THE KINGS CANDLESTICKS - Fenn Ancestors

Ancestors of Harold Fenn


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16. Simon FENN [4546], son of Simon FENN of Offton [4544] and Mary FOLGER (FOULGER) of Battisford [4545], was baptised on 16 Jan 1741/42 in Barking SFK, died on 11 Nov 1806 in Coddenham SFK at age 64, and was buried on 17 Nov 1806 in Coddenham SFK. Another name for Simon was FYNN.

General Notes:
Simons bap notice at Barking (and Offton) SFK spells his name Fynn. "Simon Fynn of Simon & Mary was baptised Jan 16", page headed 1741. On the next line below is an entry " William Fynn of James & Susanna was baptised March 1st" but Coddenham Registers show "Fenn Simon son of Simon and Mary his wife (late Fulcher) buried 17 Nov 1806 aged 65 years" John Longe Vicar.

Simon Fenn in 1791 took up the lease of Valley Farm Coddenham from the Rev John Longe, the farm was previously in the tenure of Mr Bolton. Before that time, a map dated 1790/91 HD 1467/3 SRO, showing the property of the Rev Nicholas Bacon Vicar of Coddenham, identified "Fenns Farm". This was a smaller lease of 146 acres, with a cottage, in 22 fields and meadows, to the west & south of Valley Farm. Was Simon the tenant there before Valley Farm
Bacon who died about this time passed the Coddenham living and surrounding lands to his relative John Longe.

Valley Farm had a farm house and substantial farm buildings which exist to this day (1999). The rental valuation for the 219 acres was L175 17s 0d. The valuation document records that it was let to Simon Fenn at L175 from Michaelmas (Oct 11) 1791 for 15 years. The land consisted of 27 acres of pasture and 192 acres of arable land. Simon farmed additional fields belonging to Longe in the surrounding locality.
Later Simon is recorded as paying tithes to the Coddenham Church until 1806, based on a valuation of the farm of L160. This valuation was second only in the roll, to the value of Sir William Middleton's property at L170.

Simon was a churchwarden at Coddenham 1791. The Vicar was the Rev Nicholas Bacon. Ref Ips. PRO HA24/50/19/4.5 [20]
Coddenham Parish Overseers Books: Ref Ips. PRO FB37/A1/2 FB37/G1/3
Simon Fenn : 1783 occ Val L70 ass L1-15-0. (Earlier "Fenns farm"?)
1805 occ Val L160 ass L12-0-0. (Valley Farm)

Land Tax Redemption 1798. Coddenham Suffolk.
Rev Jn Longe proprietor, Simon Fenn occupier, tax 16 0s 0d.
Simon Fenn proprietor William Barker occupier 12/-
Ancestry.

"Grandfather" Fenn of Coddenham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Brad Street one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.
Liveing Archive, Liveing Family Notes by Edward Liveing 1870

Rev John Longe's Diary:
January 1, 1798. Delightful fine day our tenants, S. Fenn, R Fenn, J. Brook and J. Bird with their wives dined here.
April 16, 1798. Mr S. Fenn paid half a year's rent L86
October 31, 1799. Paid Simon Fenn for two loads of barley straw L1 1s 0
April 16, 1800. Paid S. Fenn for 5cb of barley @ 13' - L3 5 0.
Ref:50/19/4.2 & 4.3

Simon was also Principle Inhabitant in 1791, a surveyor for the parish in 1792, churchwarden 1798. His last signature to the record is as a Vestryman in 1805.

Lands in G(C)oddenham
Catalogue Ref. HD 1467 A2A
FILE - 'A valuation of the Revd Mr Bacon's estates in Coddenham. . . . . by John Edwards' - ref. HD 1467/5 - date: 1791
('The Lawn'; 'the Meadows'; 'Mr Bacon's intended farm from Michaelmas 1791'; 'Mr Bolton's farm now let to Simon Fenn')

Land Tax records at Ipswich PRO for the district of Bosmere & Clayton, village of Coddenham show:
1799 ref B150/1/11(1-2) Simon Fenn (occupier) Rev John Long (proprietor) assessed for tax of L16 . Simon Fenn (proprietor) William Barker (occupier) tax 12/-
1803 ref HB16 29/40 Simon Fenn (occupier) Longe (proprietor) tax 16/- per annum. Simon Fenn (proprietor) William Barker (occupier) 12/- p.a.

SIMON FENN
Birth year1741
Death year1806
Age 65
Burial year1806
Burial day17
Burial month11
PlaceCODDENHAM
Church descriptionST MARY
Church denominationANGLICAN
CountySuffolk
National Burial Index for England & Wales

Ipswich Journal "Simon Fenn of Coddenham died 1740 - 1806". " Tues se'nnight died in his 66th year, much respected by all who new him, Mr Simon Fenn of Coddenham farmer"

Coddenham Churchyard monumental inscription transcript reads: "To the Memory of Simon Fenn who died November 11th 1806 aged 65 years"

THE WILL of SIMON FENN of CODDENHAM.
Dated 23 July 1806
In the Name of God Amen: I Simon Fenn of Coddenham in the County of Suffolk, farmer being of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding hereby revoking all former and other Wills by me at any time heretofore made do make publish and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (that is to say).
First I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth my beloved wife my best bedstead with the furniture bed bedding blankets pillows and linen thereunto belonging and commonly used herewith and also a sufficient quantity of household furniture proper and necessary to furnish two rooms to be allotted and set out at the discretion of my Executors herein after named to and for her own separate use and disposal.
Also I give and bequeath unto the said Elizabeth my wife one annuity or yearly sum of fifty pounds free and clear of and from all or any parliamentary parochial or other payments or deductions whatsoever for and during the term of her natural life to be paid to her as the same shall from time to time be received by four even and equal quarterly payments in every year the first payment to begin and be made at the expiration of three calendar months next after my decease and for the purpose before mentioned I do hereby authorise empower and direct my Executors herein after named their Executors or Administrators to place out at interest in their names but not at their hazard upon Real or Government securities such part and a sufficient part and . . . . . of my personal estate that the interest money arising therefrom shall and may be sufficient to pay and discharge the said annuity or yearly sum of fifty pounds at the times and free and clear of all deductions as aforesaid.
Also I give and bequeath all the rest and residue of my household furniture plate linen china stock of liquor and also my farming stock both live and dead crops of corn hay clover grain and seeds as well growing as stored And also the immediate use and occupation of the farm lands and premises now used and occupied by me together with all my estate and interest in the unexpired term of the lease hereof unto my son Robert Fenn his Executors and Administrators he and they paying and discharging all arrears of rent rates and taxes which shall be due at the time of my decease.
Also I give and bequeath the sum of ten pounds to the industrious poor of the Parish of Coddenham aforesaid to be distributed at the discretion of my Executors within the calendar month next after my decease.
Also I do hereby authorise empower order and direct my brother Robert Fenn of Hemingstone in the County of Suffolk farmer my said son Robert Fenn my son in law George Goodwin of Stowmarket in the said County and my son in law Theodore Banyard Coates of Henley in the said County my Executors hereinafter named and the survivor of them and the Executors and Administrators of such survivor as soon as conveniently may be next after my decease absolutely to sell and dispose of all such of my Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditments and Premises with their and every of their appurtenances wheresoever situate lying or being as is or are Copyhold or Customary Holden either together or in parcels to the best purchaser or purchasers and for the best price or prices that may or can be reasonably obtained for the said and all such and so much of my said Messuages Lands Tenements and Hereditments and premises with their and every of their appurtenances as is freehold or clear for hold
I give and devise unto the said Robert Fenn my brother Robert Fenn my son George Goodwin and Theodore Banyard Coates their Exec's & Assign's In trust that they the said Robert Fenn my brother Robert Fenn my son George Goodwin and Theodore Banyard Coates and the survivors of them and their Exec's & Assign's of such survivors do and shall as soon as conveniently may be after my decease absolutely sell and dispose thereof either together or in parcels and for the best price or prices that may or can be reasonably obtained for the same And my will is that the receipt or receipts of the said Robert Fenn my brother Robert Fenn my son George Goodwin and Theodore Banyard Coates or the survivors of them or of the Heirs Exec's Administrators or Assigns of such survivor shall be a sufficient discharge or discharges to such purchaser or purchasers for his her or their purchases of or for all or any part of my said Estates whether freehold or copyhold or for Customary Holden or for so much hereof for which such receipt or receipts shall not be answerable for the misapplication or nonapplication of the said purchaser monies or any part thereof and the monies arising by such sale or sales and by and out of the . . . . . issues and profits of the said Estate and promises until such sale or sales thereof . . . . . with such principle money after the death of my wife as is before directed to be placed out at interest and also all the rest residue and . . . . . of my monies securities for money personal estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever after payment of my just debts and probate charges I give bequeath and dispose of as follows.
First I give and bequeath hereout the sum of one hundred pounds unto Emma the daughter of my daughter Sarah Coates now living with me and the remainder thereof I will shall be divided into five equal parts or shares (after all just charges thereout deducted) And one fifth part I give and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth the wife of the said George Goodwin her Exec's and Administrators and one other fifth part I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary the wife of the said Theodore Banyard Coates her Exec's and Administrators and one other fifth part I give and bequeath unto my son Robert Fenn his Heirs Exec's and Administrators and one other fifth part thereof I will and direct that my said Executors so and shall in their own names but not at their hazard place out at interest upon Real or Government securities and do and shall pay over the interest thereof as the same shall from time to time be received into the proper hands of my daughter Alice the wife of John Sharman during the term of her natural life to and for her own separate use and not to be under or subject to the debts control or engagements of her said husband and her receipt under her hand from time to time notwithstanding her coverture a good and the only sufficient and effectual discharge to my Executors for the same and upon this further trust that they my said Executors do and shall after the decease of my said daughter Alice pay and dispose of the said last mentioned fifth part unto and amongst all and every the children of my said daughter Alice which shall be living at the time of her decease (in case there shall be more than one child then living) in equal shares due proportions but if there shall be only one child then living then to such only child and be paid and payable to such children severally said respectively at their several and respective ages of twenty one years in case such times of payment happen after the decease of my said daughter Alice but if such children or only child shall be of full age at her decease then to be paid and payable to them him or her as soon as conveniently may be after her decease and my will is that the parts and shares of such of the said children as shall be under the age of twenty one years at the death of the said Alice their mother shall be routi. . . . . ed out at interest and the interest thereof applied for and toward their respective maintenances and educations and in case my said daughter Alice shall die without leaving any child or children or shall die leaving child or children and all and every such child or children shall die under the age of twenty one years without leaving lawful issue then the last mentioned fifth part shall be equally divided my remaining other children or their respective legal representatives in equal shares and proportions
And from and out of the remaining fifth part I give and bequeath unto the said Emma my daughter (the daughter of my said daughter Sarah Coates) the sum of one hundred pounds and the remainder of the said fifth part I give and bequeath unto my said daughter Sarah Coates her Exec's and Administrators And my will and mind further is that the said two sums of one hundred pounds and one hundred pounds shall be paid to the said Emma (the daughter of my said daughter Sarah Coates) at her age of twenty one years and in the mean time to be placed out on interest in the name of my said Executors but not at their hazard and the interest applied towards her maintenance and education but in case the said Emma shall happen to die under the age of twenty one years unmarried and without leaving lawful issue then I will and direct that the same shall be equally divided amongst my remaining other children or their respective legal representatives in equal shares and proportions and I give and bequeath the same accordingly and my will and . . . . . further is and I do hereby declare that whatsoever sum or sums of money have already been or may hereafter be by . . . . . to any or either of my said daughters or any or either of their husbands respectively shall be reckoned accepted accounted and taken as part of the monies or legaties or shares of my Estate by me hereto before to there or to of for their benefit or advantage respectively bequeathed or given And I do hereby further declare that what I have given and bequeathed to my said Wife . . . . . and by this my last Will and Testament is in . . . . . and full satisfaction of her doie . . . . . and thirds or claim of in or out of my Estate both Real and Personal or either of them
And lastly I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said brother Robert Fenn my said son Robert Fenn the said George Goodwin and the said Theodore Banyard Coates Executors of this my last Will and Testament In witness I the said Simon Fenn the Testator have to the three first sheets of this my last Will and Testament contained in four sheets of paper set my hand and to the fourth sheet thereof have set my hand and seal this twenty third day July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and six
Simon Fenn
Signed sealed published and declared by the said Testator Simon Fenn as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence and at his request and in the presence of each other have hereto subscribed our hands as Witnesses
William Goodwin, Edmund ? Brown, John Marriott.
This Will was proved at London the fourth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seven before the Right Honourable Sir William Wynne Knight Doctor of Laws Master Keeper . . . . . of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by the oaths of Robert Fenn the son of the deceased George Goodwin and Theodore Banyard Coates three of the Executors named in the said Will to whom Administration was granted of all and singular the goods chattels and credits of the said deceased having been first sworn by commission to administer power reserved of making the like grant to Robert Fenn the brother of the said deceased and the other Executor named in the said Will when he shall apply for the same.
Ref PROB 11/1457 Page 227 Image 182
Copy on file 2002 and under documents in this file 2013.

Research Notes:
That Simon, had a son Robert, is confirmed by his will and further in a letter dated 27 Aug 1807 at Coddenham from Rev John Longe to his solicitor Wenn in Ipswich as follows;
"Dear Sir,
I herewith send you the leases for late Simon Fenn's farm, which I should wish to be altered as I lately mentioned to you, as to his son Robert Fenn, to take place from last Michaelmas; except the mere alteration of the name and the clause "for the life of S Fenn" everything else may remain."
Ips PRO HA24/50/19/3.21

However the Coddenham Parish Register dated 2 Oct 1785 show Robert as the son of Simon and Mary. The writers hand at this time is different from the hand of the entries in the first half year of 1785 and 1786. Accordingly the view is taken by the researcher that the writer in October may have been unfamiliar with the Parish families and entered Mary in error.

