumbents [?] was dead, & immediately set off for Cambridge to enquire into it. He has 2 senior Fellows - one has refused it, but the other has not yet given his determination. If it falls to him, it would be wrong to defer their marriage - The parish is in Norfolk 4 miles from Norwich! Far enough is it not my C.? But the event [?] is in better hands than ours! Should D. possess it, I trust I shall rejoice for their sakes - if not, the relief will be great, tho' selfish! But under our absolute uncertainty, we do not breathe a word of it to any one. Soon after I received your letter, I felt it necessary to consult Mr Pritchard for an eruption in her face, which did not go off as usual when the mild weather came, but was proceeding to bleed occasionally, & remembering your dear Aunt Sally's former attack, I feared letting it go on. Mr P. has given her [?] sarsaparilla with Brandis's alkali, etc. - & ordered her to bathe regularly at Bishopton, drink, & wash with the water. She is altogether better, & I think too, the little excursion to Oxford in our open chaise, did her good. Mrs Stephenson writes that Maria is certainly stronger. We are [?] very much obliged to your dear Edward for his prescription & advice.
Page 4
Be so kind to tell the Lees with John's love, that he hopes to hear from Mary soon, & that her letter will be particularly acceptable to him now he is alone - for Mrs Lees & the child are gone to Kensington for a fortnight at least - he has had good accounts of their arriving there - & through her late sister's husband she is offered a place at the Duchess of Gloucester's house to see the Coronation procession. They went to Kensington last Thursday. Remember us also kindly to Mary if you please. . . . as well as usual & sends love.
You may depend on my making all the enquiries in my power for Mr T. Fenn, who I hope will not be reduced to taking an obscure [?] district upon his own hands.
Pray remember us affectionately at Polsted & Horkesley - are you not glad the Bazaar is over?
Miss Helward & her niece come to us, God willing, on the 8th - from her I first heard the Bazaar was successful - & to her wrote the sum obtained, after having your letter.
Mrs Stephenson goes to Lympsham [?] from Hastings for a few weeks - & then Maria
Top of page 1, written crossways
will pass to the Jenkinsons at Hastings, where I hope she will stay some weeks.
And now dearest, with affectionate true love from all to all, & each to each, Farewell!
If you hear nothing, you may depend that D. has not the vacant living.

Your own most tenderly

M.F.K.

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge



5. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing Re Marriages of Frances C Fortescue and Edward B K Fortescue, 30 Oct 1838, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 65a-d LT7
There was no envelope; the address was written on the fourth page of the letter, and the letter was then folded over and sealed. The letter was addressed to:
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Colchester
The letter was postmarked twice: "Stratford on Avon OC 30 1838 A", and then "G 31 OC 31 1838". On the fourth page there is written (in a different hand):
"30 - Oct 1838
Marriage of
Frances
& E B K Fortescue
M F K to C M L"

Alveston
Oct[obe]r 30 - 38
Precious Kate,
A full hand & full heart, will only allow me to give you a skeleton view of our . . . . . proceedings, which I have delayed doing, till I could speak with some accuracy. Precious Fanny's marriage was, as you know, planned for the 23rd - but the lawyers could not prepare the settlements in time, & said it must be put off another fortnight - since that various dates have been fixed, & only yesterday we received what I hope will prove final letters, that they would be prepared for this day week, Nov. 6. On that day think of us each I entreat you - & add I pray you, to your daily litany a fervent petition that the state on which our dear one is to enter, may be to her & to her excellent husband, what our church emphatically describes it, "the holy state of matrimony." On one account we can see that it was well to be delayed, because Dewe
Page 2
has employed the interval in going to Norwich, getting himself instituted, etc., & settling all his concerns at Rockland, which he finds to be a better living than was expected, being more than L350 per ann. The Bishop was very obliging, & thanked him for volunteering residence, & having two services. But there is a great puzzle about the house they thought of hiring while building their own, & we fear unless they take it immediately they cannot have it, which would oblige them to go there before winter. But all is in abeyance yet. They purpose going immediately on their marriage to Cheltenham for at least a short term - all beyond is undecided. We expect Dewe & his brother Charles on Monday evening - & on Tuesday dear F. hopes to go early to church, (where Mr Mead is to perform the service, & her father to give her away - the three Miss Hanesleys, & Maria, being her bridesmaids - Mrs Stephenson & myself going with them - ) & then return, change her dress, & set off before the breakfast which we must give to Mr & Mrs Peyton as curates of this parish, & a few others - we display no favours.
Page 3
Now for Edward - his marriage which was planned for the Tuesday after Fanny's, is also put off, & at present stands for Tuesday the 23rd, unless another delay arrives. Your uncle is to perform their service, & her father to give her away - her sisters & Maria to be her bridesmaids, & perhaps some other relations - we are to go to Elmdon the day before. Where they go from the marriage is not fixed - but the Archdeacon has consented to their residing with us till at least after Edward's ordination next year - a very merciful plan so far to make up the loss of our own precious Fanny - so when they return from their wedding tour they come to us - & I have now seen enough of dear Fanny Ann to be assured that I can love her entirely.
John's [here a note has been added, in pencil, and in a different handwriting, "John Lee the coachman] love to his family - they are well, I shall hear from him or Mary [here a note has been added, in pencil, and in a different handwriting: possibly "Lee as aforesaid".], soon. Oh that woman is such a comfort to me as I cannot tell you! If they go to Rockland soon, they will probably want your young servant, but that we shall know more about - if they do not, they will pass part of the winter with Mr Spencer.
Page 4
I trust it will not be many weeks before I am again able to rejoice with you & your dear husband! Mrs S. [here the name "Stephenson" is written in pencil, in a different handwriting] sends kind love, & asks when you write, to tell her if her brother [here the name "John Gurdon" is written in pencil, in a different handwriting] is returned from Ireland [?]. I hope you will be able to read this, but all . . . . . , & my head is more than addled - [?] is well, & sends her love - all our dearest write [?] love to each & all - tell your beloved mother that her & my morning together after you went off, is now powerfully brought to my mind - she I know will feel for me, & by & bye you too will feel also! My precious one believe in the tender affection of your Aunt M. F. K.

Transcribed: Dr Stanley Lapidge 03/16



6. Maria Downing's Letters: To Edward Liveing Re Fanny Knottesford's marriage & birth Charlotte 4 Nov 1838, 9 Nov 1838, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 66a-d LT7
Written in pencil, in a different hand, at the top of the letter:
"Birth of Charlotte 4 Nov 1838"
The envelope is addressed to "Edward Liveing Esq., Nayland, Colchester." It bears two postmarks. The first reads "Stratford on Avon NO 9 1838", and the second reads "G 10 NO 10 1838". On the envelope is written, in a different hand, "Fanny Knottesford's Marriage 8 Nov 1838. Birth of Charlotte Liveing Nov 4 1838. M.F.K. to E.L."

Your heart cheering announcement, my dear Edward, reached us on Tuesday morning, & was received with real thankfulness - you were very kind in remembering us so early, & I only delayed acknowledging it, till I could in reply tell you that our precious Fanny is become a wife - the event took place only yesterday, as she could not be prepared for Tuesday - & after such a day of excitement, the
Page 2
re-action makes me very glad to return note for note, & not see more blank paper before me! She behaved incomparably, & I never loved her husband as his beautiful conduct throughout made me love him yesterday. Her last words in the carriage as they drove off to Leamington were, "I am quite happy." Mary Lee is with them - where they will go next is undetermined. We had her poor neighbours, & school children, nearly 150 regaled (sic) in the barn which Edward fitted up very nicely, with
Page 3
a tea drinking, cakes etc., at 3 o'clock, & they staid till evening. She left her very affectionate love for her aunt & cousins, which I promised to deliver. What is Baby's name to be? Our united affectionate congratulations are yours, & all yours, with a very dear kiss to Mama.
Ever, my dear Edward aff[ection]ately yours,
M.F.K.
Alveston
Nov. 9
I hope some cake will arrive in a day or two.

Transcribed: Dr Stanley Lapidge 03/16



7. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 25 Nov 1838, 25 Nov 1838.
Liveing Archive 67a-d LT7
The envelope is addressed to
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Colchester
On the envelope is written, in a different handwriting, the following:
25 Nov 1838
accts of Fanny K
Edward B K weddings

There are two imperfect postmarks, which cannot be completely deciphered. There is also a very clear postmark, enclosed in a circle, reading "G 26NO26 1838", and there is also a stamp, in red ink, "Colchester Penny Post".

My dearest Kate,
I have delayed replying to dear Mary's letter[s] (for which pray return the dear girl an Aunt's affectionate thanks) that I might add a somewhat detailed account of our two weddings - but finding the time for doing so impossible to obtain, I fear waiting longer for it, lest I should also pass the time for your precious little Charlotte's baptism, for whom Maria desires me to tell you she is not afraid to answer because she knows her parents, & their first object for their children, - tho' in most cases she could not conscientiously undertake the office. Will you then, my love, or your dear Edward, be so kind to advance Nurse's L5 for her, & I will transmit it with our other debts in January? I am glad you find Mrs Sarjeant an efficient assistant, & will thank you to remember us very kindly to her. I think she also attends Mrs Torlesse on these occasions?
The mercies of our
Page 2
God towards you, my beloved One, fill my heart with thankfulness, & I beg to assure your other self of my sincere gratitude both for his own letter, & that of his amanuensis.
We parted yesterday from our precious Fanny, whom another week will probably find a sojourner in Norwich, till they can find an habitation in their own parish. On the eventful 16th they drove to Leamington, where they have remained till now. We saw her the following Wednesday at Kenilworth, where they met us for 2 hours on our way to Elmdon (where Edward was married) - & truly I came away a happy mother! She was looking so remarkably well, & in such excellent spirits - & her Joseph so rejoicing over his bride, that I would not have her again Fanny Fortescue, inexpressibly dear as she is to me, & great as is the loss of her, if a wish could accomplish the metamorphosis! Last Wednesday we drove over & brought them back with us, only for one whole day - they left us again yesterday morning, because duty decidedly calls for a change of plan, & their immediate presence in Norfolk. This has been my greatest trial - but I remonstrate with my feelings from the
Page 3
conviction of her entire happiness. The occasion of this change is a good house being on sale at Rockland, which it is very desirable for him to purchase - but an exchange must be made of glebe land for it, & besides it is copyhold - so that many parties are concerned, & many difficulties arise. They are going therefore first on a visit to Dr King at Cambridge, the President of his College, & then to talk over, & consult the College upon the business - & then proceed to Norwich for personal conference with the Bishop & the other parties concerned. Lee [?] is every thing to them, & a special favourite with his Master. This & the Lees kin, quite well. [?]
Now to give you a hasty outline of our proceedings. On Wednesday the 9th Dewe & his brother arrived in the carriage that the former had hired for their wedding tour. Dearest Edward was excessively kind, & forgot his own matters in preparing his sister's. He sat up till 4 o'clock the next morning, reading over her settlement etc. We had a private breakfast at 8, & F. came down to prayers which were suited to the occasion, & while we were at breakfast took her leave of the servants, & other matters. Then came Mr Meade in his full canonicals, having purchased a pair of knee breeches with gold buckles for the occasion, then her bridesmaids, 3 Miss Annesleys, & after being detained more than ½ an hour for signing, sealing etc., we went to church - precious Fanny with us & Mr Meade, her eldest bridesmaid Miss Annesley - then Mrs Stephenson, 2 Miss Annesley, & Dewe in Mr Annesley's carriage - & last the 2 brides men, Chs Dewe & Edward, in D's travelling carriage - the church was very full, & I trust many prayers were offered. When we returned, she changed her dress - looked into the barn which her brother had dressed up
Page 4
tastefully for our rustic fete, & went off before the public breakfast - they each sustained their parts most admirably - & the last words she spoke were, putting her head out of the carriage, & smiling at us, "I am quite happy." Our small parlour party consisted of Mr & Mrs Meade, Miss Hare, & Mr & Mrs Peglar [?] (the minister of the parish) - the table was covered with tea, coffee - hot sweetbreads & pidgeons - cold chickens, tongue, mould of calves head etc. - sweet things - preserves & fruit - while then Miss Mordaunt came, leading up the Alveston school girls - & Edward Spooner [?] - then began the barn fete with all the poor women round us, & their children - they had tea, bunns, iced & not iced plum cakes, & wine - Edward amused them with all sorts of games, magic lanthorns etc. etc., & they did not disperse till past 9 o'clock - the two schools, Alveston, & Billesley, having gone before - dearest F. was married in a good white poplin with a mantilla of the same edged with swansdown - a swansdown long tippet - white satin bonnet with an orange flower, & long vail [sic]. The bridesmaids had French white poplins with mantillas of the same with swansdown & white bonnets etc.
The Wednesday following we went to Elmdon - on Thursday morning we each had our breakfast in our respective chambers - much delay was caused by horses not coming etc. We assembled for family prayers before 10, & the Archdeacon was so affected that he broke down in the midst, & Mr Kennaway went on with them. Fanny Ann, by Edward's particular desire, was married in a vail without a bonnet, & a wreath of orange flowers - never I think could a lovelier Bride [?] be seen - she went with her father & mother, & your uncle, in the Archdeacon's carriage, her 5 bridesmaids & myself in ours, & the rest followed in three others. Immediately as they returned more than 20 poor women with their children came into the vestibule & the bride with her own hand gave each a slice of
Top of page 1, written crossways
iced wedding cake, from a large one that Edward cut up .... had [?] the public breakfast which Edward chose him to be present at & Mr Kennaway gave an excellent address on the duties of all parties, & the typical character of marriage etc. She then changed her dress, & they left us after 2 o'clock for Malvern Wells, where they now are. We returned on Friday. They go for a few days from Malvern to Elmdon, & then come to us [?]. .............. Fanny Ann was married in a ...........white flowered silk & her bridesmaids had white satins.
Bottom of page 1, written crossways
I cannot look over what I have written.
Top of page 2, written crossways
Dearest love to all. Mrs Stephenson included. Some of our cottagers hung out a flag to salute Fanny as she passed us going away, & gave her a loud shout. One of the poor women at Elmdon said, when the carriages drove off, "It was awful - yet grand."

Yours ever,

M.F.K.

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016.





8. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 31 Mar 1841, Re Death of Thomas Liveing an infant.
Liveing Archive 68a-f LT7
The front of the envelope is addressed to
Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester, and postmarked "Paid 1 AP 1841" and also "Paid at Stratford". The reverse of the envelope is postmarked "Stratford-on-Avon MR 31 1841", and on it is written (in another handwriting) "Death of Thomas Liveing an infant March 1841. Mentions E. Fortescue's young child." On the inside of the flap of the envelope is written (in Maria's handwriting) "Bye well - & the Lee's [?] - how is his mother getting on" Preserved with the letter is a note (in another handwriting) stating "This relates to the death of a baby boy who was christened Thomas and died very soon after."

As a mother, dearest Kate, I feel with you - but as a Christian parent, I would rather rejoice with you, & your dear husband, that you have a child - in heaven - beholding the face of Jesus - and wearing his blood bought crown, without receiving one scar in the conflict!
All your children, I trust
Page 2
through grace will eventually wear that crown - yet the time may probably come when, seeing them tossing on the waves of a boisterous world & exposed to unforeseen temptations, you will say with me - One I have secure, & bless Him who so early housed the tender plant.
I shall be anxious to hear about yourself, & especially whether you suffer locally from the stoppage in nursing?
Page 3
It was exceedingly kind to tell me with your own hand - & I bless God for the alleviation given you, in foreseeing the continuance of a disease that would have made life painful! I am also very thankful to hear of the recovery of dear little Harriet & Charlotte & that they have had it.
We are expecting Edward & F.A. in a fortnight (Easter week) & here she will quietly wait
Page 4
her confinement in the latter end of May, we now suppose. Thank God she is better as the baby improves - he is cutting double teeth & single teeth together - one of the former has just appeared - our accounts too from Rockland are favourable - We have communicated to them the deliverance of your precious infant.
My affectionate love to your dearest Mother, & each one of your dear circle - I should like to know the day & hour, if not passed when the little sacred casket is consigned to its temporary resting place?
Continued onto page 1
Let the motto of my seal be your motto under? this first bereavement

With much love from each to each, your ever affectionately & humanly sympathizing aunt M. F. K. Alveston Mar. 31 1841.

Transcribed: Dr Stanley Lapidge 03/16

9. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Manor House Alveston WAR. Maria is recorded as aged 66 not born WAR



10. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 7 Sep 1841, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 69a-d LT
The envelope is addressed to Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester. On the envelope is written, in another hand, the following:
M F K - C M L Sept 7 - 1841 Aunt Mary & Frances staying a Alveston Mrs Selfes mentioned at Elmdon

The envelope is postmarked in black, within an oval, "Paid A Stratford", and in red, within a square (with rounded corners) "C Paid 8 Se . . 8 1841". There is a further postmark on the reverse of the envelope, but it is not decipherable.

Alveston
Sept[embe]r 7 - 41
My dearest Cath -
Two painful scenes I have been in this morning - by the bed of a young woman in Stratford when her last breath was drawn! - & by the bedside of a very dear friend who was seized with paralysis on Sunday! You will therefore accept I know of a skeleton note, to repeat the unnecessary
(page 2)
assurance that our dear M & F's detention here gives us entire pleasure & no inconvenience whatsoever - & that I only regret Edward & Fanny Ann & Maria's engagement to Elmdon tomorrow, to stay over the baptism of Mrs Selfe's infant & her own churching, on Sunday, for the dear girls sakes who will then be left without a young companion to amuse them! It has been a long engagement, & I only wish it occurred a week or
(page 3)
two later.
Dear Fan told you of her cough yesterday - it is not hard or violent, but has returned at times ever since she came & does not yield to the few things I have ventured to prescribe. This circumstance, unless we succeed in getting rid of it, will reconcile your Aunt to her return, tho' I can assure you they will leave a void behind that cannot readily be filled - for I know not quite their equals -

Affec[tiona]te love all round & from all - your tenderly affect[tiona]te M.F.K.

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016



11. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 28 Feb 1842, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 70 a-e LT8
At the bottom of page 4, upside down, and in another hand, there is written:
Edward F K F 2 yrs old on Sat prior to 28 Feb 1842 [therefore] born Feb 1840
M F K to C M L 28 Feb 1842 G D L to school at Bedford

The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester". The front of the envelope contains an oval postmark, in black ink, which appears to read "Paid at Stratford A", and a further postmark, in red ink, which reads "F Paid MR 1842." The reverse of the envelope contains a further, circular postmark, which is virtually illegible. On the reverse of the envelope is printed "Edward F F K born Feb 1840. Uncle [?] G. to school at Bedford 1842. M F K - C M L 28 Feb 1842;" and the envelope is numbered 9. There is also a card attached to this letter, on which is written, in a different hand, "I went to school at Bedford at the beginning of 1842 & was in Dr Brereton's house - it was not satisfactorily managed, & the housemaster not a gentleman. G D L"

Alveston Feb[ruar]y 28
1842
Your letter to Maria yesterday, beloved one, has brought my fault to remembrance in painfully vivid colours - but indeed my hand and head have been fully called into exercise, & my mind too, tho' with so many mercies I ought not to express the latter - but Fanny felt your & dear Edward's great kindness to her deeply, & urged me to acknowledge it - but I have not - one reason why I did not write then immediately was that I had an undefined fear on my mind about precious George going to Dr Brereton - something I have heard that gave rise to it, but what I could not then, nor can now recollect
Page 2
nor can your uncle, as we had then no interest in him or his school. I felt that I had no right to raise suspicions in your mind that I could not substantiate & yet with such an impression, I could not satisfactorily to myself notice his being gone there without it. These disappointments are painful, but often good - remember how deeply tried we were with Edward's first tutor, & yet if he had not been so bad, we should never have placed him with Mr Meade, whom we had constantly overlooked in all our enquiries - & therefore I can experimentally encourage you to look simply to God for direction, "doubting not but earnestly believing" that He will direct your path to some safe shelter for that precious child - shall
Page 3
I again apply to Mr Meade? It may now be more successful. If I shall do so, tell me again your requisitions.
I leave Maria to answer all your affect[ionat]e enquiries, & can only say that I left Rockland on the Thursday that I Lee [?] was to return in the evening - parting from Fanny not satisfactorily - she was too thin - too weak - but has applied since to Mr Cooper, & is taking tonic medicines - baby exciting constant apprehensions from spasms in the windpipe - but has thank God recovered from several, & Lee encourages her by one of your children when a baby & wraps it up as Mr L [?] used to order - her name Frances Maria - Fan would have the latter & her husband & I would have the former. Joseph's brother & sister & myself are godparents.
Lee has taken the nursery, for which I am most thankful - she has excellent management, & will be more with Fanny - she still is over the other servants as before - Mary Ann is fixed for cook with general approbation - & they are trying a villager housemaid who I predict will not do.
Page 4
I shall be anxious to hear that my Sister & nieces are recovered - dearest love to them all - little Edward was 2 years old on Saturday - they are all at Wilmcote
your & your dear husband
very affectionately M F K

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016



12. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 9 Mar 1842, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 71a-e LT8.
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester". There is an oval postmark, in black ink, containing the words "Paid at Stratford" with the letter "A" in the middle of the oval, and there is a further postmark, in red ink, containing the words and letters, "F Paid 10 MR 10 1842." On the front of the envelope is written, in a different hand, "M F K - C M L 9 March 1842, death of C M L's mother"; and the number "10" is also written on the envelope, in a small circle. On the reverse of the envelope there is a further postmark, in black ink, on which only the word "Colchester" can be distinguished.


Alveston March 9 1842
My precious C.
I felt cowardly about writing to you yesterday - in fact I could not do it - Yet ought we to feel unmixed thankfulness that one we love so well is "delivered from the burden of the flesh" at an age when she must very soon have become a burden to others! Your precious Mother, my Kate, may, I think, more than most other persons, be said to have "served her generation - & then - fallen asleep" -
(page 2)
She was an extraordinary woman - left by the husband of her youth & her fondest affections with one only child, that child she naturally idolized - but, she never suffered idolatry to appear, nor ever foolishly indulged you. As a wife, her conduct in every way (resulting from soundness of judgment as well as principle) - was perfect - & to her husband's family she was a daughter & sister most highly prized, & tenderly beloved. She was too the last wrack surviving of a family of whom I can say "each were to
(page 3)
each a dearer self - supremely happy in the awaken'd power of giving joy" - at least to me she was that wrack - tho' one blasted branch yet remains, - & when the time appointed by my Heavenly Father shall come, may that poor branch be permitted thro' the blood & righteousness of her Saviour, to sit at the feet of those she loved so dearly on earth!
But I am wrong to express my own feelings when I sat down to comfort you - you dearest C. to whom now I seem more fondly to cling than ever! You know & love many of these dear ones - they all know & love you.
Since writing this, your precious letter is brought in - & I trust I
(page 4)
do appreciate your kindness in writing it. "Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace."1 She was silent on subjects of experimental religion2, but that was no loss in His eyes who searcheth the heart & trieth the reins3, tho' such a constitutional reserve would lead one not to expect an expression of what passes within in dying hours.
B. . .? grows more & more feeble, but is still walking about the house. John's cough is better, & his family well.
I trust a blessing will attend your disposal of dearest George - & that the mantle of his great grandfather may enfold him in every progress toward, & in, his ministering in the church of God!
Top of page 1, written crossways
Fanny nurses her infant with both breasts & writes that she does so now with comparative ease, but she is generally weak, & taking tonic medicines.
On the back of the envelope, and written at an angle I did notice your tenderness about this . . . . . .? & loved you for it - but your Thursday's letter had apprised me - particularly from the swelling of her legs.
On the flap of the envelope . . . sweet Fanny better (there may have been further words written above this, but they are covered up).

In truest sympathy my own dear niece's ever affectionate aunt
M. F. Knottesford

Footnotes:
1. Psalm 37, verse 37, King James version.
2. It appears that experimental (or experiential) religion was of great importance to John Wesley, and through him to the Methodist Church. I have not found a succinct definition of it; but one essay which I have found comments that "The older Reformed writers used the word [experimental] to indicate that we not only read and confess what Scripture teaches, but also are enabled by the Holy Spirit in our own experience to prove and enter into those truths." See <http://www.westminsterconfession.org/Recovering_Experimental_Religion.pdf>. (Sherman Isbell, "Recovering Experimental Religion").
3. Psalm 7, verse 9, King James version: "for the righteous God trieth the hearts and reins," and Revelation, chapter 2, verse 23, King James version: "and all the churches shall know that I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts."
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016



13. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 17 Mar 1842, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 72a-e LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester". The front of the envelope has an oval postmark in black ink, containing the words "Paid at Stratford", and the letter "A" in the centre. There is a further postmark in red ink, containing the letters "F Paid 18 MR 18 1842". On the back of the envelope, the letter is numbered "11"; and, in a different hand, there is written:
M F K - C M L 17 Mar 1842 Funeral of Mrs Downing Persons written to Mrs Crick - (servant at Ovington or Ely) The Kings Spencer Fanny Symes Mrs Pemberton
In addition, and at right angles to the above, there is written:
Mrs Downing was buried at St Paul's Covent Garden where there was some diff[iculty] in finding the vault of her husband G.D.
The back of the envelope also has a circular postmark, in black ink, with the inscription "Stratford on Avon MR 17 1842".

