THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS - Fenn Ancestors

Ancestors of Harold Fenn


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8. Capt Robert FENN [198], son of Simon FENN [4546] and Elizabeth UNDERWOOD [4547], was baptised on 2 Oct 1785 in Coddenham SFK, died on 27 Mar 1844 in Coddenham SFK at age 58, and was buried on 3 Apr 1844 in Coddenham SFK. The cause of his death was dropsy.

General Notes:
Robert was a farmer of Valley Farm Coddenham from 1806 when he replaces Simon Fenn on the Coddenham Parish Tax assessments of "Valley Farm" valued at L160 . Valley Farm was held in Leasehold from John Longe, who inherited the land from Bacon.

Robert is named as son and executor in his fathers Will, and is legatee to all the residue household furniture, plate, linen, china, stock of liquors, farming stock live and dead, crops of corn, hay, ? , grain, seeds, ? , and the occupation and use of the farm Lease (Valley Farm)

A letter from Rev John Longe to his solicitor James Wenn dated 27 Aug 1807, instructs that the lease be transferred to Robert "from Michaelmas last" on the same terms and conditions (ref. HA24/50/19/3.21 Wenn died aged 67 in Aug 1834).

Robert & Harriet were married by licence which reads: "Robert Fenn of Coddenham Gent to Harriet Liveing of Harwich. 1813".
DP170/1/22 Pg 4
A marriage bond for L100 was signed by Robert on the 18th May 1813, confirming both their ages were upwards of 21 years, and that he was free to marry
Essex PRO D/ALL 1813. (copy on file)

Robert Fenn bachelor of the Parish of Coddenham in the County of Suffolk and Harriott Liveing of this Parish of St Nicholas Harwich were married in this Chapel by licence with consent of Parents this Eighteenth day of May One Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirteen by me Wm Winfield Vicar
Witness's:Thos Liveing, Harriet Liveing, Mrs Liveing, Samuel Ward Jnr?, M A Enafer?
Marriage Certificate on file

Harwich May 21
Tuesday was married here, Mr Robert Fenn, a respectable farmer at Coddenham, Suffolk, to Harriett second daughter of Mr T Living (sic) Esq, Commander of his Majesty's packet the Lady Nepean, of this port.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday 22 May 1813.

Married.
Yesterday sen'night Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham, to Miss Harriet Living, daughter of Capt T Living (sic), Commander of the Lady Nepean, packet at Harwich.
Bury & Norwich Post. 26th May 1813.

Ipswich.
Yesterday sen'night John Robinson was committed to the county jail, in this town, by the Rev John Longe, charged with stealing a silver tablespoon, the property of Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 5 November 1814 (this may have been Robert [4529] ?)

Grandfather Fenn of Coddenham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing . . . . .
Liveing Archive Liveing, Family Notes by Edward Liveing 1870

In 1817 he held the auction described below, the Parish Tax assessments (valuation still L160) then name a Thomas Diggons as taxpayer for Valley Farm.

In 1818 - 1819 Overseers tax for the poor a Robert Fenn was assessed for land bought from George Gibbons, valued at 6 pds, however in the 1819 - 1820 assessment this land appears to have passed to a Geo Goodwin for the last two quarters.
(Ref FB37/G1/3) Who was this Robert?

The researcher is of the view (2002) that Robert and Harriet may have been unable to continue at Valley Farm perhaps for financial reasons? although Rev Longe papers show no record of arrears in land rent due to him, and no trace of a bankruptcy has been found.

Land Tax assessments for the district of Bosmere & Claydon, village of Coddenham show:
1803 ref HB16 29/40 Ipswich PRO, no record of Robert.
1806 - 1817 Robert Fenn assessed for tax on Valley Farm
1823 ref HB16 29/40 shows Robert Fenn (occupier) Longe (proprietor) assessed tax L2. Also Mrs Fenn (proprietor) Sharman (occupier) tax 12/-
1827 ref HB 16 290/10 shows Widow Fenn occupier (land) Longe (proprietor) tax L2. Also Mrs Fenn (proprietor) John Sherman (occupier) tax 12/-

THE IPSWICH JOURNAL, of the 4 Oct 1817, pg. 4, col. 2, carries an Auction notice as follows:
At Coddenham, by John King, on Mon & Tues the 6th and 7th of Oct 1817. The farming stock and part of the furniture of Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham.
On the first day will be sold the farming stock, which comprises 6 very excellent young cart mares and geldings, chestnuts and bays; a chestnut stallion, ditto mare with foal at foot ; another chestnut mare, and a black ditto, a bay horse fit for saddle or harness; a 3 year old chestnut colt fit for saddle; a chestnut suckerel, by Belgrade ; and a year old chestnut cart colt ; 5 prime milch cows, in calf ; a 2 year old hefier, and 3 two year old steers; 2 sows and pigs ; a capital road wagon, a useful ditto, a half ? -bucked ditto, a harvest carriage, 3 full-load tumbrills, a three-quarter ditto, an 8 hopper drill complete, a set of scarifiers, tormentors and hoes, 4 gangs of harrows, 4 foot ploughs, a wheel ditto, 2 double toms, a 2 horse roll, dressing machine, 40 sacks, barn utensils, steel malt mill, hand tools, 10 pairs of plough trace, 8 sets of cart ditto, 4 ditto of thillhorse gears, and a great variety of useful farming effects. On the same day will be sold, the Dairy Utensils, 16 excellent hogsheads, Iron-bound stands, 4 1/2 barrel casks, and a quantity of glass bottles, in lots.
The Furniture (to be sold on the Tuesday) consists of an extra sized 4 post bedstead, with green moreen furniture; a 4 post bedstead with mahogany feet pillars, and glazed cotton furniture; other bedsteads and hangings, bordered goose and other featherbeds, blankets and counterpanes, bedside carpets, mahogany chest of drawers, ditto basin stands, dressing tables and glasses, painted wardrobe, neat chamber chairs, a handsome pier glass, in burnished frame; Kidderminster carpet, 4 yars by 5; 6 modern mahogany chairs, and two elbows to match, mahogany card and pillar tables, handsome chinz window curtains, coffee and tea urns,mahogany bureau, painted buffet, 30 hour clock in wainscot case, an excellent kitchen coal range with cruife, & c. complete; kitchen tables and chairs, a good 3 coomb mash tub, 190 gallon brewing copper, 2 small coppers, other brewing and washing requisites, cullinary articles, earthen and stoneware, and numerous useful domestic effects.
Catalogues to be had at the Market Inns in the County; at the neighbouring Public Houses; at the place of sale; and of the Auctioneer, County Press Ipswich.
Sale to begin each day at Ten o'clock.

Merchant Taylors School Register.
June 1827.
Robert Liveing Fenn, b 17 Mar 1814, s of Robert and Harriett, schoolmaster, Harleigh, Suffolk.
Thomas Harrold Fenn, b 15 Dec 1815, s of Robert and Harriett, schoolmaster, Harleigh, Suffolk.
Roberts entry comes with a note: "R L Fenn Senior Clerk in National Debt Office"

Enquiry's with Merchant Taylors School in 2009:
Dear Mr. Fenn,
We have records of Robert L.Fenn as born 17.3.1814 son of Robert (schoolmaster) and Harriet of Hawleigh Suffolk M.T.s 1827-29 died unknown date August 1884 (occupation civil servant National Debt Office). Variant spelling Liveing/Lieving and his brother Thomas H. Fenn as born 15,12.1815 M.T.S 1827-31 with 2 terms in the Sixth Form. No further details under his entry in the 1561-1934 Register published in 1936)
Geoffrey Brown: Head of General Studies
Merchant Taylors School was formed in 1327 by the craft Guild of Merchant Tailors & Linen Armourers.

Dear Mr. Fenn,
In an idle moment I discovered that "Hawleigh" is an obsolete variant spelling of Haughley (Suffolk) still seen on some old milestones.
Godfrey Brown

Elizabeth Fenn, widow of Simon Fenn late of Coddenham farmer, buried 21 May 1831 at Coddenham, died at Hawleigh aged 78 yrs - was Robert living with his mother at Hawleigh at that time?

Robert appears to be alive in 1836, Harriet is described as wife of Robert Fenn in Thomas Liveing's Will. Harriet is living with her family in Harwich at this time.

The 1841 Census lists a Robert Fenn of Crowfield aged 50 (age rounded down in 1841 census could be between 50 & 54) schoolteacher born Suffolk. (Crowfield is a hamlet a short distance from Coddenham).

2015 - proof that Robert was of Crowfield in 1840 has now been found in the Suffolk Chronicle of 30 May 1840 reporting the marriage of his son Thomas Fenn to Maria Alston. It reads "On Tuesday week, at Nayland, by the Rev H.T. Liveing, Thomas Harrold Fenn, Esq., of Rushall, Wilts, son of Mr Robert Fenn, of Crowfield, to Maria, youngest daughter of the late George Alston, Esq."

The school at Crowfield was owned by Shrubland Hall, a 19thC undated map shows it with a mark "sell". Does the Shrubland Hall Archive have information on Robert Fenn ? 2011

A search of the Ipswich Journal on line for school masters between 1817 - 1844 reveals many ad's for school masters for Workhouse Schools (pay between L20 - L35 p.a.) and National Schools.
2009.

A note in the diary of Aaron Smith of Coddenham is as follows: "March 27th 1844 Mr Fenn our lodger died aged 58yrs"
Ref: Qs Coddenham 9 Lummis Vol 21 Ipswich PRO.

This Robert was described as a farmer on his death certificate, cause of death dropsy (on file) Application No R157327 No 413, a Sarah Smith was present at his death.

Died: 27th inst., at Coddenham after a protracted affliction, Mr Robert Fenn: as a neighbour he was highly respected, and as a master he was generous and kind.
Ipswich Journal. 30th March 1844.

Deaths: 27th ult., after a protracted affliction, Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham.
Bury & Norwich Post. 4 April 1844.

Died.
Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham near Ipswich aged 38 (sic)
Ref: Norfolk Chronicle 6 April 1844

Robert Fenn abode Codd b 3 Apr 1844 57yrs
Coddenham Burial register

Deaths: Mr Robert Fenn of Coddenham - Norfolk Chronical 16 April 1844.

Whites Directory Suffolk 1844 Crowfield: No record of a Robert Fenn

The death details entered against Robert in this record are based on an age at death of 58 years. This fits the bap. date the death certificate, and the note in the diary of Aaron Smith of Coddenham. Roberts address given in his son's marriage notice 30 May 1840 plus the mention of "master" in his death notice, links this Robert with the 1841 Census record of Robert of Crowfield schoolmaster and Robert of Hawleigh schoolmaster in 1827 and finally Robert husband of Harriet Liveing, father of Thomas Fenn. This Robert was described as a farmer on his death certificate (on file) Application No R157327 No 413, a Sarah Smith was present at his death.

Tithe Apportionment Crowfield.
Robert Fenn Occ. William Webb Owner. Plan 325 Cottage & Garden 27p. 10 Jun 1845. (No tithe entered?)
Ref: Tithe Apportionments TNA IR29/33/126.
This tithe apportionment struck in June 1845 is a minor anomaly.

The 1851 Census records Harriet as a widow, records at her death in 1864 record her as widow of Robert Fenn, gent, landed proprietor.

Research Notes:
Robert is shown in the Coddenham Baptism Register as ; Fenn Robert son of Simon and MARY Aug 28 1785.

There is no record of a marriage between a Simon Fenn & Mary in the Coddenham Register. Elizabeth Fenn is described as Simons relict on her headstone. This section of the 1785 Register is in a different handwriting to that of the vicar Longe and the researcher now (2002) considers the entry an error.

The Robert Fenn married to Harriet Liveing is believed to have separated from Harriet at some time, and is not mentioned in Fenn family records of that time kept by following generations. From at least 1828, family letters confirm Harriet living with her parents in Harwich, at times in a depressed state.

Harriet is named a beneficiary in her fathers will dated 5 Oct 1833 and described as the wife of Robert Fenn. However her legacy is placed in trust for her and "her present or any after taken husband" specifically denied any benefit from the proceeds.

Ref General Notes Thomas Liveing [230]
Appeared Personally: Charles Liveing of Danmark Hill Camberwell Esq, Robert Liveing Fenn gent & William Jennings gent both of the National Debt Office London, Liveing stated on oath that after the death of Thomas Liveing on the 30th Aug 1836 but before the funeral his sister Harriet wife of Robert Fenn proceeded to the room or bedchamber called the Great Front Room where stood a chest of drawers . . . . .

Coddenham Association
Notice is hereby given, that the Annual Meeting of the Subscribers of this Association will be held at the Crown Inn in Coddenham, on Monday the 5th day of June next, at the hour of One o'clock in the afternoon; when the subscribers, and all other persons desirous of becoming Members, are requested to attend.
Subscribers Names:
Sir William Middleton Bart.
The Rev John Longe.
The Rev Thomas Methold.
William Martin Esq.
Mr Robert Brooke, Barham.
Mr William Bird, Baylham.
Mr J. Simpson, Coddenham.
James Brooke, Coddenham.
John Fox, Coddenham.
John Bird, Coddenham
Robert Proctor, Coddenham.
William Bird, Coddenham.
Robert Fenn, Coddenham
Theod Banyard, Coddenham.
Mrs Katharine Mayhew.
Mr Richard Keeble, Creeting All Saints.
Mr Philip Beart, Creeting All Saints.
Mr Joseph Peck, Crowfield.
Mrs Mary Larter, Crowfield.
Mr Thomas Edwards, Gosbeck.
Mr Edward Elliston, Hemingstone.
Mr Luke Leaders, Hemingstone
Edward Field, Hemingstone
James Garnham, Hemingstone.
James Brooke - Treasurer
Richard Mudd - Solicitor
24th of May 1809.