Colin Fenn (2003) confirms that there is no record of any Fenn's buried in Coddenham between 1705 - 1790. Ref LDS film 993236 - 2 Coddenham Church and Churchyard inscriptions to 1884 by Rev Haslewood.

In 1870-72, John Goring's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Coddenham like this:
"CODDENHAM, a village, a parish, and a sub-district, in Bosmere district, Suffolk. The village stands 3 miles NNE of Claydon r. station, and 31/2 ESE of Needham-Market; and has a post office under Needham-Market. The parish comprises 2, 719 acres. Real property, L.5,300. Pop., 903. Houses, 203. The property is subdivided. Shrubland Park belonged formerly to the Bacons; and is now the seat of Sir W. F. F. Middleton, Bart. The living is a vicarage, united with the p. curacy of Crowfield, in the diocese of Norwich. Value, L.1,006.* Patron, the Rev. R. Longe. The church is a fine Gothic edifice, with a tower; and has some good monuments. There are an Independent chapel, and charities L.80. -The sub-district contains seventeen parishes and a parochial chapelry. Acres, 30, 765. Pop., 8, 480. Houses, 1, 862. "

Coddenham: The church here was given to Royston priory by Eustachius de Merc, the founder, about the year 1220. Here is the manor of Dennies, and here stood the manor-house of Shrubland Hall, where Edward, third son of the Lord Keeper Bacon, became seated, by his marriage with the heiress of Little. Nicholas Bacon, one of his descendants, erected a new mansion in a very pleasant park, which contains the finest Spanish chesnut trees in the county. This edifice having been pulled down, a new one was built in its stead, and became the residence of Sir William Middleton, the present possessor, who was created a baronet in 18O4. It commands an extensive prospect along the Norwich road. Here is also a manor called the Vicarage, being always vested in the vicar for the time being.

Other Records

1. "Grandfather" Fenn of Coddenham: Notes by Edward Fenn FRCP, 1870.

Simon married Elizabeth UNDERWOOD [4547] on 28 Oct 1776 in Coddenham SFK. Elizabeth was born about 1753, died on 14 May 1831 in Haughley SFK aged about 78, and was buried on 21 May 1831 in Coddenham SFK.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Alice FENN [375]

         ii.  Elizabeth FENN [4550] (baptised on 7 Apr 1777 in Coddenham SFK - buried on 24 Feb 1837 in Coddenham SFK)

        iii.  Sarah FENN [202] (born about 1782 1783 in Henly SFK)

         iv.  Mary Anne FENN [4548] (baptised on 24 Feb 1782 in Coddenham SFK)

          v.  Eliza FENN [4549] (baptised on 6 Sep 1783 in Coddenham SFK)

8        vi.  Capt Robert FENN [198] (baptised on 2 Oct 1785 in Coddenham SFK - died on 27 Mar 1844 in Coddenham SFK)




17. Elizabeth UNDERWOOD [4547] was born about 1753, died on 14 May 1831 in Haughley SFK aged about 78, and was buried on 21 May 1831 in Coddenham SFK.

General Notes:
Simon Fenn
Marriage date28 Oct 1776
Marriage placeCoddenham
Spouse's first name(s)Elizabeth
Spouse's last nameUnderwood
Suffolk Marriage Index.

Elizabeth was aged 33 at her marriage Simon 36. Both were of Coddenham and single. They were married by W Hughes Curate, by licence.

Elizabeth was left an annuity of L50 p.a. free of deductions, the best bedstead, bedding, blankets, pillows, linen and furniture commonly used herewith plus a sufficient quantity of household furniture proper and necessary to furnish two rooms.
Land Tax records:
1823 ref HB16 29/40 Mrs Fenn (proprietor) Sharman (occupier) tax 12/-
1827 ref HB16 290/10 Mrs Fenn (proprietor) John Sherman (occupier) tax 12/-
It is likely this property was owned by Elizabeth, John Sharman was her son in law.

Coddenham Churchyard monumental inscription transcript reads: "Also of Eliz Fenn relict of the above who died May 14th 1831, in the 79th year of her age".

Suffolk Family History Soc. (Burials): Elizabeth Fenn buried 21 May 1831 aged 78, abode Haughley or Hawleigh, buried Coddenham by Thomas Nunn.

The death entry in the Coddenham Register clearly spells Hawleigh.

Elizabeth married Simon FENN [4546] on 28 Oct 1776 in Coddenham SFK. Simon was baptised on 16 Jan 1741/42 in Barking SFK, died on 11 Nov 1806 in Coddenham SFK at age 64, and was buried on 17 Nov 1806 in Coddenham SFK. Another name for Simon was FYNN.


18. Commander Thomas LIVEING R N [230], son of Robert LIVEING [427] and Sarah HEARN [428], was born on 16 Mar 1760, was baptised on 23 Apr 1760 in Harwich ESS, died on 30 Aug 1836 at age 76, and was buried in Harwich Churchyard.

General Notes:
Thomas was a successful mariner and businessman, continuing the family's maritime history.

Essex Record Office File D/DU 206/9 contains various business letters addressed to Thomas.

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/10
DEED DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Scope and Content:
Papers and accounts of Captain Thomas Liveing, son in law and executor of Thomas Liveing's will, 1791-1809; release of legacy under the will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent. for L1000 invested in 3% consolidated bank annuities by Edward Bettes Harrold of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, surgeon and apothecary, 15 August 1809;

2 DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
6 November 1807
Bill of Sale: I Bridget Rachael Deane widow of Harwich and Elizabeth Rachael Deane spinster of Harwich, executors of the will of Philip Deane of Harwich, deceased, commander of the packet ship the 'King George' do in consideration of a sum of two thousand one hundred pounds in the hand by William Liveing of Harwich mariner do sell assign . . . . . that good Packet Boat Cutter or Vessel called the 'Lady Nepean' of Harwich, built at Bridport, Dorset in 1803 with one deck and one mast, length of 57 feet, breadth of 19 feet 2 inches, hold 10 feet 2 inches deep, 77 tons, a square sterned cutter with no galley and no figurehead together with all masts sails sails yards anchors cables ropes cords guns gunpowder amunition small arms tackle apparel boats oars . . . . . to Thomas Liveing of Harwich, mariner, 6 November 1807.
Signed: B R Deane E R Deane and other witnesses.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/11

26 December 1831
Bill of Sale: I Thomas Liveing of Harwich Gentleman in consideration of a sum of one thousand three hundred pounds in the hand by William Liveing of Harwich mariner do sell assign . . . . . that good Packet Boat Cutter or Vessel called the Lady Neapean of Harwich (description of the vessel) together with all masts sails . . . . . to William Liveing of Harwich mariner who now is and for ten years last past has been the Commander and John Barns the Master (of the Lady Nepean). . . . .
26 December 1831.
Signed Thos Liveing and other witnesses.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/11
This would appear to be a sale to William Liveing [6266]

The Packets.
Passage from Harwich was the main and shortest route to Holland and Europe until larger paddle steamers started to ply between Dover and Calais in the early 19th century. Packets Commissioned by the Post Master General would carry mails in addition to cargo and passengers. The crossing to Holland took about 48hrs always dependant on the weather. Coastal trade was also important. They were armed at times of war. A successful Packet Commander could make more than a L1000 a year, it was a lucrative industry.
Thomas's boat was typical for size at 77 tons.

Morning Chronicle 20 Oct 1809
Harwich the Lady Nepean Capt. Liveing for Gottenburg.

Morning Post, 23 Aug 1810.
This afternoon arrived the Lady Nepean packet, Captain Liveing, from Gothenberg, with mail and passengers, after a tedious passage of 14 days.

The London & County Directory 1811
H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean' from Mistley & Manningtree to Harwich daily.

The London & County Directory of 1811:
Packet Boat
Dover - Lady Nepean - Liveing.

Harwich. (transport options in 1811!)
Coaches - William Collen and Co proprietors of the Harwich coaches to and from the Spread Eagle Inn Gracechurch Street London morning and evening to the Three-Cups and White Heart Inn Harwich
A Waggon - To the Bull and Kings Arms Inn Leadenhall Street London
Water Conveyance - Sundry vessels constantly trading to and from Harwich taking goods etc at Bear-Quay and Harrison's-Wharf London.
Packet Boats
Auckland 1st - Bridge. Auckland 2nd - Line
Lady Nepean - Liveing. Earl of Leicester - Hammond
Lord Nelson - Deane. Lord Duncan - Hamilton
Diana - Macdonough. Lark - Wye
Prince of Wales - Mason. Lady Frances - Rutter
Beaufoy - Norris. King George - King
Days of sailing - Wednesdays and Saturdays now to hear Hellgoland and Isle of Anhalt, in time of peace to Helvoetsluys (sic).

Harwich Dec 29
The Lady Nepean Capt. Liveing for Cuxhaven
Ref: Morning Chronicle 31 Dec 1813

Harwich September 22
Sailed - Wednesday the Lady Nepean, Capt Liveing, for Helvoetsluys.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 2 September 1820.

Harwich and Dovercourt Association.
For the protection of Property, and prosecution of Felons, Thieves, and Depredators.
Whereas, a violent attempt was made in the night of Friday the 9th, or early in the morning of Saturday the 10th instant, to break into the banking house of Messrs Cox and Knocker at Harwich; the Committee of this Association hereby offer a reward of twenty pounds, to whoever shall discover the offender or offenders . . . . .
Members: . . . . Thomas Liveing . . . . .
Ref: The Suffolk Chronicle Saturday, 24 January 1824.

Essex Record Office
Reference Code D/DU 206/14 Dates of Creation 1822-1838
Mortgage account book of Thomas Liveing, with receipts for 1824-1836; at end reversed, note that Thomas Liveing delivered his commission as the commander of H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean', 1822; executors' accounts, bills (including bills for funeral), receipts etc. estate of Thomas Liveing, 1836-1838; sale catalogue of furniture of Captain Thomas Liveing, deceased, sold on the premises at King's Head Street, Harwich, 14-15 September 1837 (marked copy); insurance policy with Suffolk and General Country Amicable Insurance Office for the insurance of house of Thomas Liveing (L380), storehouse (L60), house (L180) with kitchen (L30), all in Kings Head Street, Harwich, 14 February 1838.

Memorandum
Feb 2nd 1822
Delivered my Commifsion as Commander of H M Packet Lady Nepean to Mr Anthony Cox the Agent for Packets at this Port to be by him delivered to their Lordships the Postmaster General.
Thos Liveing
T L Fisher
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

October 20 1834
Received of Mfs Dinah Frances and others the sum of six pounds five shillings being half a years interest due the 27th June last past 6-5-0
Thos Liveing
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

April 25 1835
Received of Mfs Dinah Frances and others the sum of six pounds five shillings being half a years interest due the 27th December 1834 last past 6-5-0
Thos Liveing
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14
33 DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Dates of Creation 1822-1838
Scope and Content:
Mortgage account book of Thomas Liveing, with receipts for 1824-1836, with details of a large number of loans made by Thomas to various parties. (At end reversed)
Note that Thomas Liveing delivered his commission as the commander of H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean', 1822; Executors' accounts, bills (including bills for funeral), receipts etc. estate of Thomas Liveing, 1836-1838;
Insurance policy with Suffolk and General Country Amicable Insurance Office for the insurance of a timber, plaster, and tile house of Thomas Liveing (L380), storehouse (L60), brick and tile house (L180) with kitchen (L30), all in Kings Head Street, Harwich, 14 February 1838. Premium L1 17 0.

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14 - a fascinating file of receipts insurance policys accounts and notes etc including:
Sale catalogue of furniture of Captain Thomas Liveing, deceased, sold on the premises at King's Head Street, Harwich, 14-15 September 1837 (marked copy).
A summary of receipts on page 16 shows the proceeds from the sale at L249-16-11 from some 370 lots, less expenses L27-9-9 and sales to family totaling L104-5-8 nett L145-11-3 plus the sale of a bed L5-5-0 total realised L150-16-3 approx.

Ipswich.
Deaths.
30th ult., much respected, in the 77th year of his age, Capt Thomas Liveing, many years Commander of the Lady Nepean Post Office packet, on the Harwich station.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday Sept 3, 1836.

PRECIS OF THE WILL OF THOMAS LIVEING OF HARWICH.
Dated 5 October 1833
First after my debts funeral and probate expenses, and legacies be satisfied, all ready money and cash at my bankers to my dear wife Harriet, also all my household goods and chattles for the term of her natural life.

To my sons Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing all my messuages, tenements, lands, etc in Harwich and elsewhere in trust permitting my wife Harriet to have hold and enjoy the same taking rents and profits for the term of her natural life.

Upon the decease of the said Harriet my wife the Trustees to sell and dispose of same and all other of my personal estate and effects and I give and bequeath the proceeds to Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing and all and every other of my child or children who shall be living at the time of the demise of my said wife equally to be divided between them share and share alike.

Provided always that with respect to the share of my daughter Harriet the wife of Robert Fenn I order and direct that the same shall be placed out at interest in the names of the said Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing and the prooceeds thereof be paid into the hands of my said daughter Harriet Fenn for her own sole or separate use for the term of her natural life. . . . . . "that those same or any part thereof may not be at the disposal of or subject or liable to the control debts or engagements of her present or any after taken husband but only at her own sole and separate disposal" . . . . .

Thereafter I give and bequeath the principle monies aforesaid to be divided between the children of my daughter Harriet, at age twenty one, equally share and share alike.

I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Gill and William the son and daughter of my late brother William Liveing L15 each for mourning.

I appoint my dear wife Harriet my executrix and my sons Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing executors of this my will

Signed: Thomas Liveing
Witnesses: Thomas Stevens, Robert Lake, John Sansum all of Harwich.