Alveston
Mar. 17 - 1842
One line, precious Kate, just to satisfy you that the persons you named are all written to - & Mrs Crick also - to her I first wrote, very much to relieve myself, - because a person who had attended, with so much tender fidelity, the remains of my precious mother from Ely to Ovington, I felt would understand what parting with even a very aged parent was - & that she could bear some of the burden with me, for you. The Kings - Spencer - & Fanny Symes, I likewise wrote to last week - & Mr Pemberton, who, tho' comparatively near you, might not have heard
(page 2)
it, & during the existence of Ovington, they frequently saw each other.
Pray read Bonnet's Family of Bethany1 through - & remember us with very affectionate regard to dear Mr Harrold when you see him.
I am not satisfied about your cousin Fanny - she is too soon tired, & I have written for a faithful particular account of her - Baby is better - & George improving in every way by being under the care of a person who possesses the organ of orders2. Baby sleeps with Fanny, therefore Lee's deafness is of less consequence.
Tell me from time to time of your George - thankful to hear better reports of dear M & F. With much love, but no time, my own Kate's tenderly affectionate
M.F.K.
(page 3)
I was very glad Mrs Johnson could attend - your dear Grandmother could only you know have servants on the journey, & that Mr S. Alston could accompany now, was a greater satisfaction.

Footnotes
1. This appears to be a reference to a book by L. Bonnet, The Family of Bethany: or, Meditations on the Eleventh Chapter of the Gospel according to Saint John, published by J. Nisbet & Co, London, 1838.
2. This meaning of this phrase is obscure. An 1828 edition of Dr Johnson's dictionary refers to "A hand of a vast extension, and a prodigious number of fingers . . ."
Transcribed by Dr S Lapidge 2016



14. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 6 Apr 1842, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 73a-e LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester". The front of the envelope bears an incomplete oval postmark, in black ink, containing the words "Paid at . . . . ord A"; and it also bears a further postmark, irregularly shaped, in red ink, containing the words and letters "F Paid 7 Ap 7 1842". On the front of the envelope, in a different handwriting, are the words "M F K - M K L Ap 6 1842. Expec[ted] birth of Aunt Ellen. Uncle Knottesford just over 70. Bracelets of M Downing sent to M F K." On the front, the envelope is numbered "12". On the reverse of the envelope there are two circular postmarks, in black ink: one containing the words "Stratford on Avon Ap 6 1842", and the other containing the words "Colchester Ap 8 1842".

My precious Kate,
The mail must not return without an acknowledgment of your dear note, & its affecting accompanyment [sic]. I well remember those bracelets - they were a bridal present - given I believe by him whose memory she so faithfully cherished!
(page 2)
On every account they will be very dear to your aunt while she lives - & tenderly do I thank my dearest niece for bestowing anything so precious upon me. After that period, I shall give directions to have them sent back to you, & charge your own memory with seeing this direction fulfilled.
I have told sad stories about you - for in reply to the queries
(page 3)
of several persons I have said you were not again in the family way - I am glad however if that, or any cause short of illness, prevented you from such an undertaking as following your dearest mother. It would have been too much for you.
How kind it is of Mr Torlesse to take dear George under his tuition - & how thankful I shall be if you find him sufficiently taught, so that he can remain with you till
(page 4)
his removal to College! I shall trust to dearest Mary or Fanny to spare the trouble so oft times taken by their kind Father in giving me very early intimation of the little stranger's appearance - & may our Heavenly Father be with; bless, & preserve thee my Kate, & give you if it be His blessed will, a healthy perfect child, whose name shall be registered in the Lamb's book of life!

Your uncle sends his best love, & thanks you affectionately .......[?]
(top of page 1, written crossways) Your uncle's dear thanks for your remembering his birthday & will certainly not forget you. He was 70 on that day.
Alveston
April 6 - 42

Cont: (on the inside flap of the envelope) were wise in making your painful arrangements & dispositions at once - painful as these concerns always are, time only increases their weight.
With affect[ionat]e love from each to each, your own tenderly affectionate M.F.K.

Cont: (on the reverse of the envelope, on the outside) Mrs Stephenson who came last Thursday sends best love. Her son was married the preceding Tuesday.

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016




15. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 7 Jul 1842, Alveston Manor House WAR.
Liveing Archive 74a-g LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester," and is numbered "13". The front of the envelope bears the impression of a red postage stamp, cancelled with an elaborate cross shape. On the front of the envelope, in a different hand, is written the following (at right angles to the address itself): "E. Liveing recovery f. carbuncles. Death of ------ Bye a servant from Nayland. Burial at Old Alveston. Servant Mary acc[use]d John Lee Coachman as F. of her child. M F K - C M L July 7 1842." On the reverse of the envelope there is a black wax seal, and two postmarks. The first, in black ink, appears to read "Stratford on . . . JY 7 1 . 4 .", and the second, in red ink, reads "C 8 JY 8 1842". On a separate card, preserved with the letter and envelope, there is written the following, in a different hand: "The 'Bye' was a servant from Nayland and her sister Sally was our laundress. The person whom the servant 'Mary' accused of being the father of her illegitimate child was John Lee the coachman. Mrs Knottesford never believed the accusation to be true. The 'poor Mary' mentioned in connexion with the coming of the Dewe's was M. Lee, John Lee's sister, who was the Dewe's nurse."


Alveston Manor
July 7 - 42
Very sweet, my own dear Cath, was the sight of your writing again & especially as it conveyed a relieving account of your dearest Edward's sufferings! I have always understood that few complaints are more acutely painful than the one he has been exercised with - & under that impression I have sincerely & deeply sympathized with him, & with you all. I do hope he will be careful of himself now that he is getting better, & run no risks, & encounter no heats, to check perspiration, or delay that entire recovery which as a husband, a father, & the physical
(page 2)
helper of so many, it is his duty to promote. Give him no peace till he has arranged the journey to Scotland, which dear Mary's visit there, presents so fair an opening for - & give to him, & to our darling Fanny, an aunt's affectionate love - thank the latter very affectionately for her last dear note, & tell her that she occupies a warm recess in her said aunt's heart!
I am particularly thankful to hear the descriptions that both you & Fanny give of Baby, after the trial you underwent a year & half ago - & feel it peculiarly merciful.
Poor Bye's remains were deposited in Alveston old church yard on Thursday - & I trust every direction she gave us has been fulfilled - they were full & minute, so that we had little to deliberate on without authority. All our servants have put on
(page 3)
mourning for her - we were already wearing it - & 13 persons from, & round our house, went yesterday to Alveston church in a sable habit, to pay her respect. She desired me to beg the favour of your dear husband to let all her things - & money - be sent to your house - the former to be given to Sarah for her to divide between herself & her sister - & the money she hopes he will take the trouble of dividing equally between them. She said, "Sally has a kind, a very kind Master & Mistress - they are very good, like mine, & I hope she will faithfully cleave to them." Nothing could be more calm & enviable than her departure! She was continued here till ample evidence was given of a renewal of heart - no temper manifested - whatever was done was right - she was constantly in prayers - convinced of sin & lamenting the sin[s] that most easily beset her, & in childlike
(page 4)
confidence threw herself upon her Saviour alone for pardon & salvation. Her thankfulness for every little attention paid her often exceeded what those who surrounded her felt to be due - & after death her corpse was really lovely - the furrows of old age were smoothed, & every vestige of pain removed. She desired that her funeral expenses, & doctor's bill, might be paid from her own money, & the remainder sent to you - but we cannot take it from the Savings Bank till her daughters have administered, because there are more than £50 - will you be so kind to let that be done, & then it shall be transmitted as soon as possible.
Our late unhappy servant, Mary, had a living child this day fortnight at her father's whither we had sent her - but a far worse tale is attached in the person who she declares & persists in declaring is its father, & in whose name she has registered it! That person gave up
(page 5)
his place instantly, but continues in his house, very strongly protesting his innocence! The whole subject is harrowing - I trust your Mary will not come with the Dewe's - it would be too much for her! - I entreat you not to let a whisper of this go from your lips - you will hear it through the family at one time or other most likely - but I assure you Bye's peaceful death was like a soft balm in the midst of all this agony.
Mrs Stephenson, & her maid too, were like a god-send to us through this painful business - she is going on Thursday - I can not say more than give true love from all to all - especially the two recovering sufferers -

Your own
M.F. Knottesford

(page 6)
If you hear anything from the family be so kind to tell me what report is sent to them - but do not say that you have heard of it from us.

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016



16. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 10 Jan 1843, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 75a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester," and is numbered "14". In the top right hand corner there is written the word "paid". There is a red postmark on the front of the envelope. In this, the word "Paid" is distinct, but most of the other letters are blurred. On the front of the envelope there is written, in a different hand, the following: "Jan 10 - 1843 Death of Mrs Symes." There is a red circular postmark on the reverse of the envelope. Many of the letters are blurred, but the letters "Stratf" and "JA 10 1843" are moderately clear, however the commentator is incorrect with the year.


My precious Catharine,
I ought to have told you three days ago, that in the most peaceful happy way possible, last Friday, that blessed Saint Mrs Symes1 was admitted into the joy of her Lord. Her disease, which was only perceptible in its threat [?] for a day or two, was supposed to be an effusion of water on the heart - her nephew, Dr Fripp2 wished Dr Symons to be called in, but he never saw her - poor Fanny3 wrote on Friday the third to prepare me for what might follow, & named Dr Symonds being sent for - the next day, Saturday, she wrote again, that not an hour after her former letter was posted - on Friday the 3rd, all was over - she had had a very painful night on Thursday & did not close her eyes. In the morning she said, "Jesus is very precious to me now - tell them all I die in peace - great peace, such as the world cannot take from me, nor death itself."
Page 2
Less than an hour before she departed, she settled some accounts with Fanny very clearly - and then said, "Now I must lie quiet, Dear, to be ready for Dr Symonds." Fanny was not therefore surprised at the stillness that continued, till some arrow-root being brought her, Tanner on going to administer it, found only a corpse, & gave a loud shriek, which announced to her poor daughter the agonizing truth. Only on the first, she read aloud the daily texts & verses in Daily Food4 - dwelling with peculiar delight on the lines "But the happiest year they know - Is this [sic] last etc. -5 "
This morning I have had a deeply affecting letter from poor Fanny - I never read deeper feeling couched in as few words. Tomorrow is the painful day - I wish you could known [sic] it in time to think of her. She says that some time hence, when she is equal to collecting them, some small tokens of love are to be sent to you & us, by her Mother's especial desire. I am sure dearest C. you will now more than ever rejoice in having soothed the declining bed of this precious relative.
Page 3
A thousand thanks for your dear . . . (the paper is torn here) & its very interesting contents! I cannot fancy that _ _ _ (a blank has been deliberately left here) will refuse this lodge when his uncle & aunt spoke with confidence of Mr H.L. being going to take it? When his residence is decided, let me know.
Your dear husband, I know, will not spare himself - & I verily believe tho' it is an anxious thing for you all to see him on horseback when he ought to be in bed, that the blessing of God is more likely to accompany & preserve him from danger than if he pitied himself, & followed all your wishes concerning him. I quite understand the nature of his arrangement with Mrs Torlesse, & I have this to say, that you & Fanny have blessed husbands, & that I advise you to make the most of them - for few indeed are the women equally honoured - & if you did not love your husband for your own sake, you ought for your aunt's, to whom he has repeatedly laid under deep obligation[s]. Be so kind to let me hear soon of him, & of the dear children. Tender love to your
Page 4
precious mother - she & I are now the only wrecks left of that generation.

Kindest regards at P. [?] & H. I congratulate them on the power & will to "arise & build the house of their God"6. All well here - Lee & Bye [at this point there is a tear in the paper.]

Top of page 1, written crossways

Edward & F.A. are at Elmdon. She sends good accounts.

Dearest love from all to all, & affect[ionat]e wishes for the rising year ever [?] my own beloved niece your tenderly affectionate M.F.K. Alveston Jan[ua]ry 10 - 40. First day of 1d postage.
I shall not seal with black that you may not be alarmed.

Footnotes:
1. Anne Symes nee Bowles [9989]
2. Probably Dr James Fripp [25553]
3. It is taken that the Fanny referred to is Catherine Frances Symes [22019], Mrs Symes daughter.
4. This may be a reference to Daily Food for Christians: Being a Promise, and another Scriptural Portion, for every day in the year. This was probably published annually, by the Religious Tract Society, in London. The British Library catalogue refers to copies for about 1830, for 1852, and for about 1880, but does not appear to hold copies for any other years. There are references to copies of Daily Food for 1843 on Google, but those copies appear to have been published in Boston; it may be that the American version was substantially copied from an English edition, but I have not been able to locate any references to an 1843 English version.
5. These lines are quoted from John Newton's hymn "See! Another year is gone!" The lines which Mrs Symes quoted are the final lines of the hymn, and in full they read, "But the happiest year they know/ Is their last, which leads them home."
6. This appears to be a quotation from Nehemiah, 2.18, relating to the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem, which reads "Let us rise up and build." (King James version).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2016





17. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 12 Mar 1843.
Liveing Archive 76a-d LT8
In another hand, are added the words, "1843 - should be 12th as E.L. died on 10th March."

At the top of page 1, in another hand, are written the words "on the occasion of my father's death - G.D.L. MFK. to CML 12th March 1843."
At the bottom of page 4 there are written the words "Death of Edward Liveing" and the number "15", both in another hand.

My precious Catharine,
You are in the best school! that school into which the children of God have been taken in all ages - the crucible in which they all have been refined, to be meet for their Father's use! I dare not condole with you - with eternity in my eye, & the view which then will be taken of all earthly afflictions but sin - I would rather say as Mrs Stephenson did on first seeing us at little Francis' death, smiling, "I am not come to condole with you, but to congratulate you!" Turn
(page 2)
thou dear afflicted one, to Isaiah 27 - first part of the 9th verse1, for the blessed uses & end of the purifying process that you are undergoing. It has been a great strengthening to me in periods of suffering - & all the preceding verses are very precious also. I wish I could relieve you by sharing your sorrows & your fatigue, but I know that if one jot of the former would be good for you to be lessened, your Father would not have appointed it - & I bless & adore His gracious love & power that enables you to say, "In the midst of the sorrows that I have in my heart, Thy comforts refresh my soul."
(page 3)
I thank you again & again for those sweet words on the envelope - Mr Harold's2 encouragement. And I am most thankful that Mrs Fenn3 can, & is come to you, for I fear reaction on your own frame, when your anxieties subside. Yet I know & feel that He who has given you this blessed calmness, can also preserve your body - & I am sure the affliction is for good, by that very resignation! & now, oh my dear, dear Catharine, may "the God of all grace, who hath called us unto His eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that you have suffered awhile, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To Him be glory, &
(page 4)
dominion for ever & ever. Amen."4
Your own tenderly sympathizing Aunt M.F.K.
Alveston
March 2.

Foot notes:
1 "By this therefore shall the iniquity of Jacob be purged; and this is all the fruit to take away his sin . . . ." (King James version).
2 Taken to be Dr T C Harrold [132]
3 Harriet Fenn nee Liveing [227]
4 The First Letter of Peter, chapter 5, verses 10 - 11 (King James version).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



18. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 23 Mar 1843.
Liveing Archive 77a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester, and has two postmarks on the front: a circular one, in black ink, which appears to read "Stratford on Avon Mar 23 1843", and another, in red ink, which appears to read "H Paid 24 MR 24 1843". On the front of the envelope there are written, in a different hand, the words "M F K - C M L 23 March 1843 My grandfather's Death"; and the envelope is numbered "16". There is a further postmark, in black ink, on the reverse of the envelope, but the letters are indistinct.

My very precious Catharine,
The sight of your own writing was a sweet balm to my mind - & upon my bended knees I adore the grace so abundantly displayed in, & through you! These are internal evidences more powerful & precious to mourning pilgrims than any book that can be written save that of Revelation.
Miss Stratford's kindness induced me to trouble her again yesterday - but there was one thing upon which my mind has been much exercised, which at the moment of writing I failed to ask - whether you were able to go to
(page 2)

the house of prayer on Sunday? On that day I seemed peculiarly called out in prayer for you, & felt strengthened in the persuasion [?] that if it were so, you were sustained by the arms of everlasting love. "I have chosen thee in the furnace of affliction"1 - but chosen & upheld by Him, you can witness that

"In sorrows sevenfold furnace tried
Supported Lord by Thee
The flames shall but their bonds divide,
And leave their bodies free."2

In coming out from your sacred seclusion, many painful recurrances, like that of dear Baby, will await you - but the power of Jesus can make you through them all "endure, as seeing Him that is invisible."3
(page 3)
I have told Miss Stratford that from both your cousin Fanny, & Mrs Stephenson, I have received expressions too feelingly tender to forward to you - human sympathy weakens the Christian - divine sympathy strengthens & heals.
Those dear five sermons that you mention were given to us when our little Francis was taken, & never can I forget the comfort they proved. We have since put them into the hands of many afflicted ones. I am very glad that Lady Rowley sent them to our sweet Fanny4 - of that lovely child, I cannot say what my heart would dictate - she is in the Lord's hands - & shall we be wiser than He!
Take again my tenderest thanks for the heart-encouraging note of this morning - your Uncle & cousins send their truest love - they do deeply & sincerely
(page 4)
feel with you! My love[s] to all around you - especially dear Mary - My own precious Catherine.
M.F.K.
Alveston March 23 - [after which the year 1843 has been added, in a different ink]

Footnotes
1. Isaiah 48, verse 10 (King James Bible).
2. It appears that M F K is here conflating verses 3 and 4 from the lugubrious hymn "Lord, if thy people suffer grief", by Thomas Kelly. Some information about Kelly may be found at www.hymnary.org <http://www.hymnary.org>., at the URL <http://www.hymnary.org/person/Kelly_Thomas>. The full text of the hymn may be found, for example, as Hymn 201 in Wallinger's Songs and Hymns chiefly designed for Public Worship, 1841, which is available at Google Books. The full text of verses 3 and 4 runs as follows:

In sorrow's seven-fold furnace tried,
This thought may give them joy,
Thou, Lord, art walking by thy side,
Nor can the fire destroy.

Yea, ev'n the flame's consuming pow'r,
Directed, Lord, by thee,
Shall nothing but their bands devour,
And leave their bodies free.

3. Hebrews 11, verse 27 (King James Bible).
4. In all probability this is CML's daughter Frances Liveing (TKC 104), who died a month after the date of this letter, on the 24th April, 1843, aged 19.
Transcribed by Dr S Lapidge 2017.



19. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 30 Mar 1843.
Liveing Archive 78a-e LT8.
On the bottom of page 4, there is written the following, sideways: "M F K - C M L March 30 1843", and the letter is numbered "17".
Appended to the letter there is a note written by Professor George Downing Liveing [TKC 99], as follows: "This seems to have been written in 1843 just after my father's death. The sheep's skin for my sister Fanny who was bed-sore & dying of consumption. G.D.L."

My precious Kate,
I have but a moment to mention that a lady I have just seen, recommends a sheepskin, not thoroughly scoured, but enough to leave the oil in - to be put under the sheet, for persons distressed by lying. She says that it gives wonderful ease to the skin
(page 2)
- that they are sold in London for the purpose, & procured by medical men for their patients - I did not like to know this without telling you for our beloved child1, if the water bed2 should not answer.
You can never be without the comfort of human sympathy, while the whole country round you, feels the loss their own! They do
(page 3)
feel it so, & nothing can be more soothing, of that nature, than the expressions respecting your exalted husband & yourself that come warm from the heart[s] of all who write to us on the subject.
But you have a far higher Comforter, who hath said, "I will never leave thee or forsake thee."3 To His precious care I still commit thee my own precious
(page 4)
one - your M F K

Thank Miss Stratford for her very kind promise - I am deeply grateful to her.

March 30 - 1843 [note: the numerals 1843 are written in a different ink.]

Footnotes.
1. The reference here may be either to C M L's daughter Frances Liveing [TKC 104], who died on the 24th April, 1843, aged 19, or else to her daughter Sarah Ann Liveing [TKC 105], who died on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18, of consumption.
2. Water beds were invented in the early 19th C by a Scottish physician Dr Arnott.
Ref: Wikipedia.
3. The Letter to the Hebrews, chapter 13, verse 5 (King James version).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017




20. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 7 Apr 1843.
Liveing Archive 80a-e LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing Nayland Colchester." There are two postmarks on the front of the envelope: a circular one, in black ink, reading "Stratford on Avon Ap 7 1843", and an irregularly shaped one, in red ink, reading "J PAID 8 AP 8 1843." The reverse has the number "19", and a circular black postmark, which reads "C . . . . ster Ap 9 1843." On the reverse these words are written, in a different hand: "Approaching death of Frances L. M.F.K. to C.M.L. Ap 7 1843. Mentions conditions her sister Catherine at Bristol. James Fripp & the Ed. Bowles." There is also a card with the envelope (in a different handwriting), which reads: "The James Fripp here named was the husband of Lydia Downing Bowles, whose portrait I have, & was father of Dr James & G.D. Fripp."

Alveston
April 7 -
(In another hand) 1843

My precious Kate,
Your last note & Miss Stratford's, have been indescribable comforts to me! any alleviation of suffering in sweet Fanny's case is so merciful, & this is not an unimportant one - I bless God for it!
Your uncle has had a most interesting & valuable communication from Mr H. Liveing1, containing what we had very much wished to know, but could not ask.
The accompanying part of a letter came this morning from Mrs Godfrey - I send it, not because
(page 2)
it expresses more sympathy than others, but because her view of it is in more accordance with what I know to be your own, than many. Let me have it again the next time you, or Miss Stratford writes. Pray thank the latter very much from me, - indeed I do desire to bless our heavenly Father for providing you with such a friend in the time of your greatest need.
Tomorrow we shall think of you more tenderly than we ever yet have done - your Uncle has been saying so this morning.
The bush burning, but not consumed, is a faithful type of God's children in the furnace of affliction - & that He himself was there, a sure support to their
(page 3)
fainting spirit - for not less surely is He with you my precious one than He was with Moses at that moment!
Your aunt Catharine2 was not confined wholly to her bed for many days - the Sunday but one before she was released, she drove down in Mr Fripp's carriage to Mr Biddulph's church in Bristol - but it was in July, & a very hot summer, & the air was indispensable for her breathing - her sufferings were extremely great, but subsided towards quite the end. I went alone not Molly with her to Mr James Fripp, & then the Edward Bowles's most kindly all removed to the lodgings we took at Clifton, & staid with me till I came away. I have had it all brought vividly before me during this precious child's illness, & seem to know every stage she passes through, & every pain she suffers - & what you suffer for her.

Tenderly & affect[ionate]ly yours
M.F.K.

Footnotes:
1 This may possibly be the Reverend Henry Thomas Liveing (TKC 2038), although that is not certain.
2 In all likelihood this is Maria's sister Catherine Downing (TKC 7077), who died of consumption, aged 34, on the 8th July 1802. Perhaps Maria is describing the progress of her sister's illness in order to give C M L some indication of the tribulations which may await Fanny.
3 James Fripp (TKC 22025) appears to have been born in Bristol in 1764, married (as his second wife) Lydia Downing Bowles (TKC 9990), the daughter of Edward Bowles (TKC 7074), in 1799, and died in Bristol in 1850, at the age of 86. His son Dr James Fripp (TKC 25552) was born in 1801, married Emma Bowles Symes (TKC 22022) in 1826, and died in 1861. George Downing (G.D.) Fripp MD 1807 - 1892. [25974]
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017




21. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 20 Apr 1843, Alveston GLS.
Liveing Archive 79a-d LT8
Envelope addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester". The front of the envelope has two postmarks: the first, circular one, in black ink, "Stratford on Avon, Ap 20 1843", and the second, in red ink, "V Paid 21 Ap21 1843." On the reverse of the envelope there is a circular postmark, in black ink, "Colchester Ap 22 1843". Also on the reverse, the envelope is numbered "18", and the following words are written, in a different hand: "Edward Liveing's death. M F K to C M L. 20.4.1843. Mentions Mrs Crick Mrs Haydon Fanny Symes - Also Samuel Fripp & his wife both dead recently - apostate to Socinianism. Also Mr Bailey on his darksome journey to Sydney."


Alveston
April 20
My precious Catharine,
"Here we see through a glass darkly"1 - but the epistles of St Peter teach me how to address you - I must not do it through that dark glass - It is the trial of your faith - oh may you be kept from hard thoughts of God! Love is inscribed on this furnace - & you will see it there! "These are they which came out of
(page 2)
great tribulation" - read the 14th, 15th, 16th, & 17th verses of Revelations 7. "The day is far spent,"2 & tho' heaviness may endure for a night3, when eternity dawns, it will all be chased away, & as an old author writes, "many happy spirits are there, who would tell you, 'I had been undone if I had not been wretched." Jesus loves you - He is now looking down upon you with compassion, & preparing
(page 3)
you for glory ineffable. He spares His weaker reeds, & upon those He prepares for his closer service He lays the greatest toil.
I have had very feeling messages for you from Fanny Symes, Mrs Crick, Mrs Haydon, & many others.
Poor Samuel Fripp4 was taken lately from his large family, & his wife was also taken a few weeks after - but oh, how different was his case, - under an awful apostasy to Socinianism5, his
(page 4)
mind sunk into idiotcy [sic] - & no power of repentance was given him! He could never say "drops of blood shed for me" - when I think of this contrast, & of that of Mrs Bailey, whose husband is on his darksome voyage to Sydney6, & she given up to awful complainings against her fellow creatures, & almost against her God likewise, I can, & do, & will rejoice for the momentary sufferings of my precious child, & her suffering daughter!
Your deeply sympathizing, yet thankful Aunt
M.F.K.