The Ipswich Journal of 29 May 1819.
Contains an similar report of the Coddenham Assn.
A Robert Fenn is listed as a subscriber

The Catalogue Ipswich Borough Archives 1255 - 1835
Town Responsibilities & Services Page 511
King Garnham, plumber & glazier, obligor; Robert Fenn of Coddenham, farmer, and John Garnham Jnr of Nacton, farmer, sureties.
C/5/1/5/2/93 14 Dec 1811.
Ancestry.com

A Robert Fenn was living in Cogshall 12 Nov 1842.
Ref: Leeds General Advertiser

Suffolk Burial Index - Robert Fenn buried Coddenham 3 Apr 1844 aged 57 abode Coddenham.

Alston Fenn writes in the 1950,s "I have a nice water colour of our Gt Grandmother Harriet Liveing who married Robert Fenn and whose mother was Harriet Harrold. It was given me by Dolly (Cotes). I wish I could find out something about Robert Fenn, we know he left Harriet but where he came from or where he went is a closed book"

Harriet Liveing writes 5 Sep 1825 Liveing Archive 52a LT6
. . . . . Aunt Downes has been with us nearly a fortnight - Harriet is gone home with her - they left us last Tuesday - on Friday they hired a donkey and cart and went to Denham? To see Uncle and Harriets children - they heard from Edwards account to me that Uncle was not at all likely to come and see us this summer as he is so lame so my Aunt wishing very much to see him took that mode of convenience . . . . .

It is however proven that it is Roberts cousin, Robert Fenn 1787 - 1825 and Margaret Fenn (nee Driver) who took up the lease of Malt Office Farm in 1817, previously occupied by John Bird, Margaret continuing with the lease after Roberts death in 1825.

Valley Farm has been owned since 1922 by three generations of the Cousens family, Harold, Reginald and Gerald, grandson of Harold - 2003.

Bankrupts 1820 - 1843 London Gazette.
Fenn Peter, Hyde St., Bloomsbury, hill broker & schoolmaster, April 8, 1828.
Fenn Sarah, Bromley, Kent, draper and milliner, March 2, 1841.
Fenn Samuel, Bell street, Edgeware road, flour dealer and baker, Nov. 5, 1825.
Fenn William Hugh, Old Change, Cheapside, tea dealer, Dec. 10, 1830.
Ref The Bankrupt Directory, Elwick.
http://books.google.co.nz/books?hl=en&id=LZIDAAAAQAAJ&dq=Bankrupt+Directory&printsec=frontcover&source=web&ots=OyWQGSL7zo&sig=3VaYReXK4ORYOjcfSMfn0LnqF_w#PPP5,M1

Check of Cambridgeshire burials 1801-37 had no record of Robert Fenn.

27 June 2009
Dear Mr. Fenn
I passed your e.mail to our Honorary Archivist who has run extensive searches but can find no record of Robert Fenn within the Hadleigh Archive Catalogue.
Regards
Elaine Root
Office Administrator
Hadleigh Town Council
01473 823884
www.onesuffolk.co.uk/HadleighTC <http://www.onesuffolk.co.uk/HadleighTC>

Robert married Harriet LIVEING [227] on 18 May 1813 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS. Harriet was born on 21 Sep 1789 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS, was baptised on 20 Nov 1789 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS, and died on 28 Mar 1864 in Nayland SFK at age 74. The cause of her death was a diseased heart, 1year certified.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Robert Liveing FENN Gent. [116] (born on 27 Mar 1814, baptised Coddenham SFK - died on 28 Aug 1884 in 32 Victoria Rd Kensington MDX)

4        ii.  Dr Thomas Harrold FENN M.R.C.S. [1] (born in 1815, baptised Coddenham SFK - died on 13 Apr 1870 in Nayland SFK)




9. Harriet LIVEING [227], daughter of Commander Thomas LIVEING R N [230] and Harriet HARROLD [231], was born on 21 Sep 1789 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS, was baptised on 20 Nov 1789 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS, and died on 28 Mar 1864 in Nayland SFK at age 74. The cause of her death was a diseased heart, 1year certified.

General Notes:
Nothing is known why and when Harriet returned to her family from her marriage to Robert Fenn. No reference to Robert Fenn is found in any of family correspondence which has survived. However her father Thomas clearly put her inheritance beyond the reach of Robert, when he wrote his will in 1833.

Harriet is mentioned in many letters written by her mother Harriet, she later lived at various family address's, when she was separated from Robert.
1861 Census lists for 31 Bear St Nayland; Harriet Fenn Widow 70yrs Fund holder. Head of house. Sarah Daniel visitor un 60yrs.Companion. Eleanor E Cousins un 21. Servant.
Harriet was identified by family letters living as follows:
1828 15 July Harwich "Harriet is but poorly having cough and cold and continues to live almost without victuals she will be happy to hear from you (Catherine Liveing nee Downing) when ever you find opportunity to write". 1828 4 Dec Harwich : letter
1831 Harwich. Harriet's mother writing to Edward her son says " Harriet is very poorly she is so pale she vexes me when I look at her . . . . . she will fret . . . . . fearing that Robert will lose the situation . . . . . should the Reform Bill pass we . . . . . we can to make her hope for tho. . . . . as . . . . . To leave the . . . . . to God. I have observed to her that even if it . . . . . had in it it might not eventually be best. I want her to lean more on God and less on man. Charles writes that he is much liked and he has no doubt but he will do well, and if Clerks are appointed it is most likely he will be established".
1831 18 Dec. Harriet is very poorly - looks about the colour of a turnip I think she much want some pills like those Edwd ordered for Miss Beaumont - she puts me in pain to see her - our new troubles have not made her better
1832 10 Feb Nayland? possibly with her brother, her father offers her money : letter
1836 April? Harwich. Harriet's mother writing to her daughter-in law Catherine Liveing (Katy) mentions Harriet in connection with buying some pigeons "knowing you and Edward are fond of them Harriet bespoke half a dozen when they could be obtained, these I have now sent were brought this morning, they are wood birds as you will see, Harriet thinks the flavour of them is higher than the tame pigeons".
1836 10 June Harwich : letter
1839 (abt) London (C/o National Debt Office where her son Robert worked)
1842 Sept. Horksley Park. Francis Liveing writes to her mother from Tom Fenn's, Rushall refering to Robert Fenn proposing to visit his mother at Horksley Park (Essex?)
1848 21 & 24 Aug Kelvedon ESS. Robert while travelling Nth writes two letters to his mother C/o T C Harrold Esq Feering Nr Kelvedon Essex. Robert visited Fortescue & Mrs Knotterford at Alveston Manor 3 miles from Stratford

The 1851 Census records Harriet as a widow.

Her grave in St James Churchyard Nayland reads "In memory of Harriet widow of Robert Fenn gent who died March 28th 1864 aged 74 years. What doth the Lord require of thee but to do justly and love mercy and to walk humbly with thy God"

Death Cert No 477 Dist Sudbury-Bures, registered 13 Mar 1864. confirms age at 74 yrs. Occupation " Widow of Robert Fenn landed proprietor". Informant "The mark of Eliza Burrows present at the death Nayland".

Will dated 27 Feb 1864 was proved 2 May 1864, at under 1000pds by sons Robert Liveing Fenn Gent of The National Debt Office and and Thomas Harrold Fenn Surgeon of Nayland, executors and sole beneficiaries in equal shares.

Portrait of Harriet in possession of E.L. Fenn Auckland N Z 1998.

Other Records

1. Marriage of Harriet & Robert: 18 May 1813, St Nicholas Harwich ESS.
Marriage Register, St Nicholas Harwich Essex.

2. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Rushall WIL. Harriet is described as aged 50 of independant means not born in Wiltshire

3. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 14 The Green Camberwell Dulwich SRY. Harriet is recorded as head of house widow aged 61 no employment born Harwich ESS

4. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, 31 Bear St Nayland SFK. Harriet is described as head of house a widow aged 70 fundholder born Harwich ESS Also in the house was Sarah Daniel a companion aged 60 and a general servant.

5. Harriet's Death: 28 Mar 1864.
Harriet in old age, Headstone in Nayland Churchyard, Death Certificate

Harriet married Capt Robert FENN [198] on 18 May 1813 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS. Robert was baptised on 2 Oct 1785 in Coddenham SFK, died on 27 Mar 1844 in Coddenham SFK at age 58, and was buried on 3 Apr 1844 in Coddenham SFK. The cause of his death was dropsy.


10. George ALSTON [61], son of Samuel ALSTON [85] and Mary VANDERZEE [86], was born on 11 Sep 1763, was baptised on 8 Oct 1763 in Nayland SFK, died on 4 Feb 1831 in Nayland SFK at age 67, and was buried on 5 Feb 1831 in Nayland SFK.

General Notes:
George was an Attorney at Law. Resided at "Grooms" Nayland 1800/31.

Miniature and silhouette in possession of E L Fenn Auckland NZ 1998.

George Alston Gent of Nayland, granted commission to take affidavits, 29 Dec 1785. Ref HA541/1/2

1786 Nov 1 - George as Deputy Steward of the Manor of Nayland for the first time presided over the Court Baron.
Ref: Dr Edward L Fenns book of notes pg 31

George paid Quit Rent to the Manor of Nayland in 1797, 1818, & 1827 as:
For the freehold Mansion called Groom 6d, 4 pieces of ground laid into the Wall Garden 4d, 4d, 4d, & 9d, Garden behind Mansion 1/-, Ground called Chamberlains pt of Mansion 4d, Ground laid into yard opposite church 4d, total 3/11d
Copyhold ground called Themballs and other land 4/4d
George also owned Hawks in Lt Horkesley.

1798 George was listed as an Out Sitter and paid 2/- Land Tax in Wissington by Nayland.

George acted as Attorney for an Edward Blair of 45 Marlborough St and 49 Upper Berkley St London, owner of substantial estates in Lt Horkesley (Lord of that Manor?) and elsewhere, many letters between them some of a personal nature exists in the possession of Julia Redman and the Colchester RO ref D/DOt/E3

Edward Blair was also George Alston's friend, business associate and agent in London.

George writes many invitations in warm terms to Blair to visit them at Nayland.
Nayland 8 May 1798.
. . . . . The season is now come for felling timber, we expect the pleasure of seeing you here. . . . .
I Remain Dear Sir
Your Faithful and Very Obedient Servant
George Alston.

A number of letters exist written by Blair to George, interesting in their form and detail of life at that time:
London
January 20, 1804.
Dear Sir,
. . . . . Your wig is in hand, and is expected daily but as you propose to be in town so soon, perhaps you would like to see it before it is sent. The maker says that straight here is the present fashion, but I have ordered this to be like the former.
Having observed your fondness for pork, I had thoughts of sending you a collar of brawn, but shall defer it till I see you, as the taste is peculiar. It is to me insipid food, though recommended by the name of fashion.
Perhaps I may trouble you upon your return with some books for your neighbours. You are not yourself a bookish man, which is the reason I have not hitherto troubled you by sending any.
Yours etc etc
E Blair.

London,
August 8, 1805,
Dear Sir,
I take the opportunity of Mr Whitmore's return to Neyland (sic) to send you for your sisters use, another number of Thompsons Scotch Songs. . . . . I send also a piece of Harpsichord wire (No.5) obtained from Broadwood's, which I hope will stand the necessary tension. No more sonatas are published than they have already, that is 6 by Pleyel and 6 by Kozeluck, having experienced that his chief profit arises from the songs. I have added also the frontispieces to the two first volumes, which were not published at the time with the music.
Yours in haste,
E Blair.

Essex Record Office D/DOt E3 1 bdl.
RECORDS OF LITTLE HORKESLEY
Dates of Creation 1786-1828
Correspondence and accounts of George Alston of Nayland, Suffolk, attorney-at-law, to Edward Blair, esq., residing in London, relating to the management and legal affairs of the Little Horkesley Estate. Matters include rents and repairs, cultivation of leased farms, tithes, parish rates and the curacy of Little Horkesley; also (1804) to dispute between Edward Blair and William Cole [of Colchester] over payment for making a survey of the parish

George also acted as Agent for Blair inspecting, and arranging repairs to be done on his properties, collecting rents and tythes, and negotiating with Blair's tenants.

London,
October 13, 1805.
Dear Sir,
In reply to your letter of the 28th ult. I have no objection to the lath and plaster in the manner you mentioned . . . . . But whatever way is adopted must be undertaken immediately, or else deferred till the next spring lest the frost set in before it be dry, which will infallibly cause it to scale, and fall off. . . . .
I learn from my brother, who has been lately down there, that W Sadler has spread a false report of me as having broken my word with him; for that I had promised neither to turn him out of his farm, nor raise his rent. I never dreamt of any such engagement; nor could he have any pretence to claim it. But had I even promised, I have kept my word; as he himself has refused to stay. He told me in person that I had used him generously, as well as my father and mother before me, in suffering him to continue upon the old terms for 40 years. Let him take care lest his short road to heaven, by the way of faith without works, should prove too long for him ever to reach it. All liars, we are told, are excluded. Had he been assured of my promise he would not have failed to have claimed it. . . . .
I should have answered your letter sooner, but that I waited for the return of Mr Parish, by whom I sent you the last number of Scotch songs with a line of explanation. He told me yesterday that he delivered the parcel to Mr Harrold, who would hardly omit to forward your part of it, so that it appears a mere omission on your part to notice it in your letter. . . . .
Yours etc etc.
E Blair

London
December 24, 1805.
Dear Sir,
I thank you for your communication of yesterday, respecting the sale of Burrell's farm. But besides that I have not at present the command of so much money, the situation is not particularly eligible for me; and it is greatly encumbered with old wooden buildings, of which I have already a super abundance.
Mr Gosling is welcome to some pollard's for fencing; only let him begin with the oldest and worst. Indeed his own interest should direct him to this, as his farm is crowded with a superfluity of them. I observed several which were cut down by his predecessor, and were left to rot in the neighbouring ditches.
Mr Wiggins says that two loads of manure returned to the farm, is an equivalent for one of hay or straw carried off; but care should be taken that it is really returned.
. . . . . Mr John Barnard, executor to the late Dr Gibbons, called on me lately, to return me the copy of my sister's marriage contract. I see by it that her husband has no control over her fortune. She and her trustees have the absolute disposal of it, in all respects the same as if still unmarried; her discharge being good to all intents and purposes. A power is also reserved to apportion her children, according to her own and their discretion. . . . .
I am sorry for your brother Jame's loss, as I fear his children also will be sufferers by the loss of their mother. His own health is not good and they are still but young. (Within a year the children were orphaned)
The compliments of the season attend you all. What a horrible scene of slaughter is now carrying on in Germany. Surely the madness of Kings shall be richly rewarded!
Yours,
E Blair.