Memorandum: No2 Harwich 4 April 1818 L500.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Harriet Fenn wife of Robert Fenn of Coddenham SFK at different times and in different sums the sum of L500 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No3 Harwich 24 March 1819 L300.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Julia Ambrose wife of John Ambrose farmer of Copford ESS on her marriage the sum of L300 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No? Harwich 8 Nov 1820 L500.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Julia Ambrose wife of John Ambrose farmer of Copford ESS the further sum of L500 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.
It is my desire and request that when you get the remainder of your share of my property that you should pay of the money borrowed of Mr Logan and also the sum or sums borrowed of your brother Edward.
Signed: Thomas Liveing

Memorandum: No4 Harwich 16 Nov 1821 L200.
Whereas I have given to my son Edward Liveing of Nayland surgeon the sum of L200 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Witness my hand.

Memorandum: No5 Harwich 23 Aug 1830 L100.
Whereas I have given to my son Charles Liveing of National Debt Office London on his marriage the sum of L100 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No6 Harwich 23 Aug 1830 L200.
Whereas I have given to my son William Liveing of Harwich mariner at various times and on various occasions the sum of L200 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.
In addition to the above L200 I have let him have the sum of L400 more for his own use in all L600.

Memorandum: No7 Harwich 5 Oct 1833 L300.
Whereas I have given to my son Henry Thomas Liveing L200 to purchase furniture with and L100 more when he took the degree of Master of Arts in all L300 it is my will it shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Appeared Personally: Charles Liveing of Danmark Hill Camberwell Esq, Robert Liveing Fenn of the National Debt Office in the city of London Gentlemen & William Jennings of the same place Gentlemen and jointly and severally made Oath and the first the said Charles Liveing for himself saith that he is the son and one of the executors named in the last Will and Testament as containing in paper writings marked Nos 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 of Thomas Liveing late of Harwich in the County of Essex a Captain in his Majesty's Post Office Service deceased who died on the 30th day of August last past and he further saith have few days subsequent to the death and prior to the funeral of the said deceased but the day he more particularly he is unable to set forth on search being made for the deceased's Will his the deponents sister Harriet Fenn wife of Robert Fenn proceeded to the room or bedchamber called the great front room where stood a chest of drawers wherein the deceased was in the habit of keeping his papers of moment and in one of the drawers thereof found a paper parcel which she thereupon brought to the deponent who was then in the adjoining room who immediately proceeded to open the same and then therein found the last Will and Testament of the said deceased together with certain paper writings or memoranda in the handwriting of the deceased and having now carefully viewed and perused the paper writings hereto annexed marked as aforesaid that marked No1 beginning thus this is the last Will and Testament of me Thomas Liveing of Harwich in the Co of Essex Esq aducing? thus this 11th day of Oct one thousand eight hundred and thirty five and thus subscribed Thomas Liveing that marked No 3 beginning thus L300 herewith Mar 24 1819 ending thus and also the sum or sums borrowed of your brother Edward and having the name Thoms Liveing set and subscribed to the first and
second sides thereof that marked No 2 beginning thus Harwich April 4th 1818 ending thus witness my hand this 4th day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen and thus inscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 6 beginning thus Harwich August 23rd 1830 ending thus witness my hand Thoms Liveing that marked No 4 beginning thus Harwich November 16th 1821 ending thus . . . . . written with my own hand the day and year above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 5 in continuing this memorandum Harwich August 23 1830 ending thus . . . . . written with my own hand the day and year above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 7 beginning this memorandum Harwich Oct 5 1833 ending thus written with my own hand the year and day above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing further saith the same are the papers by him predeposed of and are the only papers which were aforesaid found by him or contained in the said paper parcel and he lastly saith careful search hath sure been made among the papers of the said deceased but no paper or papers in the handwriting or otherwise of the said deceased whereby any sum or sums of money are specified as having been advanced by him the said deceased in his lifetime to his children save as by him predeposed have been found or discovered And the said Robert Liveing Fenn for himself saith that he knew and was well acquainted with the said deceased for some years prior and to the time of his death and during such his knowledge of and acquaintance with the said deceased often saw him right and subscribe his name to paper writings and thereby became well acquainted with his manner and character of handwriting and subscription and the said William Fennings for himself saith he knew and was well acquainted with the said deceased for some years prior and to the time of his death and during such his knowledge of and acquaintance with him has been in the habit of corresponding with and receiving letters in reply which he knows and believes were written addressed and forwarded to him the deponent by the said deceased and thereby became well acquainted with his manner and character of handwriting and subscription and they the said Robert Liveing Fenn and William Fennings having now carefully reviewed and perused the said paper writings now hereto annexed marked respectively 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 beginning ending and subscribed as aforesaid lastly say they verily and in the constructure? believe the whole body series and contents of the said paper writing beginning ending and subscribed as aforesaid save and except the words "turn over" appearing written at the foot of the first side of that marked No 3 as also the words "it is my desire and request that when you get the remainder of your share of my property that you should pay off the money borrowed off Mr Logan as also the sum or sums borrowed off your brother Edward" appearing written at the bottom of the second side of the said paper writing marked No 3 together with the names Thomas Liveing thereto set and subscribed to be all of the proper character handwriting and subscription of the said deceased
Chas Liveing - same day the said Charles Liveing was duly sworn to the truth of hereof Before me W. C. Curtis Surv . . . . . Pt Montague J Fatham Ser . . . . . Pub. R Liveing Fenn W. Fennings same day that said Robert Liveing Fenn and William Fennings were duly sworn to the truth hereof before me John Laubeny Sivir . . . . . Pt Montague I Faltham Not . . . . . Pub

Will as contained in paper in paper writings marked Nos 1,2,3,4,5,6 was proved in London 1st March 1837 before the worshipful William Calverley Curtis Doctor of Laws and Surrogates on the Oaths of Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing the sons and surviving executives to whom Admon was granted having been first sworn duly to administer

The Executors.
For the Funeral of the late Captn Thos Liveing
5 Sep 1836
Drs to Philip Hast.
Inside Coffin lined with matrafs and pillow - L2 12 6d
Outside coffin half inch oak covered with cloth best black furniture & etc - L6 10s 0d
6 feet of oak used at the grave - 6s 0d
Paid eight bearers - L2 2s 0d
Paid Beadles 4/- Constables 2/- . 6s 0d
Paid stones to cover grave - L1 4s 6d
Paid brick'd grave - L3 10s 6d
Clerk & Sextons fees - 13s 6d
Ministers Fees - L2 16s 6d
L19 18s 6d
With Mr Hast's grateful thanks
9 Sep 1836
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

Harwich
Most Excellent Sale Of
Household Furniture
Fine feather beds equal to Down, with Superior Blankets. Marseille quilts, and other Counter . . . . . Horse hair, Cotton, and Wool Mattresses and Four Post, Tent, and other Bedsteads and Furniture . . . . . Properties etc.
To Be Sold by Auction
By Messrs Hast & Squirrel
At the residence of Captain Liveing, deceased, in
Kings Head Street, Harwich.
On Tuesday the 14th of September, 1837 and the following day,
. . . . . punctually each day at 10 o'clock, on account of the number and quality of the lots,
Without Any Reserve
. . . . . genuine, an excellent household furniture in the best possible preservation: comprising seven excellent down and feather beds, with bolsters and horse hair, wool and cotton mattresses, prime blankets, rich Marseille and British counterpane quilts, various four-post and tent bedsteads . . . . . chintz, moreen, and dimity furnitures, and win. . . . . en suite: mahogany commodes on various . . . . . chairs, cushions and covers, set of fine wood ma- . . . . . tables, on telescope slides; also in mahogany, tea, card, loo, dining, and Pembroke tables; . . . . . fancy painted and Japanned toilet and washing . . . . . excellent mahogany sofa, with mahogany seats of . . . . . and nailed chairs en suite; excellent pier, . . . . . and swinging glasses and mirrors, in rich frames, . . . . . dimensions; gentlemen's portable writing desks, boxes, caddies, etc; most excellent mahogany and . . . . . double and single chests of drawers etc: two . . . . . bureau desks . . . . . or rosewood and other stained . . . . . chairs; handsome Brussels, Kidderminster, and . . . . . carpets and stair carpeting and hearthrugs, pas- . . . . . floor cloths, variety of brass and steel fenders, irons, capital 8 day clock, sundry valuable foreign . . . . . canvass and boards by the old masters; framed . . finished engravings. Sets of table cutlery, . . . . . cruets, spirit bottles, etc, candlesticks and . . . . . dinner and desert sets very neat, sundry lots . . . . . china, in bowls, plates, dishes, cups and saucers, and ornaments. About 100 volumes of books, . . . . . biography divinity history etc. Also a variety of stone and glass bottles, kitchen, washing, and utensils, in copper, tin, and iron ware; casks, tubs, and the usual appendages in housekeeping.
. . . . . be viewed the day previous to the sale and catalogue . . . . . of the Journal Office, Ipswich, and Auctioneers.
Ref Ipswich Journal 9 Sept 1837 (A poor image)

From a copy of the above catalogue, showing the sale prices, we see:
Scotts Bible in 4 Vols L5-10-0
Burkitt's Testament 18/0
Village Sermons 4 Vols 8/6
West's Letters to a Young Lady 8 Vols 3/6
Clark's Life of Christ 2/-
Navigation 5 Vols 1/8
Atlas 5 Vols 2/3 etc.
4 Windsor Chairs L1
Handsome Mahogany Bureau L2-6-0
A Gout Stool 3/6
Good Feather Bed L5-5-0
The sale raised L249-16-11 but after commission's and other sale costs including refreshments the net amount was L145-11-3
Ref: Essex R.O. D/DU 206/14

The following is an brief account of the personal estate of Thomas Liveing at 1st Mar 1837.
Cash - L218. Household effects - L272. Leasehold interests - L1375. Mortgages Bonds Annuities Interest Dividends etc - L10940. Probate & funeral expenses etc were L328, stamp duty of L125 was paid on the estate.
Ref: ESS RO D/DU 206/14

Declaration form by his son Charles Liveing that Thomas Liveing's estate was valued at L12477-10-6
Note by Charles Liveing of the main distribution of the funds of the Estate to the beneficiaries as- Julia L.2329, Harriet L.2329, William L.2329, Edward L.2329, Charles L.2329, Henry L.2329.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14

Thomas's tombstone in Harwich Churchyard reads: In memory of Thomas Liveing gent some time commander of one of HM packets on this station who died Aug 30th 1836 aged 76 (also see Harriet's notes). They were natives of this town where they spent their days endeavouring to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with their God.
Transcribed by Edward Liveing May 1874, not traced in 1999.

Research Notes:
Colchester Record Office.
Kalendar Harwich Munuments.
Item 157.
1807/08
Five printed receipts for payments of 6d per month for each of the 16 members of the crew of the Lady Nepean, paid to Runnacles of Harwich, receiver for the Port of London, towards the maintainance of the Greenwich Royal Hospital for seamen, as required by law.
Various accounts from Anna Maria Cope for sailmaking, canvass, ironmongery, ropes, tarpaulins etc. Bills from Adam Gavin of Gottenberg for sundry items including spirits, meat, salt, potatoes, pilotage, repairs and varnish.
E L Fenn, 15 June 2004.

Liveing (T-). of Harwich. Letter to W. Huskisson 1812.
Ref British Library 2007.

Marriage date was perhaps 1787

Essex Record Office
MISCELLANEOUS DEEDS ETC.
DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Reference Code D/DU 206/10
Dates of Creation1767-1830
Extent15 items
Scope and Content Release of legacies under the will of Thomas Hearn of Harwich by Thomas Hearn of Harwich, mariner, eldest son, 8 August 1767, by William Hearn of Harwich, draper, 15 October 1770 and by Richard White, baize maker of Coggeshall and Anne his wife (formerly Hearn), 26 August 1774; release of legacies under the will of Robert LIVEING of Harwich, gent. by Robert LIVEING of Harwich, gent., 19 July 1785, by Thomas LIVEING of Harwich, gent., 24 August 1785, by Joseph Threadgill of Harwich, fisherman and Martha his wife, 25 August 1785 and by Richard White of Coggeshall, esq., his wife Anne, Thomas Hearn of Harwich and William Hearn of Coggeshall, 9 March 1786; probate, 21 January 1792 and copy of will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent., appoints wife Deborah Harrold and son-in-law Thomas LIVEING of Harwich executors, bequeaths to wife Deborah all money in public stocks at his death for life, on her death to be divided equally between children Thomas Churchman Harrold, Edward Betts Harrold and Harriet LIVEING, with the condition that a sum not to exceed L.300 can be advanced to any of the children by the executors during his wife's lifetime, 11 August 1791 [proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1792, reference January 25]; papers and accounts of Captain Thomas LIVEING, son in law and executor of Thomas LIVEING's will, 1791-1809; release of legacy under the will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent. for L.1000 invested in 3% consolidated bank annuities by Edward Bettes Harrold of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, surgeon and apothecary, 15 August 1809; attested copy of will [for registered copy see D/ABR 33/372] of Sarah Stow of Harwich bequeaths L.5 and wood and coal in cellar to Ann wife of Jeremiah Durrant of Dovercourt, gardener, to Mrs LIVEING wife of Thomas LIVEING of Harwich, gent., her double chest of drawers, two large china bowls and the residue of her estate, to Elizabeth Thorogood LIVEING, daughter of Captain William LIVEING silver milk pot, locket and beads, to Robert LIVEING Fenn and Thomas Harrold Fenn, sons of Mrs Harriett Fenn a silver table spoon each, to Harriett Fenn two silver table spoons, to Elizabeth Mary Logan, wife of Thomas Logan of Harwich, surgeon two large china bowls, to Mrs Mary Sansum, wife of John Sansum of Harwich, gent. two china bowls, to Isabell Ann Kelly, daughter of Thomas Kelly of Harwich, mariner, six china cups and saucers, to her lodger Mrs Mann six silver teaspoons, 14 July 1830; account of executor of will of Sarah Stow, 1830.