Footnotes
1. St Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter 13, verse 12 (King James version).
2. Luke 24, verse 49 (King James version).
3. Psalm 30, verse 5 (King James version).
4. This is presumably Reverend Samuel Charles Fripp (TKC 9962), who died on the 7th February, 1843, and whose wife, Mary Anne (née Pocock) (TKC 9963), died four days later, on the 11th February, 1843. They appear to have had at least five children who survived them.
5. According to Wikipedia, Socinianism was a system of Christian doctrine which originated in the 16th and 17th century, and involved, among other things, a rejection of orthodox Trinitarian theology and of the doctrine of the pre-existence of Christ. Wikipedia also asserts that, in Britain and North America, during the 18th and 19th centuries, "Socinianism" sometimes served as a catch-all term for any kind of dissenting belief.
6. The description of the voyage as "darksome", and the fact that Mrs Bailey is complaining so bitterly, implies that Mr Bailey may possibly have been sentenced to be transported to Australia for a criminal offence. According to the website www.convictrecords.com.au <http://www.convictrecords.com.au>, a certain William Bailey, who was ordained in 1831, and who from 1839 to 1843 was Rector of St Peter's Church, in the parish of St Margaret's, Queen Square, Westminster, was convicted in February 1843 of uttering a forged promissory note for £2,875, and was transported on the Gilmore, on the 12th April, 1843 (details may be found at the URL <http://www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/bailey/william/63953>.) It is possible that MFK refers to Mr Bailey precisely because he was a clergyman.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



22. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 28 Apr 1843.
Liveing Archive 81a-d LT8
At the top of the first page of this letter, and in a different hand, there is written the number "20", and the words, "Frances Liveing's Death M F K to C M L Ap 28 1843".

Wednesday
April 28
(in a different hand) 1843

I would bow my knee with adoring gratitude, my Catharine, to Him "who hath loved us," for having released our precious Fanny from all possibility of suffering, in mind or body, again! The conflict is over - the enemy vanquished - & this beloved child is re-united to her Father, - but oh, in how different circumstances from those in which they parted!

"I ask them whence their victory came?
They with united breath
Ascribe their conquest to the Lamb,
Their triumph to His death."1
Page 2
I have sometimes indulged myself with comparing our state here to that of captives shut up in a prison house - an order comes for one to be released - the massive doors sound hard while unbarring - but no sooner are they opened, than the captive flies out, &, scarcely saying good bye, flies off to his Father's house, where unutterable joy & liberty await him. The other prisoners, to whom he had endeared himself, lament his loss, & feel their captivity more lonesome & terrible than ever - by & by a messenger is sent to liberate another, till one by one, they are all manumitted, & the dungeons
(page 3)
emptied of all their mourners. I have got a very sweet note from this dear liberated one, written after your last confinement, which I do, & shall continue to cherish through the very short period of my own imprisonment - & if I could, I would now transport myself to her happy chamber, where gazing on her sacred relics,

"In love with the beautiful clay,
And longing to lie in her stead,"2

I would congratulate her beloved Mother on the added links given her with the inhabitants of the Church triumphant, & the honour bestowed upon her, by this mark of adoption in God's own family - the[y] being called to
(page 4)
sacrifice her dearest earthly ties - at His own holy summons.
But I must not write too much now - it is not kind.
I entreat you take care now of your own health, & get all the rest you can. I am thankful George is with you.
Miss Stratford has been exceedingly kind in writing to me so often - be so kind to tell her I am deeply sensible of it.
And now, my own precious C. I commend you & all yours to the love & care of Him upon whose arm you "are coming up from the wilderness."3 He will never leave you nor forsake you - commit all your care to Him - He will not refuse to bear it! "Jesus loved Mary, & her sister, & Lazarus."4 We all feel for & with you.

M.F.K.

Footnotes:
1 This verse is taken from the hymn "Give me the wings of faith to rise" by Isaac Watts (1674 - 1748), from his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 1707 - 09, Book II, number 140. Some information about the hymn, and its full text, may be found at <http://www.hymntime.com/tch/htm/g/i/v/givemetw.htm>; and information about Watts himself may be found on Wikipedia, at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Watts>.
2 These verses appear to be taken from a funeral hymn, "Ah, lovely appearance of death," with lyrics by Charles Wesley, which was used at the funeral of the Earl of Buchan, in 1767. The first verse of the hymn reads as follows:

"Ah lovely appearance of death,
No sight upon earth is so fair;
Not all the gay pageants that breathe,
Can with a dead body compare.
With solemn delight I survey
The corpse, when the spirit is fled,
In love with the beautiful Clay,
And longing to lie in its stead.
The full text of the hymn, and some information about it, may be found at the URL: <http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Ah_lovely_appearance_of_death!_(Benjamin_Milgrove)>.
3 Song of Solomon, chapter 8, verse 5. In the King James Version, the verse reads, "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her beloved?"
4 John, chapter 11, verse 5: in the King James Version, the verse reads, "Now Jesus loved Martha, and her sister, and Lazarus."
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017




23. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 18 May 1843.
Liveing Archive 82a-e LT8

Added in another hand: 1843. The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Nayland, Colchester." On the front of the envelope there is a circular postmark in black ink, which reads ". . ratford on A. . . My 18 1843", and also a red, irregularly shaped postmark, which reads "Paid 19 My 19 1843". On the reverse of the envelope there is a circular postmark in black ink, reading "Colchester My 20 [or possibly 21] 1843." The envelope has been numbered "21", and the following notes have been written on the envelope, in a different hand: "Frances Liveings Death - May 18 1843. M F K to C M L. Mentions Sarah Ann. The Dewe children. Miss Halward & Mrs Pryke of Stoke."

With the letter there is preserved a note which reads, "This letter was written on the occasion of my sister Fanny's death. I do not understand what is meant by 'both the Liveings being come to their daughter.' G.D.L."

Alveston May 18
I have not been well, my precious One, or I should immediately have answered your affecting note received on Monday - & I should have said that the elder Mrs Cardale, after having passed a very suffering night in her last illness, remarked, "Wave upon wave, but not one wave too many" - & that I felt assured it was given my beloved niece in faith, to respond to that assurance under these complicated & successive trials! Your case my C. is like that of the apostles on a stormy sea, when
(page 2)
Jesus was asleep on the pillow, with this difference, that you realize His presence, & acknowledge His love directing the storm for your ultimate benefit - & they scarcely as yet admitting his Omnipotence, fancied they must wake him to give Him notice of the danger. Yes, He is with you, & joy shall come in the morning, however clouded the night may seem!
Blessed be God, this morning has brought comfort in the improved account of dear Sarah Ann1 - I bless Him with, & for, you, that your anxiety respecting her is in any way lessened. If you go to Hastings, think of your aunt
(page 3)
Frances - & wherever your steps are guided, may it be to the spot where you shall each receive the surest blessing!
I am very thankful for your relief in both the Liveings being come to their daughter!2 It is of no use saying that I felt for you! Yet it is sweet [?] to share the burden with those we tenderly love, whether we express it to them or not.
A good account, thank God, from Rockland3 this morning - George is getting well, & Baby has not taken the measles yet, tho' far from well thro' cutting teeth. How does little Ellen4 pass thro' this Infant ordeal? & how many has she?
(page 4)
Mrs Stephenson sends her dearest love to you - she leaves us next week - I assure you each one here has, & continues to, bear you on their heart & lips in truest sympathy. I am glad you have seen Miss Halward, she has been so kind in giving us information about you. Mrs Pryke of Stoke wrote me a very feeling letter last week, & expressed great comfort in the thought of you residing in the parish. I am very glad of it, & especially for the advantage to your young ones of Mr Torlesse's5 ministry.
The Lord be with thee, my precious child, & bring you out in His good time, "as gold tried seven times in the fire"6 - your own in tender love. M F K
How kind to exert yourself in writing to me.

Footnotes
1. C M L's third daughter, Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105). Sarah Ann died on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18, of consumption.
2. George Downing Liveing (TKC 99) left a note with this letter, which states "I do not understand what is meant by 'both the Liveings being come to their daughter.'" If he did not understand what this sentence meant, there is little enough hope that we can make sense of it now. Note that in M F K's letter of the 7th August, 1843 to C M L, about C M L's move to Stoke by Nayland, M F K does remark, "I could indeed have wished that the Liveings could have accompanied you thither!"
3. This refers to a letter from M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine (TKC 9951), whose husband, the Reverend Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), was for many years the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk. "George" is Frances's eldest son, George Downing Dewe (TKC 15867), who was born in 1840, ordained as a priest in about 1864, and died in 1903. "Baby" may possibly be Frances Maria Dewe (TKC 15868), who appears to have been born in late 1841, and who would accordingly have been about 18 months old at the date of this letter.
4. Ellen Liveing (TKC 109) was C M L's eleventh (!) and last child. She was born on the 6th June, 1842 (when her mother was 44 years old), so that when this letter was written she was a little less than a year old; and she died on the 30th January, 1864, aged 21, of consumption.
5. The vicar of Stoke by Nayland was the Reverend Charles Martin Torlesse (TKC 1633). He had come to Stoke by Nayland in 1823, initially as Curate, and became Vicar in 1832. He then remained as Vicar until his death in 1881, so that he was the principal priest of the parish of Stoke by Nayland for some 58 years. His predecessor as parish priest was in fact M F K's husband Francis Knottesford (TKC 7076)- who left the parish in 1823, in order to take up his inheritance of Alveston Manor.
6. So far as I can determine, this is not an exact quotation from the Bible; instead, M F K seems to be conflating at least two Biblical quotations here, probably including Revelation 3.18, where the Laodicaeans are advised to "buy of me gold tried in the fire" (King James version), and possibly also Psalm 12.6, "The words of the Lord are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of fire, purified seven times".

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017






24. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 18 Jul 1843, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 83a-e LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, 40 [?] Wellington Square, Hastings". It has a circular postmark, in black ink, which reads "Stratfo . . . n Avon JY 18 1843 B", and also an irregularly shaped red postmark, which is indecipherable. The envelope has been numbered "22", and on the envelope there is written the following, in a different hand: "M F K - C M L July 18 1843. Mentions Cecilia Prowett & [?] marriage with Mr Blencoe & her being consumptive . . . [?] coming marriage of Maria & Mr Jackson." The reverse of the envelope has a circular postmark in black ink, reading "Hastings JY 20 1843". With the envelope there is a card, presumably written by Professor George Downing Liveing, which reads, "The Prowetts were cousins, descendants of Zachary Chambers. Archdeacon Lyall was Rector of Hadfield and my uncle Henry had at one time been his curate; but the lady to whom the latter was engaged was not Lyall's niece, but Louisa Harrold."

My own beloved Kate
Your dear note was a real comfort to me, for I was feeling anxious about you, & especially respecting dear Sarah Ann1 - Do you think her health was injured by the trials you have undergone? Many are the enquiries, & beautiful are many of the remarks that I receive from distant friends about you - I often think I should like to send as I receive them - but they are touching - judgment forbids what feeling will [?] prompt.
Mrs Stephenson is still with her son, & I do not hear of any intention to visit Assington - her address is, "Trinity Cottage - Southport - Ormskirk - Lancashire."
I have not heard from Miss Jenkinson.
(page 2)
Cecilia Prowett's2 tale is a singular one - she was engaged at the time I told you she was dying, to a Mr Blencowe, whose first wife had died of consumption 2 years before, & was a niece of Mr Prowett, & left one infant daughter - every one supposed that his intended wife would not live to succeed her - however, it pleased God that she should recover sufficiently to marry late in this spring, & they went to Tonbridge Wells - & to the surprize of even her [? his?] own family, they are just come back to her Father's, much improved by the change of air etc. - still, I should think her state is very uncertain.
I dare not use a writing position long together, but I have employed my own pen now to tell you Maria's3 message, & present situation4. My husband's curate has just been appointed to a school near London - in consequence of which opening, your uncle has most
(page 3)
kindly agreed that Jackson shall succeed him in the curacy, & as soon as the lawyers, & other business will permit, that the marriage shall take place, & they continue to live in our house5 - this has always been Maria's particular wish - & if her husband adds as much to the comfort of all her family, as Edward's wife has uniformly done6, we shall have cause for much thankfulness. F.A. is expecting her third confinement the end of this, or beginning of the next, month7 - her own mother cannot come on account of personal indisposition - & may our heavenly Father grant there may be no occasion for it!
I see in the papers that a niece of Archdeacon Lyall is married - is it the same person to whom Mr H. L.8 was engaged?
Baby at Rockland9, like yours, is not well, thro' cutting teeth they suppose - do let me know how yours goes on?
Remember your aunt with grateful
(page 4)
esteem to Miss Stratford - & unite us all in true affection to the beloved ones with you - particular love from M. & each of us to dear Mary.
I am not certain whether I sent you one of our friend Mr Poynder's pamphlets or not? - & therefore enclose it now.

My own dearest Kate's tenderly affectionate

M.F.K.

Alveston Manor
July 18 - 1843.

Footnotes:
1. This is a reference to C M L's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105). At the time of this letter, Sarah Ann was almost certainly suffering from the consumption which caused her death seven months later, on the 22nd February, 1844, at the age of 18.
2. Cecilia Prowett was the daughter of the Revd. Charles Prowett (TKC 21846) and his wife Cecilia Wolseley (TKC 21845). Mr Blencowe (TKC 26514) first married Revd. Prowett's niece, Gratia Prowett, and then, after she had passed away, "kept things in the family" and married Revd. C Prowett's daughter Cecilia - his first wife's cousin.
3. M F K's daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953).
4. At the date of this letter Maria was engaged to be married to the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), who was a gentleman of means, but who then had no position. At the same time, M F K's husband (and C M L's uncle), Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076), was the Rector of the small church of Billesley, near Stratford upon Avon, and had just lost his curate: and so F F K provided for the needs of his own small church, and also those of his prospective son-in-law, by appointing Francis Jackson as his new curate.
5. The lawyers did make difficulties over the settlement, and so the marriage had to be delayed; but it ultimately took place at Billesley Church (where Francis had just become curate) on the 23rd November, 1843. There is an interesting description of the wedding celebrations in Francis Knottesford's letter of the 12th December, 1843 to C M L. After the wedding, Maria and Francis Jackson did live at Alveston Manor, with Maria's parents.
6. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) and his wife Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679) lived with Edward's parents at Alveston Manor, and M F K's remark here suggests that the arrangement worked harmoniously. Frances Anne was often referred to in family letters as "F.A." - possibly to distinguish her from her sister-in-law, Edward's elder sister Frances Catherine, who was usually referred to as "Fanny".
7. John Fortescue was born in 1843 (we do not appear to have an exact date), and is said to have died, unmarried, in the early 1870s.
8. This may be the Reverend Henry Thomas Liveing (TKC 2038), who was the youngest brother of C M L's late husband, Dr Edward Liveing (TKC 98). The engagement which is mentioned here (and in the attached note by George Downing Liveing) must have been terminated in some way, because the entry for Henry in TKC indicates that he never married.
9. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine (TKC 9951) was the wife of the Reverend Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) who was the Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk: and so the "Baby at Rockland" is almost certainly a child of Frances and Joseph. In all likelihood, this will be Frances Maria Dewe (TKC 15868). We do not know her exact date of birth; but census records indicate that on the 30th March, 1851 she was nine years old, so that at the date of this letter she would have been about two years old. So far as we know, the Dewes' next child, Sarah Elizabeth (TKC 15869) was not born until 1844.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



25. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 7 Aug 1843, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 84a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester". It has a circular black postmark, reading "Stratford on Avon AU 7 1843 B", and a further irregularly-shaped postmark, in red ink, reading "Paid 8 AU 8 1843". In another hand, someone has numbered the letter "23", and has written "M F K - C M L Aug 7 1843 removal to Stoke." There is a postmark in black ink on the reverse of the envelope, but the letters are mostly indecipherable.

One line of endeared & heartfelt sympathy must meet my precious niece on her arrival at Stoke! I could indeed have wished that the Liveings could have accompanied you thither! But you have an invisible arm to rest on in coming up from the wilderness! & that arm is mighty!
(page 2)
You are most wise in coming at once to Stoke - it is an effort - but one you will hereafter be thankful to have made.

I do not mean to take up your time, my own beloved & afflicted one, but only to assure you that so far as poor human sympathy goes, you have those here, who would thankfully relieve your full heart
(page 3)
if they could. Take our dearest love - when you can without difficulty, by your own pen or dear Mary's, or Miss Stratford, tell us how your beloved invalid is going on, I shall be thankful.

In tenderest sympathy

your own

M.F.K.

Alveston
Aug. 7

Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge. 2017.



26. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 20 Nov 1843, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 85a-c LT8
On the fourth page, which was left blank by the writer, there is written, in a different hand, the number "24", and the note "Nov 20 - 1843. Maria's marriage".


My precious Kate,
From week to week I have delayed writing to you, because I constantly expected to know when you might think of Maria as undertaking the responsible duties of a wife - only 2 days ago, we had no expectation of their marrying till Spring came round again - but the most kind exertions of Mr Cardale?, & the castigation Jackson gave his solicitors last week, has brought things round, & we are now expecting the marriage to take place on Thursday next1. I entreat
(page 2)
you think of, & pray for her on that day, that she may so pass through her term of wedded life, as she will wish to have done upon a dying bed! His Mother2 & Sister are to remain here till the Wednesday following - think of your Aunt also during that visit!
We have much trying weather for dear Sarah3 - such frequent & alternate changes from cold to comparative warmth - never are you & she absent from my mind - but I cannot see you - I cannot help you! My comfort is that Jesus does both - That "very present help in trouble", who says of His own
(page 3)
church, "I have chosen thee in the furnace of affliction."4
The Lord be with thee, my own beloved niece - very much love is yours, & all yours, from each one here, & especially

from your truly affectionate
M.F. Knottesford

Fanny5 is very grateful for your kindness about M.A. Webb.

Particular love to dear Mary

Alveston
Nov. 20 - 43

Footnotes.
1. MFK's younger daughter, Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953) was engaged to be married to the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), but there had been a long delay, because the solicitors for both parties had not been able to complete the Marriage Settlement in time. Maria's father, Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076) mentions this delay in his letter of the 12th December 1843 to CML, at the bottom of page 6: "the wedding was necessarily so long delayed in consequence of difficulties arising about the settlement, that neither of those parties could stay for it, the former being obliged to return home after 7 weeks' absence, & the latter to leave home for Hastings on account of her health for the winter."
2. There is a little information about Lady Jackson on page 8 of Francis Knottesford's letter of the 12th December, 1843, including that her fortune of £1,200 per year was at her own disposal. This letter implies that she and her daughter might well have been formidable house guests.
3. CML's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105). Sadly, Sarah Ann was suffering from consumption, and the letter seems to indicate that her illness caused her to be badly affected by changes in the weather. Sarah Ann died a few months later, on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18 years.
4. Isaiah 48, verse 10 (King James version).
5. MFK's elder daughter, Frances Catherine (TKC 9951), the wife of the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.



27. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 26 Dec 1843, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 86a-c LT8

Alveston
Dec 26 - 43
My precious Kate
I must write a line to you at this touching season, altho' I know that God is with you of a truth, yet nature thinks & feels, & I cannot but feel with you! This is human sympathy, but you, blessed be God, are a Christian - & you have support which the world knoweth not of - you can rejoice, through tears, at the return of a period that celebrates the wonderful Incarnation, through which your beloved ones were saved
(page 2)
from Satan's power, & now behold the face of their Saviour in glory!1

"Oh, for this love let rocks & hills
Their lasting silence break"2-

Yet a little while, & when patience hath had its perfect work, you too will be casting your crown before the Lamb, & joining with them in an everlasting chorus, with smiles of joy, & no place left for sighing or combating, for sin & sorrow shall have fled for ever!

You have perhaps heard that Miss Harrold is with Fanny3 at
(page 3)
Rockland, who is become exceedingly attached to her - & that she is probably going to Mrs Carus Wilson4, not in their schools, but as a personal assistant to Mrs C.W. who marries off her last daughter in February, & wishes to have their place supplied. I trust it will be a mutual blessing, & then how remarkable it will be that we should be made instrumental in the comfort of one connected with that family, who, as you know, were for many years, my refuge & supporters in
(page 4)
Suffolk!
How thankful should I feel to have your last report of dear Sarah Ann5 confirmed if such be the will of God! I hope poor M.A. will not prove a great trouble to you?
Maria & her husband6 returned on Saturday, & he is gone to assist Edward7, who is overworked, & far from well.
I will not put a black seal, but we are using it for a cousin of my husband's, who has lately left a widow & family, utterly destitute of support! Not by his fault - & they were most affectionate!

With dearest love from all, to all

Your own M.F. Knottesford

Footnotes.
1. MFK is here referring to the deaths of CML's husband Dr Edward Liveing (TKC 98), who had died on the 10th March, 1843, and also of CML's daughter Frances Liveing (TKC 104), who had died shortly after her father, of consumption, on the 24th April, 1843.
2. These lines are taken from the hymn "Plunged in a gulf of dark despair", which was written by Isaac Watts, and first published in 1707. The stanza from which M F K is quoting runs,
"Oh, for this love, let rocks and hills
Their lasting silence break,
And all harmonious human tongues
The Saviour's praises speak."
Watts was born in 1674 and died in 1748, and was a very prolific English hymn writer (his hymns include "When I survey the wondrous cross" and "O God, our help in ages past"). Further information about him can be found at http://hymnary.org/person/Watts_Isaac.
3. "Fanny" is MFK's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (TKC 9951), whose husband Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
4. Mrs Carus Wilson is probably the wife of the Revd. William Carus Wilson. Some details of his life may be found at the website address https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Carus_Wilson. The novelist Charlotte Bronte was one of the pupils at Carus Wilson's Clergy Daughters' School, and it seems likely that the profoundly unflattering portrait of the headmaster, Robert Brocklehurst, in Bronte's novel Jane Eyre is based on Carus Wilson.
5. This is a reference to CML's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105). Unfortunately, any favourable reports of Sarah Ann's health were erroneous, and she died of consumption on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18.
6. Maria" is MFK's younger daughter Maria Margaretta (TKC 9953), who had married the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954) on the 23rd November 1843: at the date of this letter, Maria and Francis had just returned from their "honeymoon". There is a detailed description of their wedding, and a brief character portrait of Francis, in the long letter of MFK's husband Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076) to CML, dated the 12th December, 1843.
7. MFK's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Edward was the priest of St Andrew's Church, Wilmcote (he had in fact founded the chuch, in 1841), and Francis Jackson often assisted him with the services there.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017





28. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 15 Jan 1844, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 87a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester". It bears a red one penny stamp, and has two circular postmarks on the reverse: a black one, whose outer letters are mostly illegible, but with "JA 15 1844 B" in the centre; and a red one, which reads "X 16 JA 16 1844". The front of the envelope is numbered "26", and the following notes are written on it, in a different handwriting: "M F K - C M L Jan 15 1844. Mentions accident to one of C M L children probably Aunt C breaking her arm? Mentions widow of F F K cousin Capt. Fortescue Morgan staying at Alveston left penniless on his death."


No, dearest Kate, Fanny1 concealed from me your precious child's accident, - a habit she is too fond of acting upon, & a really painful one, because it makes one always suspicious - to say that I am not unhappy about you, would be an untruth - but I know that my love for you is more than apathy compared with the love of your Saviour - & I desire to become dumb & open not my mouth! "Ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy."2
(page 2)
We have now a dear afflicted widow staying with us, whose husband, Capt. Fortescue Morgan, has only been taken from her about 5 weeks - but she was forced to leave her house - they had been living only on the ½ pay of a naval captain, & when he died, they had literally but . . . . . in possession! They had wisely trained their daughters for governesses, & the eldest is with Mrs Gurdon [?] near Ipswich - the younger not out yet - & the eldest son is going through the hospitals in London - your uncle &
(page 3)
I, are just now alone, & the attention necessary to pay to our poor friend has prevented my writing for several days; & now makes me hurried - Well, there is but one thing really to be dreaded, & that is, being let alone, & suffered to live at ease, & as we list in this pilgrimage!

To our dear Lord I commit [commend?] my own Kate, & all hers!

M.F.K.

Alveston
Jany 15

Footnotes.
1. MFK's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951), who was married to the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
2. John 16, verse 20 (King James Bible)
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.



29. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 16 Feb 1844, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 88a-c LT8
On the unused portion of page 4, and in a different handwriting, there is written the number "27", and the note "M F K - C M L Feb 16 - 1844."