Blair writes somewhat cynically on George taking a second wife.
London
May 29th 1806
Dear Sir,
I have been long ago instructed, that the marriage of a wife has sometimes hindered engagements of a much more serious nature, than that for which you apologise in your note of this morning: even the keeping of the marriage supper of the Prince of Peace. I do not however consign you to "outer darkness" for the deed but merely "inner darkness" of a private chamber; till you shall have fully expiated your offence, by incurring all the pains and penalties of matrimony. In a word, I wish you all the comforts the state is capable of, which however are in my estimation so small, that they are in no respect a balance for the certainty of their opposites. In truth though I had formed no conception of the party, I had an obscure expectation of some such new arrangement, from a certain derangement I observed at Horkesley; and it must be confessed that of two unavoidable wills, you have chosen the least. I presume from the name your lady is one of the two sisters I saw at Stoke last year. I wish her all prosperity. Let me know whether I shall send her a piece of plate, or other furniture, of the value of 20 guineas as a token of my sincerity. I take the liberty of referring it to her own choice, because I reckon that a thing of use is at all times preferable to a toy, and I should be sorry to blunder upon a useless complement.
With my best wishes to you both,
I remain,
Yours etc etc.
E Blair.

London
December 3, 1811
Dear Sir,
. . . . . You will receive by the conveyance of the wagon, a couple of carpets for your two parlours, as new and as ugly as fashion can desire. I hunted in vain for a neat octagonal pattern for the front room, on account of the angular fireplace. But no such patterns have been manufactured for these last seven years; and though they offered to make one on purpose, they could not disgrace their name by keeping them on hand. But the single recommendation of fashion will, in the eyes of certain of your family at least, sufficiently overbalance other objections.
The watch is repaired but not yet regulated. Certain parts which Georgehad been broken, will now be replaced by new ones, and it will be forwarded in a week or two.
You have addressed your last letter to "No.45" which was the number of my former lodging. But my present is No.49 but I am strongly tempted to shift again, on account of the disgust of living among rogues. My drawers having been robbed the other day of a considerable quantity of linen viz: 3 shirts, 6 cravats, 7 handkerchiefs, 4 pair of cotton stockings, and 3 pair of white silk. My landlady's suspects a certain fat old woman whom she received for a few nights, and whose time of departure corresponded with the loss. Yet she refused to take any legal steps to identify the thief, lest she should bring a bad report upon her own house; choosing rather, woman like, to be herself suspected, than by proving it on the guilty, to clear her own character. Ann will say, what motive can induce her to such perverse conduct? The hope only of obtaining 3 1/2 guineas per week off a stranger. For though such an expectation never be realised, yet the conviction will operate as strongly as the truth. But even thus the contrivance is at best unnecessary, as she might at any time get quit of me, according to agreement. But you know women never go directly to their object; they love a little plot to bring about the end.
With my best respects to your ladies,
yours etc etc
E Blair

London
August 25, 1812.
Dear Sir,
When my tenant Creek came last to town to petition for the renewal of his lease, he told me your lady has a vessel on the stocks, but was unable to determine what time it would be launched. I was unwilling therefore to visit you at a venture, lest I should arrive at the unseasonable time of the groaning; which though you have not mentioned it, I presume must now be over . . . . .
I propose however seeing you in the course of next week, when I hope to find you all in perfect health. And remain in the meantime, with my best respects to your lady etc etc.
Yours etc etc
E Blair

London
March 31, 1813.
Dear Sir,
I have been this day informed by Mr Ball that he has yesterday dispatched the piano-forte to be delivered to you by one of the common stage wagons, on its way to Hadleigh. You will pleased to return the packing case by the same conveyance, and acquaint me with the day of its arrival in town, that Mr Ball may fetch it from the in in his own caravan, which will save him a few shillings for porterage. Address it to "Mr Ball, pianoforte maker, Duke Street, Grosvenor Square, London."
You should have received it before but that I have waited till now, for the opportunity of replacing it by the sofa, which had been removed to the apartment of my fellow lodger; and who has but lately recovered from a tedious and severe sickness, notwithstanding the daily attendance of five medical gentleman. Having at length adjourned to his country house I regained the sofa just in the nick of time, for he relapsed and returned again within a week.
A little further delay was occasioned by having the hammers new leathered, for the improvement of the tone; and replacing one of the pedals, which was broken off. After all, it will prove a useless piece of furniture to you both, who are not musical; but it was your ladies own choice: and utility is seldom consulted when the love of fashion predominates. . . . .
I am yours etc
E Blair.

Nayland 5 April 1813
George reply's to Blair that he had received the piano consigned by him, arriving by wagon "to the great joy of my wife" Also mentions his wife is poorly and they are going to the sea at Aldeburgh.

Aldeburgh 31 May 1813.
George writes to Blair that he, his wife and children "are much gratified with the change of the scene" at Aldeburgh.

George writes to Blair 3 Feb 1818 "I have been confined to my bed five days, I am now only able to sit on a sofa in consequence of an operation for the removal of a tumour on my leg which as you may remember was the cause of my lameness. Without society and possessing but few books times passes very slowly with me. I therefore beg the favour any morning you can share time, that you would have the goodness to call"
George was writing from 2 Greville St, Hatton Garden London.
Ref: Colchester RO ESS ref D/DOt E3

Written untidily with corrections, on the back of a letter written to George by George Downing 23 Apr 1798 was the following:
Sir By desire of Mr Jones I called upon you yesterday to settle the two-year . . . . . Lady Day cash which he expects you to pay to me immediately.
To Mr Lean

Sir Mr Dawson has fixed Monday next five o'clock in the afternoon to be at Hadleigh for . . . . . admit to the copyhold field of Rigatts Hall Manor
Nayland 25 April 98
Mr . . . . .
These appear to be drafts of letters emanating from George Alston's law office.
Ref George Downing [96]

George was the Steward for a number of Manors.
Essex Record Office D/DQ 84/108
MANORIAL DOCUMENTS AND OTHER RECORDS OF BELCHAMP WALTER, FOXEARTH AND PENTLOW
Level: Series Deeds of Manors of Liston Overhall, Liston Netherhall and Liston Weston
Dates of Creation 3 June 1788
Scope and Content Admission of William Henry Campbell, esq., eldest son and heir of Wm. Campbell, esq., decd. Piece of arable land etc etc . . . . . all copyhold of the manor of Foxearth Court of Sadler Whitmore, esq. Steward: George Alston gent., deputy for Samuel Alston gent.

Essex Record Office D/DU 381/35
DEEDS AND MAPS OF ELMSTEAD AND FRATING; COTTON FAMILY OF WOODFORD; DEEDS OF LOUGHTON AND ROMFORD
Dates of Creation 22 Oct.1792
Scope and Content Admission of John Grimsey on surrender Robert Chaplin and Nathaniel Holmes, excecturors of Thomas Fenning [as in D/DU 381/33] Property as in D/DU 381/32 and a grovett part of Hulls with a way leading to Bromley Heath, all copyhold of manor of wix hall or Abbey Court of Rev.Erasmus Warren Deputy Steward: George Alston, gent.

Essex Record Office D/DC/41/68
MISCELLANEOUS ESSEX DOCUMENTS
Series Manor of Dale Hall in Lawford
Dates of Creation 7 May 1801
Scope and Content Admission of James Dear on d. of brother John Land (10 a.) in West Bergholt, copyhold of manor of Nether Hall alias Cooks Hall in west Bergholt Court of Thomas Brand, esq. Steward: George Alston, gent.

Essex Record Office D/DU 293/324
DEEDS MAINLY RELATING TO GREAT DUNMOW
Dates of Creation 31 March 1803
Scope and Content . . . . . Court of John and Rich.Marriott, esqs. Steward: James Alston, gent.

Essex Record Office D/DQ 84/44
MANORIAL DOCUMENTS AND OTHER RECORDS OF BELCHAMP WALTER, FOXEARTH AND PENTLOW
Dates of Creation 10 May 1803
Scope and Content Letter of George Alston to unidentified correspondent, forwarding 'Mr Jay's Title completed by Mr. Harrington his atty.' and promising to send 'Mr Bullock's Title' when received from the latter's attorney, Mr. Frost.

Essex Record Office D/DU 133/87
DEEDS AND RECORDS OF LANGHAM AREA.
Dates of Creation 24 April 1809
Scope and Content Copy of the surrender of John Moore of Langham, yeoman, to the use of George Alston of Nayland (co. Suff.), gentleman (exor. of John Norman of Nayland, farmer, decd.), conditional on the repayment of L40. Property, as in 133/80 9except 21/2a. land, already surrendered) Recites: 133/85

Essex Record Office D/DU 133/183
DEEDS AND RECORDS OF LANGHAM AREA.
Dates of Creation 20 May 1813
Scope and Content Admission of James Blyth, jun., on the surrender, as in 133/181 Property as in 133/181 Lord:Anne Hinde, widow Steward: George Alston,gent.

Repository: Essex Record Office D/DC/36/20
MISCELLANEOUS ESSEX DOCUMENTS
Series Manor of Dale Hall in Lawford
Dates of Creation 21 August 1816
Scope and Content Conveyance . . . . . (iii) John Ambrose of LondonManningtree, gentleman (trustee of a term of 1000 years assigned in this Conveyance); (iv) . . . . . (iv) John Mathew Greenwood of Lincolns Inn (co. Middx.), esq., and George Alston of Nayland (co. Suff), gentleman (exors. of Samuel Alston, decd.); (v) John Ambrose (trustee of George Bridges);. . . . .

Manor of Nayland with Downings - Rentals 1818.
Alston George
Mansion called the Groom 6d.
For a piece of ground laid into the Wall Garden 4d.
For the garden behind the mansion 1s 0d.
For a piece of ground called Chamberlains Pt of mansion 4d.
For a piece of ground also laid into Wall Garden 9d.
For a piece of ground formd Doomsdales laid into Wall Garden 4d.
For a piece of ground laid into yard opposite church 4d.
For a piece of ground called Harlins Yard laid into Wall Garden 4d.
Ref: Bury R.O. HA541/2/1/13 v 3s 11d.

Essex Record Office D/DU 177/71
DEEDS OF ALTHORNE, MAYLAND AND LATCHINGDON-CUM-SNOREHAM
Dates of Creation 19 March 1823
Scope and Content Copy of Assinment of Mortgage, 13 March 1818, for L1,000 (i)John Griggs of Messing, esq.; (ii) Benjamin Cook; (iii) George Alston of Nayland (co. Suff.), gent. Property as in 177/62 Recites: 177/66; 177/69

Essex Record Office D/DU 177/93
DEEDS OF ALTHORNE, MAYLAND AND LATCHINGDON-CUM-SNOREHAM
Series Deeds of Chamberlands lands in Althome and Mayland
Dates of Creation 31 March 1823
Scope and Content Assignment of Mortgage for remainder of term of 1,000 years (i) George Alston of Nayland (co. Suff.), gent.; (ii) Lucy Boys Revett; (iii) John Harriss and John Population; (iv) William Wright of Maldon, gent. Poperty as in 177/88-90 In trust for securing the L500 and to attend the inheritance Recites: 177/69; 177/71; 177/88-91

Essex Record Office D/DXkLondon/30
Manor of Wix & Mistley.
Series D/DXk 28-40 Deeds of Westlands Farm, Wix
Dates of Creation 29 April 1823.
Scope and Content Manor of Wkkds Hall or Abby. Memorandum of Conditional Surrender for L130; of John Ham of Wix, yeoman, (by the hands of George Alston gent., steward), to use of Nathl. Cutting of wix, farmer. The lands & tenements called Westlands (16 a.)
Placement uncertain ELF 2004

Essex Record Office D/DU 133/91
DEEDS AND RECORDS OF LANGHAM AREA.
Dates of Creation 8 October 1829
Scope and Content Copy of a Warrant of Satisfaction of George Alston, as in 133/87, addressed to the Steward of the manor of Langham, that he has received the principal and interest moneys due to him by virtue of three conditional surrenders made by John Moore, as in 133/87, of property, as in 133/87


Ipswich Journal 5 Feb 1831
"Yesternight died at his residence at Nayland in the 68th year of his age , George Alston Esq".

Bury & Norwich Post - Death Notices:
On Friday evening . . . . . Same day whilst sitting in his chair, George Alston of Nayland, solicitor.
Ref 2/2/1831/2/2 Bury RO

The Nayland Parish Register puts George's age at 69.

WILL of GEORGE ALSTON of NAYLAND
Dated 7th February 1818.
I George Alston of Nayland in Suffolk hereby revoking all former Wills whatsoever by me at any time therefore made DO make this my last Will in manner following - And do appoint my loving wife Anne and my brother Samuel Alston executrix and executor thereof.
I direct all my just debts to be duly paid.
NEXT I give devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate unto and to the use of my said wife Anne her heirs executors and administrators chargeable with the payment of five hundred pounds apiece to my six children George, Samuel, Edward, Charles, Margaretta and Maria to be paid to them respectively at their several and respective attainment of the age of twenty one years with lawful interest for the same in the meantime towards bringing them up and such part of the principal as may be necessary for their advancement in the world AND in case of the death of any of them under age and without lawful issue I give the legacy of him or her so dying unto the survivor to be equally divided between them ALSO chargeable with the payment of one annuity or clear yearly sum of thirty pounds so my unfortunate brother William Alston during his life by half yearly payments the first payment to be made at the end of six calendar months next after my decease
My desire is to be buried in the Church Yard of the Parish Church of Little Horksley in Essex.
In witness whereof I the said GEORGE ALSTON the testat my hand and seal this seventh day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.
Geo. Alston (LS).
Signed sealed published and declared by the said testator as and for his Last Will and testament in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have hereto inscribed our names as witnesses - J.G. Sargeant, Jn Perry, Charles Edward Perry.