Medical Notes: Notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP.
Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion ( . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ) he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye check" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Bradstreet one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)

Other Records

1. Capt Thomas Liveing: A Cutter Harwich, Notes on the Battle of Camperdown, 1797.
Cutter Princes Royal leaving Harwich c1810

Notes on Thomas Liveing serving at the Battle of Camperdown1 11 Oct 1797.
The Cutter Argus in Coastguard Service at Harwich Cmdr, Capt Saunders, Chief Mate Thomas Liveing. 17.
The cutter sailed very fast and before the Battle of Camperdown when we were at war with the Dutch this and others of H.M. Cutters were in attendance on the British Fleet (Friday) to carry dispatches Capt Saunders being often drunk his brother in law Mr Liveing had frequently the command.
This was the case when the Dutch colours were taken at ye battle of Camperdown and they were sent home to England Mr Liveing commanding who stood at ye helm all night, there being a gale of wind. There was probably some office in charge but drunk.
Mr Liveing did not like being in attendance on the Fleet and under command of the Admiral.
There was also a Wivenhoe Cutter (Capt Mannings?), The Viper cutter of Harwich Capt Morgan engaged in similar service
Another occurred in which the Argus Cutter was in attendance under Lord Nelson or Sir Sydney Smith in the Fleet (or Squadron) off Deal or Dover, Mr Liveing and some others were sent off in boats to fetch off our sailors (Wounded ones?)
They were going to cut out French gun boats but found it impossible as they were chained together, and the expedition was a failure, as they advanced under fire of Batteries and lost many sailors
Who came home to ye Cutters? when . . . . . service and was discharged
Who piloted the fleet in the North Sea and received thanks of Trinity Board.
The compiler has been unable to validate this story but much of it is entirely possible

1. 11 October, 1797,was one of the Royal Navy's greatest victorys, but became overshadowed by Trafalgar 1805. Batavian (Dutch) losses: 11 ships of the line, 540 dead, 620 wounded; British losses: 203 dead, 622 wounded


2. Thomas Liveing letter to his Wife (copy): Family Life, 24 Jul 1797, Aldeburgh SFK.
Liveing Archive Image IMG3850 & 39a LT4

Letter from Thomas Liveing to his wife Harriet.
Aldbro July 24 1797
What return can I make to my dearest best of wives for her letter only to assure her how much I respect and love her above all other creatures in the world. I humbly hope the good and gracious disposition of all events will soon bring me to her I hold dear in this life, that of seeing my family again
I am many times attempted to read your letter before I could accomplish it, indeed I don't know whether I have read it all now for as soon as I began my eyes were as soon filled with the tears and I was obliged to put it up again.
You do not say anything of your mother how she did I hope she is well how is my little Edward and the rest of them I would gladly give a guinea for a kiss of them.
Our affair is still in suspense but hope to hear from London tomorrow Mr Saunders will be in the harbour today and I think will call upon you he is in good heart about her, I wish I could say so to. I would have you send a direction to Mr Saunders and beg the favour of him to enclose a note of L20 to your brother the remainder can be sent to you - I should have sent to you by the cutter but had not the opportunity of writing soon enough, if anything should occur favourable tomorrow I shall not fail to let you know. If the cutter comes down tomorrow send me a pair of shoes. I have had a little inflammation and swelling of my right ankle from the fatigue and being so long out of bed, but by the friendly assistance of an old lady a Mrs Beddon the boat setters wife of this port it is much better.
Adieu my dearest best of girls and be assured that I would not wish to live were I dispossessed of her, unless for the sake of the little ones, remember me to your mother and let me hear from you soon.
God bless and comfort you don't drive off going to Mr Club if you're breast is not better.
T Liveing

Grandfather dearly loved to have his head combed, used to say Julia come and comb my head for a penny sometimes it was 6d. He had a six inch pigtail tied up with ribbons a little bit of leather at top where it fixed in. These pigtails were the natural hair a little piece of leather tied round at the base and a piece of ribbon half inch wound up and down bows at top the end turned up like a drakes tail used to call coft sic (cue or queue).
Ref: Notes on Harriet Harrolds Wedding.



3. Thomas Liveing: House Insurance & Receipt, Sale Catalogue and Prices, 1838 To 1839.

4. Capt Thomas Liveing:
His resignation as Commander of the Lady Nepean, 1822

His funeral bill 1836

5. 01 Thomas Liveing & others: Family memories.
Liveing Archive

Notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP.
Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing (his brother-in-law) piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion whether on the Argos or the Isis not known, he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye cheque" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Bradstreet one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)


6. 02 Thomas Liveing & others: Family memories transcription copy of 01.
Liveing Archive

Copy of the notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP, by E H T Liveing (c1920's).

Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing (his brother-in-law) piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion whether on the Argos or the Isis not known, he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye check" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Brad Street one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)


7. Harwich & surrounding Villages: 1885 1900.
Courtesy National Library of Scotland.

Thomas married Harriet HARROLD [231] on 7 Sep 1786 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS. Harriet was born on 4 Dec 1762, died on 24 Jan 1837 in Nayland SFK at age 74, and was buried in 1837 in Harwich Churchyard.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Julia LIVEING [119] (born on 8 Jun 1787 in Harwich ESS - died on 14 Feb 1868 in Copford ESS)

9        ii.  Harriet LIVEING [227] (born on 21 Sep 1789 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 28 Mar 1864 in Nayland SFK)

        iii.  Thomas LIVEING [135] (born on 29 Oct 1791, baptised St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 22 Jun 1806 in Savannah Le Mer Jamaica)

         iv.  Capt William LIVEING [136] (born on 31 Oct 1791, baptised St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 12 Jun 1870 in 7 Clifton Villas Warwick Rd. Maida Hill MDX)

          v.  Sarah LIVEING [2035] (born on 14 Jun 1794 - buried on 23 Jul 1794 in Harwich Churchyard)

         vi.  Dr Edward LIVEING M.R.C.S. [98] (born circa 1795, baptised St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 10 Mar 1843 in Nayland SFK)

        vii.  Charles LIVEING Esq. [258] (born circa 1798, baptised St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 29 Mar 1858 in Brighton SSX)

       viii.  Sarah Ann LIVEING [2037] (baptised on 13 Aug 1802 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS - died on 28 Apr 1805, buried in Harwich Churchyard)

         ix.  Rev Henry Thomas LIVEING [2038] (born on 14 Jun 1805 in Harwich ESS - died on 27 Mar 1884 in Tansor Northampton)




19. Harriet HARROLD [231], daughter of Thomas HARROLD [131] and Deborah BETTS [21861], was born on 4 Dec 1762, died on 24 Jan 1837 in Nayland SFK at age 74, and was buried in 1837 in Harwich Churchyard.

General Notes:
Harriet Harrold born 4 December 1762 about 4 o'clock in the morning inoculated for smallpox 29th of January 1768
Ref: Dr Edward L Fenns book of notes pg 44

Harriet, was an active mother and wife and a profuse letter writer. Numerous letters from Harriet to members of her family have survived. Harriet writes with interest, and conviction in the power of the Lord, for example, this description of the birth of her twins Thomas & William. "an awful day, never to be forgotten, my poor father died two hours before the birth of the first child, a dead father, two children born, a very very bad breast of long duration which excited great fear of a cancer, and no power to suckle my children, I praise God for supporting me through so great a trial"

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/10
DEED DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Attested copy of will [for registered copy see D/ABR 33/372] of Sarah Stow of Harwich bequeaths to Mrs Liveing wife of Thomas Liveing of Harwich, gent., her double chest of drawers, two large china bowls and the residue of her estate, to Elizabeth Thorogood Liveing, daughter of Captain William Liveing silver milk pot, locket and beads, to Robert Liveing Fenn and Thomas Harrold Fenn, sons of Mrs Harriett Fenn a silver table spoon each, to Harriett Fenn two silver table spoons, to Elizabeth Mary Logan, wife of Thomas Logan of Harwich, surgeon two large china bowls, to Mrs Mary Sansum, wife of John Sansum of Harwich, gent. two china bowls, to Isabell Ann Kelly, daughter of Thomas Kelly of Harwich, mariner, six china cups and saucers, to her lodger Mrs Mann six silver teaspoons, L5 and wood and coal in cellar to Ann wife of Jeremiah Durrant of Dovercourt, gardener, 14 July 1830; account of executor of will of Sarah Stow, 1830.

Ipswich.
Died.
25th inst. (a Wed) , at the residence of her son, William Liveing, Esq surgeon, of Nayland, Mrs Liveing, relict of the late Captain Liveing of Harwich, in the 73rd year of her age.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday January 28, 1837.

Wednesday last at the residence of her son William Liveing Esq surgeon of Nayland in her 73rd year, Harriet, relict of the late captain Thomas Liveing formally of the Lady Nepean, Post Office Packet, on the Harwich Station.
Ref: Bury and Norwich Post Wednesday, 1 February 1837.
These reports appears to have Edwards name wrong.

THE WILL OF HARRIET LIVEING of HARWICH
Dated 27th November 1836
This is the Last Will and Testament of me Harriet Liveing of Harwich in the County of Essex widow. I give and bequeath all my estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever whereof or whereto I shall or may happen to die possessed or entitled, unto and between the several persons and in the several proportions following - that is to say, one sixth part thereof unto my dear son William Liveing, one other sixth part thereof unto my son Edward Liveing, one other sixth part thereof unto my son Charles Liveing, one other sixth part thereof unto my son the Reverend Henry Thomas Liveing, one other sixth part thereof unto my daughter Julia Ambrose and the remaining sixth part thereof unto and equally between my two grandsons Robert Liveing Fenn and Thomas Harrold Fenn (children of my daughter Harriet Fenn) as tenants in common and appoint the said Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing Executors of this my will, hereby revoking all former wills by me made. In Witness whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty seventh day of November one thousand eight hundred and thirty six.
Harriet Liveing - signed sealed published and declared by the above named Harriet Liveing the Testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us - Wm Chantry of Copford Gent - E. Theedham of Copford Essex spinster.

Proved at London 1st March 1837 before the Worshipful William Calverley Curteis Doctor of Laws and Surrogate by the oaths of Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing the sons the Executors to whom Admon was granted, having been first sworn duly to Admr.
Copy of the Will on this file

Harriet's Harwich tombstone read: Harriet Liveing his wife who died Jan 24th 1837 aged 74. They were natives of this town where they spent their days endeavouring to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with their God. Not traced in 1999.

Harriet's letters below provide us, almost 200 years later, with a priceless glimpse into the daily life of this family.
E L Fenn 2008 - 2014.

Research Notes:
Harriets birth date is taken from her letter of Dec 4th 1828 to her daughter-in-law Catherine, wherein she says "I have this day attained my 66 year"

Alternative birth date 4am 4 Dec 1762.

Their wedding may have been 17 Sept.

Transcription of Harriet's and other letters contain punctuation underlines etc as accurately as I found possible. E L Fenn.

Attested copy of will [for registered copy see D/ABR 33/372] of Sarah Stow of Harwich
bequeaths L.5 and wood and coal in cellar to Ann wife of Jeremiah Durrant of Dovercourt,
gardener, to Mrs Liveing wife of Thomas Liveing of Harwich, gent., her
double chest of drawers, two large china bowls and the residue of her
estate, to Elizabeth Thorogood Liveing, daughter of Captain William
Liveing silver milk pot, locket and beads, to Robert Liveing Fenn and
Thomas Harrold Fenn, sons of Mrs Harriett Fenn a silver table spoon
each, to Harriett Fenn two silver table spoons, to Elizabeth Mary Logan,
wife of Thomas Logan of Harwich, surgeon two large china bowls, to Mrs
Mary Sansum, wife of John Sansum of Harwich, gent. two china bowls, to
Isabell Ann Kelly, daughter of Thomas Kelly of Harwich, mariner, six
china cups and saucers, to her lodger Mrs Mann six silver teaspoons, 14
July 1830; account of executor of will of Sarah Stow, 1830.

Liveing Archive IMG 2836 & 2838 catalogues letters between Mrs Thomas Liveing and her family.

Liveing Archive.
Note thought to be by Edward Liveing FRSP.
The Harwich folks in my father's childhood, used in the afternoon and evening to sit out on benches before their houses in the street. There were benches constructed to permanent supports but the seat was movable and taken indoors. Here the men and women talked and smoked and gossiped and took tea. Mrs Liveing (my grandmother) perceived? this a vulgar custom and would (not) indulge in it or allow it in her family.