My precious Catharine,
Would I take you out of those tender & Almighty Hands which are disciplining you painfully for the present, but only "to do you good at your latter end," that you "may not be condemned with the world"? Oh no, & yet my heart humanly bleeds for you, & for your precious child!1 But what a privilege is yours & hers - an assured heir of glory! Pain for an hour - & absence from pain for ever: You have desired to nurse your children for God, & is He not giving you your hire? Has He not done for one2, & is He not doing for another
(page 2)
what the utmost bounds of your conception could desire? Eternity - one safe in Eternity - present with Jesus - & never never can fall or suffer again! & precious Sally safe for Eternity! I can rejoice for you while I weep with you. But you must not add the excitement of writing to me - indeed I had rather bear the uncertain anxiety of never hearing, than feel that you are making such an effort! Is not Miss Stratford with you? I know she would kindly give me a line occasionally - & if she be not with you, what is the cause?
Fanny3 has long been suffering from inflammation etc., in her eye[s], which does not seem likely to be
(page 3)
subdued at present - her husband writes for her, & the last account was the most favourable I have received - but I tell you this because she expresses regret that she cannot assure you with her own pen, how tenderly she bears you on her heart.
Poor Mrs Morgan is still with us, & I hope will remain here some time longer - she is a deep sufferer in every way, & my greatest comfort is in administering those poor attentions, which lighter than a feather in reality, yet are something to a wounded heart.
Give my very dear love to Mary4, & tell her that Maria & her husband5 are taking Mr Seymour's parish duties at Kinwarton for a few weeks, during his absence. Edward & F.A6. with their children are at Wilmcote - he is not well, & has
(page 4)
suffered severely from his head & face, but will not relax, or allow that he is otherwise than well.
Fanny has not heard from Miss Harrold7 since she went to Casterton - I hope she is happy there?
To the care of Him who loves you infinitely more than even your affectionate aunt, I commit my beloved, tenderly beloved Catharine & her dear dear family!

With your uncle's best love
ever my own C.'s

M.F.K.

Alveston
Feb[ruar]y 16 - 44.

Footnotes.
1. At the date of this letter, C M L's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105) was dying of consumption. She passed away some six days later, on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18.
2. Sarah Ann's elder sister, Frances Liveing (TKC 104) had only recently died of consumption as well. She passed away on the 24th April, 1843, at the age of 19.
3. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951), who was the wife of the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), the Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk.
4. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103).
5. "Maria" is M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953), and her husband is the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954). Maria and Francis normally lived at Alveston Manor with M F K. Although Francis was a priest, he was of independent means, and did not have a regular living at any church. Instead, he normally helped M F K's husband out at Billesley Church, and also assisted his brother-in-law Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) at his church at Wilmcote.
6. This refers to M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) and Edward's wife Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679). Edward had founded St Andrew's Church at Wilmcote in 1841, and was its parish priest.
7. This takes up a comment which M F K made in her letter to C M L dated the 26th December, 1843, where she stated that Miss Harrold was "probably going to Mrs Carus Wilson, not in their schools, but as a personal assistant to Mrs C.W. who marries off her last daughter in February, & wishes to have their place supplied." The Revd. William Carus Wilson was the founder of the Clergy Daughters' School, which had previously been attended by the novelist Charlotte Bronte, and at the time of this letter was located in Casterton, Cumbria (which is where Miss Harrold had gone). Some information about Carus Wilson may be found at the web site address https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Carus_Wilson
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



30. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 4 Mar 1844, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 89a-d LT8
The envelope which has been associated with this letter on the website is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a red one penny stamp, with an indecipherable postmark over the stamp itself. On the front of the envelope the number "28" has been added, in a different hand, and there is also written "M F K - C M L 4 Mar 1844 wrong envelope." On the reverse of the envelope there are two unclear circular postmarks, in black ink, which appear to read " . . . ord on Avo . . . FE 26" and "Colc . . . ." There is also a clear circular postmark in red ink, which reads "A 27FE2 1844."


My own precious Catharine1

Your dear note was an unspeakable comfort to me! What can I wish more for thee my love, than what your Saviour is giving, & doing for thee! How remarkably appropriate the psalms were yesterday! I felt myself by your side, believing & hoping you were able to be at church, & took the comfort of them for you -

"In the furnace God may try thee
Thence to bring thee forth more bright;
But can never cease to love thee,
Thou art precious in his sight.

"God is with thee,
God thine everlasting light."2

(page 2)
When Miss Stratford's letter comes, I shall be thankful to hear that you were enabled to gratify your wish - but I am sure you were supported through it - that arm on which you lean in coming up through the wilderness, will never, can never, forsake you - it is a tried, a trusted arm - on it leaned the prophets, apostles, martyrs - & on it leaned your father[s], as will, I trust, lean your descendants, & thousand others, whose remark, like that of the Queen of Sheba will be, "the half was not told me"3 of what I now see, & seeing partake, of thy glory, O Thou Lamb of God, in this
(page 3)
thy kingdom, which will never end! It is a great comfort that you have now Mr Torlesse4 for your own minister, on every account.
The first hope that I have received of dear Fanny's5 eyes, came on last Saturday, but that report speaks of gradual improvement - the white, & pupil too, always appears suffused, as if she had been weeping violently - & the sight I fear was nearly gone. She sent by her husband a message of tenderest feeling to you, & I know that one of her greatest regrets is her inability of expressing her sympathy to yourself.
(page 4)
Give our very affectionate love to dearest Mary6, & to my own George7, whom I look to, to be his mother's friend, & earthly support -
May you all & each be a sanctified family - saved from every delusion & heresy - from the world - the flesh - & the devil - polished shafts in the Saviour's quiver - & blessed recipients of that glory into which four8 of your dearest ones, are entered, & safe for ever!

Your own tenderly loving

M.F.K.
Alveston March 4 - 44

Footnotes:
1. This letter was written very shortly after the death of C M L's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105), and M F K is trying to comfort her niece in her bereavement.
2. M F K appears to be quoting from the third verse of the hymn "Zion stands by hills surrounded", of which the words were written by Thomas Kelly (1769 - 1854), and first published in 1806. In the version which I have found, the whole of the third verse runs as follows:

In the furnace God may prove thee,
Thence to bring thee forth more bright,
But can never cease to love thee,
Thou art precious in his sight.
God is with thee, God is with thee,
God, thine everlasting light. (An alternative version reads, "Thou art precious in his sight."

Further information about the hymn, and also about Thomas Kelly, may be found at the URL <http://hymnary.org/text/zion_stands_by_hills_surrounded>.
3. This is quoted from the First Book of Kings, chapter 10, verse 7 (King James version), relating to the Queen of Sheba's visit to King Solomon's court. The whole verse reads, "Howbeit I believed not the words, until I came, and my eyes had seen it: and behold, the half was not told me: thy wisdom and prosperity exceedeth the fame which I heard."
4. The Reverend Charles Martin Torlesse (TKC 1633) was Vicar of Stoke by Nayland from 1832 until his death at the age of 86 on the 12th July, 1881. He was well known to M F K and her husband, as F F K had preceded Mr Torlesse as the parish priest at Stoke.
5. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951).
6. C M L's eldest daughter Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103).
7. C M L's eldest son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99), who in due course became Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge, and President of St John's College, Cambridge.
8. M F K is presumably referring to C M L's husband Dr Edward Liveing (TKC 98), who died on the 10th March, 1843, apparently of an acute throat infection, and to her children Thomas Liveing (TKC 102), who was less than a month old when he died on the 28th March, 1841, Frances Liveing (TKC 104), who died of consumption, aged 19, on the 24th April, 1843, and Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105), who had died only a few days before the date of this letter, on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18, also of consumption.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



31. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 16 Mar 1844, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 90a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and the initials "p.p." have been written in the top right corner. There are two postmarks: a circular black one, with many letters indistinct, which appears to read " Stratford on Avon MR 16 [?] 1844 B", and a red one, which appears to read "H Paid 18 MR 18 1844." Also on the front of the envelope there is written, in a different hand, the message "M F K - C M L March 16 1844", and the envelope is numbered "29". On the reverse of the envelope there is a circular black postmark, with a number of indistinct letters, which appears to read "Colchester MA 19 1844".

I did intend writing to you this morning, my precious one, before I received your dear enclosure - & now I am further impelled by the love I owe you for giving me what I esteem a double treasure - the words of that book which spoke life & immortality to your exalted child1, written by her own hand! Mr Jones2 once said, "oh that I could wrap myself in some leaves of the Bible, & so fly to heaven." They have both been conducted thither by Him who is the sum & substance of it - He Mr Jones has been
(page 2)
more than 40 years revelling there in joys past our conception - & to her the text she quotes from Genesis has lately been realized - "Joseph said unto his brethren, come near to me3." Sweetly will this remembrance of one I dearly love, as part of you, tho' with my bodily eyes I never saw her, be cherished by your aunt, till the shadows that surround her flee also away, & thro' the blood of Jesus she be permitted to sit at the feet of those who are already with their Lord. Fanny's4 eyes are, thank God, improving - but she is still led blindfolded to Church, & does not venture out of doors except on Sundays. Lee has had
(page 3)
influenza, & the children too have been ill, but thro' mercy they are all getting round again.
If you should ever fall in with the young widow Hoykes [?] of Stoke (for there was an old widow of that name when we left it) will you be so kind to give her my love, & tell her that I often think of her, & trust that she is coming forward in the best things - Jackson & Maria5 are returned to us, & seem really happy in each other. Our poor afflicted cousin, Mrs Morgan, is still with us - I did write to Mrs Rowley in her (or rather in her son's) behalf - she sent me £5, & recommended applying to Mr
(page 4)
Harold6 - but I felt if that good man had any superfluity, it ought rather to be expended in releasing his aged brother from his profession, than upon strangers, & have consequently not followed her advice. I was thankful to hear of his recovery.
How is Mary Ann going on? I hope she has not been more of a trouble than an assistant to you? But I have often thought with some anxiety on the subject.
With affectionate love to dear Mary7, from us all - & to yourself, I am my own Catharine's
tenderly affectionate aunt,
M.F. Knottesford
Alveston March 16th [at this point "1844" has been written in another ink, and the numerals "18" appear to have been blotted out.]
Mrs Stephenson continues ill - confined to her rooms, & chiefly bed, at Clifton.

Footnotes:
1. C M L's daughter Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105), who had died of consumption on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18.
2. The Revd. William Jones was one of the most distinguished churchmen and theologians of the later eighteenth century, and had some influence on the High Church party of the early nineteenth century, and on the Oxford Movement itself. In 1777 he became the perpetual curate of Nayland, in Suffolk, so that he is still known as "Jones of Nayland". He died in 1800, and it seems clear that M F K, writing in 1844, still has a clear recollection of him. There is an entry for him in The King's Candlesticks, at TKC 26226.
3. Genesis, chapter 45, verse 4 (King James Version).
4. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951), who was married to the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), the Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk.
5. This reference is to M F K's younger daughter, Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953), and her husband Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), who had married on the 23rd November, 1843, and were living with M F K, and her husband Francis Fortescue Knottesford, at Alveston Manor.
6.
It is not clear who exactly M F K is referring to here. Edward Fenn has considered that the likeliest candidates are either Dr Thomas Churchman Harrold (TKC 132), who was apparently still practising as a surgeon at the age of about 79, or else his younger brother Edward Betts Harrold (TKC 133), but there is no certainty in the matter. If Thomas Harrold was still practising medicine at such an advanced age, it might have been a very good thing if his slightly younger brother Edward Harrold could have relieved him from the need to carry on in his profession!
7. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.



32. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, Jul 1844.
Liveing Archive 92a-c LT8
There does not appear to be a photograph of the envelope. The fourth page of the letter is numbered "31", and the following is written, in a different handwriting: "End July 1844. Edward B F had been to Stoke & visited C M L & family but returned to Alveston very unwell -
(in another handwriting) ?Date End July 1844

My dearest Cath,
I forwarded Mrs T's [?] note to Rockland1 on Saturday, & feel exceedingly obliged to you, as Fanny will also, & will send you many messages in her next letter, I know. Before we meet, be so kind to ascertain the terms etc. of this good woman - I am very thankful she was disengaged.
Edward2 returned more than gratified - alas, for his own sake too much excited - by his Stoke excursion! He admired your children - your house & everything about you, & felt
Page 2
the suppressed pain he cost you in many houses where for his sake you forced yourself to enter! - he returned on Saturday evening, exhausted, & told them at Wilmcote3, "he could not talk about Stoke - everything else they might ask him! - Monday he came to us, & then poured forth all his fullness - from which time he has been distressingly affected in his head, side (heart I fear) & cramp in his legs4 - he could not leave his bed till yesterday, & then only to lie on a sofa. Jackson5 is exceedingly kind in taking Wilmcote for him, & he & Maria are staying there. It is a great relief that dear E. is
Page 3
at home, & that his wife is with him - He was particularly taken with his cousin George6, & indeed with all of them.
But I have bruised my finger & must give up with tenderest love - A Dieu
M F K

Footnotes:
1. Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk, was where M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue ("Fanny") (TKC 9951) lived - Frances's husband Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was the Rector of the village. M F K is saying that she has forwarded Mrs T's note to Fanny. For some time, Fanny had been suffering from an illness of her eyes.
2. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Clearly, Edward had been visiting C M L and her family in Stoke by Nayland. Edward himself had lived in Stoke until he was about seven years old, because his father had been the parish priest there from before Edward's birth until he moved to Alveston Manor, near Stratford upon Avon, in 1823. The visit to Stoke affected Edward deeply - presumably, because of childhood memories.
3. Edward was the parish priest of St Andrew's Church, Wilmcote, near Stratford upon Avon; indeed, he had founded the church, in 1841. However, at this time Edward, and his wife Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679), did not actually live at Wilmcote most of the time, but instead usually lived with Edward's parents, at Alveston Manor.
4. This was the beginning of a very long period of illness for Edward; he had to spend several months recuperating at Hastings - St Leonard's, and was not able to resume his ministry at Wilmcote until well into the next year.
5. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954) was Edward's brother-in-law - he was married to Edward's younger sister, Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953). Francis Jackson was a priest, but he also had independent means, and accordingly never needed to obtain an official position. Maria and he lived at Alveston Manor with Maria's parents, and Jackson was therefore free to take over Edward's priestly duties at Wilmcote, when Edward fell ill.
6. C M L's eldest son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99), who was aged 16 at the date of this letter, and eventually became Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



33. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 26 Jul 1844.
Liveing Archive 91a-d LT8
"The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a red one penny stamp. On the front of the envelope, and in a different hand, there are written the number "30", and then the words "M F K - C M L, July 26 - 1844, Sympathy for death of Aunt Sarah Ann." On the reverse of the envelope there is a circular postmark, in black ink, reading "Stratford on Avon JY 26 1844 P", and a further circular postmark, in red ink, reading "C7 27JY27 1844"; and there is also written (in the same handwriting as on the front of the envelope) the following: "M F K - C M L 26 July 1844. Edward Fortescue just met from visit to C M L at Stoke but now unwell."

Happy, honoured Mother! - thy short pilgrimage closed, to be assured of meeting three children in glory!1 "Thy daughter is not dead but sleepeth"2 - & that her body only - he - herself is waked up to life & joy unutterable -

"Nothing is dead, but that which wished to die;
Nothing is dead, but wretchedness & pain."3

"The languishing head is at rest,
Its thinking & aching [sic] are o'er,
Her quiet immoveable breast
Is heav'd by affliction no more:
The lids she so seldom could close
By sorrow forbidden to sleep,
Seal'd up in eternal repose
Have strangely forgotten to weep:
Page 2
The fountains can yield no supplies,
These hollows from water are free,
The tears are all wiped from her eyes,
And evil they never shall see."4

I have thought my own dear C. that the physical sufferings you have been so agonized by witnessing in both your precious children, might probably be designed to make you more willing to give them up - & for themselves now, they are as if they had never been - they cannot suffer more. Since your last account I have humbly trusted that her Saviour would either shorten, or lessen her sufferings - He has done the former - & He can support you my precious one. Indeed you are honoured to be thus kept in his school, for whom He loveth, he rebukes &
Page 3
chastises. That only bad sentence is not gone forth "Why should they be stricken any more ? They will revolt yet more & more."5 Her blessed Father6 is no doubt conscious of the rescue of his child, & oh, may it be given him to present all his family to Him who bought them, saying in that day, "Behold here I am, & the children whom Thou gavest me!" Again, I repeat, my dear Catharine, you are an honoured wife & mother. Thousands & tens of thousands would envy you, who are shut up in torments - & thousands too, who though saved themselves, are lost to hope for their dearest ones. "Jesus loved Martha, & her sister, & Lazarus."7
I have got a note of precious Fanny8 to myself, & one to Maria9 - I wish you would send me the least
Page 4
scrap of precious Sally's10 writing too - I shall not have long to keep them, but during a short imprisonment they are sweet. Give her aunt's dearest love to Mary,11 & tell her that my whole heart goes out in sympathy towards her!
Fanny's eyes I fear are bad - I understand the dimness prevents her from doing the least thing - yet there was a little improvement in the last account, if it may mercifully continue - & Lee has been ill with influenza.
Your uncle feels very thankful for having been made a medium of any comfort to precious Sally, & desires me to assure you of his heartfelt sympathy. He & I are now alone with Mrs Morgan, who knows how to feel for you!
Mrs Stephenson wrote after George12 was taken from us, "I often look at the weather house that your George gave to Christopher - where he now is, there are no weather houses, or if there are, the Lady is always out!"
Across top of page 1.
Remember me to Miss Stratford with much regard. Perhaps she will be so kind to tell me some particulars & how you are.
Your own tenderly loving aunt M.F.K.
July 26 (at this point the year "1844" has been added by another hand, in blue ink.)

Footnotes:
1. M F K is referring to the deaths of C M L's children Thomas Liveing (TKC 102), who was born on the 7th March, 1841 and died three weeks later, on the 28th March, 1841; Frances Liveing (TKC 104), who died of consumption on the 24th April, 1843, aged 19; and Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105), who also died of consumption, on the 22nd February, 1844, aged 18. C M L's mourning for Sarah Ann is the primary subject of this letter.
2. This quotation is taken from the description of the raising of Jairus's daughter, in the Gospel of Luke, chapter 8, verse 52: " . . . but he said: Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth." (King James Version).
3. It appears that these lines are quoted from "The Complaint: or, Night-thoughts on life, death and immortality," by Edward Young, which is described by Wikipedia as a "long poem . . . published in nine parts (or "nights") between 1742 and 1745". The lines quoted by M F K are lines 41 - 42 of part I of the sixth "Night" of the poem, "The Infidel Reclaimed". The text of the poem has been made available online, by Project Gutenberg, at the URL <https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33156/33156-h/33156-h.htm>.
4. M F K here quotes (with slight variations) verses 7, 9, and 10 from the hymn "Ah, lovely appearance of death", by Charles Wesley (1707 - 1788). Wesley was among the very greatest of eighteenth-century hymnwriters, but it may be felt that this hymn is not one of his finest. M F K also quotes from this hymn in her letter to C M L dated the 28th April, 1843 (Letter 81). The full text of the hymn, and much information about Wesley's life and work, may be found at the URL <https://hymnary.org/text/ah_lovely_appearance_of_death_no_sight>.
5. Isaiah, Chapter 1, verse 5 (King James Version). I do not understand why M F K refers to this verse as a "bad sentence", nor what she means by saying that it has not gone forth.
6. C M L's husband, and the children's father, Dr Edward Liveing, M.R.C.S. (TKC 98) had died on the 10th March, 1843, aged about 48, of an acute throat infection.
7. The Gospel of St John, Chapter 11, verse 5.
8. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951), who was married to the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), the Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk.
9. M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953), who was married to the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954).
10. Presumably "Sally" was the nickname of C M L's daughter Sarah Ann, who had passed away so recently.
11. C M L's daughter Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103), who was born on the 9th July, 1822, and was therefore 22 years old when this letter was written.
12. M F K's son George Downing Knottesford (TKC 14700), who died, aged 12, in August 1826.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



34. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 5 Aug 1844.
Liveing Archive 93a-c LT8
On the fourth page of the letter, in a different handwriting, there is written the number "32" and the following note: "August 5 1844. Edward Fortescue's illness serious lung trouble & no hope of complete recovery! !"

When I last wrote to you, my precious C. I mentioned what we hoped to be a temporary illness of dear Edward1, originating in excitement - after some days, however, finding it did not subside, your Uncle insisted upon applying to Mr Pritchard, who found that the cause of his disease was, what we least suspected! - a wide spread disorder in the left lung, & of so serious a nature that he desired Dr Thomson to be called in immediately - the result of the stethoscope being applied, confirmed too painfully Mr P's apprehension - This was only last Monday - & for several days immediate danger was apprehended but I bless our heavenly Father
Page 2
that rapid progress has been arrested - but three weeks must pass, if they can succeed in drawing off the fluid, before they can ascertain the extent of this mischief - it is not inflammation, but consumptive matter that has closed all the air vessels, & they think must have been long forming. Such is God's will! Poor Fanny Ann2 is mercifully strengthened for her duties, & has hitherto been night & day in his chamber. Under these circumstances, unless there be an improvement that we are not taught to look for, you my own precious Catharine must not come here - it would be too much for you, & that thought would make me wretched.
Page 3
May I be taught a lesson of resignation from you3! I would not write last week - now I can thankfully say there is hope, at least from very present danger - none for ultimate recovery4. I cannot write more - your own loving aunt
M.F.K.
Love to every dear nephew & niece - Fanny5 has desired me to thank you affectionately - I could be anxious if I dare[d], on her account just now, & have not told her the worst.
Alveston
Aug 5. - 44.
I will write again when the three weeks trial is passed - unless we should be called to a painful sacrifice previously.

Footnotes:
1. M F K's son, the Revd. Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950).
2. Edward's wife, Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679).
3. Two of C M L's daughters, Frances Liveing (TKC 104) and Sarah Ann Liveing (TKC 105) had recently died of consumption - Frances in April, 1843, and Sarah Ann in February, 1844.
4. Contrary to all expectations, Edward did recover, and lived for another 33 years, often in apparently robust health.
5. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



35. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 13 Aug 1844.
Liveing Archive 94a-d LT8

My own dear Catharine,
I am exceedingly grieved that I told you so abruptly of dear E's illness1! In my confusion & distress I fancied I had managed it gently, but I am sure I did not by the effect it had upon you - & oh, how ungrateful & cruel after your tender consideration under greater trials!
I would not write till this morning, because on Saturday he had a sudden alarming
Page 2
seizure, the present danger of which they said would not be past within 48 hours - Blessed be God those hours are gone, & both our medical friends are surprized to see him in an improved state. By their own desire, & that of Fanny Ann's2 family, (not her own or ours) Dr Blakiston from Birmingham was sent for, whose opinion entirely coincided with their own - he has particularly studied that part of the human frame.
Edward suffers most from breath
Page 3
& exhaustion, & they do not suffer him even to be moved from one side of the bed to the other, but by their own hands. His cough is nearly gone - but in his present state, I would not for worlds have you my Catharine subject even to this constant hearing about him - & had rather go from the house myself, than bring you into it. I apprehend that I shall be in a strait between leaving him, or deserting Fanny3 - but "The Lord will provide", & I must leave it all till the time comes. It is in
Page 4
better hands than mine.
Poor F.A. is wonderfully supported - she has not undressed for many nights, & one of us by turns sits up with her. Yet I have a strong belief that I would not part with, that he will be raised to a certain point - & his own persuasion is, that he may live through the winter.
With tenderest love from all here to all - my own precious Catharine's
M.F.K.
Alveston
Aug. 13 - 44 -

Footnights:
1. "E" is MFK's son, the Revd. Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), who was indeed seriously ill for several months after the date of this letter, but ultimately recovered.
2. Fanny Ann (who is also referred to as "F.A.", later in the letter) was Edward's wife (TKC 14679).
3. "Fanny" is MFK's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951). Fanny, and her husband the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) lived some distance away from MFK's home near Stratford upon Avon - in Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk, where Joseph was the Rector. It is not clear what MFK means by her reference to "deserting Fanny". But Fanny appears to have been expecting, and then to have had a baby at about this time - her daughter Sarah Elizabeth Dewe (TKC 15869) was baptised on the 14th November, 1844, and is likely to have been born only a short time before the baptism. If Edward's health permitted, MFK would certainly have wished to be with Fanny at the time of the baby's birth.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.



36. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 22 Aug 1844, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 95a-c LT8
Page 4.

In another hand the letter is numbered "34", and there is written, "Aug 22 1844. Edward K Fortescue's illness. Still very ill."