I George Alston do hereby add this as a CODICIL to my Will hereunto annexed and desire that the same may be taken as part thereof. Whereas since the execution of any Will I have purchased a further part or share of a freehold estate at Lawford in Essex subject to a life interest therein Now I hereby give and devise all my fourth part of and in the said estate at Lawford an all other real estate which I have purchased since the execution of my Will unto my loving wife Anne her heirs and assigns for ever. AND whereas there is now . . . . . in my name in the three percent Consol Annuities L221.18.3 Stock transferred to one at the rate of 9% (sic) for L100 by the Rev. John Staples Hand for the amount of my son Samuels legacy of L100 and daughter Margaret's legacy of L100 left them by their Aunt Miss P Vanderzee Also the fourth part of the residue of her effects given by her to my daughter Maria of whose Will the said John Staples Hand is sole exectuor. Now my Will and devise is that on my son Samuel's attainment of the age of twentyone years there be paid or transferred to him one half part of the said sum of L221.18.3. stock also and accumilated interest whereon and likewise on the interest thereof after the sale of three pounds per centum per annum. And that on my daughter Margaret's attainment of the age of twentyone years or be married which shall first happen the remaining half part of the said L221.18.3. stock be paid or transferred to her together with the like accumulated interest thereon And that on my daughter Maria's attainments of the age of twentyone years or be married which shall first happen there be paid or transferred to her the said L714.7.7. stock tegether with the like accumulated interest thereon the said sum of L221.18.3. and L714.7.7. stock to be paid at the price the three percent consol (sic) shall be at the expectations mentioned for payment thereof.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty ninth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five.
Geo. Alston.
Signed sealed published and declared by the said George Alston as and of a Codicil to his Will in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have hereto subscribed our names as witnesses.
J.G. Sargeant (Att. at Law)
Charles Edward Penny
Fred. Brown.

I George Alston of Nayland in Suffolk do hereby add this as a CODICIL to my Will and desire that the same may be taken as part thereof Namely I give to my two nephews Charles Alston and Henry Alston two hundred pounds apiece of lawful money of Great Britian to be paid to them or their executors or administrators at the end of six months next after my death.
Written with my own hand and seal this seventeenth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty.
Geo. Alston.
Proved under L35,000 in London with two codicils the 8th March 1831 before the Court by the oath of Ann Alston widow the relict one of the executors to whom admin was granted being first . . . . . by . . . . . duly to administer . . . . . . . . . . to Samuel Alston the brother the other executor . . . . . . . . . .
PROB 11/1782.

Research Notes:
The following are references to some of the legal work done by Samuel Alston and his sons James and George at their Nayland practice.

Suffolk Record Office, Ipswich Branch:
ROWLEY OF TENDRING HALL
Catalogue Ref. HA 108
TENDERING HALL ESTATE TITLE DEEDS

FILE - 'Sherwin against Rowley, Title deeds relating to the estate purchased of Mrs Sparrow situate at Stoke in the county of Suffolk - ref. HA 108/2/21 - date: 1682-1798
[from Scope and Content] 1769 William Meadowes of Combs to Samuel Alston of Nayland in trust for William Martin of Stoke by Nayland
[from Scope and Content] 1778 Simson to Samuel Alston of Nayland moieties in trust for Edward Gusterson of Nayland and Henry Gusterson of Bures St Mary
[from Scope and Content] 1783 Fuller and Toosey to James Alston of Nayland in trust for Sarah Sparrow of Edwardstone

FILE - 'Manor of Nayland No 1' - ref. HA 108/2/22 - date: 1669 - 1805
[from Scope and Content] 1756 Assignment of mortgage to Samuel Alston of Nayland

FILE - 'Sherwin against Rowley. Title deeds relating to an estate at Stoke by Nayland and Polstead in Suffolk purchased of Mr Robert Vince'. - ref. HA 108/2/27 - date: 1694-1802
[from Scope and Content] 1785 Margaret Parke of Saffron Walden (Ess) to George Alston of Nayland in trust for Henry Vince of Stoke by Nayland
[from Scope and Content] 1788 John Harsant and wife, Deborah, devisee of John Hyndes of Brandeston to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for Henry Vince

FILE - 'Bacons Cottage' - ref. HA 108/2/45 - date: 1699-1814
[from Scope and Content] 1809 Mortgage to George Alston of Nayland
[from Scope and Content] 1810 Assignment of mortgage to Sir William Rowley, with Bacon's promise to pay Alston L.63 plus interest

FILE - 'Deeds of houses and lands at Stoke purchased of Chrisp and Manning' - ref. HA 108/2/48 - date: 1797-1810
[from Scope and Content] 1797 Gilbert Ironside of Upper Brook Street (Mdx) and Richard Willis of Monmouth to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for William Chrisp of Stoke by Nayland together with a farm called Penns in Stoke and Wissington
[from Scope and Content] 1797 Mortgage to Abraham Dansie of Sproughton and George Alston of Nayland

FILE - 1a 34p Meadow in Nayland - ref. HA 108/2/51 - date: 1812
[from Scope and Content] 1812 Sir William Rowley and George Alston of Nayland in exchange for 2 parcels of meadow in Nayland

FILE - 'Title deeds relating to two messuages and 2a of land at Stoke next Nayland purchased by Sir William Rowley bart, of John Ellis 13 Oct 1825' - ref. HA 108/2/57 - date: 1744-1825
[from Scope and Content] 1797 Emmerson to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for John Ellis of Stoke by Nayland and Anna Maria Hart of Boxford
[from Scope and Content] 1825 Ellis and Charles Alston of Colchester (Ess) to Sir William Rowley, together with 2r 7p allotment under Enclosure Act
[from Scope and Content] 1797 Assignment of mortgage to James Alston

FILE - 'Conveyance of 2 pieces of land in Stoke by Nayland Suffolk from Mr Watts to Sir William Rowley bart, 4 Sept 1828' - ref. HA 108/2/64 - date: 1711-1828
[from Scope and Content] 1812 Mortgage to George Alston of Nayland

FILE - 'Writings of freehold premises in Polstead belonging to R C Rowley purchased of Mr Mortimer's executors dated March 28 and 29 1838' - ref. HA 108/2/72 - date: 1764-1838
[from Scope and Content] 1776 Mortgage to Samuel Alston of Nayland

FILE - 'Sir J R Rowley Bart, writings relating to land purchased of Carter' - ref. HA 108/2/75 - date: 1721-1843
[from Scope and Content] 1822, 1823, 1826 Copy mortgages to George Alston Nayland
[from Scope and Content] 1828 Assignment of mortgage to George Alston junior of Hadleigh

FILE - 'Deeds relating to the farm called Greenwoods in Polstead bought of Mr E Daniels in 1845 by Sir Joshua R Rowley bart'. With note that land part of Sprotts Farm of 5 Jan 1939 subject to a rentcharge of L.3 a year paid to the Congregational Church of Nayland - ref. HA 108/2/76 - date: 1710-1845
[from Scope and Content] 1782 Assignment of mortgage and additional loan to Samuel Alston of Nayland, with bond

FILE - 'Title deeds and writings relating to certain messuages and premises at Stoke by Nayland Suffolk, purchased by Joshua T Rowley Esq of the trustees of the late Mr John Pryke' - ref. HA 108/2/86 - date: 1657-1865; 1664-1822
[from Scope and Content] 1794 Joseph and Margaret Parke to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for Isaac Pryke of Stoke by Nayland, with copy of a Fine
[from Scope and Content] 1794 Assignment of mortgage to James Alston

FILE - 'Writings relating to freehold cottages and land situate at Stoke by Nayland Suffolk belonging to Sir Charles R Rowley bart, late Goddards' - ref. HA 108/2/92 - date: 1720-1873
[from Scope and Content] 1790 William Crisp of Stoke by Nayland to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for John Parson of Boxford, with copy of a Fine
[from Scope and Content] 1829 Mortgage to George Alston of Nayland

FILE - 'Writings relating to a freehold cottage and 11a of land at Leavenheath in Stoke purchased of Mrs Holton and her daughter and conveyed to the uses of the settlement of 12 July 1860' - ref. HA 108/2/93 - date: 1769-1876
[from Scope and Content] 1799 Mortgage to James Alston of Bocking (Ess) in trust for Samuel Steward of Assington and Joseph Wass of Stoke by Nayland, with bond

FILE - 'Sir C R Rowley bart. Deeds relating to freehold premises at Stoke by Nayland Suffolk purchased of James Beardwell' - ref. HA 108/2/96 - date: 1829-1876
[from Scope and Content] 1866 Mortgage to Samuel Alston of Nayland

FILE - 'Deeds relating to 3 cottages abutting upon the churchyard Stoke by Nayland and purchased of the trustees of Charles Worters' - ref. HA 108/2/104 - date: 1754-1888
[from Scope and Content] 1842 Cream to Samuel Alston of Nayland
[from Scope and Content] 1845 Alston to William Chisnall of Polstead

Deeds relating to Sir Richard Williams' estate purchased by Rowley in 1750

FILE - 'Deeds relating to L.11,000 mortgage late Gifford' - ref. HA 108/2/3 - date: 1700-1785
[from Scope and Content] 1777 Samuel Alston of Nayland, executor of Samuel Meadows of Halstead (Ess) and George Wheeler of Manningtree (Ess), grandson of Meadowes to the trustees of the will of Sir William Rowley

FILE - 'Deeds relating to the estates purchased of Joshua Rowley Esq and Mr Alston' - ref. HA 108/2/7 - date: 1648-1778
[from Scope and Content] 1776 Samuel Alston of Nayland, executor of Samuel Meddows of Halstead to Joshua Rowley

FILE - Bundles - ref. HA 108/2/8 - date: 1675-1827
[from Scope and Content] Alston, Church and Williams Stowe of Nayland to Rowley trustees

MISCELLANEOUS ESTATE PAPERS - ref. HA 108/9

FILE - Miscellaneous - ref. HA 108/9/6 - date: 1809-1837
item: 2 Copies of draft agreement between William Rowley and George Alston of Nayland concerning mortgage on a cottage in Stoke by Nayland - ref. HA 108/9/6/3 - date: 1810
item: Draft conveyance by lease and release from Sir William Rowley to George Alston of Nayland of garden containing 1 rood 18 perches in Nayland - ref. HA 108/9/6/4 - date: 1810

Ref A2A

PRO - C202 = Chancery: Petty Bag Office: Writ Files
C 202/184/10 Lincoln - William Hurd Robinson, Theophilus Williams; Northampton - Richard Buswell; Nottingham - William Cutts; Salop - William Egerton Jeffreys; Somerset - Moses Clarke, Thomas Skurray; Southampton - William Dibsdale Faithfull, John Hart, Francis Worsley; Stafford - Richard Allen, John Comberback, John Cruso, Thomas Fenton, Edward Whitehouse Jackson, Joseph Smith; Suffolk - George Alston, George William Brown Bohun, Samuel Buckle the younger; Sussex - John Woollett; Warwick - Ambrose Mainwaring; Westmorland - John Barrow; Worcester - Henry Roberts; York - Robert Scott; York E. 1796
*

Medical Notes: London
March 31, 1813.
Dear Sir,
I have been this day informed by Mr Ball that he has yesterday dispatched the pianoforte to be delivered to you by one of the common stage wagons, in its way to Hadley. You will pleased to return the packing case by the same conveyance, and acquaint me with the day of its arrival in town, that Mr Ball may fetch it from the in in his own caravan, which will serve him a few shillings for porterage. Address it to Mr Ball, pianoforte maker, Duke Street, Grosvenor Square, London.
You should have received it before but that I have waited till now, for the opportunity of replacing it by the sofa, which had been removed to the apartment of my fellow lodger; and who has but lately recovered from a tedious and severe sickness, notwithstanding the daily attendance of five medical gentleman. Having at length adjourned to his country house I regained the sofa just in the nick of time, for he relapsed and returned again within a week.
A little further delay was occasioned by having the hammers new leathered, for the improvement of the tone; and replacing one of the pedals, which was broken off. After all, it will prove a useless piece of furniture to you both, who are not musical; but it was your ladies own choice: and utility is seldom consulted when the love of fashion predominates. . . . .
I am yours etc
E Blair.

Other Records

1. George Alston Snr born 1763: Nayland Suffolk. His silhouette, articled as law clerk to his father

2. George Alston Snr born 1763: Samuel Stevens articled as his clerk 1796, postumous surrender to the Manor of Assington 1851

George married Mary CREEK [62], daughter of James CREEK of Little Horksley [4920] and Mary GUSTERSON [5352], on 22 May 1798 in Little Horkesley ESS. Mary was born in 1770, was baptised on 27 Feb 1770 in Little Horkesley ESS, died on 13 Apr 1801 in Little Horkesley ESS at age 31, and was buried on 20 Apr 1801 in Little Horkesley ESS.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Rev George Downing ALSTON [68] (born on 15 Nov 1799 in Nayland SFK - died on 18 Jan 1880 in Clifton, GLS)

         ii.  Mary ALSTON [87] (born on 13 Mar 1801 - died on 30 Aug 1801)

George next married Anne Margaret VANDERZEE [60] on 24 May 1806 in Holborn St Andrew LND. Anne was baptised on 29 Mar 1776 in Gt Burstead ESS, died in Feb 1856 in Nayland SFK at age 79, and was buried on 22 Feb 1856 in Nayland SFK. The cause of her death was an aneurysm of the aorta. Another name for Anne was Margarett Anne VANDERZEE.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Margaretta ALSTON [66] (born on 1 Dec 1807, baptised Nayland SFK - died in 1808, buried in Nayland SFK)

         ii.  Samuel ALSTON [63] (born on 6 Oct 1809, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 17 Apr 1887 in Nayland SFK)

        iii.  Rev Edward ALSTON [64] (born on 13 Dec 1810, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 11 Nov 1871 in Witham ESS)

         iv.  Charles James ALSTON [65] (born on 25 Jun 1812, baptised Nayland SFK - died in 1878)

          v.  Margaret ALSTON [67] (born in 1813 in Nayland SFK - died on 1 Mar 1902 in Nayland SFK)

5        vi.  Maria ALSTON [2] (born on 19 Jul 1815, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 21 Mar 1871 in Nayland SFK)




11. Anne Margaret VANDERZEE [60], daughter of James VANDERZEE [126] and Philadelphia MEAD [1041], was baptised on 29 Mar 1776 in Gt Burstead ESS, died in Feb 1856 in Nayland SFK at age 79, and was buried on 22 Feb 1856 in Nayland SFK. The cause of her death was an aneurysm of the aorta. Another name for Anne was Margarett Anne VANDERZEE.