Other Records

1. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 30 Apr ?. Liveing Archive 138a-d LT12

2. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 183 ?. Liveing Archive 115 a-d LT10

3. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 31 Dec 183 ?. Liveing Archive 116 a-d LT10

4. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 21 Oct 1822 (year uncertain).
Liveing Archive 55 a-c LT6
Ipswich Oct 21
My dear Julia
As I am still at Ipswich I did not get your letter to yesterday and we may all readily agree with the wise man in that we are born to trouble - and you my dear child are not without your share we are very sorry you have had so much cause to complain and should be very happy to help and advise you but alas these assertions will not alleviate your anxious mind but this must observe that you should fly to that man to do your business she has frankly told you that he shall double the same before paid for the same business very much surprised me can't Mr Novell produce money again and do the business - your F says he doesn't know why Smythies should not do as well as Mr Alston for without he let you have his own money he still has nothing more to do with it than to seal the writings as its what he always charges for them of course we cannot tell how long his conscience may be but your Father (who is sitting by me says) tell them they must do as they think best for I know not how to advise for the best you say Smyth requested Mr Aln to abate but I don't understand what Alston had to do so as to make an abatement - I wish Ambrose could sell instead of mortgaging to Betts a dreadful think to do with law and lawyers
Page 2
how short lived as human happiness - for close on the heels of pleasure follows pain - why does God permit troubles to cluster upon u & I but, that we may be tired of this one this punish? world - and be preparing for that world where trouble and sighing will never come - and yet, how it's allurements drawers and fastens my weary soul down to earth - notwithstanding the many struggles it has soar to the heavens - Good God help me and help all my dear ones safely through - I heard a most excellent sermon yesterday from 6 Gallations 7 and 8 verses - look for them we were admonished to take good heed what seed we sow - to be very careful not to sow tares with the wheat - for a harvest will surely follow according to what we sow - and in that harvest day my naked uninformed soul must stand before God alone and no shelter can then be found for it - no friend can secure it for the fiery avenging arm of a just God - if - I have not put on the Lord's Jesus Christ - and as directed the same chapter to try ourselves - to prove what our works - what sort of seed we have sown - may you my dear Julia profit from considering this chapter I well know we ought not to be slothful - we are commanded to work - or we have no room - to expect bread to eat - but I heartily wish Ambrose was not so much cumbered with temporals - for I fear the eternals are much forgotten - this is as much cause to fear doing too much - as being indolent - and meandering time - that way is the right way, I pray God to lead us for Christ's sake amen. We have had a dreadful weather - and it is still bad - I am thankful to say that Willm escaped Saturday and Sunday nights storms - which ushered many souls into the presents (sic) of God - prepared or unprepared for the solemn event - I suppose you heard of the loss of the Yarmouth cutter and 30 of her hands Capt Saus (sic) whose sister depended on him - Sally Ballads half brother was first mate was also lost - and poor Richard Smith - who used to sail with your father.
Page 3
Saturday a boat upset in Ipswich River with the Master of a Collier and his mate and an Ipswich lad who took the opportunity of coming with them in the hope of seeing his father and mother all were lost - the Bell tolls - may be for them - for they were picked up on low water and brought here the master's wife is near confinement if she had any regard for him - what must her sorrow be - Lord hear the cry of the fatherless and the widow.
I had a letter from Aunt Downes on Saturday - who says that if we like to come - or rather to go to the funeral we may cram into the coach - but Aunt (being preinstructed) told Uncle we had no wish to be there at that time - but had rather go after his return from London - she adds the interment will not take place before eleven o'clock on Wednesday next (I suppose a vault is preparing) she says she has not seen her brother look better for years his toe is still diseased - but nevertheless he means to go to London on Monday 28 and proposes writing to you to procure game but I doubt not but he will be glad enough of ducks if you can get no game - by the way we have had no game at all this season we have sent Dutch ducks here and more . . . . . . instead - but nothing has been sent to Mr Feeling - should you be fortunate to have any to spare that will be worth sending to him shortly - pray do not forget it - pray has Mrs Round taken off as much as will make it worth Ambroses living in the farm - it was well you went you need help your husband when you can for he has a heavy burden on him - poor little boys finger - a sad thing for him and should think if his bowels are not open he should take something to open them for frequently one whitlow follows another and perhaps you may prevent it could you keep a poultice on the finger - should he have another - if you can persuade him to keep his hand in water as hot as he can bear it and as often as you can it will tend to bring it forward - you did not mention babs eyes so I hope they are quite well I think was (sic) you to feed the child it would make him better your milk would agree with him better - Mrs Feelings used to bruise meat for her children in a mortar as if you were potting it and your Aunt Harrold used to chop meat exceedingly small and add gradually - the child was three months old while I was there - pray try - and perseverance - Catharine dont like to eat but she is determined not to give it up and I hope you will do the same it will be better for you and the child too, I know - if the child has purging give him what your Uncle ordered for poor little Sally when about his age 3 drops of paragorie (Elikser) and 2 drops of hartshorn - I suppose she took it 2 or three times a day Harriet used it for Robert - F - says give my love to her dear and tell her I shall go home on Wednesday morning - his bowels had been well opened - and I got 5 leeches on his temples and he was bless God much
Page4
I forget to say that money for the horses and gentlemen is come to the bank a good job - 41 - what a mercy they escaped the stormy weather - and with such passages God give as a due sense of all his mercies
F often mentions John - he is now saying he is as sweet a creature as it ever was born.

Should you have occasion to write to Ipswich I shall write Aunts address - Mrs Downes opposite Mr Ransoms Tobacconist St Clements Ipswich - I should be glad to know how Mr Brents business is settled - but am afraid F should see the letter
Page 1 Cross Hatched
better but everything takes effect on him or reading your letters he complained this struck his heart - and then flew to his head I do what I can do keep him quiet but I cannot guard him every way my Aunt talks of coming home on Thursday or Friday I should think Uncle will not let her come so soon but there is no saying what he may do - I know she will not stay any longer than she can help - she wishes me to stay till she returns. Willm took the mail on Thursday we can't help feeling anxious for him if they are out F says they must have a bad passage God forgive and save him and them all your F is better on whole I go without supper because he should not have any - many times when I want it very much we have not had any lately - H is very weakened and she make such are fuss because the cloth is not laid she is but a poor eater and wants and enjoys supper and like to have it in the usual way - I am glad you are likely to have a hand and earnestly hope that she may prove worth having - among her good qualities you did not mention her honesty I hope you enquired after that material point - F says tell her not to put herself too much expense for mourning - God be forgiven your guide your father your all to all eternity and also be the God of your husband and children prays your affectionate mother
H Liveing
Thank you for the trouble you have taken respecting cloths

Addressed:
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
Near Colchester
Essex

Noted: Hall Mark of paper 1822 - Tom Ambrose & Baby. from Ipswich 21 Oct Mr & Mrs at Ipswich whileAunt Downes away at her brothers E Betts to some funeral Ambrose mortgage and Mr Alston Storms & loss of Yarmouth Cutter Capt Sares & 30 men.

Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper



5. Harriet's Letters: To Her Son Edward, 1823. Water mark 1823
My dear Edwd
Your letter very much surprised and vexed us, poor Mary! She appeared so much better before I left your house that I was led to think only weakness remained the effect of indisposition - as you could not see that her dissolution was so near of course her friends were not informed of her dangerous state in time to come and see her before her departure. We are very sorry for her and for you all everyways - I can't put her from my mind long together - I have no doubt that you have done everything for her that you thought best for her which is a comfortable reflection in the midst of trouble, your family being so large I don't know how you have managed with a corpse in the house - it's many years since I heard Mr Hoadee remark on the sudden death of a man who was killed at once by a kick of a horse "that death loves to lay in ambush and to seize on his prey when the object little thought he was taking an aim at him" it came forcibly into my mind that your poor object did not see deaths aim - as you did not, till her thread of life was spun almost to the very end. This, and various other instances ought to convince us of the necessity of keeping our end always in view if we value our souls Eternal Welfare we must do so for if we so far forget God to allow ourselves to live in any known sin it is at the peril of the soul not to be prepared then for the shaft of death, we must live a thoughtful, careful life in the fear of offending God and fearing ourselves least we should offend Him. The Psalmist says "blessed is the man that fears always"
Now dear Edwd there are two important points respecting you
Page 2
that are on my mind and burdens me very much, I have before the present time made up my mind to write to you and say how sorry we are that there should be a disunion between Henry and you and Charles - alas that brothers should live as aliens - surely there ought to be a lively affection kept up between children of the same parents. What can be much more desirable in this world than kind affectionate friends - if ever so poor and mean yet if their heart is towards us they may in some way add to our comfort - if then the meanest friend may find a way to serve us they are so far an addition to our own happiness then let us prize them accordingly - surely then it must be a sin to quench the flame that ought to burn bright in the hearts of brothers and sisters - I have written to Henry (by this nights passed) on the subject (I don't mean to exculpate him for he is sadly self willed). I have endeavoured to set some of his faults before him and to convince him that it is an unchristian thing not to live friendly with his brothers and that I should write to you on the subject and that I suppose Charles was with you or would be in a day or two but as you were sadly situated with the corpse in the house you could not conveniently meet there but I hoped as you would all know our minds it would awake an opening and lead to a happy meeting which I pray God may never more be shut against each other - for how can you expect to meet in Heaven if you are disjointed on earth? I also added this as he was your junior, I hoped after my letters to both he would make the first advances.
And now comes the second point I wish to set before you - I was repeatedly grieved while I was with you to hear you speak so short so rough so unkindly to the dearest friend
Page 3
you have in this world. Now although I am fully persuaded that you have a great affection for her and would do everything in your power to prevent any one else from using her unkindly yet that you should trifle with her feelings astonishes me, her disposition is so mild and she bears a strong affection for you I doubt not, which makes her put up with your cross manner quietly, but if you think at all, you must be aware that you stab her to the quick, wounding her feelings very much, neither do you regard bystanders who witness your positive rough replies. You will say in you have no intention to hurt her - why then allow your self in such strong appearances? I remarked that the very same words you used sometimes - had they been spoken in a milder softer tone of voice and in a less positive way would have fully answered the purpose you intended and without giving pain - I can but marvel that as it has pleased God to give you good sense and a mind that quickly deserns between good and evil - that you do not strive to get the better of your rough unpleasant temper, every way it is desirable to take such a happy resolution for your own sake for your wife's sake and your children's and inshort for all your friends sake and also the sake of the afflicted and poor with whom you have much to do - a soft persuasive manner with the sick helps to comfort and relieve them where a rough manner chills and adds to their sufferings it hides many good abilities you have or at least mars them - for a good act done in an unkind manner half cancels the obligations - if you at all value the advice of your mother you will take a strong resolution to get the better of a failing
Page 4
that does you much harm in soul if not in body and harms much good you do and disables you from doing much more you otherwise might do - I know you cannot do this or any other good act in your own strength without the help of God therefore offer frequent ardent prayers for divine help adding your own hearty endeavours and God will (if you persevere) in his good time give you victory.
I trust dear Edwd that you will give attention to what I have said, you will have come differently in the outset but the event will be happiness to you and yours and blessedness to yourself hereafter I heard a person say if Mr Liveing had a softer more persuasive manner he would very much add to the good he does now. I earnestly pray God to send his blessing on this my endeavour to set you right remember it is your mother that writes and from an affectionate motive she does so treat it not lightly I have advanced only truths and they are all important and had they been set forth by an abler pen they would have appeared more striking and would in a manner have compelled you to performance, but I am willing to hope that a parent's heartfelt desires may prevail - and I am sure it will add much to the comfort of your affectionate bosom friend think should it please God to take her from you what an addition to the poignancy of your grief it would be that you had wantonly wounded her very many times by short rough and unkind reply's
I have said enough and O that you may profit.
Remember us very kindly to all our friends
And believe me your affectionate mother
H Liveing
I have sent two stools they are for you
they are wet which is the reason that they wont open
this letter was begun last evening
Harwich Saturday morning.
Original in Fenn archive Ref L13


6. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 27 Mar 1824.
Liveing Archive 50a-d LT6
My dear Julia
We are surprised that you have not written as I said Father says write for fear I should alter my mind, and knowing how unwillingly he leaves home you might have been almost sure that he would not go - I hope illness has not prevented your writing - for I have some fears that way -F has been to the Office and he hears Paddle drives the coach tomorrow, he intends sending this with the eight pounds enclosed by him we therefore beg that you will be sure to write and let us know that you have got it - as to Father he has taken no notice to pay any more of the bill - and without Ambrose writes and urges it - very much nobody knows when you will get it - he is a man whose word is not to be depended on its plain or he would not have thus flown from the bargain he made - F - says ask how the poor little boys do - poor little lambs, poor things bless their little hearts. Poor Mrs Easton has walked into the village last week for the first time since last September she has had a narrow escape for life - Mr Eneser is infirm and not likely to last long he has a complaint that weakens him very much - poor old Mrs Hibblets is very sadly, I don't know whether she will get out again - and old Mrs Elliston is very sadly drooping by degrees into eternity - so my old friends are leaving
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me - what a word - leaving me did I say - I may leave them - Aunt Downes was much as usual when I left her she bids me always remember her to you - says she has the interest of my family at heart as much as I have - by the way she is forced to consent to take 3 and a half percent for her money instead of four which is a sad loss to her but we did not know how to advise her better.
We have been saying what a good thing it would be if Ambrose could get his mortgagee to let him have the money for 4 percent - or if he could get only half a percent taken off I would try him at 4 percent - first. We expect Mr Scott will call off - I tell your F it will be better to submit to it if he does - for you can't make so much in the stocks of it - money is but of little value now - we heard from Henry this week - he is very hard at work he tells me preparing for college - he speaks very highly of Eve - as a worthy upright man - who altho he has four more pupils added to his care - he does not at all abate of his attention to him - I suppose he is well as he does not mention to the contrary - he desired his love to all his friends - Charles writes that his business is not yet settled but he hopes it will be settled before he comes into the country one way or another - which he expects will be on easter monday - or rather he intends coming to see us at that time - I suppose you will see him sooner - Willm we learn got to Cuxhaven
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last Wednesday night - he did not get over before the east wind caught him - he takes the mail tomorrow - Louisa is very well she can suckle with only one breast - Elizabeth grows and improves - appears to have as fine a bust or chest as her mother she is quite genteelly made nurse says - she appears very intelligent and very lively and strong - . . . . . is so fond of her - is there any likelihood of our seeing you and Ambrose - I think the time long since I saw you - Uncle Betts was very well when I heard of him - Edwd writes that Fanny has had the thrush 2 months which did not annoy her much - but it did . . . . . her mother very much - and he . . . . . had a sore throat and violent cold . . . . . which confined him several days but they are all well now - remember us all kindly to Ambrose and kiss the dear lambs for us - pray God bless you all accept our united love your afft Mother
H Liveing
Harwich March 27, 1824
Harriet had a letter from Robert saying that they were both very well and that he hoped she would not forget the 27 day of the month was his birthday - Sally has told me to be looking out for a maid - but added I shall not have you get only if Arnott begins to look out - O dear I dread a change

Addressed:
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford.
Noted: March 27, 1824, random addition has been done on the address panel, as are childish scribbles in pencil on all the pages.
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper

7. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 28 Jun 1824.
Liveing Archive 49a-d LT6
Harwich Jun 28, 1824
My dear Julia
You will say I do little else but write letters to you - I wrote by Mrs Deane which I suppose you received - and also by Willm - which may be he forgot it contained our strong desire (amounting to prohibition) that Henry should refrain from the use of a gun . Harriet thinks that he is with you - but I think you meant next Thursday - and not the next day after you wrote - Willm will (if it pleases God) take the mail on Wednesday so he will be down tomorrow night or he must travel all night to be at home on Wednesday morning - the purpose of this letter is to give you the information you desired respecting Mrs Harold. I had a letter from Uncle in consequence of one I wrote to enquire how he got home, and how Uncle Betts recd him & he tells me he saw you and your youngest son and Mr Ambrose - and that he thought you were looking very well - and also that Uncle Betts treated him kindly and remembered him - altho it was 30 years since he last saw him - Uncle soon broached money matters - but I don't know whether he mentioned his intentions towards him - but then Charles had told him Sir Ewen had left him L7000 (what an unlucky tongue Charles has) Uncle E told him he was sorry that the information was incorrect - that may be interest and principal
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may amount to that sum - but that it was unlikely that he should get all the latter or possibly not half - and not at all probable to obtain the interest - Uncle E has seen Charles since and told him of the blunder he had made - but Charles says Uncle Betts was mistaken he only said that about L7000 was due to Uncle E - and not that he had received it - and promised to explain the mistake - it does not appear that Uncle did more than call at Edws for he says "it so happened that I did not see Edws eldest little girl when my brother and I called there the young lady was not forthcoming - but the youngest was very familiar and a pretty child and the next day when the elder came to return my visit and brought her doll to introduce to me I was gone out with my brother to call on Mr Whitmore and unluckily missed him - he came to call on me at the same time - and was gone before our return" he goes on to say that "Mrs Harold had been much more indisposed in my absence than when I left him she is still very poorly indeed - but nothing occurring to present she with Amelia Harriet and Julia - will set off for Horksley on Thursday 1st of July I hope they will reach Whitham that day - and Horksley to an early dinner the next -" my being able to give you this timely notice I hope you will be somewhat prepared to see them - perhaps as her appetite
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is very bad she may be glad of a glass of wine and a biscuit with you - I hope John will be at Mrs Ambrose or somewhere out of the way - without he could behave better - mind how you speak yourself - the Misses will catch everything you know - do pray have that intolerable grass flat mowed it makes you look so disordered - so wilderness like - I should like to come and stay with you till all my company was - if John was not in the way for I could have no comfort . . . . that poor child so humoured and spoilt . . . . . two excellent sermons yesterday upon . . indeed - and being a hypocrite . . . . . on religion for being half a Christian or almost a Christian will not stand as instead - to fit us for heaven - we must not only have faith - but we must study obedience - we must - shew our faith in God - by our works - which is being obedient to the word of God - want of due - considerations leads us to ruin - we may have faith - and God's holy spirit for asking - without which he that knows his own heart must be convinced that he can do nothing as he ought to do - the expending of time - is a great crime. Lord help us to improve it more to the Glory of God and to working out our own salvation we have a holy God to do with - and it is expressly told us that without holiness no man must see God in heaven - O that it may please God to quicken as by his holy spirit that our thoughts be more with God, and that our attention may not be so much taken as by this worlds pursuits as to make us forget the care of our souls God has promised to give his holy spirit to those who ask - believing they shall have what they ask - God will be importuned continually and earnestly all must be in earnest all we but mock and affront the Majesty of God and if we are indeed in earnest God will grant this request in his own good time for Christ's sake
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accept our best love to not forget us when you pray to God - I do forget to recommend you to the mercy and guidance of the Almighty we much need each other's prayers - may his everlasting blessing be on you and all yours which is the ardent desire of your afft Mother
H Liveing

Addressed
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester.
Note: Jun 28, 1824
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper



8. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Cir 1825. Liveing Archive 118a-c LT10

9. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Cir 1825, (This date is a guess!).
Liveing Archive 56 a-d LT6
My dear Julia
Tom certainly looked very well when he came - he ate a piece of beef stake (sic) for his supper - and took some Porter - which I expect did not make him better - Harriet attended him by his bedside - when she did all she could to get the pills down - but instead of which they would come up - although he did all he could to prevent them - then he took the powder - which operated in the same way - as he brought up plentifully - I expect it was the means of relieving him - as he has been better since - but a dose of calomel now I think is necessary - and I hope you will manage to get one down better I had seen Edwd when eating his supper - and just going to swallow a mouthful put the pill into it - it goes down without trouble - I expect then the bear? idea of taking it made him bring it up.
We have had a scrambling? kind of a ten weeks wash shirts and small linen put away without ironing the other part has been mangled and in putting it away I find a miss of two of my better most stockings which I wore while with you - and I hope I have left at your house - one is numbered 10 the other 1 your poor father has been very unwell since our return
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he was particularly unwell yesterday - he complained of his head so very much as being stopped up and was altogether very unwell - I could not get him to eat a piece of meat - I am thankful to say that he is on the whole better today - he had a tolerable night's rest thus far goodness and mercy follows us - as for myself I am very unwell - having such a cough on my chest that I could not rest - I have a very bad headache - and queemish - I feel afraid of influenza again it may be that these miserable feelings may arise from my taking a double portion of laudanum last night I was tempted to take so much as my stomach is sore and the cough distressing.
Mrs Downing returns tomorrow and takes Anna with her - she has been as good as she could be - she is indeed a very nice child - she is I think the flower of Edws family - I mean in person - poor Mrs Logan is still as much confined as ever I think it's a month to day since the accident - she has been kept low - for fear of inflammation - pain - and starvation has reduced her much - sometimes her spirits are tolerable - but at times she is much overpowered - says the pain, and cramp of laying - is more trouble to her than her broken leg - it's a most wonderful thing how her leg did break - she was not getting over a stile, for she was some yards from it, the grass from being so dry - and the ground rising - (for it happened in Mr Pattrick's field) somehow her foot slipped and her leg snapped without her falling she tells me she eased herself down, with their hands and her well leg - surely her bones must be peculiarly brittle
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it's enough to make one afraid to stir. I am sorry to tell you we lost your little basket - with all its contents - it was tied to the iron that goes across the Chaise and I thought it swaying in safety - the driver tied it on - when we got as far as Mr Thorogoods the eggs dripped onto my cap box - not that it did any hurt as I had put several papers over the top - it ornamented the poor man's coat which he shaked several times - and drew around him - the appearance you know was not very pleasant - he looked at it several times - I assured him it would come off when it was dry or would wipe off with a wet cloth - he replied - O yes he knew that - and tied the basket further from him - but of course he did not secure it well we were very sorry for the loss of eggs and fruit - which you kindly deprived yourselves of for our sakes - we comforted . . . . . was that we had not lost our lunch and beer which we found very acceptable - the soda bottle was in the basket - which we were sorry for as I can't get such another - I know not whether there was anything else in it - as you packed it up. Remember us all kindly to Ambrose and accept our united love - may God ever help and keep you and yours - O keep the end in view - never lose sight of it as this is the only time you have to prepare for a happy eternity - what can concern you so much? Think what the contrary state must be - and O dreadful without the End - no mitigation - O God of heaven help us all and enable us to consider our state - before heaven's gate is shut against us - I can help wishing that Ambrose had not so many engagements - so many ways - to make you both forget the care of the soul - which is indeed the one thing needful (sic)
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endeavour to impress on your children's minds the vast importance of their soul - and describe Eternity in the most lively colours that they may learn to avoid death eternal - and thro Christ's atonement enjoy a blessed state - tis your duty to warn your servants also for we must give account to God for what we have done that we ought not - and for what we have left undone which ought to have been done Life and death are before us all - O choose while you have time that death takes you not unawares - I have sent the sermon book I hardly
know how to part with it - but have no right to detain it - read the ninth sermon - with attention may God bless the perusal - your affct Mother
H Liveing
I better I wish Ambrose did not keep from church - nor read newspapers on a Sunday bad examples take more effect than good ones
I am sorry that your eyes are not better - patience I expect will alone cure them - try the allum and egg Monday noon.

Addressed:
Mrs Ambrose
Copford

Noted: date? mentions Aunt Anne a nice child Had just returned from a visit to Copford Mrs Dowling & Anne staying at Harwich
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper

10. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 14 Feb 1825.
Liveing Archive 51a-e LT6
My dear Julia
I don't know whether you saw Louise and Willm but they meant to stop and say how do you do if the coachman would let them - but at any rate she had no opportunity to tell you how ill she is without she was obliged to end her journey at your house - she was not at all fit to leave home - she has an inflammation in her womb bought on by straining herself in dancing her heavy child up, as high as her arms would reach a great number of times together - we have repeatedly begged she would not do so, for my part I have even been afraid that the child would jump out of their new arms as she is so active and strong - but she is not given to be advised, and in this respect she dearly pays for it - we all know her complaints must be a dangerous one - Mr Logan says although she has had much pain and has been really very ill - and has lost her appetite as well as almost all her flesh - yet the inflammation is but slight - or she would have been much worse - with care and medicine she may be restored - but she is in a bad state now - Willm stays at home this voyage for the first time since he has been Capt nd now I expect his stay will be short altho the Packet is gone to Cuxhaven.
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O what dreadful account the last Packets brought from thence from the dreadful wind and high tides vessels were driven miles into the fields, and a house floated across the haven and came so near Capt Deane as to touch his cable - what strange events vessels in fields and houses swimming - and there was a corpse in a house (your father remembers the house quite well as it is opposite to a public house and is half a mile from the Haven) which was so filled with water that the body was floated of a table - it is their customs not to put the body into the Coffin, until they are going to bury them - the people were much alarmed, as well they might they were in fear for their lives as well as their property - there was a house on the rope ground which was filled or carried away - however the master of it made his escape from it on a piece of timber which floated past it but could not help his family who were all drowned his wife and three children and a servant - what a dreadful thing - and many more dreadful things there are that we know nothing about - it is 106 years since they had such a tide in that part - it pretty well demolished Mr Stevens ropewalk - I mean fences, and part of the buildings and cottage he had there he let for seven pounds per year is nearly all gone, and several people in those other buildings were so flooded they were obliged to get out with their goods - indeed they must be all much alarmed
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had the tide come one inch higher, the whole marshes and Randfields ropewalk would have been under water - there were three or four high tides here Harriet was so unlucky as to cut the tape and used it, which you sent for a measure of Thomas's head before she was aware of what it was - so she did not like to venture on a new cap, without knowing what she was about the one now sent was Roberts which she has done up and made rather smaller - which I thought might do for a time to run about the grounds in - I don't know that caps become your children, but the seal skin are the most durable I rather think hats look better till the children are taller, but you may form some judgement by this how are the children I don't expect to hear that Johns lameness is better, I think that is a standing complaint Your Uncle told Harriet that an attack of palsy is very common to children, only they do not tell parents of it generally, as they would be frightened - and as the child almost always recovers from it, they don't even suspect what has been the matter with them, and he had hoped yours would have done the same but as it had been so long standing, he feared he might not be much better now - however you will I have no doubt do your part in the hope of helping him - has he learnt to speak yet? and does Tom speak like other children, pray do what you can that he may not learn Johns jargon take a little
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pains to get him forward and make him speak like other children of decent parents, try to put proper words into their mouths, as well as endeavour to make them speak and don't let them be unlike other children as far as is in your power - I wish enough they were put to some decent school, that a regular attention might be paid to them, and that their manners and minds might be forming - they are in the way to hear much more than they ought to learn now I am sure - for we are all much more prone to acquire evil, rather than good, and wrong impressions early form'd are not easily eradicated, mind Julie the care of the soul is a vast charge, and as mothers generally have the care of the first years of their children rather than their Father's, a great charge rests on them to strive to lay a good foundation to build on hereafter, it is of the utmost consequence remember don't put it off by saying it is time enough - it's never too soon to begin so good a work when reason begins to dawn, children know much more than parents are often them aware of see for instance, how soon they show anger, and revenge - how soon they discover what they may do, and what they may not do, by looking at your countenance, whether you appear serious - or if you smile - if the latter they are sure to do as they like, whether you have said don't do so, or not, these and any many more remarks you may make, which will clearly show you that they know more than you had
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Supposed, and of course you at the same time discover that there is the great necessity for your care to implant early virtue" as Gay say's and to pluck up those noxious weeds which would check and spoil so good a work - I am aware from sad experience - that our best endeavours often fail - I often remember too, many errors in my own conduct, which wanted correction, and which I was perhaps not aware of them, all I can do now, is to warn my children, that they err not in the same way - and to look up to God for a blessing on my weak endeavours that they may have the desired effect - I never give a letter of advice to either of you but it is accompanied by praying for God's blessing - I am also convinced that children of good and wise parents, often fall short of their parents hopes - nay altho they have had a pious example set them and much care has been taken to form their minds right yet they have turned out bad characters and have brought their parents with sorrow to the grave - for as I remember Mr Hacks once said, you may set them a good example - and direct them in the right way, but you can't give them grace - no that can alone come from God and for which it is our own bounden duty to pray for - discouraging as this description may appear, yet there is much comfort to be drawn from having acted our part well - we at least deliver our own souls in this respect
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How long is it since we have seen you cant you spare time to come? is not this a leisure time? I need not say we shall be glad to see you and yours perhaps Ambrose can come with you, can't Mrs Groom keep house for you ? I hope she will do you the kindness to direct you how to manage your washing, if she would be so good to be with you one time, and would superintend for you so that you might wash without so much trouble and wear to your linnen - Harriet has been giving me some account of her method and how well her linnen looks - Mrs Groom told her, there was management wanted - so I hope you will learn - I certainly would, if I had white water try it, but with such dark water as ours, we should have darker linnens than we now have I expect - the weather is thank God better - I hope now the worst is over, how mercifully the Packets have been preserved in the midst of such stormy weather and in such a succession of adverse winds, how much reason we have to be thankful and bless God for his goodness and in particular for your Brother's safety, for although he escaped much bad weather by laying so long in Cuxhaven he has been in many gales this winter - they had only stormy weather all the time they laid their and at last when they did get out it was not fit for them to come but they were anxious to get
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to get (sic) home - and they lay at Holland in all the bad weather they get home on Tuesday just before dinner and Mr Cose made them go out on Wednesday - the people had not time to get their own messages nor indeed could things to all that was needful for the vessel - they worked till it began to grow dark, and were obliged to go then - we had a fine fuss - Father was not in his best of tempers.
I suppose you saw the death of poor Miss Louise Fennings - she had not been well for months, but went out occasionally, she was confined the last four days, but they did not expect her death. Mr Logan called that morning but did not see her, as her sister told him she was asleep he replied he would not disturb her but would call again soon - he had scarcely gotten to his house before they sent to tell him that she was dead to his great astonishment - and a very great shock it must be to them all they were all at breakfast except one of her sisters who sat by her bedside who thought she looked queerly and ran to the next room to call the maid to come and look at her when they found that she was dead what an easy departure out of this world into the next she must have poor thing I hope as she had so long a warning that she was prepared to meet God her death was caused by water in her
Page 8 (opposite Page 5)
head, she has complained a long time of pains and weight in her head - but she never told all her ailings - so that Mr Logan had to work in the dark - Mrs Logan told me - it appeared like a sudden death at last - see- see - how necessary it is always to have death in view, so much so at least as to be preparing to go if it should please God to call us in a sudden -
I have written so much you won't have patience to read it - I will only add our best and United love - I pray God to bless and keep you and yours believe me your afft Mother
H Liveing
Same Page.
Harwich Feb 14, 1825
Miss Dutton was married while William lay at Cuxhaven, her husband is a shipbuilder his name is Boef - she sent a piece of cake I have sent you a taste of it - he is a young man but has been married before and has a child about a year old - he is a German a respectable man one who will look after his business.