My precious Catharine - I conclude by this time your beloved Mary1 is returned, & you could have accomplished your journey hither! But so it must not be - there are three persons whom I interdict from our house - yourself, Mrs Stephenson, & Mrs Morgan - & they are just the persons who would give us the greatest comfort. Blessed be God hope rises certainly - but the fluid is not yet sufficiently lessened
Page 2
to ascertain the extent of disease - he is evidently best when least excited, & when he2 is allowed to continue in bed. To day he is suffering from a pain in his leg - the greatest amount of pain that he has yet endured - but the last was a better night than he has usually past -
I trust you will take some journey - I am sure you require physical recruiting3 - Thank you for your kind considerate message to F.A4. - she is yet wonderfully kept up - we make her lie down on a bed at night in his chamber, for out of that
Page 3
we cannot prevail on her to go - her mother & another friend have taken the 2 eldest children5 - the Baby6 is a comfort to her. Amongst our great mercies is Jackson & Maria7 not having left us when he was taken ill - they were going the next Monday -
The Lord ever bless my precious Catharine & her beloved children - dear love to all - your own
M.F.K.
Alveston
Aug: 22 - 44

Footnotes.
1. Presumably C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103).
2. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) was desperately ill, apparently with a lung disease, and remained ill for several months.
3. Recruit, (Dated usage), replenish or reinvigorate (numbers, strength, etc.). "travelling was said to recruit the constitution" Dictionary.com
4. Edward's wife Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679), who was doing her utmost to look after her sick husband.
5. Edward and Fanny Anne's two oldest children were Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684), born on the 26th February, 1840, and Mary Fortescue (TKC 14686), who appears to have been born some time in 1841.
6. Edward and Fanny Anne's third child, John Fortescue (TKC 14688), appears to have been born some time in 1843, and might therefore have been somewhere between 6 and 18 months old at the time of this letter.
7. Maria is M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953), and Jackson is Maria's husband Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954). Happily for the family, Maria and Francis lived at Alveston Manor with Maria's parents (and with Edward and Fanny Anne). Equally happily, Francis was a priest, but with no regular church duties: and so Francis was able to conduct all the services at Edward's church at Wilmcote throughout Edward's long illness.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



37. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 8 Apr 1845, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 96a-e LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester," and it bears a red, postmarked penny postage stamp. Crosswise to this, a different hand has numbered the envelope "35", and has written "M F K - C M L Ap 8 1845. C M L invited to Alveston." On the reverse of the envelope there is an indistinct circular postmark, in black ink, which appears to read "Stratford on Avon AP 8 1845." There is also a red postmark, which appears to read "P[?] K 9 AP 9 1845."

My precious Kate, our letters were likely to have crossed again, for it was only accidental interruption that prevented me from writing yesterday!
Your uncle has been talking of, & anticipating the 8th several days, & now desires me to unite his affectionate wishes for you, with his thanks for all the kind one's [sic] expressed by you for himself!1 May you indeed be blest - you have been blest, & may those rich blessings be
Page 2
continued & multiplied, with a relief from the outward cross, through this & the succeeding years of your pilgrimage! I feel very thankful for your improved account of dear Edward2, & also for the prospect, if it be graciously allowed us, of a personal communication in the next month!
When you can arrange your plans, we shall rejoice to hear them - your Uncle says, you must indeed come now if possible, or he shall never see you
Page 3
again - such could I also say with more human likelihood - I do trust, for more reasons than one, that your way will not now be blocked up, for your presence will be required at midsummer, I trust happily at home - & in August we have the prospect of two confinements in this house! Fanny Ann3 - & the other I have given my promise not to name, but I will to you, & shall tell Maria I have done so4 - yet for your own ears only. I have engaged for her that dear nurse who was with Fanny5 - Mrs Macleod [?]. Remember we have 2 beds
Page 4
now, & entreat you to bring as many of the dear ones with you, as you like to fill them.
Edward6 etc. leaves St Leonard's this week, but Dr Duke insists upon his giving himself 5 or 6 weeks rest on the road before he comes to work, & he has promised to obey him - so they mean to visit some of her relations, etc., in, & near, London.
I write in exceptional haste having been so hindered, or I should lose the mail. Jacksons at Wilmcote7. Tenderest love - your M.F.K.
Dear Mr King has followed & rejoined his wife - a momentary dissolution without any previous pain or suffering.
(written on the inside of the envelope) April 8, 45 - Alveston. I had not heard of the illness of your servant's child. Is he a native of Stoke?

Footnotes
1. C M L was born on the 8th April, 1798, and F F K (TKC 7076) was born on the 4th April, 1772. Since the dates of their birthdays were so close to each other, their respective congratulations and best wishes on each other's birthdays were always at risk of crossing in the post.
2. This may be a reference to C M L's son Edward Liveing (TKC 100), who had presumably been unwell.
3. Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679) was the wife of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 7076). They normally lived at Alveston Manor, although they had recently spent some months at Hastings/St Leonards, where Edward was gradually recovering from a very severe illness. Their son Laurence Fortescue (TKC 14689) was duly born on the 17th August, 1845, at Alveston Manor.
4. Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953) was M F K's younger daughter, and she and her husband Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954) also lived at Alveston Manor. The birth of their daughter Mary Cordelia Jackson (TKC 14734) was registered in the third quarter of 1845, at Stratford upon Avon.
5. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951).
6. Edward Fortescue had been desperately ill since late July 1844, and had been spending a considerable time recuperating at Hastings/St Leonards. We know that Edward did spend a number of weeks returning very gradually from St Leonards to Stratford, because we have a mention of his progress in a letter to John Henry Newman from Newman's close friend Elizabeth Bowden, dated the 15th April 1845: "The Fortescues went on Friday to East Farleigh - he was wonderfully improved in looks and strength - more than I should have expected in the time. He was hoping to go home in about 6 weeks, and was much disappointed at Dr. Duke's telling him at last that he must not think of returning to his parish for months yet - but it is no wonder after such an illness." The visit to East Farleigh, in Kent, will certainly have been to Henry Wilberforce (the son of William Wilberforce, the great crusader for the abolition of the slave trade), who was the Vicar, and who was Fanny Anne's cousin as well as a personal friend of Edward's.
7. During Edward Fortescue's very severe illness, Francis Jackson, who was a priest, had helped Edward out by taking all the church services at Edward's church of St Andrew's, Wilmcote.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge- 2017





38. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 2 Jul 1846, Rockland NFK.
Liveing Archive 97a-f LT8

The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and has a red penny postage stamp, which has been postmarked. On the front of the envelope, and in a different handwriting, the letter has been numbered "36" (the second numeral seems to have begun as a "7", and then to have been changed to "6"). There is then written, "M F K - C M L July 2 - 1846. Writ[ten] fr[om] Rockland where she is stay[ing]. Uncle G. had been staying at Alveston. M F K had past through Ely & found G. Downing still remembered after 40 years." There are two indistinct circular black postmarks on the reverse of the envelope.

Rockland St Mary1
July 2 - 46

You will be surprized, my dearest Kate at the date of this scrawl, for I have not recovered from the surprize of writing it - We parted with your & our beloved George2 on Saturday, when, nor on the following day, had such a prospect any place in my expectation - but on Monday Edward3 came over
(Page 2)
& urged so strongly my returning with the Dewe's, promising to come here & fetch me back, & also to persuade his Father to accompany him, that I felt it might be a duty to strengthen my health for future requirements, & to help dear Fanny with her children under the loss of Lee - & so, your Uncle also pressing it, I did what I could in making the best of a very short notice,
(Page 3)
& left Alveston with them by the rail road, on Friday - our way led us thro' Ely, where I was equally thankful & surprized, to find your blessed grandfather's name4, after 40 years, held in the deepest love & respect - few remembered him personally, but the young had heard of him thro' their parents & grandparents, & told me, before they heard I was his daughter, that no name was equally reverenced throughout the church, & the town! Then
(Page 4)
we parted from poor Lee, & reached this place, now so very much improved & pretty, on the next day. Fanny is still without a nurse, but has heard of 2 that seem to be promising if they, or either of them be not engaged. She has wished to write to you, & so have I, but her time is more than occupied with the charge of her 3 bantlings5, & I have wanted power.
Mr Boultbee & his sister called after dear G's departure, to take leave, &
(Page 5)
grieved us with the prospect of his taking a curacy in Hampshire, alas! Mr B. spoke in the very highest terms of George, & said he had but one fear for him, that he would study too closely6 - his powers of mind & his industry, Mr B. said, were equal, & would carry him through Cambridge with high honors - & that [? The word looks more like "this" or perhaps "thus", but the context appears to require "that": perhaps M F K has simply made an error.] his conduct equal'd both. Sweet sounds to the ear of an aunt, & sweeter still to those Sweet sounds to the ear of an aunt, & sweeter still to those of a mother!
The heat has been
(Page 6)
excessive, but has subsided with us in plenteous showers of rain, without storms, & your aunt is very mercifully rallying in the absence of excitement & the mixture of sea with the land breezes.
Much affectionate love is wafted to you, my C. & to yours, from the Rockland trio - your letter is just come in from Alveston, & we rejoice to hear that you have 3 years certain continuance at dear Stoke,
(Page 7)
& ere that period be elapsed, I trust the house may be your own.
I really hope dear G. assigns the true cause for his looking thin & poorly, because it is a general remark that every one, in Warwickshire at least, betrays similar symptoms.
The Jacksons7 are not yet returned - & Edward has not been well, but F.A.8 speaks of him as recovering, & he is going again to his friend Munro at Harrow.
With tenderest love, ever my own C.'s warmly affectionate
M.F. Knottesford

Footnotes:
1. The address shows that when she wrote this letter M F K was visiting her elder daughter Fanny - Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951). Fanny's husband, the Reverend Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
2. C M L's son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99). Presumably he had been visiting M F K at Alveston Manor.
3. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950).
4. M F K's father, and C M L's grandfather, was the Reverend George Downing (TKC 508). For many years Revd. Downing was the Rector of Ovington, East Tilbury, and a Canon and Prebend of Ely Cathedral. He died in 1809.
5. "Bantling" appears to be an archaic word for a little child. Fanny had three little children by this time: George Downing Dewe (TKC 15867), Frances Maria Dewe (TKC 15868), and Sarah Elizabeth Dewe (TKC 15869).
6. Mr Boultbee's fears were not realised: George ultimately became Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge and also at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, a Fellow of the Royal Society, and President of St John's College, Cambridge.
7. M F K's younger daughter, Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953), and her husband, the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954) had presumably been travelling.
8. Edward's wife, Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679) - M F K normally refers to her as "F.A." in her letters, to distinguish her from her elder daughter Frances Catherine ("Fanny").
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017




39. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 6 Feb 1847, Alveston WAR.
Liveing Archive 98a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester," and has a red penny postage stamp, which has been postmarked. The envelope is numbered "37" (it was originally numbered "36", but a "7" has been printed over the "6"). There is then written on the envelope the following, in a different hand: "M F K - C M L Feb 6 - 1847. Ref[er]s to diff[erences] of climate of Stoke & Stratford. Considers Stoke though cold much more healthy. Mrs E B F loses her mother." On the reverse of the envelope there is a black lump of sealing wax, and three circular postmarks: the first, in black, reads "Stratford on Avon FE 6 1847 B", the second, also in black, reads "Colchester FE 8 1847", and the third, in red, has a small crown at the top, with the letter "C" to the left, and an indistinct letter to the right, and then "8 FE 8 1847" printed beneath.

Alveston
Feb[ruar]y 6 - 47

My precious Catharine should have received an earlier fulfilment of her affectionate order, if all our hands had not been restrained from using a pen - but Frankie1, to whom both M2. & I looked for assistance, was attacked a fortnight ago with fulness in the head, & forbidden to write, or read, or stoop his head, or even go out of the house. Thank God, the sharp medicines that were administered have restored the circulation, & he goes to
(Page 2)
Wilmcote3 as usual - dear M. has had no return of rheumatism from the severe cold, & went comfortably about the house, till, through a little imprudence, she took a fresh cold, & is again confined to her room, but it is only a common one, & with care I trust will soon be removed - She continues to nurse her infant4, who has never suffered from her mother's illness. Your Aunt, Mr Pritchard said the last time he was here, is very much stronger, & hopes to escape from her chamber when the weather becomes milder. Your uncle continues well - & now,
(Page 3)
having done my duty about ourselves, I may indulge my own desires in joining with you in thankfulness to that tender Almighty Father who has hitherto preserved your Beloveds from injury in the cold climate of Stoke - another proof that it is not this or the other place or treatment, but the will of our Father, that determines our state, & He who has heard prayer, I trust will give you at the close of this last month of winter, to praise Him for continuing mercies. The lesson that you are learning, I was taught before you, for I hailed removal into a warmer air than Stoke for both Fanny5 & George6, whose lungs I thought were suffering, but never
(Page 4)
had we so much repeated illness as since we came here - George was soon taken from us, & Fanny was perpetually under medical hands till she returned to the sharp climate of Norfolk! I am now earnestly desiring to commit her in faith to our Heavenly Father for her approaching confinement7 - the first that I have not been with her -
When you write, (& I am sure you will relieve my heart's care for you, by telling me how the dear girls go on) do not forget to name dear George, of whom we were thankful to hear so merciful an account - & give him our love also in your next communication. I hope you find no inconvenience in Mr Green's vicinity at Nayland?
Dearest love from all to all your own
M.F.K.
(Top of page 1, written crossways)
Dear F.A8. deeply felt & feels the loss of her mother - she is now at Wilmcote with her husband, who continues so mercifully free from complaint.

Footnotes:
1. This almost certainly refers to the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), who was married to M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953). Francis and Maria lived at Alveston Manor, with M F K and her husband.
2. "M" must be a reference to Francis's wife, M F K's daughter Maria.
3. This refers to St Andrew's Church, Wilmcote. M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) was the parish priest there, but unfortunately Edward was often unwell. Whenever he was ill, Francis Jackson took the services at Wilmcote for him.
4. Probably Georgiana Frances Jackson (TKC 14735), who was baptised on the 28th October, 1846, and is likely to have been born earlier in October, 1846.
5. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951), who was married to the Reverend Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), who was for many years Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk.
6. M F K's second son, George Downing Knottesford (TKC 14700), who died at Alveston in August, 1826, at the age of 12.
7. Fanny's baby Francis Joseph Dewe (TKC 15870) appears to have been born in the first quarter of 1847. He ultimately followed his father into the priesthood.
8. "F.A." is Edward's wife Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679) (and called "F.A." to distinguish her from M F K's elder daughter Fanny). She is at Wilmcote because that is where her husband was the parish priest.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



40. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 19 Jul 1847.
Liveing Archive 99a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and has a postmarked red "One Pence" stamp. On the front of the envelope, the letter is numbered "38", and the following words have been written, in a different hand: "M F K - C M L July 19 1847. Uncle G - first in his exams at Cambridge. M F K returned from visit to Rockland. My father doubtful what Prof. to take up. Mr Blencoe mentioned." 13 On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks: the first, in black, reading "Stratford on Avon JY 19 1847 B", the second, in red, which appears to read "C F[?] 20 JY 20 1847", and the third, in black, which appears to read, "Colchester JY 20 1847".

Alveston
July 19 - 47
My precious C.
Your dear & gratifying note followed me here this morning - & from my heart do I thank you for so much information - your uncle1 is set at ease by hearing that dear George2 was at the Installation, for he was almost unhappy in the thought of his losing it! Mr Boultbee tells us he was the first in his class at the examinations, & that he is doing great things in Cambridge - may our gracious Father preserve him in equally physical prosperity!
We too are longing for converse with our beloved nieces, whether driving up in a lumbering concern (Mary3 will understand this) or in the lighter conveyance of
(page 2)
a Fly, & shall rejoice to hail their appearance when it can be brought about.
I returned home the Saturday before last, & have daily intended to tell you so, but business pressure after so lengthened an absence, has prevented me. Blessed be God I left dear F.4 certainly much stronger, Yarmouth was much blest to her in this respect, her cough was nearly gone, & she now writes that it is wholly gone. I am longing for Mr Crosse's opinion, who we could not see after her return, but I am now became acquainted with Mrs C. to whom I intend writing when I hear that he has been at Rockland, & I feel sure that she will give me a faithful report.
Jackson5 kindly went from London to R. to fetch me, & we came from Peterborow [?] to Ely on the day after
(page 3)
a fatal accident had occurred on that very road. I found all well here, thank God, - Maria6 with her two chicks7, & the two youngest Fortescues - Edward, Fanny Ann, & the two elder children8 joined us from Rugby9 last Friday - dear E. not well, tho' looking better than I expected - but he has engaged to see Mr Pritchard tomorrow, & put himself again under his care - F.A. expects a confinement in October, & is remarkably well.10
I sincerely feel for you & for your dear Edward11 under his uncertainties! I know you will give me the satisfaction of hearing when he has decided! Three of F.A.'s brothers have been in a like dilemma.
Oh the misery of domestic changes! I do pity you in this also, for I should very much like to be your servant if I were younger, only I fear you would soon dismiss me
(page 4)
for culinary ignorance, & I fear too that I should groan under washing up dishes in this hot weather!

With dearest love from all to all, ever my own Kate's affect[ionat]e Aunt

M .F.K.

Has Mrs Blencowe12 any family?

Footnotes
1. That is to say, M F K's husband, Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076).
2. C M L's son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99). At the time of this letter he was a student at St John's College, Cambridge. In due course he became Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge, a Fellow (and later the President) of St John's College, and a member of the Royal Society.
3. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103).
4. "F" is almost certainly M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951), the wife of the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), who was Rector of Rockland St Mary, Norfolk. It is assumed that Mr Crosse was Frances's doctor, and it appears from this letter that she had been in poor health.
5. The Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), who was married to M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953). Francis and Maria both lived with M F K and her husband at Alveston Manor, and Francis was also his father-in-law's curate at All Saints Church, Billesley. It appears from this letter that Francis, having been in London, fetched his mother-in-law from Rockland St Mary, and escorted her home from there to Alveston.
6. M F K's younger daughter (TKC 9953).
7. Maria's two elder children were Mary Cordelia Jackson (TKC 14734), who was born in the third quarter of 1845, and Georgiana Frances Jackson (TKC 14735), who was born during 1846.
8. The returning visitors were M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), Edward's wife Frances Anne (née Spooner) (often referred to as "F.A.") (TKC 14679), and their two eldest children Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684), who was born on the 26th February, 1840, and Mary Fortescue (TKC 14686), who was born in 1841. The two youngest children, who had been left behind at Alveston Manor, were John Fortescue (TKC 14688), who was born in 1843, and Laurence Fortescue (TKC 14689), who was born on the 17th August, 1845.
9. We do not know why Edward and Fanny Anne had been visiting Rugby: but Fanny Anne's youngest sister, Catherine, was married to Archibald Campbell Tait (TKC 15873), who was then the Headmaster of Rugby School, in succession to Dr Arnold. Edward and Fanny Anne may very well have been visiting the Taits. Archibald Tait later became Dean of Carlisle, and then Bishop of London, and then Archbishop of Canterbury.
10. George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690) was duly born in October 1847. He became first Superintendent of the Reading Room, and later Keeper of the Printed Books, at the British Museum.
11. This must be C M L's son Edward Liveing (TKC 100). Edward became a doctor, and ultimately became the Registrar of the Royal College of Physicians. At this time, he appears to have been uncertain as to what profession he should follow.
12. Mrs Blencowe was born Cecilia Prowett, and is mentioned in M F K's letter of the 18th July, 1843.
13. This note must have been written not by Professor George Downing Liveing (as seems to have been the case with most such notes), but instead by one of Edward Liveing's children, (probably Edward H.T. Liveing) who indicates that Edward was having some difficulty in choosing a profession.
Transcribed by Dr S Lapidge 2017.



41. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 28 Aug 1847, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 100a-d LT8
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a red penny stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there is a circular postmark in black ink, reading "Stratford on Avon AU 28 1847 B". There is a further circular postmark, again in black ink, reading "Colchester AU 30 1847", and there is a third circular postmark, in red ink, reading "30 AU 30 1847". On the front, the envelope is numbered "39", and there are written the following words, in a different hand: "M F K - C M L Aug 28 1847 another child to E B F exp in Oct. The house at Wilmcote finished & nearly ready for his occupation."

My own dear Kate,
It is really extraordinary, & mortifying, how we have been for a long time, like two buckets in a well - our mutual plans never assorting!1 How glad should I have been could my beloved nieces have taken their journey hither now, or during any period between my return from Rockland2 & the time you mention! But F.A.3 is to be confined here, & the only one bed we have left, will be occupied then by her husband at night, & the infant & nurse will have the use of it in the day. Her expected period is in October4, but she is weakened by
(page 2)
her three disappointments last year, & Mr Pritchard, fearing anticipated confinement, orders her perfect quiet at present & for the next fortnight, but he sees no cause for further alarm in her case. Their house at Wilmcote5 is finished all but airing & furnishing - if it be considered sufficiently dry, they will enter it when they leave us in the winter, at any rate if all their lives are spared, they are not likely to return here as their home next summer, & then we should be less cramped for room to receive dear relatives! Mr Pritchard's treatment was, through the mercy of God, blest to [sic] Edward's recovery, & we have
(page 3)
not seen him so well as he now is, for some years past6.
Mrs Crosse tells me that her husband considers dear Fan [?]7 improved, but that she must be very careful to avoid taking cold, & evening air - her husband writes that she took a cold in the change of weather & retains a cough which though trifling, he wishes were removed, & that her strength returns very slowly.
I feel for your disappointment my C. in your late journey, & leaving your new servants, as I do for our own in losing our dear niece's society the present year. It is a long journey you are undertaking without a male guard, but that Eye which orders all events, will be upon you, & I confidently trust will strengthen
(page 4)
your mind, & preserve you from all evil - no obstruction can occur, no wheel take the wrong direction without His permission, & the prayer of faith secures safety to our paths. If you have leisure, let me hear from you when you have reached your destination, & I have no doubt of receiving a safe & happy report.
I wonder what sort of sermon the Bishop of Tasmania8 gave you - but I now recollect it is not he, but the B[isho]p of Toronto9 who is said to be a high Tractarian - so I beg his Lordship pardon for questioning his orthodoxy.
You will be heard my C. for dear Edward, as you have been for his beloved brother, who I hope we shall see when he come [?] to Mr B's, because we can get him a comfortable bed at Mrs Allen's, even should our own be filled.

With dearest love to all, your own in true affection.

M.F.K.

(top of page 1, written crossways) It will indeed be sad if no public thanksgiving be appointed for such great relief & bounty, but I expect nothing from our legislators.

Alveston Aug. 28 - 47.

Footnotes:
1. According to the online Free Dictionary, at <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/assorting>, "assort", as an intransitive verb, can mean to "agree in kind; fall into the same class". It appears that M F K is using that meaning of the word here.
2. Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk, was the home of M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine (TKC 9951), whose husband Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was the Rector of the village.
3. "F.A." is Frances ("Fanny") Anne (TKC 14679), the wife of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Edward and Fanny Anne lived with Edward's parents at Alveston Manor.
4. Edward and Fanny Anne's son George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690) was duly born in October 1847. He first became Superintendent of the Reading Room, and later Keeper of the Printed Books, at the British Museum.
5. Wilmcote Vicarage, which was designed by the noted architect William Butterfield. The contract for the construction of the Vicarage is preserved in the archives of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, in Stratford upon Avon.
6. Edward was desperately ill, apparently with a disease of the lung, in 1844 - 45.
7. This may well be M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine.
8. According to Wikipedia, the Bishop of Tasmania, from 1842 until he retired on account of ill health in 1863, was Francis Nixon.
9. According to Wikipedia, the Bishop of Toronto, from 1839 to 1867, was John Strachan. Wikipedia does devote a paragraph to his "High Church Views", and comments that he was "intensely devoted to the promotion of the Anglican position in Canada," and that he "stressed the ancient practices and historic liturgy of his church."
This presumably relates to a comment in C M L's (lost) letter, to which this letter is a reply.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



42. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 29 Sep 1847, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 101a-b LT8
Only the envelope found which reads: "MHK to CML Sept 29 1847. Uncle George staying at Alveston Maria (Mrs Jackson) youngest child George 1 year old today born 29 Sep 1846 [40]"



43. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 17 Apr 1848*, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 193a-c LT15
The envelope does not survive. On the blank, fourth page of the letter, someone, in another ink, has written: "17 Ap 1850* Fanny's baby's illness. Goymer letter."

Alveston April 17
1850 (in another ink, *date in question see below, 1848 has been adopted)
Dearest C.
We are longing to hear of dear George1, & the issue of his "Little go" ?
Poor Goymer's2 letter was really affecting - it did not denote high spirit, & there was no abuse of any one - where can he be now hiding his head? I do feel for him, having known, & respected him for so many years - of Cook the butcher we never had a good opinion.
Fanny's baby3 has 3 disorders - inflammation of lungs & liver, which reached the heart - immediate but not ultimate danger is removed - she longs to bring him under Mr
(Page 2)
Pritchard4, as Mr Crosse is 5 miles off, & he needs frequent looking to - but I see not when the Fortescues can make way for them5.
May this be a holy, & a profitable season6 to each of us, & our families!
How very graciously has the Lord again nationally relieved us! To lie down in our beds, & move about, "none making us afraid", is wonderful!

Your own in dearest love to all
M.F.K.

(Page 3)
Do get "Fleming's Rise & Fall of the Papacy" - 2/- sold by Shaw London - It was originally written in 1701, & predicts the waning of the Papal power in 1848 - after the overthrow of the French monarchy. We have the original work - but that part is reprinted, & very curious.