General Notes:
Anne was a beneficiary under her mothers Will.

Anne owned a small book, in the possession of the compiler, titled "First Flowers" by A Literary Amateur. It is a collection of facts, poetry, politics, social themes etc, one chapter is titled "Choice Scraps" which includes half a page on the Origin of Dueling; once required as a matter of course, if one was called a liar.
The fly leaf is endorsed Southend Essex Anne Alston July 19 - 33 and the price was 6/-

Anne was a spinster at her marriage, witnesses were George vanderzee & Harriott Alston.

Mr Alston
Nayland
Suffolk
My dear George
I conclude you have had the goodness to consent to my request in prolonging my stay here a week or 10 days longer, in your next perhaps you may be able to fix a time for coming, I yesterday called upon
Mrs C - V. and insisted upon her calling, for me to go with her to Mr Chines this morning, unfortunately it happened to be the morning he went out to visit patients but would be at home with six at which hour we . . . . . an to go again, I thought you would be greatly disappointed if you did not hear from me to day, or what I would have deferred it to have sent you an account of Mr Chines opinion of her, she is going to spend the day and begs to be very kindly remembered to you and all at Stoke, we called with your letter into Mr Blair on Monday he would have written an answer but I told him I expected you in town he very politely offered himself to go anywhere with us that we liked which we thanked him for, do you think you could spare time to take us a little trip in our Chaise to Henley and Oxford if the weather was fine, Phila and I should like it very much, now I am here you must give me leave to stay as long as you can and make yourself comfortable under the idea of my doing so, I have not been to any of the amusements, I cannot give you so daily an account as you did me, let me hear from you on Tuesday, I think Sarah and Hannah had better keep the tent (sic) Beds in airing by sleeping in them as they will both be wanting when we return, I am afraid you have not been able to have anything down to the garden yet, but I hope you will if the weather will allow you.
Phila unites with me in kind love to yourself and all at Stoke and dear George ever
yours truly affectionately
A. Alston
Thursday
There will be a small parcel by the wagon one day next week which had better remain unpacked till I return
Written on three sides of one sheet, indistinct postmark reads 27 and possibly 1809, note on address page "1 May wife" Letter then may have been written 27 April 1809? Phila refered to is probably Anne's sister Philadelphia.
Original in the possession of Julia Readman 1999, copy in Fenn archive.


1839 Alston Court (Grooms) Rent Charge Apportionment: Proprietor and Occupier Mrs Ann Alstone.
164 Garden 26 Pchs
165 Premises 30 Pchs.
166 House & Garden 3 Roods 15 Pchs.
Anne's birth date uncertain, incorrectly shown 1795 or 6. It is sourced to Dennis Halliday.
Annie's Almanack/Diary 1853 Ref B/33

1839 Alston Court (Grooms) Rent Charge Apportionment: Proprietor and Occupier Mrs Ann Alstone.
164 Garden 26 Pchs
165 Premises 30 Pchs.
166 House & Garden 3 Roods 15 Pchs.
Anne's Will is dated 13 Jul 1850. Proved London 16 Apr 1856. On file.
Annie's Almanack 1853 Ref B/33
Annie's birth date is sourced to the 1851 census

Anne was aged 79 at her death

Anne was a beneficiary under the will of Philadelphia Liveing as were her children Samuel, Margaret, and Maria Alston.

Settlement by Mrs Anne Alston
Dated 26th of April 1850.
This indenture made the 26th day of April 1850 between Anne Alston of Nayland in the County of Suffolk widow of the one part and Samuel Alston of Nayland aforesaid attorney Thomas Harrold Fenn also of Nayland surgeon and Robert Liveing Fenn of the National Debt Office gentleman of the other part. Whereas the said Anne Alston being desirous of providing for her son-in-law (sic) the Rev George Alston Clerk and his four children namely Alfred Alston Edward Alston Waldon Alston and William Alston after his decease she has transferred into the joint names of the said three several parties a sum of L3801.13.6 stock at L3 per cent consolidated Anns (sic) upon the trusts as are hereinafter declared concerning the same. Now this indenture witnesses that in further pursuance thereof it is hereby declared and agreed that they the said three several parties Samuel Alston Thomas Harold Fenn and Robert Liveing Fenn and the survivors or survivor of them his executors and administrators shall and will stand possessed and interested in the sum of L3801.13.6 L3 per cent consolidated Anns (sic) so transferred to them as aforesaid upon the trusts and to and for the intents and purposes hereinafter declared that is to say. In trust for the said Anne Alston during her life and after her decease upon trust to pay the dividends and annual produce of such monies as the same shall become due to the said George Alston during his life for his own use and benefit and after the decease of the said George Alston upon trust to pay one fourth part of such Stocks or Trust monies to each of the said four children when and as they severally attain the age of 24 years and if any or either of them shall depart this life before attaining that age then upon trust to pay the share of the one so dying unto the survivor or survivors in like manner as his original share is directed to be paid. And upon further trust to apply the interest and dividends of such trust monies for the benefit of the said four children of the said George Alston during their respective minorities. And upon further trust that they the said three several parties shall and may advance or appropriate at any time or times after the decease of the said George Alston all or any part or presumptive part of their share of the said trust monies or any . . . . . part or share for the maintenance education promotion in life or otherwise for the benefit of the said four children living . . . . . their respective minorities.
Power to appoint new trustees.
In witness Anne Alston Samuel Alston Thomas Harold Fenn Robert Liveing Fenn
Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of Margaret Alston
Ref: SRO Bury HA541/11253

Settlement by Mrs Anne Alston
Dated 4 October 1850
This indenture made the fourth day of October 1850 between Ann Alston of Nayland in the County of Suffolk widow of the one part and Samuel Alston of Nayland aforesaid attorney Thomas Harrold Fenn also of Nayland Surgeon and Robert Liveing Fenn of the National Debt Office gentleman of the other part. Whereas the said Ann Alston being desirous of providing for her son's the Rev Edward Alston and Charles James Alston after her decease she has transferred into the names of the said three several persons as trustees for the purpose here after declared the sum of L4616 Stock in the joint names of the said Sam Alston Thomas Harrold Fenn and Robert Liveing Fenn, and the sum of L3077 Stock 3.25 per cent anuities in the joint names of the said Robert Liveing Fenn and Thomas Harrold Fenn and Samuel Alston.
Now this indenture witnesseth that in pursuance thereof it is hereby declared and agreed that they were said Samuel Alston Thomas Harrold Fenn and Robert Liveing Fenn and the survivors of them there executors and administrators . . . . . shall and will . . . . . said sums so transferred to them as aforesaid . . . . . to and for the interests and purposes hereinafter declared concerning the same that is to say -- in trust for the said Ann Alston during her life and after her decease upon trust to pay the dividends and annual produce of the said sums of L3077 for the maintenance of the said Edward Alston during his life and upon trust to pay the dividend and annual produce of the said sum of L4616 for the maintenance of the said Charles James Alston during his life. And after the decease of either or both of them . . . . . in trust to divide the share of him or there dying into four equal parts . . . . . to pay to the Rev George Alston the son-in-law (sic) of the said Ann Alston the other to the said Ann Alston the other to the said Margaret Alston a daughter of the said Ann Alston and the remaining fourth to Maria Fenn another daughter of the said Ann Alston provided that in case the said George Alston Samuel Alston Margaret Alston and Maria Fenn showed any or either of them depart this life before the said Edward Alston and Charles Alston respectively then upon trust to pay the portion or portions of any or either of them so dying to the survivors or survivor of them or the issue or children of such of them so dying leaving issue or children living. When either or both of the said principle moneys shall become payable such issue or children taking a parent share with any accruing share provided that in case any of such issue or children shall be absent on emmigration or otherwise unheard of for the space of three years next after any enquiry under these presents shall become requisite then the party or parties so absent shall be considered as deceased to all intents and purposes. Provided and upon trust that they the said trustees shall after the decease of the said Ann Alston at the expiration of every three years prepare an account in writing of the income and expenditure herein and if any surplus upon trust to divide the same between the said Samuel Alston Margaret Alston and Maria Fenn.
Power to appoint new trustees
Signed in witness thereof: Ann Alston, Sam Alston, Thomas Harrold Fenn, Robert Liveing Fenn
Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of Margaret Alston
These two indentures above have been transcribed from rough copies on file 2007. They are the root of the disagreements between Samuel Alston and his half brother Rev George Alston.
Ref Suffolk Record Office Bury St Edmunds HA541/11253


THE WILL OF ANNE ALSTON OF NAYLAND.
Dated 13th July 1850.
I Anne Alston of Nayland in the County of Suffolk, Widow of George Alston late of Nayland aforesaid gentleman deceased do declare this to be my last Will. I appoint my son Samuel Alston my daughter Margaret Alston and Thomas Harrold Fenn Executors thereof.
First I give and devise unto my said son Samuel Alston all that my messuage wherein I now reside with the closes of meadowland . . . . .
To my daughter Margaret I give the sum L1000 to be paid within six months after my decease.
Further my will is and I direct a sum of L1000 to be invested in the names of the said Samuel Alston and Henry Tiffen gentleman of Sudbury in trust for my daughter Maria Alston
With respect to the third part of the residue of my personal estate, I give to my said son Samuel my furniture and implements of household, and a portion of the books, plate and linen.
I give to my daughter Margaret three hundred pounds with the furniture in her own rooms and part of the books plate and linen.
AS TO THE RESIDUE OF MY PERSONAL ESTATE AND EFFECTS After the payment of my testamentary expenses and the legacies hereby given I give and bequeath one third part thereof to the said Samuel Alston, and another third part thereof to the said Margaret Alston and the remaining third part thereof invested in the joint names of the said Samuel Alston and Henry Tiffen in trust for my said daughter Maria for her separate use during her life and after her death to her husband Thomas Harrold Fenn for his life and after both their deceases to divide the principle between the children of my said daughter Maria in equal shares and proportions. . . . . in them at twenty one. Provided and I declare it shall be lawful . . . . . during the minority of any or either of the child or children to apply the interest towards the maintainance and education of the said child, or children and also to advance any part of the presumptive shares of any or either of the same child or children in or towards his or her advancement in the world.
I give to Robert Liveing Fenn and the said Henry Tiffen 10 guineas apiece.
In witness hereof I have hereto set my hand this Thirteenth day of July 1850
Anna Alston.
In the presence of witnesses Martha Crook & Priscilla Sargent.
Proved at London the 16th April 1856.
Full Will on file.

Frances Brennan writes 2012 to advise Anne's cause of death.
*

Other Records

1. Letter From Anne Alston to her Husband George: Cir 27 Apr 1809.

2. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Court St Nayland. Margarett is described as Anne aged 60 of independant means.
There are three servants in the house.

3. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Town St Nayland SFK. Anne is described as the head of the family, an annuitant aged 75, born in Billericay ESS. Also resident in the house were family plus:
Hannah Cook, servant, aged 18. Priscilla Sargeant, servant, aged 18. Ref No 44.

Anne married George ALSTON [61] on 24 May 1806 in Holborn St Andrew LND. George was born on 11 Sep 1763, was baptised on 8 Oct 1763 in Nayland SFK, died on 4 Feb 1831 in Nayland SFK at age 67, and was buried on 5 Feb 1831 in Nayland SFK.


12. Dr George Charles JULIUS [51], son of William JULIUS [685] and Jane Smith EDWARDS [686], was born on 6 Jun 1775 in Nicola Town St Kitts, was baptised on 12 Aug 1775 in Christ Church Nicola Town St Kitts, died on 6 Nov 1866 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng. at age 91, and was buried in Church In The Wood Hollington Nr St Leonards.

General Notes:
Copied from the Family Bible of G C Julius.
George Charles Julius - born June 6th 1775 at Nichola Town in the island of St Christopher. Married Sept 14 1795 at Shoreditch Church in the City of London. (The transcriber is unidentified but these dates have been adopted)

Baptisms: Christchurch Nichola Town St Kitts.
1775 August 12 Geo Charles s. of Wm & Jane JULIUS born 2nd June last (1775).
From a transcription by Mr & Mrs John Bromley c1925 and typed by Col H R Phipps, Bratton Lodge, Bratton Seymour, Wincanton, SOM. Presented to the SOG London 23 Nov. 1934. As searched 1984 by A Fysh, on file, and 2011 by J Christensen.

Edinburgh University.
George Julius of Somerset was a medical student there for three sessions although he did not graduate.
1792-3 Anatomy and Surgery, Chemistry, Botany, Royal Infirmary.
1793-4 Theory and Practice of Medicine, Royal Infirmary will stop
1794-5 Anatomy and Surgery, Chemistry, Practice of Medicine, Materia Medica, Clinical Lectures.

Julius George CCS 1797.
AS 10 July 1797
Surgeon 30 April 1809
R 28 April 1812
In CG of 8 March 1798 name given as Jullings.
Ref: Role of Indian Medical Service 1615-1930 Crawford London 1930

Date of commission as Asst Surgeon 10 July 1797.
Date of commission as surgeon 30 April 1809.
Nominated by - Thornton Esq. Admitted to service.
Granted furlough to Europe 1809 on PA
Retired 28 April 1812.
Ref: Detailed records of Bengal Service L/MIL/10/71

1806 Shahabad
1809 Civil Station Shahbad
1810 on furlough
Ref: India Register.

Apothecary to the Royal Household at Kew c. 1812 - ?
1812 9 July Julius, G. C.

J
ULIUS JOTTINGS. April 1900 No 2.
REMINISCENCES OF GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS. 1773 - 1866
We are indebted to Mrs Arabella E PARKINSON (nee Quilter) for the following: Some of my happy early days were spent at the Old Palace, Richmond, Surrey. (My grandfather) used often to take me out with him on his rounds.
When driving to Kew we sometimes met the King, who would stop his carriage and say, " Dr. Julius, there is nothing in the window,"or,'' Yes, you must call today and enquire" This alluded to a piece of putty placed as a signal to save my grand father's time, and that he might know he was, or was not wanted, and His Majesty George IV., being of an inquisitive turn of mind amused himself by watching this signal and making enquiries. Many of (my grandfather's) patients lived in Richmond Park, Lord Sidmouth and others and I have read there by moonlight whilst waiting for him.
One old countess used to accuse him of neglecting her, if her bill did not come to 100 pounds per annum. Another of his lady patients, also a countess, never paid him at all, but left the matter to her executors, and it then came to 700 pounds.
He was the most punctual of men, and when he rang, as was his custom, every morning for family prayers, we had only time to rush from the landing to the dining room, or we should be too late. He scarcely ever missed church, and his behaviour in it was most devout. Of course, with his large practice, the largest, I believe, out of London, he was often called away, and his footman was told to stand in one place in the porch where he could see him, and so come away without alarming or disturbing the congregation. He was a most temperate man, drinking only water, and as a rule no food between breakfast and late dinner. He had a weakness for sugar, and often brought me a piece from someone's basin, left, I suppose, on purpose for him.
I remember often seeing Sir Benjamin Brodie at my grandfather's, and one thing they said made a lasting impression on my young mind:-" It is such a comfort, when we lay our heads on our pillows at night, to feel how much we have done for our fellow-creatures during the day."

It would appear that George Julius, and Arthur George Onslow, 3rd Lord Onslow were friends, and this association continued with George's son Frederick.
This note relates to a French snuff box given to George:
"For my very good and excellent friend Mr George Julius in testimony of my sincere regard and high esteem for him"
Onslow.
(The Onslow family had a connection with New Zealand, the 4th Lord being a Governor, in 1892 he bought back to Clandon Park,West Clandon, SRY, a Maori meeting house (Hinemihi) which had survived the Mt Tarawera eruption. 2000
)

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM "GENEALOGY" BY FLORENCE STEVENS.
Chapter VII. We now turn to the history of the sixth child of William and Jane Julius. This was George Charles, and well do I remember him A tall stately old man, with very white hair, blue eyes and a rather shambling gait. "The Doctor" he was always called by his family.
He could be severe and some people were rather afraid of him. He was 6 feet, spare and abstemious. He was born on June 6th 1775 in the Island of St. Kitts and accompanied his parents to England in 1779, as did also his eldest sister Jane, then 22 years old and Robert and Nancy, and possibly his two other sisters. After his fathers's death a year later, his mother moved to 15, Pritchard St. Bristol.
George Charles was sent to Eton* as his father's Will provided. Money matters were not easy when he grew up rumour says owing to the dishonesty of Trustees, and whether he went to Cambridge or not is not certain.
It was imagined by the family that he was sent to the Rev Jonathan Gilder, Rector of Aspeden in Herts. to be tutored, but a comparison of dates shews that it could not have been the case as George Charles Julius was only about 11 or 12 when Jonathan Gilder died in 1787.
George Julius soon settled his domestic life by marrying at the age of 20 one of Gilder's daughters Isabella Maria, aged 21. It was an early but very happy marriage. This was in the year 1795, just when Napoleon was beginning his stormy career and disturbing the peace of Europe, and this doubtless affected the Julius finances.
We do not know how early he determined to become a Doctor, but in 1796 he was attending Sir Astley Cooper's lectures in St. Thomas's Hospital. He received his Certificate from Sir A. Cooper in May 1796 and in July his first child Emily was born at Bristol.
The young couple decided on venturing to India where George was certain of a practice, leaving the baby Emily in charge of her, grandmother and Aunt Jane in Bristol. It must have been a real adventure in those days of Anglo Indian life. One of Mrs. Julius sisters accompanied them, and they remained in India till 1809 when little Emily always nicknamed "Pem" was about 13 years old.
When they returned to Europe in 1809 the European war was in full swing and they could only travel with a convoy. The story is current that when Dr. Julius had taken tickets for the voyage he went off up country to settle business and during his absence his wife met the Captain of the vessel who swore so dreadfully at every turn that she could not travel with him and cancelled the agreement, getting tickets on another boat. During the voyage a terrible , storm came on near the coast of Africa, and the ship, which I believe was the Chichester in command of the swearing Captain, went down with all on board including 250 children.
The vessels stopped at St. Helena for some days on the way home, and some of the family went on shore. I subjoin the copy of a bill sent in to Mr. Julius. Bill made out to Dr. G. C. Julius when stopping at St. Helena on his way from India in 1809.
Probably William did not land as he was only two years

30th April 1809.
Board etc. L1 lOs. Od.
Ditto on child. 15/-
1st May.
Board. L1. 10. 0
Ditto two children. L1. 10. 0
Board from 2nd May to 8th inc. at 30s. L10.10. 0
Three tickets to the Play. L1. 10. 0
50 Apples at 6d. L1. 5. 0
A Pie 5/-
20 Loaves of Bread at 9d. 15/-
27 lbs . of Flour at 4d. 9/-
Total L19. 19. 0
Received J. Barnes from Mr. Julius L19.19s.Od St. Helena 1809.
The family seem to have gone to Mrs. William Julius on landing.

P Hatfield Eton College
John Hill
Tuesday, May 19, 2009 4:53 PM
Subject: George Julius
Apologies for the delay in replying . . . . .
He does not seem to have attended Eton, though I have to say that before 1791 we do not have a complete list of boys, so it is possible he did come here but no lists survives for the period of his stay. However, he did not attend King's either, which in those days was almost entirely the preserve of Etonians, so I suspect that his father's Will was not followed in this repect.
P. Hatfield, College Archivist

JULIUS JOTTINGS, JANUARY 1900. No 1.
Grandpapa was a very fine old gentleman, over 6 foot, with marked features and rather a stern face, but a pleasant smile, and stately, courteous manners of the old school. Granny as she was fondly called by her devoted grandchildren, was of medium height, in the youth had auburn hair, was gifted with a keen sense of humour, and found a fund of stories to which it was our great delight to listen.
My earliest recollection of Grandpapa and Granny was on the occasion of a family dinner at the Old Palace, about the year 1850, near Christmas. The Archibald Julius and two of their children were there, the Fredericks and several of their party, Edric and Herbert Julius, Cameron Quilter, and many more.
The three latter dressed up as old women, and were most amusing; we also had a Punch and Judy show, the first I had ever seen. Such large family gatherings seem now to be things of the past. The next time I remember to have seen Granny was when she came to stay with us at Wrecclesham Vicarage. It was very hot weather, and during the absence of nurse from the room, my elder sister and I took off the baby's things, got our paint boxes, and painted her in rainbow coloured stripes. I shall never forget Granny's peels of laughter when the infant was brought for her to inspect.
When Grandpapa was a boy he was heir to considerable property, but his trustees were dishonest, and by the time he became of age it had melted away. He was sent to he tutored by the Rev. Jonathan Gilder, Rector of Aspeden, Hertfordshire, and Vicar of Layston, and he married one of the daughters; she was aged twenty one and he twenty; they were married on the 14th September 1795, and went to India in 1799. . . . . (Story about Isabella saving an Indian woman from sati). . . . .
On an occasion when he was in India Grandpapa was invited to a feast given by some native chiefs. At the last minute he was called away to visit a patient. Every European at that meal died from poison within a few hours!
When they left India Grandpapa took tickets for the passage on board the "Chichester" (this, I believe, was the ship) then went up country to wind up his business. During his absence Granny heard a very bad report of the captain, that he ill-treated his men and could not speak without an oath. She determined she would not travel in his ship, so she took tickets in another which sailed under the same convoy; it was in the time of war with the French. Of course Grandpapa was very vexed and angry at such a whim. However, Granny had her own way.
The vessels sailed, a party of about five ships. There was a fearful storm off Mauritius, and the "Chichester' went down. There were 250 children on board, being sent home by their parents, five of one family well known to the Julius.
In 1810 they settled in Bristol, and in 1814 came to the Old Palace, Richmond where they lived forty one years, and Grandpapa became partner to Sir David Dundas, who lived at Queensberry House and attended the Royal Family then living at Kew. George the IVth gave Grandpapa some candlesticks, silver plated on copper, which are now in the possession of his granddaughter, Mrs. Hull, of Earls Mount, Redhill.
Part of this time his eldest son, Dr George Julius, was practising with his father, and for his services to a young Princess was presented by King William the IVth with a silver vase, dated September 18, 1833, which is now in the possession of his grandson, Bertie Julius, of Tilford.
Of my grandparents interesting circle of friend, during these years, others are more competent to speak than I, but I observed in the memoirs of the late Canon Hoare that he reckoned them among his special friends.
In 1855 they retired to Wrecclesham, as they thought, for good, but Grandpapa missed the life and smooth pavements of a town, so in 1862 they once more moved, this time to St. Leonards, where, at Maze Hill House there days were ended. He died in 1866 at the age of 91, and she in 1867 in her 93rd year. They were buried in the churchyard at Hollington. The last remaining of their children, Aunt Annie, widow of Colonel Deverill, died in May 1898 aged 84.
Wishing that this brief fragment had been more complete,
I remain, dear Editor,
Yours faithfully,
M. Louisa Brewin.

NOTES BY MRS JENIFER SHELLSHEAR, (nee Julius).
George spent his early childhood in the West Indies. He was in England when his father died. In 1792, the Edinburgh University Medical School records describe him as "of Somerset," so until then he may have been living with his mother in Bristol. He studied at Edinburgh 1792-95, though apparently he did not graduate. Then from 27th Sept 1795 for a period of perhaps 12 months, he acted as dresser to the surgeon. Mr Henry Cline.
About a year later 10th July 1797 George was appointed Ass. Surgeon to serve in the Bengal Presidency by the Honourable East India Company. He returned to England on furlough in 1809, returning finally in 1812. During his time in India, 5 more children were born, one of whom, a son, died there. The Missionary Chronicle of March 1821 affords a small glimpse of the family's life in India, describing how Mrs. Julius while stationed at Arrah in 1804, courageously saved the life of an Indian women who was being forced to commit suicide.
In 1810 George settled in Bristol, then by 1812, seems to have established himself at the Old Palace, Richmond where for sometime he was partner to Sir. DAVID DUNDAS also practicing in Richmond. On 9th July 1812 was appointed apothecary to the King's Household at Kew, a post he held till 1836, thus serving George III, George IV, William IV.
During the years he attended the Royal Family, several pieces of plate etc. were variously presented to him by King George IV and King William IV, and are now in possession of various members of the family. He was apparently successful and well liked and with one of the largest practices outside London.
He worked in Richmond until his retirement in 1855.
ROLL OF INDIAN MEDICAL SERVICES 1615 - 1930. (D. G. Crawford - London 1930)
GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS
CCS 1797
AS. 10 July 1797 (In CG of 8th March 1798 name given as Jullings)
Surg. 30 April 1809
R 18 April 1812

Deaths.
On the 6th inst at Mazehill House, St Leonards on Sea, G. C. Julius Esq M.D. late of Richmond Surrey in his 92nd year.
The Times Friday November 9, 1866.