Footnotes.
1. C M L's eldest son, George Downing Liveing (TKC 99).
2. Goymer was a bookseller at Stoke by Nayland, who is referred to from time to time in this correspondence, and sometimes supplied hymn books to M F K's husband.
3. "Fanny" is M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951). Her baby (a little boy) may well be Francis Joseph Dewe (TKC 15870), who was born in the first quarter of 1847. Fanny's only other son was George Downing Dewe (TKC 15867), who was born on the 30th July, 1840.
4. Mr Pritchard was the "family doctor", at Stratford upon Avon, who had looked after M F K and her husband, and many other members of the family, for many years.
5. Alveston Manor was a large property, but it did not have unlimited accommodation. For a number of years M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) and his family had been living at Alveston Manor, while Edward was parish priest at Wilmcote, about 4 miles from Alveston. Wilmcote had originally had no Vicarage, and accordingly Edward had either "commuted" to Wilmcote from Alveston Manor, for Sunday services and his other priestly duties, or else had sometimes occupied lodgings in Wilmcote. However, Edward had now had a Vicarage built at Wilmcote; M F K's letter 100, dated the 28th August, 1847, confirmed that by then the Vicarage had been completed "all but airing & furnishing", and that by the next summer Alveston Manor would no longer be Edward's family home. M F K's comment in this letter suggests that Edward and his family would be moving to Wilmcote in the near future, but not just yet, and that M F K would not have room for Fanny and her family at Alveston until Edward and his family had left.
6. The reference to a "holy" season suggests that this letter may possibly have been written at or near the beginning of Holy Week and Easter, which are among the most solemn of the Church's festivals. We do not know in which year this letter was written - the family member who reviewed the letters in later years suggested 1850. In 1850, Easter was celebrated early, on the 31st March; but in 1848, which I believe is a more probable date for the letter, Easter was on the 23rd April, in which case M F K's letter would have been written on the Monday in Holy Week.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017

*When was letter 193 written?
I believe that this letter was written on the 17th April, 1848, rather than on the 17th April, 1850. My reasons for this assertion are as follows.
1.MFK hopes that this will be a "holy and profitable" season for both families. The word "holy" probably means that one of the church's important festivals is coming up; and given that the letter was certainly written on the 17th April, the festival in question is probably Easter, with the Holy Week which precedes it. There is no other "season" in the church's year which falls around the 17th April. In 1850, Easter fell early, on the 31st March. Conversely, in 1848 Easter was on the 23rd April, so that, if MFK did write her letter in 1848, she would have been writing on Monday in Holy Week. During the whole decade from 1840 to 1850, Easter only fell after the 17th April in 1840 and in 1848, and 1840 is not a possible date for this letter, because the letter refers to Fanny's sick baby, and her first child was not born until the 30th July in that year.

2.Fanny Dewe is dealing with a sick baby boy. Fanny did have a baby boy, John William Fortescue Dewe (TKC 26936) at some time in the spring of 1850, but probably not as early as the 17th April (in letter 195, which was written on the 22nd May, 1850, the baby has not yet arrived, and M F K is wondering whether it will be a girl). The alternative is Francis Joseph Dewe (TKC 15870), who was born in the 1st quarter of 1847, and therefore might have been 13 - 15 months old on the 17th April, 1848. M F K could certainly not have described Francis Joseph Dewe as a "baby" in April, 1850.

3.Robert Fleming's A Discourse on the rise and fall of Papacy, 6th edition, was reprinted some time in 1848, in London and Aberdeen (although I do not know exactly when in 1848). The French monarchy actually was overthrown in February 1848 - Louis Philippe abdicated on the 24th February, and the Second Republic was declared on the 26th February. The Papacy had very great difficulties later in 1848 (the Pope had to escape from Rome in November). Fleming's book would have been a highly topical subject of discussion in April 1848, but very much less so by 1850.

4."I see not when the Fortescues can make way for them". Edward and Fanny Anne had lived at Alveston Manor for many years. However, in 1847 Edward arranged for a Vicarage to be built for them at Wilmcote, where Edward was the parish priest. Letter 100, dated the 28th August, 1847, confirms that by that date the Vicarage was complete, except for "airing & furnishing", but the letter also shows that Edward and Fanny Anne would not be taking up permanent residence in the Vicarage until some time in the following year. And letter 194, which I have dated the 18th May, 1848, indicates that Fanny Anne and her "little tribe" had only finally left Alveston Manor a few days previously. Thus, it makes sense that on the 17th April, 1848 Fanny Anne was not yet ready to leave Alveston, to make way for her sister-in-law Fanny Dewe, and her baby; but I am not aware of any reason to think that the Fortescues would be staying at Alveston Manor in April 1850.

5.A national emergency has just been averted. So far as I know, England had few if any national emergencies in 1850; but that was definitely not the case with 1848. There were several revolutions in Europe (most of them unsuccessful, and bloodily suppressed), and in England the Chartist Movement caused real fears of revolution. On the 10th April 1848, there was a mass meeting on Kennington Common, which was to involve a march on Parliament, to present a petition for reform. Large numbers of special constables were recruited, to prevent the protesters from crossing the Thames, or getting anywhere near Parliament. In the event, the petition is supposed to have been brought peacefully to Parliament in three cabs, with the Chartist leaders walking alongside. Within two days, the authorities had asserted that there weren't nearly as many valid signatures on the petition as the Chartists had claimed, and the newspapers thereupon decided that the whole presentation of the petition was a fiasco, and reported accordingly. This might just fit with what MFK wrote on the 17th April.
Dr Stanley Lapidge, 3rd January, 2018



44. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 18 May 1848*, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 194a-c LT15
Along the right-hand margin of page 2, these words are written crossways, and in a different ink: 18 May 1850*. 12. (Then a 12 in another ink, numbering the letter in the collection)
12 * See below

18 May 1850 (in another ink)
Precious Kate - an inflamed eye, and after that a lame arm, prevented my replying to your first letter, & very kind it was to write again, & tell us of Miss Stratford's amendment, for which I rejoice for your sake & her own - pray tell her so with my kind regards.
Yes, we did see dear George's honorable station1 very soon after I wrote the enquiry, but I was too blind to send you your uncle's & all our party's congratulations!
You were very wise in directing the tale respecting Crowfield to be told to Edward2! I have apprized him of it, but the letter has not arrived yet.
In reading over your dear Aunt Frances' MSS lately, I have found a letter that interested me much, but I felt would interest you more, & amuse you also! So here it is, that the heroine of the
(Page 2)
tale may peruse, & show it to her children now themselves past a similar display! So evanescent are all earth's enjoyments!
Fanny Ann & her little tribe3, except the 2 youngest, left us on Tuesday for a fortnight's visit to her father4, & to return to us as their home, no more! It is no common mercy to have lived together for 10 years, without one discordant word, & I trust without a discordant thought - yet this very union throws a shade of sadness over my mind on parting, which I am sure you can understand5.
Your uncle rather alarmed us last week, & we prevailed with him to apply to Mr Pritchard6, who through the great mercy of God, assured us there was no cause for alarm - that his cough, defluxion, weakness etc., were only the result of influenza, & he was rather feverish - the medicines he prescribed have been blest to him, & he is now as well as usual.
The Dewe's7 we are expecting this evening, if God prospers their journey, which they are accomplishing in one day!
Pray let us hear when you go to London, & all about it - we shall think of the bridesmaids.
(written crossways on page 1)
Much love from all to all - your own M.F.K. May 18th. Mrs Stephenson is going to Newton & Assington.

Footnotes
1. C M L's eldest son, George Downing Liveing (TKC 99). George's life was filled with academic honours (he ultimately became the first Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge), and there is no way to tell which honour is referred to here.
2. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950).
3. "Fanny Ann" is Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679), who was married to M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), and thus was M F K's daughter-in-law.
4. Fanny Anne's father was William Spooner (TKC 14680), who was Rector of Elmdon (near the present-day site of Birmingham Airport) and Archdeacon of Coventry. Archdeacon Spooner was very elderly, and had not been in good health.
5. On the assumption that this letter was indeed written on the 18th May, 1848, Edward and Fanny Anne are now moving permanently from Alveston Manor (where they had been living for most of the time since their marriage, on the 15th November, 1838) to Wilmcote, about three - four miles away, where Edward was the parish priest. St Andrew's Church, Wilmcote, was built in 1841, but the Vicarage was not begun until 1847. During the years when there was no Vicarage, it appears that Edward either "commuted" from Alveston Manor, or else at some periods he stayed in lodgings in Wilmcote. However, M F K's letter of the 28th August, 1847 (letter 100) confirms that by that date the Vicarage had been substantially completed, and only needed airing and furnishing, so that in due course Edward and Fanny Anne would be moving into the Vicarage permanently. It appears probable from this letter that they spent at least much of the winter of
1847 - 48 at Wilmcote (so as to reduce commuting during the inclement weather); they probably returned to Alveston Manor for a time during the spring, and then finalised their move to Wilmcote at about the time of this letter.
6. The Knottesfords' family doctor.
7. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951), and her husband the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952). Joseph Dewe was Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk, and so the family were hoping to travel from Norfolk to Stratford upon Avon in a day.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017

* What is the date of Letter 194 ?
This letter was probably written on the 18th May, 1848, rather than the 18th May, 1850. I assert this for two reasons.
First, on the 18th May, 1850 M F K's elder daughter Fanny was very heavily pregnant, and it would not have been sensible for her to travel from Norfolk to Alveston at all, let alone to do so in a day (there are references to the pregnancy in letter 192, written on the 19th February, 1850, and in letter 195, written on the 22nd May, 1850).
Second, the sixth paragraph of this letter, with its reference to "Fanny Ann and her little tribe" no longer living at Alveston Manor, fits very well into 1848, but does not fit into 1850 at all. Fanny Anne and her husband, M F K's son Edward, had been living at Alveston Manor since their marriage, on the 15th November, 1838. Edward was the parish priest at Wilmcote, about 3 - 4 miles from Alveston Manor, and he had recently built a Vicarage there. In letter 100, dated the 28th August, 1847, M F K writes "Their house at Wilmcote is finished all but airing & furnishing - if it be considered sufficiently dry, they will enter it when they leave us in the winter, at any rate if all their lives are spared, they are not likely to return here as their home next summer . . . ." Thus, some time after the 28th August, 1847, Fanny Anne and Edward were going to begin living permanently at Wilmcote Vicarage, rather than at Alveston Manor. Letter 194 appears to be describing the final stages of the moving process. Conversely, Edward and Fanny Anne did not move anywhere at all during May, 1850.
Dr Stanley Lapidge, 27th December, 2017.





45. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 6 Jul 1848, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 186a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and has a postmarked red one penny postage stamp. The envelope has been numbered "1", and on it there is written the following, in a different hand: "M F K - C M L July 6th 1848 John Ambrose Marriage to Eliz. Liveing mentioned - C M L & 2 d[aughters] invited to Alveston." On the reverse of the envelope there are three postmarks: a red circular postmark, bearing the letters C and W, with a crown symbol in between the letters, and then "7 JY 7 1848"; a black circular postmark, on top of the previous one, with "Stratford on Avon" and the characters JY 6 (other characters are indistinct); and a circular black postmark, reading "Colchester JY 7 1848".

6 July 1848 [but this date has been written in another hand]
Dearest Kate - we did see the marriage1 in the St James's2, but 2 items (the mis-spelt name, & the bride's father being designated Captain) made us doubt whether they were the parties - a subsequent paper has set it all right - but do tell me which of your brothers in law it is? I did not know that either of them was connected with the navy or the army - is it Charles?
Fanny's3 baby4 is still a sojourner in this lower world, & his symptoms are certainly improving, but the 2 eye-teeth make no progress, & unless they come out, & his strength increases, we dare not feel any confidence in his recovery - & this leads me to your question, or rather to its answer. The Bishop's5 confirmation
(Page 2)
& visitation are to be in the last week of this month, & the first week in August - (he is to abide with us both times!) immediately after which the Jacksons6 go to his mother7 - but neither of his sons your cousins consider it safe for your uncle to be left with the necessary charge of his whole duty8, for tho' surprizingly well for a man of 76, age tells upon him, & assistance is often requisite - so they have settled among themselves, that Joseph shall return to Rockland next week - remain there three weeks, & come back to join Fanny & assist her father, in the same week that the J's leave us - & they the Dewes will continue here so long as he can properly be absent from his parish.
Now we have set our hearts upon your & the dear girls coming to us9, as soon as you can remove after the first week in August to enjoy,
(Page 3)
& be enjoyed by, dear Fanny, who longs to see you again, & be introduced to her younger cousins - you will also see her four children. We shall then have 2 beds, one large, & one small, (which the Jacksons will leave) for your occupation, & I trust dear Mary will find no loss in the absence of one cousin, while she has the society of another, who I am sure she will equally love.
I am very glad Miss Stratford has found that usual restorative, change of air, beneficial to her, & only hope the benefits may not be lost thro' the foggy malaria of Manchester!
Have you been able yet to see Mr Goymer10, & know whether he received your Uncle's letter with its enclosure?
Farewell dearest - best love from all to all - my own C's affectionate
M.F.K.
Alveston
July 6 -

Footnotes:
1. The note which has been written on the envelope of this letter indicates that this was the marriage of the Revd. John Ambrose (TKC 7037) to Elizabeth Thorogood Liveing (TKC 2065). The marriage is said to have taken place on the 29th July, 1848, some weeks after the date of this letter: so perhaps the announcement in the St James's was that the wedding was going to take place, rather than that it had already done so. Elizabeth was the daughter of Captain William Liveing (TKC 136).
2. This may possibly refer to the English Churchman and St James' Chronicle, which appears to have been founded as The English Churchman in 1843, as a successor to the St James' Chronicle, which had been founded in 1761. Wikipedia indicates that The English Churchman was originally Anglo-Catholic (so that it might well have been acceptable to the tastes of M F K), but that it later became vigorously evangelical and Protestant.
3. "Fanny" is M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951). It seems that Fanny and her children were staying with her parents at Alveston.
4. This is likely to be Francis Joseph Dewe (TKC 15870) who appears to have born in the first quarter of 1847, and lived until 1902.
5. This refers to the Bishop of Worcester, as Stratford upon Avon was within the Diocese of Worcester until the Diocese of Coventry was founded in 1919. At this time the Bishop of Worcester was Henry Pepys. It appears that M F K and her husband Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076) knew him well; F F K's letter to C M L dated the 12th December, 1843 confirms that F F K, and his younger daughter Maria, had recently been staying with the Bishop at his official residence near Worcester, and that the Bishop had previously visited F F K at Alveston Manor, twice.
6. "The Jacksons" are M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953), and her husband, the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954), who normally lived with M F K and her husband at Alveston Manor.
7. F F K has something to say about Francis's mother in his letter of the 12th December, 1843: she is clearly very well off, but is "a very peculiar woman."
8. F F K was Rector of Billesley, near Stratford upon Avon, and customarily took the services there every Sunday - a morning service at 11.0 a.m., and evensong at 3.0 p.m. (There is a story that the whole family, and his servants, accompanied him to this service, and would serve a cold dinner after the morning service.) Maria's husband Francis Jackson had been appointed as Curate at Billesley, and would normally help F F K with the services. But the fact that Francis and Maria were clearly going to be absent for some time meant that some other provision had to be made to help F F K with the services at Billesley. The "cousins" who M F K refers to are probably F F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), and his son-in-law, Fanny's husband, Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952). They were both priests: Edward at Wilmcote, near Stratford upon Avon, and Joseph at Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk. Neither of them could readily help F F K out at Billesley unless they could get another priest to take the services at their own church; and from this letter it appears that Joseph could accomplish this more easily than Edward, so that Joseph went back and forth across the country, to help F F K as much as he could and also look after his own parish, while his wife Fanny, and the children, continued their visit with Fanny's parents at Alveston.
9. It appears from other letters that C M L was due to visit M F K at Alveston in August 1848, and that she was to bring her two eldest surviving daughters with her: Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103), and Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106). Clearly, Mary had met M F K's daughter Maria on a previous visit to Alveston, and may be disappointed that she will not be seeing her this time; but M F K assures her that she will be able to visit with Fanny instead.
10. Mr Goymer appears to have had a shop in Stoke by Nayland, and F F K sometimes obtained books from him.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



46. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 28 Jul 1848, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 187a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester." It bears a postmarked red one-penny stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there is an indecipherable red postmark, and two circular black postmarks. The first of them reads "Stratford on . . . . JY 28 1848 C", and the second of them reads "Colchester JY 29 1848". On the front of the envelope there is the number "2", and the following has been written, in another hand: "M F K C M L 28 July 1848. Jacksons away. C M L & 2 daughters coming to stay. Curtains to beds or no ? ?"
This letter was written very shortly after Letter 186, which is dated the 6th July, 1848, and it refers to the situations which are mentioned in that letter. In particular, Letter 187 is written in the anticipation that C M L and her daughters Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103) and Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106) will be coming to visit M F K and her husband at Alveston early in August, as soon as Francis and Maria Jackson have gone off on their travels.

(Address in a different ink and handwriting)

Alveston
July 28 1848

Dearest Kate,
In the midst of hurry skurry with I can't tell you how many Clergy & Laity after the Confirmation, besides the Bishop, I am unwilling to lose a post in telling you that the Jacksons certainly plan D.V1. setting off on Monday sennight, august 7 - & we trust you will not be long after in coming to us - your Uncle only says, do not come on Saturday - as soon as you can fix be so kind to tell us -
(page 2)
& I know my own Catherine will make no hesitation in telling me whether either of her beloveds, whom we hope to see, is in the habit of sleeping without curtains? It makes no difference to us, only I would have the small bed prepared with or without them, according as the dear girls are accustomed.
"So no more at this time from your loving" Aunt
M.F.K.
July 28 -

Footnote.
1. "Deo volente", that is, "God willing".
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017




47. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 6 Jan 1849, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 188a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester," and has a postmarked red penny postage stamp. The envelope is numbered "6", and the following is written, in another hand: "M F K - C M L Jan 6 1849. The fathers & the poor outlook in med. prof. Mr Boutlbee's need of pupils. Johnny Fort. at Mrs Stephenson's at Lympsham - F.A. still ill. Mrs Bacon (nurse) has been with Mrs Dewe but leaving." On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks: the first, in black ink, reading "Stratford on Avon JA 6 1849 B"; the second, in blue ink, reading "Colchester JA 8 1849"; and the third, in red ink, with the symbol of a crown at the top, reading "8 JA 8 1849".


Alveston Jan[uar]y 6
1849 (in another ink)

Only time, dearest Kate, to thank you for your own, & Mrs T's1 letter - & to assure you that I sympathize most truly in your perplexity - one sound is heard by all parents, but that will not relieve you! Mrs Lloyd, whose son is studying civil engineering, says they tell her, that though flat at present, there will be a re-action before long - I wish for Edward's2 sake it may be so, but I fear Mrs T. would have foreseen it.
Did you receive Mr T. Boultbee's sermon? He is in sad want of pupils, having no resources but from them, & I fear will be driven to
(Page 2)
straits - If you, or dear George3, or any of your friends could procure him one or more, it would be doing him a great kindness.
How does this severe weather agree with dear Anna?4 - I feel anxious about her.
Johnny5 is with Mrs S. now at Lympsham, & enjoying himself with the children there, & sends us pricked letters. His poor mother6 still at Leamington, rather better just now, but we hear of no radical improvement.
Mrs Bacon returns to day [sic] - I am very sorry she is obliged to go, she was so very useful to Fanny7, who I hear of now getting weak as usual, & carried upstairs, but walks down - when you have leisure to see Bacon, will you be so kind to ask her real
(Page 3)
opinion of her, & whether her legs do not swell? She will miss B. sadly I fear.
Will you give me Mr Liveing's address in London, & then I would send the towelling to their house, as you have frequent communications with them. I will tell you the price next time.
Maria8 is going on well, thank God, & all are well here.
Dearest Kate, my wish for you & yours, as well as for ourselves, thro' the rising year is contained in the valuable Collect for the Circumcision9 - that given, whether we die or live, All will be well.

With dearest love to all & from all

Your own M.F.K.

(Page 4)
I deeply regret they do not part with their nurse maid & take yours. I know she continued her old habit of smoking when they were here in the summer.

Footnotes.
1. Presumably Catherine Gurney Torlesse (née Wakefield) (TKC 1636), the wife of the Revd. Charles Martin Torlesse (TKC 1633), who was the Parish Priest of Stoke by Nayland. It appears that the Torlesses and the Knottesfords were close friends - M F K's husband had been the Parish Priest of Stoke by Nayland before Mr Torlesse.
2. This may refer to C M L's second son, Edward Living (TKC 100), who was nearly 17 years old at the date of this letter. Despite any present difficulties, Edward ultimately became a very distinguished member of the medical profession.
3. At the time of this letter C M L's son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99) was an undergraduate student at St John's College, Cambridge, and might perhaps have known of other students who could have benefited from Mr Boultbee's tuition.
4. C M L's daughter Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106), who had been to visit M F K at Alveston with her mother and her elder sister Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103) in August 1848: letters 186 and 187, which were written in July 1848, refer to the imminence of the visit.
5. John Fortescue (TKC 14688) was the second son of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). He was born in 1843, and would thus have been about five years old at the date of this letter. He was staying with Mrs Stephenson (who was a good friend of the family) because of his mother's illness.
6. Johnny's mother is Frances Anne ("Fanny Anne") Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679), the wife of M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). There is further information about Fanny Anne's ill-health in Letter 189, of the 14th May, 1849: sadly, it appears that it may have been caused by her use of laudanum (which may well have been prescribed for her as a painkiller, during one of her pregnancies).
7. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951). We do not know why Fanny was so unwell, but she had recently had her fourth child: Catherine Mary Dewe (TKC 15871), who was born in the fourth quarter of 1848.
8. M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953).
9. The Church of England celebrates the Circumcision of Christ on the 1st January; and M F K, writing a few days later, intends to refer to the Collect for that day, from the Book of Common Prayer. But the actual Collect for the Feast of the Circumcision bears no relation to the words she cites - it reads, "Almighty God, who madest thy blessed Son to be circumcised, and obedient to the law for man: Grant us the true circumcision of the Spirit: that our hearts, and all our members, being mortified from all worldly and carnal lusts, we may in all things obey thy blessed will: through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen." Perhaps M F K is referring to a Collect for a different week or festival, and has mentioned the Circumcision by mistake: but if so, I have not been able to establish what other Collect she actually is referring to.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.






48. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 14 May 1849, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 189a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a postmarked red penny post stamp. It is numbered "7", and the following is written on it, in a different handwriting: "M F K - C M L, May 14 1849, Mrs E B F ill, effect of taking laudanum." There are three circular postmarks on the reverse of the envelope, but only one of them is even partially legible. It reads "Stratford-on-Avon May 14 1849 B."

Alveston May 14 1849 (in a different hand, and different ink)
My own dearest C.
We do tenderly sympathize with you respecting dear Edward1, but the simple faith that is given you to receive it in, will be answered - He who led the people of Israel by a round about way to their own cities, very often tries His own children in like manner, "to prove them, & to do them good at their latter end." Still trust on, & by & bye you will see some good reason for your
(Page 2)
present perplexity.
I have enclosed F.A.'s2 note after she had seen Dr. L. for the first time, which will tell you all, but remember it is for your own eyes only - alas, she is driven out of London, which Dr. L. says does not agree with her, & she is no better - she is gone to some friends of theirs in Kent3, & talks of coming here next week, for the Dr. forbids her going home4 - Mrs Haydon is coming to us on Friday - the Dewe's5 were coming after Whitsunday, but
(Page 3)
if our poor invalid returns here, we shall not have beds to receive them.
Your uncle6 has taken the alternate services at Stratford for many months, & we were there on Easter morning. Mr Harding7 is now coming to reside I hope.
Thanks for telling us of dear Mrs Harrold -
Mr Ridgeway has not been here - I rejoice in your pleasure with him!
Alas, Dr Loesch [?] told Edw[ar]d8 - that all is owing to that awful laudanum, taken by herself - & I fear the result!

Dearest love to all

Your own M.F.K.

Footnotes.
1. This refers to C M L's second son Edward Liveing (TKC 100), who was then 17 years old, and appears to have encountered some difficulties in gaining admittance to his chosen career. Ultimately, he became a very distinguished physician, a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge and of King's College, London, and ultimately the Registrar of the Royal College of Physicians.
2. F.A. is Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679) (also known as "Fanny Anne"), who was the wife of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950).
3. These friends may well have been the Revd. Henry Wilberforce (the son of William Wilberforce, the great campaigner against the slave trade) and his wife Mary Sargent. Henry was the Vicar of East Farleigh, in Kent. Fanny Anne was in fact Henry's cousin, as she was the niece of William Wilberforce's wife, Barbara Ann Spooner.
4. "Home" was the recently-constructed Vicarage at Wilmcote, near Stratford upon Avon, where Fanny Anne's husband Edward was the parish priest. There is some evidence that the Vicarage was extremely uncomfortable, and Fanny Anne would have been much better looked after by her parents-in-law, at Alveston Manor.
5. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951) and her husband the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952).
6. M F K's husband, Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076), was Rector of the tiny church of All Saints, Billesley, but also took services as required at Holy Trinity Church, which is the parish church of Stratford upon Avon.
7. Mr Henry Harding, M.A., became Vicar of Holy Trinity in March, 1849. From this letter it appears that he did not immediately move into the Vicarage, so that M F K's husband was still helping out with the services even after Mr Harding's appointment.
8. "Edward" is M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), who is also Fanny Anne's husband. Edward has been told that his wife's illness has arisen from her use of laudanum, a powerful opiate.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017







49. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 30 Jul 1849, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 190a-f LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a postmarked red penny postage stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks. The first, in blue ink, appears to have the words "Stratford . . . Avon", and a date which seems to include "30 1848 [sic]". A second, much clearer postmark, in blue ink, reads "Colchester JY 31 1849 A"; and the third, in red ink, includes a crown symbol and reads "31 JY 3 . . 184 . ." (some of the numerals have been obscured). On the front of the envelope, someone has written the number "8", and the following words: "M F K - C M L. 30 July 1849. Death of Dr Young. Safe ret[urn] home of some of Liveings who had just left Alveston. George Fortescue 9 yrs old today born 30 July 1840. Aunt Anna['s] picture of her mother mentioned."

Alveston July 30 -
1849 (In a different ink)

It was very kind of you my own dear C. to give us early accounts of your beloved one's safe arrival, for really in these awful days we ought to be thankful for every letter that reaches us with assurances of preservation from danger, & from sudden calamity! I should very much like to hear dear Mary's1 detail of her whole tour, & her description of each object that most interested her.
The sudden demise of Dr Young is indeed awful, & calls for increased watchfulness in those who remain - but for himself is he not to be envied? & is not every pilgrim whose lamp is trimmed, a subject of congratulation
(Page 2)
when for ever secured from the evils that are abounding in these last days? Doubtless he is taken in love, & may that seed sown in the earth produce a plentiful harvest of like minded souls who shall take up his mantle, & be a seed to serve the Master that he served, & end as he has ended, in glory!
I cannot atall [sic] guess for whom Mrs Haydon is collecting - she said nothing about it here, only she was somewhat cross at not finding us in a fine spacious park, & surrounded with luxuries as it appears she expected - she spoke of the Wilkinsons as having defrauded her of her share of her mother's property, & that she had wished to give her god-daughter (Maria2) presents, that she could not now afford.
(Page 3) I hope her "near & dear" object is not the angel of the Irvingites3 whom she follows, & who she did not describe as a man wanting money.
I cannot recollect whether we have written since Fanny Ann4 is decided to be in the family way? Dr Locock suspected it before she returned home, & wished her to be examined at the end of 6 weeks by her own accoucheur - if it were not so, she was to return to him - but on Mr Pritchard fulfilling this wish, he decided affirmatively, & her confinement is expected in October at this house5. Mr P. hopes well for the result, & has happily got the management of her in his own hand, corresponding with, & entirely approving, Dr L.'s treatment of her. Their little girl, Mary6, has whooping cough rather severely, & the 2 others who are with them7, have it more favourably - neither Edward or F.A. have ever
(Page 4)
had it, & I trust in the great mercy of God that they, especially poor Fanny, may be spared from taking it! Eddy8 is at school, & Johnny is still under the kind wing of Mrs Stephenson9. There can of course be no communication between the cousins at Alveston & Wilmcote - a sad disappointment to both parties10.
Our Fanny11 has been confined with eresepelas [sic] in her head, & is still in Mr Pritchard's hand, but as she is, thro' great mercy recovering, I am thankful for it, because it extends their stay with us from last Thursday, to next Thursday week - this is George's12 birthday who concludes his 9th year, & Grandpapa, whose decided pet he is of all his grandchildren, has just given him a Roman history - I believe both Fanny's & my pang at parting will be softened by the prospect of an early re-union with you at Rockland!
Indeed, I can thankfully say that no report of the awful pestilence has reached
(Page 5)
us in this neighbourhood, or in that of Rockland, & oh, may Harwich may [sic] be the nearest point to you!
Tell Anna13 that her terrible preparations for her mother's execution have been carried out, for she is actually hung up in a gibbet manufactured at Birmingham, & exposed to the view of all curious & impertinent spectators, on the walls of the Alveston jail - you had best however be cautious, & whisper this in her ear, lest the authorities should hear it, & order the body to be exhumed to ascertain poor Anna's guilt & her grand aunt's contrivance!
Farewell my own beloved one - all & each of our best loves to all & each at Stoke - is there any opening
(Page 6)
for dear Edward?14

Your M.F.K.

Footnotes:
1. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103). Evidently, Mary had been travelling, and had just returned home.
2. M F K's younger daughter, Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953).
3. According to Wikipedia, the Irvingites were followers of a Christian Revival movement led by Edward Irving (1792 - 1834) which arose in London during the 1830s, and which later gave rise to the Catholic Apostolic Church.
4. M F K's daughter-in-law, Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679), the wife of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Fanny Anne is also referred to, later in the letter, as "F.A."
5. Edward and Fanny Anne's son Vincent Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14683) was born on the 15th November, 1849.
6. Mary Fortescue (TKC 14686) was the only daughter of Edward and Fanny Anne Fortescue. She was born in 1841, and thus would have been about 8 years old at the time of this letter.
7. Probably Edward and Fanny Anne's youngest children (at that time): Laurence Fortescue (TKC 14689), who was born on the 17th August, 1845, and George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690), who was born in October, 1847.
8. Edward and Fanny Anne's eldest child, Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684), who was born on the 26th February, 1840, and was thus nine years old.
9. Edward and Fanny Anne's third child and second son, John Fortescue (TKC 14688) was born in about 1843, and was thus now about six years old. Letter 188, of the 6th January, 1849, confirms that Johnny was staying with a family friend, Mrs Stephenson, in Lympsham; that letter suggests that Johnny was staying with Mrs Stephenson because Fanny Anne was in poor health.
10. Edward and Fanny Anne and their youngest children were at Wilmcote, about three miles from Stratford upon Avon, where Edward was the parish priest; and Edward's elder sister Fanny (who is referred to in the next paragraph, and the following footnote), with at least some of her children, was staying with their parents, at Alveston Manor, just a few miles away; but whooping cough was known to be very contagious, so that the two families dared not have any contact with each other.
11. M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951). Fanny's husband, the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk; Fanny and at least some members of her family had been visiting Fanny's parents at Alveston.
12. Fanny's eldest child, George Downing Dewe (TKC 15867) is said to have been born in the third quarter of 1840. This letter confirms that his exact date of birth must have been the 30th July, 1840.
13. This probably refers to C M L's second eldest surviving daughter, Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106). I do not know what Anna and her great-aunt M F K had been getting up to! However, the note on the envelope to the letter (for which see below) refers to "Anna's picture of her mother".
14. C M L's son Edward Liveing (TKC 100). It appears from Letter 188, which was written on the 6th January, 1849, that Edward was having some difficulty in choosing a suitable profession. He eventually became a very distinguished physician.
15. Whoever wrote this note was wrong about the identity of the grandchild: George (Knottesford) Fortescue (TKC 14690) was not born until October 1847. George (Downing) Dewe appears to be the only member of the family named "George" who is of approximately the right age.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017






50. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 26 Dec 1849, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 191a-d LT15
Envelope addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester". On the front of the envelope there is a postmarked red penny post stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks. The first, in blue ink, appears to read "Stratford on Avon DE 26 1849 B"; the second, in blue ink, reads "Colchester DE 27 1849 A"; and the third, in red ink, is mostly illegible, in part because the first postmark has been stamped over top of it. On the front of the envelope someone has written the number "9", and these words: "M F K - C M L. E B F now has 6 children - last not yet christened.

Alveston Dec[embe]r 26
1849 (in a different ink)

Dearest Kate - the letters are going - & I have been hindered all the morning, & can only thank you most affectionately for giving us the comforting reports of beloved George1 - & also of your dear Edward2 - & tell you that I had the unspeakable mercy of taking F.A.3 to Wilmcote on Sunday to be churched4, & of leaving her there with all her 6 children & husband - she is really well - Edw[ard] will not have proxies5, so Baby cannot be baptized till the Epiphany!
Fanny6 I trust is now going on -
(Page 2)

Dearest love to all your own M.F.K.
A happy Christmas in every sense to all.

Footnotes.
1. C M L's eldest son, George Downing Liveing (TKC 99).
2. C M L's second son, Edward Liveing (TKC 100)
3. F.A. is M F K's daughter-in-law, Frances Anne ("Fanny Anne") Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679). Fanny Anne and her husband, M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), had just had a baby, Vincent Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14683), who was born on the 15th November, 1849. Edward and Fanny Anne normally lived at Wilmcote (about three miles from Alveston Manor), where Edward was the parish priest. However, during Fanny Anne's confinement they had been staying at Alveston Manor, where Fanny Anne and the baby could be better looked after. This letter confirms that Fanny Anne is now well enough to go back to Wilmcote.
4. According to the Book of Common Prayer, the ceremony of the "churching of women" was intended to purify women from any ritual uncleanness after childbirth, and to give thanks for their safe delivery.
5. During a christening service for an infant child, godparents make certain promises on behalf of the child, who is too young to make them for himself. The Church of England therefore now requires that any adult who is to be godparent to an infant child must actually be present at the baptism service, so as to make those promises in person for the child; and so the Church now does not allow any person to be a "godparent by proxy" (this is explained at the web page <https://churchofenglandchristenings.org/for-parents/is-it-possible-to-have-godparents-by-proxy/>). Edward clearly felt the same way, and therefore Vincent's baptism could not take place until his godparents could get to Wilmcote.
6. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



51. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 19 Feb 1850, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 192a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a postmarked red penny stamp. The front of the envelope has been numbered "10", and on it, in a different hand, there is written "M F K - C M L, 19 Feb - 1850." On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks: the first, in blue ink, reads, "St . . . ford-on-Avon FE 19 1850 B"; the second, in blue ink, reads "Colchester FE 20 1850 A"; and the third, in red ink, features a crown sign and reads "20 FE 20 1850".

Feb[rua]ry 19 (in another ink) 1850 - Dearest Cath, I am very sorry that whenever I have written, I have forgotten to tell you why your "philanthropic appeal" has been so long unnoticed by me - it has been put carefully by in the intention, when I could, to make a more substantial acknowledgment, for a worthy cause indeed it is, & one that I should delight & feel honoured in aiding! but alas, a long Doctor's bill, & many home calls, have found me from time to time, unable to respond to my own wishes, & now feeling no prospect of liberation, I will not wait, but enclose you this mite, truly not the Widow's, but the poor man's, mite, & as such you will not refuse it, tho' it be so small!
I trust our dear George1 is not faging as he did before the honourable distinction was conferred upon him, & that his mind being more at rest, the sad pain he suffered from his face has not returned?
It has become so necessary for Rockland Fanny2 to resign the hope of nursing atall [sic], of which even I am forced to
(Page 2)
see the necessity! That finding in F.A.'s3 nurse, a person who thoroughly understood the management of both mother & nurse in such circumstances, I was induced to recommend & engage her for Rockland in May4, & I have a secret hope, divulged only to them, of taking the advantage of her escort, to go with her - 14 safe accouchements of my 3 daughters5, have taken off my nervous fears on those occasions - but I leave it as future, in the hands of One who is wise, & will not send me thither, if by going, I should entail trouble or distress upon them.
Will you be so kind to ask Goymer6 to send us 8 more copies of the hymns? I presume he is still in Stoke? if not, I will write to the publisher at Ipswich.
It has been a real comfort to hear of dear Anna7 passing so well through the winter - how is dear Mary8, & how are you each, & all?
We are, thank God, all but Edward's baby9, well - he has attacks of diarrhoea, that make his recovery doubtful - dearest love from all here - your own in true affection, M.F.K.
I need not tell you my Christian names for the order.

Footnotes
1. C M L's eldest son, George Downing Liveing (TKC 99). George was a student, and later a fellow, of St John's College, Cambridge, and was the university's Professor of Chemistry from 1861 to 1908. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1879. As regards the "honourable distinction" which "was conferred upon him", a note in the Ipswich Journal of the 19th January, 1849 (mentioned in his entry in TKC) confirms that he had just been "approved for Mathematical Honours" in the university's 1850 Mathematical Examination.
2. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951) was the wife of Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), who was the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
3. "F.A." is M F K's daughter-in-law, Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679). Fanny Anne had had a baby on the 15th November, 1849 (for details, see note 9, below), and M F K clearly expected that Fanny Anne's nurse would be ready for a new assignment soon.
4. Fanny had had a baby in the fourth quarter of 1849: Catherine Mary Dewe (TKC 15871). Presumably, the expectation was that Fanny Anne's nurse would go straight from Fanny Anne's household, near Stratford upon Avon, to Fanny's household, at Rockland.
5. M F K appears to be referring to her elder daughter Fanny Dewe (who had five children), her younger daughter Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953), who at the date of this letter had three children, and her daughter-in-law Fanny Anne Fortescue, who at the date of this letter had six children.
6. Mr Goymer was a bookseller in Stoke by Nayland, from whom M F K's husband sometimes purchased hymn books etc.; he is mentioned from time to time in this correspondence.
7. C M L's second surviving daughter, Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106).
8. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Living (TKC 103).
9. Vincent Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14683), the son of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) and his wife Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679) had been born on the 15th November, 1849, and was therefore just over three months old at the time of this letter. He recovered from his initial health problems, and ultimately died in 1932, at the age of 82.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017




52. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 22 May 1850, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 195a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester", and bears a postmarked red penny post stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks: the first, in blue ink, reads "Stratford-on-Avon MY 22 1850 B"; the second, also in blue ink, reads "Colchester MY 23 1850 A"; and the third, in red ink, includes the symbol of a crown, and the letters "C L 23 MY 23 1850". On the front of the envelope, in a different ink, there is the number "13", and the words "M F K - C M L 22 May 1850. Aunt Mary to go to Alveston. Christening [?] of a child of Dewe. Dr Tait made Dean of Carlisle."

Alveston (in a different ink and handwriting)
May 22 1850

Dearest C. called to go out, I have only time to say, we shall rejoice to see dear M1. on the 5th - but of yourself, I must quote your uncle's words - "Tell her, she will never see me again, at least not in a state to be talked to" - my own thought had been, that perhaps after Fanny was safe2, you might be inclined for us (i.e.) you & I [sic], to take a trip to Rockland, where I understand you have undertaken, in the case of a girl, to be my sister sponsor? But I desire to leave all in better hands - & if you see it right to remain at home rather - I dare not let a thought of mine
(Page 2)
interfere therewith!
No worse accounts of the A.D.3 I conclude you know Dr Tait4 (Cath. Spooner's husband) is made Dean of Carlisle, & they are just now settled there - so far from her father!

With true love from all to all, your own M.F.K.

Wednesday May 22
Mrs Stephenson left us this morning - being called away sooner than we hoped.

Footnotes.
1. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Living (TKC 103).
2. "Fanny" is M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951). Fanny lived in Rockland St Mary, Norfolk, as her husband Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was the Rector of that village. At the time this letter was written, Fanny was due to have a baby. She did have a son, John William Fortescue Dewe (TKC 26936), but the baby clearly had health problems, and died in September. He was buried in Billesley churchyard on the 10th September, 1850.
3. "A.D." probably stands for "Archdeacon". The reference here may well be to William Spooner, Archdeacon of Coventry (TKC 14680), who was the father of M F K's daughter-in-law, Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679).
4. Archibald Campbell Tait (TKC 15873) was married to Archdeacon William Spooner's youngest daughter, Catherine Spooner (TKC 15872); perhaps M F K's reference to the Archdeacon's health has led her on to mention another member of the Archdeacon's family. Dr Tait was appointed Dean of Carlisle in 1849, and took up residence in Carlisle some time in 1850; in 1856 he became Bishop of London, and in 1868 he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



53. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 2 Sep 1850, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 196a-d LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester". It bears a postmarked red penny post stamp. On the reverse of the envelope there are three circular postmarks: the first, in blue ink, reads "Stratford-on-Avon DE 5 1[8]50 L"; the second, also in blue ink, reads "Colchester DE 6 1850 A"; and the third, in red ink, has the symbol for a crown in between the letters "C" and "V", and then "6 DE 6 1850". On the front of the letter there is the number "14", and then the following has been written, in a different ink: "M F K - C M L 2 Sept. 1850 ?. My father's recent visit to Alveston. A. Mary still there. Jacksons at his mother's at Canterbury. Mrs Blencowe mentioned." And then, further down, there is written "wrong envelope. Letter 2 Sep."

Alveston Sept[embe]r 2 -
1850 [in a different ink]
I take shame to myself, dearest Cath, that all things going on pleasantly here, & knowing you heard of all our proceedings from beloved Mary1, it did not occur to me that you at a distance might have your thoughts respecting dear Edward2, & your uncle's reception of him! & now I am angry with myself, since your last note intimates that your calling him home was guided by that uncertainty, & that had I told you what was really the case, we might have enjoyed his society all this time, & his sister been protected by him on her return! I assure you I am really very sorry - but I saw from the first that he would please his uncle, & so carelessly forgot that you at a distance could not know it also -
(Page 2)
When I repeated your message to your uncle, he said, that he could never see the reason why he made so speedy a departure, & had felt disappointed in not having him longer, adding then, as I have frequently heard him to others, high encomia upon Edward's talents & character generally. So should any future occasion arise for his visiting Warwickshire, you may depend upon your uncle's hailing it with pleasure. Indeed all your dear ones whom he has hitherto seen, are great favourites.
In the course of this day we are expecting dear Mary to sleep here one night only, & to proceed on her journey tomorrow - very pleasant have been our short interviews with her, & it is a source of real comfort to me that our families are thus perpetuating the connexion with each other by personal intercourse & I trust natural attachment.
The Jacksons3 are not returned - M4.
(Page 3)
writes that they are both benefitted by the change, & therefore I hope she has met with no discomfort.
Poor little baby5 has recovered from his late attack, but is now falling back again, from recurring to his former food of baked flour, which brings on diarrhea, & reduces the modicum of flesh he was regaining - however there is more prospect of his pilgrimage being lengthened than at one time we could have supposed - his mother sends you tenderest love, & thanks you for your maternal sympathy. They were intending to leave us next week, but our new Archdeacon6 is coming to visit the churches on the 17th, & your uncle wishes D. to remain over that time, as the A.D.7 is to take up his quarters at our house8. If the Jacksons return before he come, I know not how to accommodate them all, having lost the use of Mrs Allen's beds, so I hope they may be inclined to stay another week at his mother's, near Canterbury9.
Mary did give me Mrs Blencowe's card, but alas, I have no interest in that asylum,
(page 4)
& did not even know of its existence.
Our Jewish anniversary was in the week after we came from Rockland, & passed off pleasantly.
We are longing to hear of dear George's10 proceedings, & regret the loss of his companion! We may say of travelling abroad what Cowper11 says of retirement "How sweet, how passing sweet is solitude - "Yet give me still a friend in my retreat - "Whom I may whisper - solitude is sweet"!12

Farewell dearest - with much love to all

Your own affectionate M.F.K.

Footnotes.
1. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103). Mary had evidently been visiting M F K and her family at Alveston Manor.
2. C M L's second son, Edward Liveing (TKC 100). Edward had evidently been visiting Alveston Manor, but had felt it proper to cut his visit short, because of a misunderstanding.
3. M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953) and her husband the Revd. Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954). Maria and Francis lived at Alveston Manor, with Maria's parents, but were currently travelling.
4. That is, Maria Knottesford.
5. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951) and her husband the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), had had a baby earlier in the year: John William Fortescue Dewe (TKC 26936). Sadly, the baby died shortly after this letter was written, and was buried at Billesley (where his grandfather F F K was the Rector), on the 10th September, 1850.
6. This may well be the Revd. Richard Brindley Hone (1805 - 1881), who appears to have been appointed Archdeacon of Worcester on the 9th November, 1849.
7. Archdeacon.
8. From this sentence, it appears that both Fanny and her husband Joseph had been staying at Alveston Manor, with their ailing baby. They had been expecting to leave in the near future, but M F K's husband has asked "D." - presumably Joseph Dewe - to stay on longer, so as to help him with looking after the Archdeacon.
9. Alveston Manor was a large property (and has now been converted into a 113-bedroom hotel!), but the accommodation was clearly not unlimited.
10. C M L's eldest son, George Downing Living (TKC 99). George was born on the 21st December, 1827, so that he was now 22 years old, and might well have been travelling in Europe, shortly after obtaining his B.A. degree from Cambridge.
11. William Cowper (1731 - 1800) was a distinguished eighteenth-century English poet.
12. M F K is quoting lines 692 - 694 from Cowper's poem "Retirement" (1782); but in line 693, Cowper writes "grant", where M F K has "give".
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



54. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 14 Nov 1850.
Liveing Archive 185f-g LT15
This letter is dated "Thursday the 14th November", but no year is given. I believe that the letter was almost certainly written on the 14th November, 1850. During the years when the letter is likeliest to have been written, the 14th November only fell on a Thursday in 1844 and 1850. In 1844, Anna Liveing was only 14 years old - probably too young to be travelling on her own. More important is the fact that, in this letter, Fanny's nurse, Hannah, has only just gone in to hospital in Norwich. But M F K's letter of the 24th January, 1851 (letter 172) confirms that Hannah has just returned from the hospital in Norwich, very weak after a painful operation. It seems most probable that Hannah went in to hospital in November, 1850, and came out of the hospital, after her operation, in January 1851. Otherwise, we would need to postulate that Hannah had to go into hospital twice: both in November, 1844, and also in November, 1850: which may not be impossible, but seems rather unlikely.

Thursday, Nov. 14 -
It is very kind of you my own dear Cath. to desire further accounts of Maria1 - after dearest Anna2 left us, she gradually progressed in recovery, till on Sunday morning Mr P3. found the character of the disease changed, & we began to lose fear about her - on that (Sunday) night, however, it returned in all its violence, & another, the 4th blister was applied -
(Page 2)
still her breath continued greatly opprest, & he felt obliged to resort to the final remedy, bleeding in the arm! from that she has obtained great relief, & is now going on hopefully, unless a fresh seizure occur, which I will trust in the mercy of our heavenly Father may be kept off! She is painfully weak, but that is far better than disease.
I trust dear A. returned
(Page 3)
to you on Monday, free from cold or harm? Tell her with my love, that the thought of her being in a healthy & cheerful party, is a real relief to the anxieties of her aunt! & thank dearest Mary4 for her second communication, which was just what Anna led me to expect - my dear love to her also.
Fanny's5 nurse, Hannah, went into Norwich Hospital on Saturday! She was medically advised to do so, & Fanny says, took the advice sensibly, & willingly.
(Page 4)
With tenderest love your own M F.K.
Edd6. did not go to Bristol on Monday, that meeting being happily given up. Thank God for all we now see & hear.
Footnotes.
1. M F K's younger daughter Maria Margaretta Knottesford (TKC 9953). It is surprising that, although Maria is so ill, the letter does not mention her husband Francis George Jackson (TKC 9954).
2. This is presumably C M L's daughter Anna Maria Liveing (TKC 106), who had been visiting M F K and her husband at Alveston.
3. Mr Pritchard was the family's medical attendant for many years.
4. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Living (TKC 103), who it seems had visited Alveston previously.
5. Fanny is M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue) (TKC 9951).
6. This is probably M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950).
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017.



55. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 25 Nov 1850.
Liveing Archive 185h-i LT15

There is a note in a different handwriting appended to this letter: "Luckock was the housekeeper: and had no easy place to fill, with two families of children as well as the old folk in the house." And on the left hand side of page 1 the letter has been numbered "18".
This letter is clearly a sequel to Letter 185f - g, which describes an earlier phase of Maria's illness. That letter is dated Thursday the 14th November, and it is now clear that it was actually written on the 14th November, 1850. This letter should therefore be dated the 25th November, 1850. The fact that, in this letter, the 25th November falls on a Monday confirms that the letter properly belongs with Letter 185f - g, where the 14th November falls on a Thursday.

Dearest Kate, I know you will be thankful with us, that dear M. rose on Saturday to dinner, without any cold or injury, & has continued improving since -
Luckock left us at 7 this morning! & since that, Nurse Lyttleton has been called home to her family who have the small pox, & is to go at 4 o'clock - so my time is occupied - but what a
(Page 2)
mercy that she was not called last week when the D's were here - nor before Maria could leave her bed! all is mercy, & most really so, when we appear to be in straits!
Dearest love to all especially M. & A.
Your own affectionate
M.F.K.
Monday Nov[emb]er 25
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



56. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 24 Jan 1851.
Liveing Archive 197a-e LT15
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester
". On the front, the envelope has a postmarked red one penny stamp. On the reverse, there are three circular postmarks: the first, in blue ink, reads "Stratford-on-Avon JA 24 185 B"; the second, also in blue ink, reads "Colchester JA 25 1851 A"; and the third, in red ink, has the symbol of a crown, the letters C and P on each side of it, and the date "25 JA 25 1851". On the front of the envelope, someone has written the number 15, and the following: "M F K - C M L Jan 24 1851. Catherine Jackson a baby cutting teeth. E B F trying to get rid of an old Polarsh [???] service at Perth Cath[edral] insisted on by old Bishop of St Andrews aged 85. Family leaving Wilmcote for Perth."