Will of George Charles Julius Doctor of Medicine.
Dated 14 September 1863
This is the last Will and Testament of me George Charles Julius late of Richmond in the County of Surrey but now of Maze Hill House St Leonards-on-the-Sea in the County of Sussex Doctor of Medicine I appoint my dear daughter Emily Julius Spinster and my dear son Alfred Alexander's Julius Solicitor executrix and executor of this my Will and I devise that all my just debts and funeral and testamentary expenses and the charges of proving and carrying into execution of this my Will may be fully paid and satisfied.
I give to my dear wife Isabella Maria Julius for her absolute use all my money that may be in my house and at my bankers at the time of my decease and I give to each of my sons and daughters who may be then living the sum of twenty pounds for mourning to be paid to them respectively as soon as convenient each of them my said daughters who shall be married receiving the same for her separate use and her discharge being sufficient for the same I give to my said wife for her life the use and enjoyment of all my household goods and furniture plate linen glass books pictures prints and other effects in and about my dwelling house and premises where I shall be residing at the time of my death and after my said wife's decease I give all and singular my said household goods and furniture linen glass books pictures prints and other effects unto my said daughter Emily Julius for her own absolute use I give to my faithful servant Joseph Bell if he shall be in my service at my decease the sum of twenty Guineas to be paid him as soon as convenient and also a clear annuity for his life of fifteen pounds to be payable to him quarterly from my decease and subject as aforesaid I give and bequeath to my said executrix and executor all the rest and residue of my Estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever (including my government stock and securities and my shares in the bank of Bengal in the East Indies) upon trust to convert into money the same or any part thereof that shall not consist of money or securities for money and to layout and invest in their names any monies so to arise and be produced in government or real securities at interest or upon any debentures or securities of any Canal or Railway Company incorporated by Act of Parliament or Charter but with full power to continue my said government stocks and securities and my said shares in the Bank of Bengal respectively as the same shall be at my decease in the same state of investment and continue to fund to alter and transpose the said trust securities or any of them so long and as often as they my said trustees shall in their discretion think proper and shall stand and be possessed of all and singular the said trust premises and the interest dividends and annual proceeds thereof upon trust for the intents and purposes following that is to say upon trust after satisfying the said annuity to pay the interest dividends and annual proceeds of the said trust premises as they shall arise and become payable unto my said beloved wife during the term of her natural life and from and after her decease all my said shares in the said Bank of Bengal (of which I have eighteen shares valued at four thousand rupees each making together seventy two thousand rupees) on the stocks funds and securities for the time being upon which the proceeds of the sale thereof shall be invested shall be upon trust to divide the same into seventy two equal parts or shares of which thirty of such seventy two equal shares or shares shall be for the absolute use and benefit of my son William Mavor Julius thirty other of such seventy two equal parts or shares shall be for the absolute use and benefit of my said daughter Emily Julius and the remaining nine other of such seventy two equal parts or shares shall be for the absolute use and benefit of my son Archibald Aeneas Julius and subject as aforesaid I direct and declare that the rest and residue of my estate and effects shall be for my said daughter Emily Julius to whom I give the same for her absolute use and benefit
I desire to express that in the division which I have made of my property by this my Will I have taken into consideration the circumstances of my several dear children some of them being well provided for but for all of whom I have an equal affection provided always and I direct that in case the said trustees or either of them or any future trustee or trustees to be appointed as hereinafter mentioned shall die or be desirous of retiring from or shall become incapable of acting in the said powers or shall desire to increase the number of such trustees it shall be lawful for the trustees or trustee on retiring or continuing on to act in the said Trusts by any writing under their her or his hands or hand to nominate any new trustee or trustees for the purposes of this my Will and when and so often as any trustee or trustees shall be so nominated as aforesaid all and singular the trusts funds and premises shall thereupon be transferred and assigned so as that the same shall be effectually vested in the surviving or continuing trustee or trustees and such additional or new trustee or trustees jointly or otherwise as the case may require upon the trusts herein before created or declared and for the time being subsisting concerning the same respectively and every such additional and new trustee shall and may act in the execution of the said trusts as fully and effectually in all respects as if he had been originally nominated a trustee in and by this my Will and I hereby revoke all my former Wills
In witness whereof I the said George Charles Julius have to this my last Will and Testament set and subscribed my hand this fourteenth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three.
George C Julius
Signed by the said George Charles Julius the testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us present at the same time who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have here unto subscribed our names as witnesses.
Jas Geo Langham solicitor Hastings
Fred A Langham solicitor same place.

This Is a Codicil to my Will dated the fourteenth day of September one thousand eight hundred and sixty three whereas by my said Will I gave and bequeathed to my executrix and executor herein named all the rest and residue of my estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever including my government stock and securities and my shares in the Bank of Bengal in the East Indies upon the trusts therein particularly mentioned and I thereby declared that after the decease of my dear wife the trustees of my said Will should stand possessed of nine seventy two parts or shares in the Bank of Bengal (of which I had and now have eighteen shares valued at four thousand rupees each making together seventy two thousand rupees) or the stocks funds or securities for the time being upon which the proceeds of the sale thereof should be invested in a trust for the absolute use and benefit of my son Archibald Aeneas Julius now I do hereby revoke and make void so much of the said trusts as relate to the seventy two equal parts or shares in the said Bank of Bengal or the stocks funds or securities for the time being upon which the proceeds of the sale thereof shall be invested thereby declared to be for the absolute at use and benefit of my said son Archibald Aeneas Julius and in lieu thereof I do hereby declare that the trustees for the time being of my said Will shall stand possessed of the seventy two equal parts or shares after the decease of my said wife in trust for my dear daughter Ann Spencer Deverell widow for her own absolute use and benefit But in all other respects I hereby confirm my said Will and the trusts thereby declared as witness my hand this twenty fourth day of June one thousand eight hundred and sixty four
George C Julius
Signed by the said George Charles Julius the testator as and for a codicil to his last will and Testament in the presence of us present at the same time who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have here unto subscribed our names as witnesses
Jas Geo Langham solicitor Hastings
Fred A Langham solicitor same place.

Proved at London with a codicil 12 December 1866 by the oath of Emily Julius spinster the daughter of the surviving executor to whom administration was granted.


Julius George Charles 12 Dec 1866
The Will with Codicil of George Charles Julius M.D. formerly of Richmond in the county of Surrey but late of Maze Hill House St Leonards-on-Sea SSX who died 6 Nov 1866 at Maze Hill House was proved 12 Dec 1866 by Emily Julius spinster and daughter at under L10,000.
Ref: National Probate Calendars

Research Notes:
Newly discovered image of George Julius courtesy of J Glauert.

Julius Jottings April 1900 No 2 Mentions a massive pair of silver candlesticks given to Dr Julius senior by the King George and then at that time in the possession of Mr Arthur O Julius of Ham. They were surmounted by the Royal crest and coronet on one side and the Julius arms on the other. They are hall-marked Mathew Bolton Birmingham 1810
Images of these candlesticks feature in the home page of this website. Also believed to have been given to George by the King William IV was a small childrens drum of carved ivory reputed to been a toy of George IV.

West Indian Book Plates.
Caribbeana Vol 3 Pg A76.
653. G.C. Julius. Arm. spade shield (F., 16,771)
Arms: Argent, a fess Azure between three stars.
Crest: A star. Motto: VIRTUTE ET INDUSTRIA FLORESCO.
Geo. Chas. Julius of the Old Palace Richmond, M.D. mar 1795 Isabella Maria, dau. of Rev Jonathon Guilder, and died 1866, aged 91.He had 1. Geo Chas Julius and 2. Fred. Guilder Julius, born 1811, who married Ellen Smith, and died 1886. (Lieut-Col H W Pook)

RICHMOND CENSUS 1841.
George Julius 60yrs M.D.
Isabella Julius 55yrs
Emily Julius 35yrs
William Julius 30yrs Army Captain.
Alfred Julius 25yrs Solicitor.
Archibald Julius 20yrs Student at Cambridge.

Fanny Maria Hull states in Julius Jottings No1 that George (her grandfather) inherited property on St Kitts and liberated all the slaves
The circumstances surrounding George's medical training require clarification.

RICHMOND PALACE - THE MEMORIES OF CHURCHILL JULIUS.
Extract from "A Power in the Land" by G.&A. Elworthy.
"The little garden attached to the house opened into the beautiful garden at the Old Palace, being a portion of the ancient Palace of Sheen built by Henry VII, in which Queen Elizabeth lived and died.
Of the State Apartments nothing is left. The part in which we lived, rented by my grandfather, GEORGE CHARLES from the Government on a 99 year lease at about 1814, was known as Wardrobe Court". Even today, when the house which once belonged in its entirety to the Julius family is now divided into three residences, the atmosphere is as redolent of history as it ever was, and by the courtesy of the present owners we were able to see for ourselves some of the magnificence that still remains. The beauty of the paneling, the charm of the garden, the sunlight slanting through the vast windows- such impressions give one the feeling of having stepped momentarily into the past. Wardrobe Court, dating back to the 15th Century when it served as the wardrobe of Henry VIIs Richmond Palace, was originally built with heavy timbered exterior walls.
Christopher Wren, in about 1730, completely enclosed the original building. Richmond Palace is rich in history, having been originally a royal residence in the time of Edward I. Anne, consort to Richard II died here in 1394; deeply affected by her death, the king, according to Holinshead, caused the palace to be thrown down and defaced. Henry V, however, restored it to its former magnificence. Henry VII, in 1492 held a Grand Tournament there. In 1499 it was almost consumed in fire, but Henry rebuilt the palace and gave it the name of Richmond.
Cardinal Wolsey frequently resided here; and Hall, in his Chronicles, says that "when the common people, are especially such as had been servants of Henry VII, saw the cardinal keep house in a manor royal at Richmond, which that monarch so highly esteemed, it was a marvel to hear how they grudged saying". " So the butcher's dogge doth lie in the manor of Richmond!" Queen Elizabeth I was a prisoner at Richmond during the reign of her sister Mary; after she came to the throne, the palace was her favourite residence, and here she died in 1603.
On an exterior wall, we are reminded that Upon this site formerly stood the Palace of Richmond built by Henry VII in 1501. A Royal Residence first occupied this site in 1126 The village of Richmond was originally known as Sheen.

THE TIMES - Saturday January 24 1824 pg. 4 col. c.
"Extensive Robbery - Between five and eight o'clock on the evening of Tuesday last, the house of George Charles Julius Esq., at Richmond, was burglariously entered, and robbed of a check for L.200, some Edinburgh one pound notes, a twenty-pound and ten-pound note of the Bank of England, and several five pound notes, a large number of sovereigns and some silver, a sealed letter containing a fine-pound note, and several sovereigns, with which the robbers got clear off".

Queen Square.
Yesterday information was received at this office that on the evening of Tuesday last, the house of George Charles Julius, Esq, Richmond, Surrey, was broken into by thieves, and robbed of property to the amount of several hundred pounds. The robbers effected an entrance at the back of the premises, and in the first instance rifled all the cupboards, closets, etc, below stairs, from thence they proceeded to the parlour, and forced open the bureaus, desks, etc, and took away a red morocco leather pocketbook, similar to those used by Bankers clerks, which contained a cheque drawn by Dr Willis on Messrs Drummond and Co., for L200, also some Edinburgh L1 notes, of the house of Forbes and Co., a Bank of England note for L20, some for L10, and several for L5. They also found a long striped green bag full of sovereigns, and a bag of silver, together with a letter from Mr Erskine, sealed, in which was enclosed a L5 note. A full description of all the property stolen has been given to the police, and a reward of L50, is offered for the apprehension of any of the robbers, who as yet have evaded pursuit.
Ref: Morning Chronicle Saturday, 24 January 1824.

Daring Robbery.
Information was yesterday lodged at the Mary-le-bone Police Office of an extensive robbery, in the house of Mr George Charles Julius, at Richmond. Hawker, the officer, was dispatched to make enquiries, and, on his return, stated to the magistrates, that the thieves, by some means unknown (it is supposed by seizing the advantage of the Hall door being left open, and opening of the library door with a false key), plundered some of the drawers, etc, of the following cash and notes; a cheque for L200 on the Bank of Messrs Drummond and Co., drawn by Dr John Willis, and payable to the order of a lady named Hodgson; some notes for L1 each, on the bank of Forbes and Co., Edinburgh; two Bank of England notes for L20, and L10, several L5 notes which were enclosed in a pocketbook; a small bag, containing some L5 notes, and a quantity of gold and silver monies, a sealed letter, known to be from a gentleman named Erskine, with a L5 note and a few sovereigns enclosed. With this very large booty the villains gone away, without giving the slightest alarm, and the robbery was not discovered until the next day.
From the regularly systematic manner in which this robbery was completed the robbers must have been experienced, and well acquainted with the premises. A large reward (L50) is offered for the apprehension of the burglars. The neighbourhood of Richmond and Kew has of late been subject to the visitation of a gang of villains, who have accomplished many very extensive nocturnal depredations.
Ref: Morning Advertiser Saturday, 24 January 1824.

Incorrect data
George Charles Julius was recorded in the IGI, London records as being born abt 1770 at The Old Palace Richmond Surrey? further there is an entry George Julius (Adult aged 22) christening March 1796 St Botolph Without Aldgate London. Batch C006338, Source 0370932 Film Printout 6901255.

Guildhall Library: Records of Sun Fire Office [MS 11936/515]
Catalogue Ref. SUN
FILE - Policy register - ref. MS 11937/515 - date: 1861-1862
item: [no title] - ref. MS 11936/515/1061404 - date: 30 May 1827
Insured: George Charles Julius, Richmond, Surrey, esq.

Sun Fire Office, 1710-1891
Exchange House Fire Office, 1708-1710
Sun Insurance Office Ltd, 1891-1959
Sun Alliance Group, 1959-1996
Royal and Sun Alliance, 1996-
To find out more about the archives described below, contact Guildhall Library
A2A.

George is untraced in 1851 census, was he in Europe?

George was awarded a silver medal by the Royal Humane Society, the inscription reads: Do IVLIVS VITAM O B RESTITVTAM 1796, Approximately - Dr Julius reviver of life
A Case of Suspension
A Life Restored
Addressed to the Treasurer.
Dear Sir,
It is with much pleafure that I communicate to you the following inftance of Refufcitation, by the ufe of the means reccommended by the Humane Society; and I hope it will encourage Practitioners to perfevere in their endeavours of reftoring Animation, when it has been fufpended even for a considerable time.
A woman in my neighbourhood endeavoured to put an end to her exiftence by hanging. - It was near half an hour before my arrival, and fhe was to all appearance dead. - I am happy to fay, that, by perfevering for fome time in the Refufcitative Procefs of the Society*, I had the in expreffible fatisfaction of reftoring Life to a defponding Woman.
I am, Dear Sir, Your Obliged,
George C Julius
Lamb's-Conduit St,
January 30th 1797."
Then follows a short poem in criticism of suicide. Perhaps signed AN?
Ref: Annual Reports, Humane Society 1774-2005: LMA/4517/B/01. (Jill Christensen)
See other records

BARCLAY C.P.
Tuesday, 2 August 2011 2:49 a.m.
Royal Humane Society;
RE: Re Dr George Julius 1796
Dear Mr Fenn
How lovely to learn of a medal that has been retained in family hands for all these years! Your medal will have been struck in silver (the RHS did not introduce bronze medals until 1837) and, as Dick Wilkinson observes, it is normal to find medals of this period mounted behind watch glasses. . . . . .
The case books covering the period during which your medal was given unfortunately do not survive, but there is a good chance that an account of the case may have been published in the Society's 'Annual Report'. I wish you all the best with your research.
Kind regards
Craig Barclay.
The Humane Society started to give out honorary medals in 1776

Dick Wilkinson, Secretary of the Royal Humane Society advises on the "Refufcitative Procefs of the Society"
Our history suggests the following methods were used initially but most abandoned after the first 60 years.
1Warmth
2Artificial respiration by mouth to mouth inflation with compression of the abdomen and chest
3Fumigation by introduction of tobacco smoke into the rectum and colon
4Rubbing the body or friction
5Stimulants
6Bleeding
7Inducement of vomiting.
It is unrecorded what particular method George used!