Friday Jan[uar]y 24 (underneath this, "1851" has been written, in a different ink) - A blind eye alone has kept my pen so long silent, precious C. & prevented me from acknowledging your sweet lines, (for sweet they were to me), written after Xtmas day - my heart met thine for the great mercy given you on the morning of that glorious anniversary, & I can say, my thanksgivings went up with yours, & supplications also, that each of those dear youths, who then made an open profession of their faith in Christ, may be "living branches of the true Vine" on earth, - that so, when called to die, they may sleep in Jesus, & rise with their blessed Father in that day, when our Lord shall come in His glory to gather in His elect, & be admired in all them that love Him! I wished to write to you myself, & therefore did not employ an amanuensis. Dear Mary's1 letter on Wednesday, confirmed my apprehension that you would all wonder at our silence - Maria2 was going to answer it this morning, but I took the pen out of her hand, & am to tell dear M[ary] so, with M[aria]'s best love, & promise of writing shortly. She is, thank God, recovered, but remains far weaker than I wish, & is too easily fatigued. Her little Kate3 thrives, & is fat, only now beginning her teething troubles - M[aria] nurses her, with other food. I have been long wishing to tell you about Edward4, & his family - she5 is now at Elmdon, taking leave of
(Page 2)
her Father, etc. Edward joined her there on Monday, & we expect them to return the end of this week - then, he may probably preach for us at B[illesley]6 on Sunday, & they go together to Oxford, etc, on Monday, whence E. proceeds to Clifton to consult with Lord Forbes7, & others, how to get rid of an old Popish service, which the poor deluded B[isho]p of St Andrews8 (the Diocesan of Perth) insists upon having performed in the new Cathedral, & which I hope occasions the belief of that establishment being the hotbed of Popery. I entreat your supplications that E. may continue, & be strengthened in his purpose, & may succeed. The old deluded man is 85 years of age9. Well, at the end of next week, he10 intends to return & take his last service in Wilmcote church on the Sunday - Tuesday the 4th he comes to a business meeting at Stratford, looks in upon us for ½ [?] an hour, & takes his final departure by the coach at 4 o'clock, for Perth! F.A. on returning [?] from him at Oxford, may come here for a few days, & remains at Wilmcote for a week at least after his leaving to pack up, & settle all their matters, & during that time, the good nurse[s], & the children will be with us. They then go to the Taits11 at Carlisle, & Edward provides a week's lodging for them at Perth, that he & she together may look out for an abiding habitation. They take the young Scotch schoolmistress with them for a nursery governess, & Nurse, & Harriet, but want a cook. Wilmcote is only a curacy under Mr Fagg, who has of course, the appointing [?] a supply [?]12.
(on the inside of the envelope) I want to send you the enclosed, & besides, my eye prevents me from writing. Oh, pray for him, & us, & for Wilmcote! Poor Hannah is returned from the hospital at Norwich very weak - the operation was a most painful one, borne with great patience13.
With dearest love to all, your own
M.F.K.

Footnotes:
1. C M L's eldest daughter, Mary Kate Liveing (TKC 103). Mary had visited Alveston previously, and thus knew M F K and her family personally, and corresponded with some of them.
2. M F K's younger daughter, Maria Margaretta Jackson (née Knottesford) (TKC 9953). Maria and her husband and family lived with M F K at Alveston Manor.
3. Maria's daughter Katharine Maria Jackson (TKC 14737), who was born in November, 1850, and baptised on the 17th November, 1850: Kate would have been a little over two months old at the date of this letter.
4. "Edward" is M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Until very recently, Edward had been the parish priest at Wilmcote, which is only about three miles from Alveston Manor; and indeed, Edward and his family had actually lived at Alveston Manor, with Edward's parents, during most of Edward's time as Wilmcote's priest. However, Edward had just been appointed as Dean of the newly-consecrated Perth Cathedral, in Scotland; and this letter is now describing his "moving arrangements".
5. "She" is Edward's wife, Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679). She is also known as "F.A." or "Fanny Anne", so as to distinguish her from M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Dewe (née Fortescue)(TKC 9951), who is normally referred to as "Fanny". Fanny Anne's father was the Venerable William Spooner (TKC 14680), who was Rector of Elmdon (near the present-day site of Birmingham Airport) and Archdeacon of Coventry: and Fanny Anne was visiting him, before setting off for Perth.
6. Edward's father, F F K (TKC 7076) was the Rector of the tiny church of All Saints at Billesley, near Stratford upon Avon, and Edward was going to be helping his father out with the service there.
7. Walter Forbes, the 18th Lord Forbes (1798 - 1868) was one of the most committed and generous supporters of the proposal to build a new cathedral at Perth. There is an excellent account of the foundation and history of the cathedral at the Perth Cathedral website, at the reference http://www.perthcathedral.co.uk/history/a-detailed-history-1847-1914/.
8. In 1851 the Bishop of St Andrew's, Dunkeld and Dunblane was the Right Reverend Patrick Torry (1763 - 1852). He had been Bishop of Dunkeld and Dunblane since 1808, and became Bishop of Fife, Dunkeld and Dunblane in 1837; the Diocese was given its present name in 1844. Bishop Torry remained in office until his death. He did indeed produce a Scottish Prayer Book in 1851, but there was much disagreement in the Episcopal Church of Scotland, as to whether services should be taken from that book, or instead from the English Book of Common Prayer.
9. Bishop Torry was born on the 27th December, 1763, and so he was actually 87 years old at the date of this letter.
10. Edward, not the Bishop of St Andrew's!
11. The Taits were Fanny Anne's sister and brother-in-law. Catherine Spooner (TKC 15872), Fanny Anne's youngest sister, was married to Archibald Campbell Tait (TKC 15873). At the time of this letter, Tait was Dean of Carlisle. In 1856 he became Bishop of London, and in 1868 he was made Archbishop of Canterbury.
12. In 1851 St Andrew's Church, Wilmcote was not completely independent, and did not have its own parish. Instead, it was located within the parish of Aston Cantlow, and thus it was in some sense subsidiary to the church of St John the Baptist, at Aston Cantlow - in technical terms, it was a "Chapel of Ease" within Aston Cantlow parish. This in turn meant that the Vicar of Aston Cantlow would have an influence in appointing any new priest for Wilmcote. The Vicar of Aston Cantlow at this time was John Frederick Fagge.
13. It appears from M F K's letter of the 14th November, 1850 that Hannah was the nurse of M F K's elder daughter Fanny (TKC 9951), and that she had just had to go into hospital in Norwich.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017

57. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Bridgetown Manor House Alveston WAR. Maria is recorded as a wife aged 75 born Ovington ESS



58. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 22 May 1851, Alveston.
Liveing Archive 185a-c LT15
This letter is dated only "May 22", but it must have been written on the 22nd May, 1851. In the fourth paragraph, M F K is describing how her son, Edward Fortescue, and his family, are in the process of moving from Wilmcote to Perth, where Edward had been appointed as Dean of the new cathedral. Edward's appointment was only confirmed in December, 1850, and M F K died in the last quarter of 1852, so that this letter can only have been written in 1851 or 1852. But in her letter of the 26th April, 1852 M F K makes it clear that she and her husband are hoping to be visiting Edward in Perth soon, and a letter of F F K to his friend Charles Rice confirms that they actually reached Perth on the 22nd May, 1852. By elimination, therefore, this letter must have been written on the 22nd May, 1851.


Alveston May 22 (1851)

My precious Kate - the silence has been very long on my part, & I love you dearly for not paying me in kind - but I am sure you have thought of your aunt as deeply entering into your anxieties respecting dear Robert & Miss Stratford. The former you feel now safe under his brother's protecting eye (& oh my C. how great the mercy that that elder brother is a protection, & not a snare [?] !) for the present, & fear not, but firmly trust, his future path will be guided by infinite love & wisdom to the fulfilment [sic] of your believing petitions.
I am very glad you had the satisfaction of Miss Stratford's visit, & her personal conferences with Mr Fenn, which I suppose have rendered the visit of her sister to London, unnecessary?
(Page 2)
This morning an account has arrived of the death of our old friend Miss Taylor on Sunday last! She was visiting the Miss Kilderbees [?] near Gosport, & had only a week's illness of bronchitis.
I must be brief through much remaining feebleness - & only tell you that your uncle1 has passed thro' the winter comfortably - age tells upon him, but scarcely perceptibly - the rest are well, thank God. Little George & Vincent2 with their nurse, are still here - Mary & Larry3 & their nursery governess (an amphibious sort of animal) were to leave their aunt Tait4, for Perth5 this week - Eddy6 is already admitted as a scholar & chorister in that College, & Johnny7 is a Probationer, & sleeps at home at present - they have taken a house, which is not sufficiently prepared & furnished yet to admit the younger children, but we are daily expecting the order for their return. F.A.8 is so very busy that perhaps
(Page 3)
she has not had time to write to her cousins - if she have, you know all about them - if not, the accounts are much as we might expect - beautiful scenery around - & comforts & discomforts of a moral nature - all very good to show us "here is not our rest".
The infectious fever at Rockland9 is graciously disappearing, if not wholly gone - & by the generous assistance of Mrs Stephenson, Fanny has a governess for her elder girls, which is a great relief & comfort to her. Miss Morris went to them from Cheltenham on the 1st of May, & at present promises to be a safe guide for the children, & such a character as they desire.
When you have a convenient opportunity, be so kind to ask Mr Goymer10 to send us 6 more hymn books, but there is no hurry.
I have just taken a turn in the garden with your uncle, for the 2nd time only since the commencement of November, excepting to church - & not there, but on Easter Day, since January. It is a great mercy to inhale the pure air again.
(Page 4)
With dearest love from all & each, to all & each, my own C.'s affectionate
M.F.K.
Do you know the "True Briton"11 - a penny publication on the 1st & 15th of each month? It is not professedly religious - but designed to counteract the horrible cheap publications of the present day, & I think ought to be in every kitchen, & every workshop, through the kingdom. Published by Wertheim & Macintosh.

Footnotes:
1. M F K's husband, Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076).
2. George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690), the fourth son of M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), who was born in October, 1847, and his younger brother Vincent Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14683), who was born on the 15th November, 1849. When this letter was written, in May, 1851, George would have been under four years old, and Vincent would have been about 18 months old.
3. Mary Fortescue (TKC 14686), the only daughter of Edward Fortescue, was born in 1841, and Laurence Fortescue (TKC 14689), his third son, was born on the 17th August, 1845, so that they would have been nine/ten years old, and five years old, respectively.
4. "Aunt Tait" is Catharine Tait, née Spooner (TKC 15872), the youngest sister of the children's mother, and Edward's wife, Frances Anne Fortescue, née Spooner. Catharine's husband was Archibald Campbell Tait (TKC 15873), who at this time was Dean of Carlisle, and later became Bishop of London and then, in 1868, Archbishop of Canterbury. The records of the 1851 census confirm that both Mary and Laurence had been staying with the Taits since at least the 30th March, 1851.
5. The whole family was moving to Perth because Edward Fortescue had recently been appointed Dean of the newly-founded Cathedral there.
6. Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684) was born on the 26th February, 1840, and was the eldest son of Edward and his wife. Evidently, by the time of this letter he was already attending the Cathedral Choir School in Perth.
7. John Fortescue (TKC 14688) was the third child and second son of Edward and his wife, and was born some time in 1843. At the date of this letter he was seven or eight years old, and was evidently attending the same school as his elder brother, although only as a "day boy" rather than a boarder.
8. Edward's wife Frances Anne was often referred to by M F K as "F.A.", so as to distinguish her from Edward's elder sister Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951), whom M F K called "Fanny". It is clear from this paragraph that Edward's wife had gone to Perth with him, to help set up home, and that most of the children were either in Alveston, with their grandparents, or in Carlisle, with their aunt and uncle Tait.
9. M F K'S elder daughter, Fanny, was married to the Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952), who was the Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
10. It appears that Mr Edmund Goymer had a Grammar School in Stoke by Nayland and was a bookseller, with whom M F K and her husband often had dealings. M F K refers to a payment to Goymer in her letter 26 April 1852.
11. See "True Briton" on https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=1FJFAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge 2017



59. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 19 Feb 1852.
Liveing Archive 173a-d LT13
The envelope is addressed to "Mrs Liveing, Stoke, Colchester" and bears a postmarked red penny post stamp. The reverse of the envelope is numbered "16", and has the following notes (in a different handwriting): M F K C M L Feb 19 - 1852. Rev Mr Prowett's death at a week before. Lady Downie (Mrs Hare's daughter who was Bridget Bowles) has lost her husband in Germany.

Feb[ruary] 19 1852 (in a different ink)
My own dearest Kate,
Again I am going to teaze you with a commission from your uncle - when he sent the money to Mr Goymer1, he forgot to add that for the carriage of the books to London, which G. paid, & he wishes to repay him, & will thank you very much when you see Mr G. to advance the sum for him, & to tell us the amount - the 12 books turned out acceptably for already 4 are disposed of.
(Page 2)
Great indeed is the mercy that has preserved dear Edward2 from contagion, & that has granted you all safety thro' the winter, with dear Ellen's3 improved health!
Fanny Ann4 is come to Elmdon, & finds her Father, thank God, better than we could have expected - little George5 is with her - the smallpox was much at Perth, & all the children were vaccinated - only Eddy6 was found unsafe - dear Edward has suffered acutely from a carbuncle in his neck, & was only recovered when F.A. left him last week.
Have you heard that Mr
(Page 3)
Prowett7 was taken to his blessed eternal rest last Sunday sennight? His dear wife had been seriously ill for weeks, & they were just rejoicing for her amendment, & dreaming no danger in him, when his disorder suddenly encreased [sic] on the Saturday, & he was insensible thro' the remaining hours? He had preached with more than his usual energy that day fortnight, from "In whom we rejoice, tho' now for a season, if need be, ye are in heaviness, etc."
This morning too an account has come of the death of dear Mrs Smith of Goldicote near us - a bitter trial to her attached husband, to whom she was his entire earthly comfort!
(Page 4)
The last accounts of Joseph Dewe8 are better. All well here.
Mr Sherrard9 at Wilmcote has had small pox, & I fear talks of leaving - the house is so inconvenient for a family, & the dirt so great as they keep no carriage, that they seem to be making up their minds to go away.
Lady Downie10 (Mrs Hare's daughter who was Bridget Bowles) has lost her husband in Germany, & is in great grief.
I trust your reports of Miss Stratford continue to improve?
Much love from all to all.
Your own tenderly attached aunt M.F.K.

Footnotes,
1. Mr Goymer was a bookseller in Stoke by Nayland, from whom M F K and her husband sometimes purchased hymn books etc. He is referred to in these letters from time to time.
2. This probably refers to C M L's son Edward Liveing (TKC 100).
3. C M L's youngest child, Ellen Liveing (TKC 109).
4. "Fanny Ann" (also referred to as "F.A.") is M F K's daughter-in-law, Frances Anne Fortescue (née Spooner) (TKC 14679). At the beginning of 1851 Fanny Anne and her husband, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), M F K's son, had moved from near Alveston to Perth, where Edward had been appointed as Dean of the new Cathedral. At the time of this letter Fanny Anne has returned from Perth to visit her elderly father, the Revd. William Spooner (TKC 14680), who was Archdeacon of Coventry and Rector of Elmdon (near the site of the present-day Birmingham Airport).
5. Edward and Fanny Anne's son George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690), who was then about 4 ½ years old.
6. Edward and Fanny Anne's eldest child, Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684), who was then nearly eleven years old.
7. The Reverend Charles Prowett (TKC 21846) was the Rector of Stapleford, in Hertfordshire. He was married to Cecilia Wolseley (TKC 21845), and appears to have died on the 8th or 9th February, 1852, aged about 71 years. If he did die on a Sunday, as M F K asserts, then the date must have been the 9th February.
8. The Revd. Joseph Dewe (TKC 9952) was M F K's son-in-law, as he was married to M F K's elder daughter Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951). He was Rector of Rockland St Mary, in Norfolk.
9. The Reverend George Sherrard became the parish priest of Wilmcote after M F K's son Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) left Wilmcote, at the beginning of 1851 in order to become Dean of Perth Cathedral, in Scotland. Fr Sherrard complained bitterly about the state of the Vicarage, both to the Bishop of Worcester and also to Edward himself, in letters which were written during 1852, but he did not in fact leave. He was still priest of Wilmcote when he died on the 21st May, 1857.
10.
Lady Downie (TKC 26906) was born Mary Anne Hare, the daughter of Charles Hare (TKC 25513) and Bridget Downing Bowles (TKC 25512). She married Dr Alexander McKenzie Downie (TKC 26905) on the 12th May, 1840. Dr Downie was physician to HRH Princess Elizabeth Landgravine of Hesse Homburg, and was knighted by Queen Victoria in 1840 in recognition of his service to the Princess. He died on the 3rd February, 1852, aged 41, at Frankfurt am Main.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017



60. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 26 Apr 1852.
Liveing Archive 185d-e LT15
This letter is almost certainly to be dated the 26th April 1852, for these reasons.
First, M F K is hoping to travel to Perth, "again". Her reason for visiting Perth was that her son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950), was the Dean of the Cathedral there. But the Cathedral was only consecrated in 1850, and Edward was only appointed Dean in December of that year. Thus, any visit to Perth could only have taken place during 1851 or 1852 (M F K died late in 1852). If we assume that M F K and her husband only visited Perth once a year, and only travelled in the warmer weather, then the word "again" indicates that this visit probably occurred in 1852.
Further, M F K states that her husband "used the prayer for rain at Billesley yesterday." This must have been at the Sunday service at Billesley; and that means that the Sunday was the 25th April, and that the 26th April was a Monday. But the 25th April was a Sunday in 1852, whereas in 1851 the 25th fell on a Friday.

My dearest Kate,
I have only 5 letters from you among my unanswered ones! - but you know how interesting every line of each has been to your Aunt, & you know too, that infirmity alone has kept my pen silent! It is very dear of you thus to overlook & indulge me!
The last subject has been a painful one - the rod it has pleased our heavenly Father to inflict on the dear Torlesses1 - yet surely on that rod was inscribed Love - oh, the transcendantness of that
(Page 2)
love to her who is now safely sheltered in the Ark, where
"Winds & waves, & storms & tempests past" - she
"Enjoys the everlasting calm of Heaven!"2

You, dearest C., could enter enter [sic] into their grief, & sympathize with their sorrow!, - & blessed be God, you can also enter into the alleviation of their grief, & feel with them that your beloved one's [sic] have only taken a short journey before you, to end in such a reunion as can never be experienced in a world of sin & changes like this! I feel for you in being called to this renewal of bitter
(Page 3)
anguish - & I feel for dear Harriet3 under the loss of an endeared Friend, who might have strengthened her steps in the path to glory!
Your uncle was surprized that dear George4 should have even contemplated obtaining a Fellowship so early, & says he should have been more surprized if he had succeeded in this term.
Can you forgive these blots? They are made through a full ink bottle, & a bad pen, & I am too stupid to re-write it.
I rejoiced with you on dear Edward's5 return in health from London.
We are calculating upon a journey to Perth6 again, in the week beginning the 16th of May, if it
(Page 4)
may be the will of God that your uncle & I have power to undertake so long a ramble!7 F.A8 is still at Elmdon, for her dear father is not at all fit to be left without a daughter & the one who lives with him was ordered away from declining health. One married daughter has quinsy, & the other is near a confinement. F.A. must remain there till Barbara can return. George9 is with his Mama, & the rest are under a valuable governess at home10. Dear E.'s head attacks still go on, & before F.A. left him he suffered painfully from a carbuncle in his neck! Just now, he is, thank God, for him well11.
Fanny12 expresses herself deeply obliged to you for taking so much trouble for the poor Idiot, & for your success therein. Your uncle did not forget you on your birthday13.
Many thanks for Miss Stratford's note. We had but one shower of rain through March, & only one sprinkling in April. Your uncle used the prayer for rain at Billesley14 yesterday.
The heads [?] are payment for Mr Goymer's charge [?]
(Top of page 1, written crosswise)
Thank you for paying it.
With much love from all to all. Your own affect[iona]te M.F.K.
April 26 -
Is your new cook likely to suit you.

Footnotes:
1. This is taken to refer to Catherine Torlesse [1680] who died 7 April 1852 aged 17
2. These lines are probably taken from a hymn which was popular at the time; but I have not been able to identify it.
3. This is probably Harriet Bridges [1634] nee Torlesse, Catherines aunt and wife of Charles Bridges a prominent evangelical divine. Harriet is reported to have been equally pious.
4. C M L's son George Downing Liveing (TKC 99). He had received his B.A. from Cambridge in 1850. At the time of this letter he was 24 years old, and F F K clearly thought that too young for a fellowship. But his college, St John's, thought very highly of him, despite his youth: they founded a College Lectureship in Chemistry for him, and built him a laboratory, as well, the very next year.
5. This is presumably C M L's son Edward Liveing (TKC 100).
6. In order to visit M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950). Edward had recently been appointed Dean of the newly-founded Cathedral in Perth.
7. They did make the journey. There is a letter from M F K's husband, Francis Fortescue Knottesford (TKC 7076), to his young friend Charles Rice, dated the 24th May, 1852, which confirms that they had left Alveston on the previous Monday (the 17th May), and arrived in Perth on Saturday the 22nd May. (The letter is held in the Archives of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, in Stratford upon Avon.)
8. F.A. (also known as Fanny Anne) is Edward Fortescue's wife, Frances Anne Spooner (TKC 14679). Her father was the Venerable William Spooner (TKC 14680), who was Rector of Elmdon, Warwickshire (near the present-day site of Birmingham Airport), and Archdeacon of Coventry.
9. This George is George Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14690), the son of Edward and Fanny Anne Fortescue. George was born in October 1847, and thus was a little under five years old at the time of this letter. Clearly, it was felt that he should stay with his mother at Elmdon while she was looking after her father, rather than being left with a governess.
10. Edward and Fanny Anne's elder children were: Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14694), who was born in February 1840; Mary Fortescue (TKC 14686), who was born some time in 1841; John Fortescue (TKC 14688), who was born some time in 1843; and Laurence Fortescue (TKC 14689), who was born on the 17th August, 1845.
11. This refers to M F K's son, Edward Fortescue. Edward had been desperately ill in 1844 - 45, and took several months to recover. Even after this serious illness he had many health problems.
12. M F K's elder daughter, Frances Catherine Fortescue (TKC 9951).
13. C M L's birthday was on the 8th April.
14. F F K was the Rector of the tiny church of All Saints, Billesley (near Stratford upon Avon) from 1823 until his death in 1859.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017







61. Maria Downing's Letters: To Catherine Mary Liveing nee Downing, 2 Jun 1852, St Ninians Perth SCT.
Liveing Archive 198a-c LT15
At the top of the fourth page, and in two different inks, the letter has been numbered "17", and the following words have been written: "M F K - M K L. June 2 - 1852 from St Ninian's Coll[ege] Perth. This is the 2nd trip to Scotland. E. F. Fortescue to Glenalmond College "

St Ninians College
Perth N.B.
June 2 - 52

My own dear Kate
I have been prevented from writing till near post time, & can therefore only tell you that by the good hand of our God upon us, we have been brought hither in comfort & safety, after a pleasant night's sejour at Leamington, York, Durham & Edinburgh, & have thank God, found all well here1. Your uncle & Edward left us yesterday for a few days visit to a Mr Boyle2, & for your uncle to see some splendid views, etc, that were omitted last
(Page 2)
autumn.
The weather is very cold, but I believe not a shade colder than in England.
Eddie3 went last evening to Mr Wordsworth's college at Glenalmond4 - an excellent Institution - his parents have long wished to remove him thither, & I only wish funds would allow of their placing Johnny5 in it also -
I shall be too late, so fare thee well, my Kate, & all the loves with thee - this is reciprocated by all your cousins in Perth - M.F.K.

Footnotes.
1. M F K's son, Edward Bowles Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 9950) had been appointed as Dean of Perth Cathedral, in Scotland, at the beginning of 1851, and M F K and her husband have travelled to Perth, to visit Edward and his family. There is a full description of the journey in Francis Knottesford's letter to Charles Rice, a young friend of his, dated the 24th May 1852 (entry number 28 in the "Other Records" section of this website's entry for M F K's husband, Francis Fortescue Knottesford - TKC 7076).
2. Mr Boyle is probably the Honorable George Frederick Boyle (1825 - 1890), who was the son of George Boyle, 4th Earl of Glasgow, and himself became the 6th Earl of Glasgow in 1869. Along with Horace Courtney Forbes, Mr Boyle was one of the principal supporters and promoters of the project of founding a new cathedral in Perth. Further information about the founding of the cathedral, and Mr Boyle's part in it, may be found at the webpage <http://www.perthcathedral.co.uk/history/a-detailed-history-1847-1914/>.
3. Edward's eldest son, Edward Francis Knottesford Fortescue (TKC 14684), who was then 12 years old.
4. Trinity College, Glenalmond (now Glenalmond College) was founded in 1847, and, according to Wikipedia, was intended "to provide teaching for young men destined for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church and where young men could be brought up in the faith of that church." The first Warden was Charles Wordsworth, who was a nephew of the poet William Wordsworth. In 1852 Wordsworth was elected as Bishop of St Andrew's, Dunkeld and Dunblane, and thereby came to have official oversight of Perth Cathedral, where Edward was Dean. From that point onwards Wordsworth proceeded to make Edward's life a misery, because of their very different views about church liturgy and ritual.
5. Edward's second son, John Fortescue (TKC 14688), who was then about 8 or 9.
Transcribed by Dr Stanley Lapidge - 2017


picture

Maria married Rev Francis Fortescue KNOTTESFORD [7076] [MRIN: 2353], son of Francis FORTESCUE of Cookhill [14678] and Frances THREHEARNE [14701], in 1805. (Rev Francis Fortescue KNOTTESFORD [7076] was born on 4 Apr 1772 in Edmonton SSX, died on 31 May 1859 in Alveston Manor House WAR and was buried on 8 Jun 1859 in Billesley WAR.)


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