Translation of tribute to David Dundas Bt.
To David Dundas, Bart.
Surgeon to the King etc
A man who relying on his outstanding talents and his own merits, attained the peak of honour and won the foremost men of the world to his friendship to a man who is justly to be admired by the medical world because of his great experience in the science of healing and because of his nature which is filled with many attractions of charm and humanity a man most beloved by his friends and all. To him the author mindful of all the benefits heaped upon him and of the friendship of which he is proud wishes with the greatest respect these first fruits of his labour to be sacred as a monument insufficient to repay him as he ought.
(Dundas (1749-1826) was surgeon general to the King from 1792 and was also made Royal Household Apothecary in 1792. He was a fine surgeon, and was made 1st Baronet Richmond in 1815.)

In 1812 George followed his Partner David Dundas Bt. as:
Apothecary to the Royal Household at Kew.
9 July 1812 - Julius, G. C.

Apothecaries 1660 - 1837
The apothecaries to the person and the apothecaries to the household were both appointed by lord chamberlain's warrant. In many cases appointments were embodied in letters patent under the great seal.
Originally there was one apothecary to the person. Two served from 1685 to 1820 when the number was again reduced to one. The remuneration attached to the offices varied from time to time. In 1660 the sole apothecary received L242 15s consisting of a salary of L115 and board wages of L127 15s. In 1685 both apothecaries were granted salaries of L500. In 1702 one apothecary received L372 5s and the other L327. By 1711/12 the salaries had been fixed at L320 5s and L160.
The office of apothecary to the household was held singly until 1727. Thereafter it was usually held jointly, two occupants serving 1727/62, three 1762/66 and two 1766/74, 1778/83 and from 1820. Originally the remuneration amounted to L100 consisting of wages of L40 and board wages of L60. In 1702 the salary was L160. By 1711/12 it had been fixed at L106 13s 4d. early in the period, all apothecaries were allowed riding wages and, sometimes, lodgings.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/office-holders/vol11/pp170-173

George was a Trustee for the estate of a John Deane (died c1821) a Judge in Madras, one of Deanes illegitimate Eurasian children, Charles was living with George and his family in Richmond in 1815.
Ref: R Wallace

Other Records

1. Images of George Charles Julius over the years:

2. Richmond Surrey: Views of the Palace and 1 Portland Terrace.

3. Royal Human Society Silver Medal: Silver Medal Awarded to George Julius, 1796. George was awarded a silver medal by the Royal Humane Society, the inscription reads: Do IVLIVS VITAM O B RESTITVTAM 1796, Approximately - Dr Julius reviver of life
A Case of Suspension
A Life Restored
Addressed to the Treasurer.
Dear Sir,
It is with much pleafure that I communicate to you the following inftance of Refufcitation, by the ufe of the means reccommended by the Humane Society; and I hope it will encourage Practitioners to perfevere in their endeavours of reftoring Animation, when it has been fufpended even for a considerable time.
A woman in my neighbourhood endeavoured to put an end to her exiftence by hanging. - It was near half an hour before my arrival, and fhe was to all appearance dead. - I am happy to fay, that, by perfevering for fome time in the Refufcitative Procefs of the Society*, I had the in expreffible fatisfaction of reftoring Life to a defponding Woman.
I am, Dear Sir, Your Obliged,
George C Julius
Lamb's-Conduit St,
January 30th 1797."
Then follows a short poem in criticism of suicide. Perhaps signed AN?
Ref: Annual Reports, Humane Society 1774-2005: LMA/4517/B/01. (Jill Christensen)

4. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. George is recorded as M.D. aged 60 not born in SRY

5. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. George is recorded as head of house married aged 75 a Physician Edinburgh not practising born St Kitts.

6. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Richmond Lodge Farnham SRY. George is recorded as married aged 85 head of household, M.D. not practising, born St Kitts West Indies. Also in the house were four servants.

George married Isabella Maria GILDER [52] on 14 Sep 1795 in St Leonards Shoreditch Church London. Isabella was baptised on 8 May 1774 in Aspenden Herts., died on 4 Jan 1867 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng. at age 92, and was buried in Church In The Wood Hollington Nr St Leonards.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Emily JULIUS [775] (born on 2 Jul 1796 in Bristol SOM - died on 31 Jul 1876 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng.)

         ii.  Richard Henry JULIUS [4469] (born in 1798 in Berhampur Bengal (Registered In London) - died on 20 Jul 1799 in Berhampur Bengal)

        iii.  Arabella Maria JULIUS [777] (born on 16 Feb 1800 in Berhampur Bengal (Reg In London) - died on 3 Jun 1885 in Beverley Yorkshire)

         iv.  Amelia Cowell "Minnie" JULIUS [779] (born on 3 Apr 1802 in Burhampur India (Reg In London) - died on 6 Jan 1831 in Richmond SRY)

          v.  Dr George Charles JULIUS M.D. [781] (born on 9 Aug 1804 in Assam Dist. Sharhabad Behar India - died on 1 Dec 1885 in Claremont Hse. Nr Tilford SRY)

         vi.  Major William Mavor JULIUS [797] (born on 14 Feb 1807 in Shahabad Behar India ( Reg In London) - died on 18 May 1876 in Black Lake Cottage Lobswood Manor Tilford SRY)

6       vii.  Dr Frederick Gilder JULIUS MD FRCS [50] (born on 28 Feb 1811 in Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY - died on 4 Jan 1886 in 4 Portland Tce The Green Richmond SRY)

       viii.  Alfred Alexander JULIUS [798] (born on 4 Sep 1812 in Richmond SRY - died on 2 Sep 1865 in Stanley Lodge Ship Lane St Mary Mortlake London.)

         ix.  Anne Spencer JULIUS [825] (born on 19 Nov 1814 in Richmond SRY - died on 28 May 1898, buried in France)

          x.  Rev Henry Richard JULIUS M.A. [776] (born on 30 Jun 1816 in Richmond SRY - died on 27 Mar 1891 in Woodcroft Red Hill SRY)

         xi.  Rev Archibald Aeneas JULIUS [847] (born on 9 Jan 1819 in Old Palace Richmond SRY - died on 4 Mar 1895 in Southery NFK)




13. Isabella Maria GILDER [52], daughter of Rev Jonathan GILDER [1260] and Mary BRAZIER [1261], was baptised on 8 May 1774 in Aspenden Herts., died on 4 Jan 1867 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng. at age 92, and was buried in Church In The Wood Hollington Nr St Leonards.

General Notes:
Marriage Register St Leonard Shoreditch.
1795 Marriage Number 335.
George Julius of this parish bachelor and Isabel guilder of this parish spinster were married in church by banns this 14th day of September 1795 by me Joseph Rose Minister.
Signed George Julius Isabella Gilder.
In the presence of Sarah Jeffreys and George Limming (Limming could the A parish official as his signature appears frequently as a witness)
Ref: MS 7498/18

At their marriage Isabella was aged 21, George 20. They were married for 71 years.

JULIUS JOTTINGS, JANUARY 1900, No 1.
MARIA LOUISA BREWIN ISABELLA'S GRANDAUGHTER WRITES; "Granny" as she was fondly called by her devoted grandchildren, was gifted with a keen sense of humour, and had a fund of stories to which it was our great delight to listen.

JULIUS JOTTINGS. JANUARY, 1901. No. 4.
OUR FRONTISPIECE. Thanks to Miss E. K. Julius, of Hollowdene, Meadvale, Redhill, who kindly lent us the originals, from which we were able to have these two likenesses of Isabella reproduced, and Mrs. Arabella Parkinson (her eldest granddaughter) for the following :- When young she must have been lovely, with her rich, auburn hair, her blue eyes, her perfect figure, and her sweet voice, so low and musical. She, like her husband, was strictly temperate, her only drink, water.
She had all the qualities then thought the most desirable in her sex. A keeper at home, clever in all domestic matters, she regulated a large establishment, and her sphere of housekeeping extended over the stabling, where she always knew how much corn and hay were required. Even the drains came under her clever management. And yet she was so gentle and sweet, so full of sympathy, that it was to her the young ones brought their troubles, and her big boys would confess to her alone their various scrapes, both at school and on the river.
On Sunday her children and grandchildren used to gather round her, and she used to read and task to them. She often read "The Pilgrim's Progress" to them. We heard once that when in India she boldly caught hold of a large, dangerous snake, which she found in her daughter's (Arabella, afterwards Mrs. Geo. Quilter) cradle, and flung it out of the window.
Whilst Isabella was out driving one day in India, when she came upon a crowd of people. She told her coachman to draw up, and to her horror found it was the funeral pyre of a man, and his widow was going to be burnt alive with his dead body, a custom to which Government has for some years put a stop. When the poor woman felt the flames mounting around her she sprang up in agony, and Isabella beckoned to her; she scrambled on to the carriage, the coachman drove off like the wind, with the angry mob yelling behind, but the woman's life was saved.
Isabella was aged 93 at her death.

The Times, Saturday, Aug 08, 1829; pg. 3; Issue 13987; col A
Human Sacrifices In India. Letter By AN EAST INDIA PROPRIETOR.
Mr & Mrs Julius describe stopping Sati amongst Brahmins, at Arah in
1804, in a letter to the author in 1820.

Richmond,
February 25, 1820.
Mrs Julius, who resided at Arrah (about the year 1804) was informed that near her premises a funeral pile was erected, on which the body of a Brahman was placed, and that a multitude of people were conducting his widow to it. At that moment Mrs Trower, wife of the Collector, called in her carriage, and both agreed to attend the delivery of the wretched victim. They drove as fast as possible to the spot: as the carriage approached, the mob took to flight; but the pile was already in flames. In an agony of mind they walked round the pile. They perceived that the roof had fallen, but not on the body of the deceased, but was resting on the edge of the pile; and that the place prepared for the widow was unoccupied, for the poor creature, availing herself of the opportunity afforded by the confusion, had effected her escape! The ladies found out the hut to which she had fled, and gained admittance. Then they beheld the poor victim, about 20 years old, surrounded by four children, and her baby in her arms. Her eldest son, at some distance, crying. Her hair was very long, hanging down; and oil and ghee were dropping from it to the ground. Her head was covered with sandal dust, and her whole body was highly perfumed. Without the smallest reluctance she consented to accompany Mrs J. and Mrs D. to my house, with all her children. On her arrival, I discovered that her shoulders were very much burnt. On being questioned, she declared that her intended immolation was not a voluntary act, but the consequence of terror from the threads of the Brahmins, who had also given her a large quantities of opium and bang; and that for many hours previous to her arrival at the pile she was in a state of distraction and stupefaction. It appears that the Brahmins, seeing the carriage drive near, hastily threw down the roof, intending it to fall on the pile, and prevent the escape of the victim. But providentially they failed; it rested on its edge, and allowed the poor widow opportunity to fly. This poor woman remained some time with Mrs Trower, and then returned to her own village; but we never heard any subsequent account of her. P Julius.
Ref: Missionary Chronicle for March 1821 pg 124/5.

Deaths.
January 4th at Maze Hill, St Leonards, Isabella Maria, widow of George Charles Julius, Esq, aged 92 years.
Ref: Hastings and St Leonards Observer Tuesday, 15 January 1867

Julius Isabella Maria 16 February 1867
Letters of administration of the personal estate and effects of Isabella Maria Julius late of Maze Hill House St Leonards-on-Sea in the County of Sussex widow deceased who died 4 Jan 1867 at Maze Hill House aforesaid were granted 16 Feb 1867 at the Principal Registry to George Charles Julius of 39 Melville Rd in the city of Edinburgh M.D. the son and one of the Next of Kin of the said Deceased he having been first sworn.
Effects under L2000.
Ref: National Probate Calendars.

Research Notes:
Images of Isabella No's 4 and 5 are reproduced from Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901. They were at that time in the possession of Miss Edith Katherine Julius of Hollowdene, Meadvale, Redhill.

Images 1 of Isabella are from paintings in the ownership of Rosemary Julius 2004

John Hill Tree shows Isabella died 11 Jul 1867 aged 92 bur., Hollington SSX.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 7 Jun 1841, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Isabella is recorded as aged 55 not born SRY

2. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Old Palace Yard Richmond SRY. Isabella is recorded as a wife aged 74 born Aspenden Herts

3. Census: England, 8 Apr 1861, Richmond Lodge Farnham SRY. Isabella is recorded as a wife aged 84 born Aspenden Hertfordshire.

Isabella married Dr George Charles JULIUS [51] on 14 Sep 1795 in St Leonards Shoreditch Church London. George was born on 6 Jun 1775 in Nicola Town St Kitts, was baptised on 12 Aug 1775 in Christ Church Nicola Town St Kitts, died on 6 Nov 1866 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng. at age 91, and was buried in Church In The Wood Hollington Nr St Leonards.

14. William SMITH of Nottingham [2423], son of William SMITH [12757] and Hannah [12758], was born on 23 Jun 1769 and died on 3 May 1818 at age 48.

General Notes:
Williams birth was on a Friday at two o'clock in the afternoon.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

William married Peggy HEATON [2424] on 24 Dec 1811 in Bulwell NTT. Peggy was born about 1778 in Middleton ESS.

Marriage Notes:

Children from this marriage were:

7         i.  Ellen Hannah SMITH [49] (born on 7 Jul 1813 in Nottingham - died on 21 Aug 1869 in The Old Palace Richmond SRY)

         ii.  Margaret Anne SMITH [12764] (born on 8 May 1815 - died on 29 Oct 1815)


15. Peggy HEATON [2424] was born about 1778 in Middleton ESS.

General Notes:
William Smith and Peggy Heaton married Bulwell on Tuesday Dec 24th 1811
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, 9 Short Hill Nottingham. Peggy is recorded as a widow head of house aged 73 means of landed property born Middleton ?

Peggy married William SMITH of Nottingham [2423] on 24 Dec 1811 in Bulwell NTT. William was born on 23 Jun 1769 and died on 3 May 1818 at age 48. picture

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