No envelope but letter encloses a lock of hair.
Written on 8 half sheets both sides of two piece of paper.


11. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 5 Sep 1825.
Liveing Archive 52a-d LT6
My dear Julia
Your Father has hastened me to finish my breakfast that I might write in time for the coach to ask you if you are not coming very shortly to see us. I as well as your father think the time long since you have been here, and it is now some time since we have seen you any where - we have been quiet in time of harvest knowing that you could not well leave home then - but now surely it must be all in - at least other people have done or nearly at some time since - as it is so long since you were here we hope you will manage so as to stay some weeks with us, if you can get no one else that you like better to keep house for you, your old nurse is no doubt a trusty person, get her to come, her harvest is over, I should be glad to add something to what you may give her to induce her to come tell Ambrose he must continue to let you stay with us. We shall be glad to see him with you to stay as long as he can make it convenient - William sailed for Cuxhaven on Saturday, they have snd (sic) windy weather; Batten who sailed with him, is forced back as he carried away a part of his rigging, and it is wonderful that his mast did not go with it, he spoke Willm as he came back who was near him - they were all well - thank God - poor Mrs Mortalman died yesterday morning her husband is in great distress for her - we have continual warnings to prepare to meet our God - O that we may be wise in time, that we may be acceptable of being happy in eternity.
Accept our love I can no more . . . . .
affectionate mother
H Liveing

Monday
I was a few minutes too late which we were sorry for - I suppose Ann Mac Donoughes marriage was in the paper so it will be no news to tell you that it took place on the first of this month, her husband is Miss Wallis's brother the Clergyman - who I am told is 39 some say 40 years old, she was 18 last february a great disportion he is also in ill health - you may remember how bad he was some years ago - it was thought he was then in a decline I saw him but it was so nearly dark that I could only see that he was tall and thin - and I have been told by five different people that his countenance very much resembles our Church Clerk - they bear an astonishing likeness of each other they say - he does duty at Saffron Walden he lives at Hartis close to her sister - Susan Wallis and King are first cousins you may remember - I have now asked Father if he has anything to say he replies no - only give my love to her bless her heart and I shall be glad to see her - Aunt Downes has been with us nearly a fortnight - Harriet is gone home with her - they left us last Tuesday - on Friday they hired a donkey and cart and went to Dedham to see Uncle and Harriets children - they heard
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from Edwards account to me that Uncle was not at all likely to come and see us this summer as he is so lame so my Aunt wishing very much to see him took that mode of convenience he was very glad to see them Aunt writes that he looks, and is well in health but his feet are a great trouble to him and he has also a sore in his leg - have you seen him - or is it a twelve months since. Should you come in your chaise if you have opportunity I would go that way - not that there will be any occasion if it is not a long time since you saw him - I would do as you talk of doing send him some fowles - or game when it suits you - because I think it will . . . . . please him - and I can find that altho . . . . . he goes no where, he is pleased with the respect shown him by the invitation - mind - if you ask him you must say, when you get better Sir, if you will pay us a visit, Ambrose will come for you at any time, if you will let us know, and will take care of you - and we will do all we can to make you comfortable - he told me my brother had offered to come, for him - and Edward had done the same but he said, I don't go anywhere, but I shall come to see you every summer while I can - he appeared to like to be asked, he seemed to speak of it with pleasure - if you do go put your white veil on he like smart folks should call on him all ways tells Mrs Prior of the carriages that stops and the fine folks that he has calling on him - Aunt Downes has said more than once she should like to take such a tour as she did two years ago and go and see you all - I am expecting my Brother - Catharine writes that he talks of coming this week - and he did say something about staying all night - I wish you were here - Harriet is now at Nacton - and Mrs Elston some time ago
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she should come home with her but I don't know whether it will suit her now - she would like to see you I am sure remember us to Ambrose and the children - I pray God bless you all for ever - if you are not likely to come soon pray write and tell us about your harvest - accept our love and believe me
your aff Mother
H Liveing

Addressed.
To Gen
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
post paid Sep 5th 1825.
Postmark obscured
Noted:
Mrs L Sep 5, 1825
Random cash numbers added on address page
Written on 3 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper, sealed with red sealing wax.




12. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 12 Nov 1825.
Liveing Archive 53a LT6
Harwich Nov 12th 1825
My dear Julia
At last I am able to tell you, that your Brother arrived this day, all well thank God. I may indeed well say thank God that they have been preserved in the midst of dangers, toils and deaths, and brought home in safety, what a mercy! When so many have met a watery grave. I suppose you have read of the dreadful loss of very many lives - there has been four ships wrecked near us - the crews I believe all saved - since last Thursday week - it's dreadful to read how many souls have rushed into eternity whether prepared or not - amazing thought! an awful transition out of this world into an everlasting state - what is drowning but sudden unexpected death as much so, as when any one falls down in a fit - as poor Mr King - and poor old Dormant who after his supper smoked his pipe - and was going to bed - but went into the privy first - but on his staying longer than usual his wife went to see after him - when to her great astonishment found him sitting on the seat, quite dead - O! that we may take warning by these awful events - and learn to live with our eye ever fixed on God - remembering the strict account, we must all one day give him how we have spent our time - how we have employed the talents he has given us. God not only looks at our words and actions - but he regards our motives - as well and will judge us accordingly to the thoughts - and intents of our hearts - nothing even there can be hid from his all piercing eye
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let us my dear Julia pray to God, to enable us by the existence of his holy spirit, to search out our hearts, that we may learn the vast number of sins we have committed against God and our own souls - and entreat his grace, to repent heartily of them the fruits of true repentance is faith, and obedience - in other words newness of life - the sudden death of so many of our fellow creatures, should urge us on to this great work, talking of it will avail us little - we must put it into act if we hope to be accepted through atoning blood - now is the day of Salvation - tomorrow may never come to us - any more than to old Dormant - and to so many - many more - the apostle says, "no you not God's goodness, and long-suffering, leads to repentance"our church directs us to pray for a "due sense of all God's mercys that we may be heartily thankful" and that we may work out our Salvation with fear and trembling - by this you may see (as Mr Carr said in our old church) "that it is not an easy thing to be a Christian - for St Paul says the work must be done with fear and trembling - with trembling for fear of a offending God God says "to this man will I look that trembleth at my word" but if we do not read God's word - and meditate on it after reading it - we shall not be likely to tremble at it - good Lord help us when we read or it will be but a dead letter - and we shall not profit by it. Pray take care and train your children in the right way - for if you do not govern them now - you will not be able to lead them right when they grow older - consider what an amazing value the sole is if - and what a dreadful thing it will be, to be found on the wrong hand - somebody says "the reason many parents fail in helping their children is - because they do not set them a good example - and others who use their best endeavours do not water them with their prayers - do not bring down the dew of heavenly grace by earnestly entreating God for Christ's sake to help them O may God give you grace to do your duty to him to your family - and to your neighbour amen, amen.
Willm had a very bad passage of eight days but God kept him through it - they were only three days in coming home - Wadling and
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and (sic) the Oskar came in with him - Bridge came in the day before W dont expect to sail till Saturday, his turn is to Holland, he has been twice to Cuxhaven - we were sorry to hear of poor Mrs Ambrose is serious in disposition, I think with you, that under God, you were a mean of preventing her having a fit, which might have proved fatal - give my respects to Maria, and I hope she wont persuade her sister to take any beer, till Margit . has a degree of poison in it, to her, and she will no doubt experience it if, she takes anything so injurious to her - as beer makes much blood - and much blood had nearly brought her sister to her end - pray remember us very kindly to Mrs Ambrose and say, we are very glad that she is better and that I am much obliged for the good things she intended for me, and altho I did not partake of them, I feel her kindness equally the same - poor Miss King - but why do I call her poor - if she is rich towards God - she is blessed - and much happier than . . . . . and . . . . . and all the golden toys of this world . . . . . could make her - you tell me she said much to Ambrose doubt not but she was aiming to promote the interest of his better part I wish it may have taken the effect she desired, that he may be finally benefited. I hope he has not let what she said slip out of his mind - the words of a dieing friend are generally sacred and are generally deeply impressed on the mind they are addressed to, in particular, if he imparted the conversation to you - you should endeavour to bring it to his mind - for much affairs of this world - as Tobias said to St Paul, makes him almost mad after them, I hope he won't increase his concerns - but try to curtail them. F - don't think you will have any coals, Billingsley said they were scarce and a number of colliers have been lost since this bad weather - H seemed to . . . . and . . . . . about them so F thinks you won't have any of his procuring Harriet desires her love and if she lives will come and see you another time - I have not been to Ipswich for fear I should spend money F says - I pray God to bless and help you directing you right in all your undertakings accept our United love - remember us kindly to Ambrose - give my love to your children and I hope they will learn to be good children, or they won't go to heaven when they die
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I should certainly have written before but I was desirous of seeing Willm first being sure you would be anxious about him - I hope you have sold all the corn you could get out for most likely it will be lower lower - believe me your aff Mother
H Liveing

it is past ten o'clock your F is calling out about bed Uncle Betts has a large hole in his leg and desires Edd to look at it every week which is more than E can conveniently do - Robert has been at Eds house a good while - as he has had two more gatherings Ed took him home to see after him and to put him up - he has returned to school a fortnight as he is better - it was very kind of Ed to take him they have had a letter from Chesham but Uncle did not mention his own or his family's health so hope they are better - Louisa is looking better but when carrying the child she sometimes feels the pains which she has suffered so much from - tell John Elizabeth desires her love to cousin John - once more God bless you . . . . .
Sunday Morning
I have opened the parcel to put a pair of socks into it - fearing that you may have neglected yourself and not worn any - now I do beg you will put them on at once.

Addressed.
To
Mrs Ambrose
Copford.
Notes: Nov 12, 1825 Uncle Betts illness violent storms at sea.
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper

Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper


13. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 2 Dec 1825.
Liveing Archive 54 a-b LT6
Harwich Dec 2nd 1825
My dear Julia
I have had a letter from Aunt Downes who wrote because she wished to tell me of your welfare and to desire, when I wrote to you, to give her love and thanks, for a very fine fowl, very fat and good. Mr Elston told her that you was pretty well, and that John was much better behaved than formally which she was truly glad to hear, and you may be sure we are all glad to learn of an amendment, pray take care to employ the change to the very best advantage, ever have and eye to soul - the soul of your children your own soul and your husbands "a word in season how good is it" but the Apostle says in season, and out of season, at all times, have Salvation in view, it is the great estate for which all (who are not blind to their own everlasting happiness) will ever be striving to obtain, the eye of God is ever upon you, and he sees, and knows, your endeavours and the motives on which you act and you have his gracious promise, that he will give his holy spirit to those who ask in faith - believing - and waiting - and expecting the blessing, to guide you into the right way, it is an important trust to become a parent - the older I grow, the more I see, the enormous charge - and the great danger of giving a wrong bias to the mind - or in not paying strict attention to check any wrong tendencies - and also to be very careful to set
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a pious example, your servants also, you may have many opportunities of giving them a friendly warning and in helping them forward - use the means whenever you can - God works by means. And when you act from a right motive, (which is the glory of God and the good of souls) the promise runs, if you benefit not those, you intend to serve, your pious endeavours, shall turn to the advantage of your own soul - it is an imperative duty of every Master and Mistress to warn their servants - as well as their children and to instruct them also. We have a great work to do and daily - and hourly need help from above - therefore according to your necessity pray not only upon your knees - but an ejaculatory may be offered up at any time, or place - you gave away - or lost a little book I bought every one of my children - if I live to go to Ipswich I will buy you another, when I hope you will read it so often as to carry it in your mind - and should your children live to be able to read, I hope you will let them read it also - for if they don't understand it, yet if it is impressed on their minds, hereafter they will most likely call it to remembrance, and may act on it, pray buy Watt's hymns for children they say read a little, and you more than a little to them - and as soon as they are able to understand, explain and enlarge it to them - be striving as soon as possible to lay in a stock of religious knowledge in particulars - and may Almighty God be with you to bless your endeavours
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Mr Elton also told my aunt that he had left Charles well on Thursday last I had a letter yesterday from my Brother who says "Charles was here lately to complete his three guineas worth of shooting" so I suppose Mr Elston brought him but Harriet says no, she expects he was at Nayland when Ambrose was in London dear creature he is always running after pleasure I never fail to set it forth to him that "they who live at pleasure are dead while they live" change of air and exercise I know is good for his health, and he takes good care to get it often, as possibly he can. We are much obliged for the cream you were so good to send, we gave Louisa a part of it - I beg that you will not send us any fowles, we can help ourselves twice a week - and therefore I beg you will sell them as soon as possible fat or lean sell them, and don't run the hazard of having them stolen - if you can't sell the lean ones for so much, sell them, it will cost you for fattening them you know. Uncle tells me Catherine expects to be at large two or three weeks longer - if this account is right I (shall if nothing happens to prevent me) be going soon I forget whether I told you, Catharine has agreed to let me remain at home till she is in bed, when Edw is I suppose to come a part of the way, or send a part of the way for me - had Catharine not made a point of my being with her I should have declined but she has taken into her mind that I can be serviceable to her, wishes it
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so I have consented to go, your F being desirous also your Father has given me leave to have a shawl so when it suits you buy one for me if you can get one the colour of your scarf I should prefer it and a coloured middle I don't like a plain middle as it is not likely to wear so clean as those that are coloured If it suits you to pay for it I will send the money directly, some way or another, if it does not suit say so and I will send it first I suppose those you saw were good ones or you would not have called them nice. Mr Hansend? has only one of the kind which is very low prized, but at the same time it is a very thin and ordinary it is 17s or 18s - I think those you saw was 33 or 35 shillings I would not mind a few shillings more if it was so much better suppose I say 38 but not to exceed 2 pounds neither do I wished to go higher than the price you mentioned but I would like to have one with some wear in it as it will last me as long as I shall live that of Mr H's would not last long - I should like to have a green ribbon for a cap as it will suit my green gown which I purpose wearing if I go to Nayland Mrs Harold had a very pretty striped green on her cap silk and crpe stripes about the breadth of that you bought for me before when you buy the shawl tried to get me one 29 inches will do I think very well - Willm sailed this morning indeed he sailed yesterday but it was so bad a night and wind contrary, that he came back and lay under the beach all night which was a great comfort to us to know he was in safety - he will go to Cuxhaven this time if it pleases God - and not to Heligoland as the Packets most likely will be cleared away there - which we feel another comfort - you know what a dangerous place it is Heligoland I mean.

This letter appears incomplete in that it is not signed off by Harriet, or existence of an address.
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper

14. Harriet's Letter's: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 4 May 1826.
Liveing Archive 57 a-d LT6
My dear Julia
As your father expects to be in Colchester next Saturday to be sworn in - I thought I must write and tell you of it that if it is not inconvenient to you to go may be you would like to see him again - you can take some sausages in your basket and not be obliged to Mrs Waters to dine with her again - F - says they are to be at Colchester by ten o'clock, I shall direct him to call at Mrs Waters and one way or another you will see one another if you go - if you have not bought the cloth and can get to Colchester in good time you may buy it and send it home by your father - by a letter this morning from Charles I learn that Dr Miller has been to London, and has gotten a probate of Uncles Will and for the present it is lodged in the Bank of England after three days it can be acted on Dr Miller is desirous of settling the business as far as he can - as soon as he can - and as at little expense as he can - he is very good to be so considerate - he is expected here on Rannailes's? account - he told me he should call on me when he came to Harwich - I have heard nothing from Uncle Edwd - I wrote the two last letters to him so shall remain quiet at present - he may come to a better way of thinking
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I have told your father if you have heard of a house likely to suit you will show it to him. Willm is sailed to Cuxhaven yesterday with a bad wind I fear he will have a long passage - he was not very well he is much troubled with his Father's complaint and with gravel (medical) I hope you take care of those books of Edwd and pray don't let the children have them. Charles says he saw Mr Heseltine and he told him that he had lately been at Cambridge that he did not see Henry but he heard Jack Bailey say he had called on him and that he was ill and in bed - how unfriendly not to speak to him when ill in a strange place far from all his friends - Harriet went to Mr Balls to ask if his son had mentioned his being ill - he said no that he had heard from his son about a fortnight since - and if he had been ill he is sure he would have mentioned it to him - for he generally say something about Henry in every letter for they are both steady young men and he is very pleased that they associate together they are in the habit of taking tea with each other he hope if he was unwell it was but of short duration - his son also mentions seeing Mr Heseltine - I try to hope that he is not very ill - but I can't feel comfortable about him and have written by this post to him to be sure not to lose a post but right directly - I hope John's health improves
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and that you are endeavouring to think better of him and if you do so you will get more rest - Charles I find intends to bring his affair to a conclusion in October - Aunt Downing is very poorly worse than usual she thinks from indigestion but if better she proposes paying me a visit in the beginning of next week - I have written to beg she will not delay longer but apply to Mr Bartlet at once for she was complaining before I saw her at Dedham and she tells me it's worse than when I saw her - if you can find time to talk to your father about Mr L - money matters - if it is done he wants the premises to be made over to you and your children.
I have only time to say God bless you all forever accept our love
believe me your aft Mother
H Liveing
Page 4.
Ambrose must repent of not taking advice and selling his core when he might have had a good price for it.
Harwich May 4th 1826
burn this

Addressed:
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
post paid
Notes May 4th 1826 probate Uncle Betts will Uncle Henry at Cambridge
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper, sealed with black sealing wax

15. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 25 Aug 1826.
Liveing Archive 58 a-c LT6
My dear Julia
Expecting that Charles may be at your house your Father would have me write as he is quite concerned at not hearing from him as yesterday was a week since, I wrote to him, requesting him to sell out L811 stock to pay for aunts house which your father has engaged to do the latter and of this month, he was directed to pay the money into Hoars Bank, that he might receive it at Ipswich and he was then requested to write to his Father now as we have had no letter we can but be surprised not being able to account for the delay - your F you know cant bear to be worse than his word, which he must be, if he has not the money -F - say's sure Charles has not lost the power of attorney - or the money - he can't conceive what the reason can be that we have not heard from him - sometimes I am afraid that he is not well - if Charles is at your house we hope he or you will write directly
I have been long wishing to hear from you I wonder you have not written - I have not heard of you since your Father was at Colchester - (with but few exceptions) everybody has had bowel ailing more or less - very many have been obliged to have medical assistance - as their sickness and pain have been severe indeed there is scarcely being quite rid of the complaint it has not been a common ailing - as the patient's after recovering from the violence of the disease lose their
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appetites and remain far from well a long time and some of them have another attack - the complaint is not only in this part of the world but there is great sickness in Holland the people die so fast that it is become quite alarming - and at Cuxhaven they are so ill that they can't get the harvest in, Capt Deane told me one farmer had 18 servants all ill - and they bring bad accounts also from Gothenberg - I shall be very glad to hear that you have all escaped the disease - though I can hardly expect to hear so good an account - Aunt Downes and her maid have been very ill with it - but she writes that they are better, but are still very poorly - I don't know whether you have heard that Mrs F Downing is dead - we did not hear of it till Edwd paid us a short visit of two nights last week - I felt vext for her loss, her chief business was going about doing good her wonted kindness will be much missed, but her change is no doubt to her everlasting advantage - Edwd - or rather Catharine is left L100 % annum and 100 is left to their three children - Mrs Downing L100 and several other legacies tho bulk of her income is left to her sister, while she lives, and then it is to be divided between her children and Catherine.
Dr Miller has been here a fortnight but we hear nothing respecting money - Edwd - says Dr Miller is an honest man and therefore he thinks (Edwd) that he won't pay one legatee before other - and if we get any by Xmas we may think it well - I don't know this may be but your F wonders Dr M - has not mentioned it to him or us, perhaps Charles knows more about it than we do - but we wholly thought that you of the fours would
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have been paid last month. I had formd an idea that the doctor had told him so - we are all open handed - ready to receive it - Uncle Edwd wanted his share long ago - I have been to Ipswich, tis a fortnight since - Aunt told me how much hurt and angry she was to find that Uncle E was dissatisfied with his very handsome legacy - I replied that he considered, that there was the same affinity between them that I have to my Uncle - well she returned "what was I to him then? I was his nearest relation - but it is as I always expected, that I should be worse off" if we should live to receive it I hope it will be spent well - for I am slapd by one and other all round, over and over - Ambrose told aunt how disappointed Uncle was, which I had hoped . . . . . would have been hid from her - as so I told . . . . . have you gotten your harvest in - if you have not had more rain, than we have had, I fear you will have no turnips, nor other green feed for your creatures - I pray God send rain, not only on your account, for it is a national consideration - we are looking forward to the pleasure we hope to have in seeing you - when are you likely to come? - We purpose going to Ipswich to meet Charles and his bride - but we have no intention of making a long stay - I thought by what Edwd said that Catharine and her train have some thoughts of coming in September - what I shall do for a cook while they are here I know not - my damsel does not improve much that way. I am sorry to say - F - bids me ask you, whether the wood he sent is likely to answer the purpose? Mr Saunders is dangerously ill with fever - Mrs Bridge has a confirmed dropsy - fever Mrs Bills is still alive and in a very poor state - I don't know that she will struggle through
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if Charles is with you, tell him to ask Edwd to send me a few cuttings of geraniums - if he has any of the better sort - for as your F - quarrels if I have many, I wish those I do have to be of the best kind - Charles may bring them with him to Ipswich - and to take care of some balsom seed for me - mine have not done so well this year as last - I like the double blossom - the single are not worth having
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remember us kindly to Charles and to Mrs Charles also to Ambrose and your young ones - we pray that God may order all events that take place in our family to the furtherance of their everlasting happiness - whatever trouble we may meet with here - God grant we may all find rest hereafter - believe me your afft Mother
H Liveing

Addressed.
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Aug 25, 1826
post paid
Noted August 25, 1826 Uncle Betts money death of F E Downing
Written on 4 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper

16. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 18 Sep 1826.
Liveing Archive 59 a-c LT6
Ipswich Sep 18, 1826
My dear Julia
I have been here a fortnight last Thursday, according to your account we expected Charles here on the Saturday following but somehow you made a mistake of a week they never intended to be here sooner than the week after they tell me - poor Aunt was quite anxious for my coming, she had been so very ill on the preceding Sunday but was better when she wrote to me on the Wednesday - I lost no time but came directly - she continued better the next day - but on Saturday she was very ill indeed with gallstones and was completely jaundiced all over, she was so very ill that she entirely gave herself up, not thinking she could recover - and Mr Bartlet told me that she was in a very precarious state, that the complaint was not generally a dangerous one, although a very distressing one - but her years, and weakly constitution were against her - he would not say she would die - but thought it is not improbable - and added that she was worn out - I was indeed exceedingly hurt for her she has been an old kind friend to me and mine and I did know how-to part with her, I could wish her to live as long as I shall, she was quite composed and willing to die - and said several times when she saw me crying if I should recover now, according to my years and poor constitution I can't live long - and when Mr Bartlet said she was evidently better - she said she was disappointed and that it was like coming back from heaven to earth again - she was
Page 2
much better for several days, but I am sorry to say is not so well again, she has no appetite - her stomach is so weak she does not know how to bear solid food, and she is tired of slops - if her stomach can be strengthened - I hope she might get better - as she has no appearance of jaundice now - either Harriet or myself must stay with her till she gets into her new house - nor can we leave her then till she is better - I should have as comfort to leave her alone I am sure.
We are very sorry for your horse, what a perishable stock is a Farmers - we are glad that John is better - I thought when you came I should keep Harriet here - and come and see you at Harwich - Edw came on purpose to see Aunt - he was better when he came - he said he did not see why she should not recover as to the complaint - if her strength would hold out - Dr Miller called to speak to your Father but he was at Ipswich Harriet saw him - he behaved very handsomely - he told her, he should be pleased to settle the business and would as soon as he could - he also told Charles the same and added that things were in train meaning that the mortgages were called in to pay the legacies those that were necessary he meant - sweet Mrs Whiles has made application in several quarters, he has received a letter from one Attorney respecting Mrs Betts will - he laught (sic) and said they did not mind her - for they should act according to the letter of will - and then they had no need to fear her - but it showed the woman - one of her daughters had been asked and another is to be married to the Son of the parish Clerk
Page 3
The Dr says she must be an indiscreet woman or she would not have had such a set in her house among her daughters - you are in a scrap? with your maid, I can't advise you about her - Charles was to have been here today but it has rained so heavily all day they did not attempt to come - I shall tell Charles to write to you when he purposes coming to your house - Father went home on Saturday as he expected the Packet - which came in this morning (Monday) he writes me the Post Office has sent to Mr Cox desiring that the . . . . . packets may be sent up, and where they . . . . . by return of ports - there has been a letter? sent petitioning that there last accounts may be settled - the answer was that there are accounts were now before his Lordship - what they are going to do with the Packets nobody knows at present - I have not seen much of my new daughter as Aunt was so ill - they, with Mr and Mrs Eleston drank tea with us, and I have seen her once since - she appears pleasant and I hope she is what she has been represented to me this I hope they may do they both promise they will live carefully and not spend all but lay by for future occasions - don't let my being at Ipswich hinder your coming to Harwich if you have an opportunity - if I hear from Chas when he is likely to come I will write with our side of this. Aunt desires her love to you and Harriet who is with us, we are going to make compot(e)? and bed - I pray God to bless you - and yours - believe me ever affy yours
H Liveing
Tell Maria that
Top Page 1
I am very sorry to say the bird she was so good to send was very well and singing nicely in the morning and was taken in a fit and died they saw it before it was dead but did not know what to do to help the poor thing I am quite vexed for it - it was in such spirits Harriet says that it offered to pick her fingers when she gave it something I shall send this by Carr?

Addressed
to
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Notes Ipswich Sep 18, 1826
Written on three half sheets both sides of one piece of paper, text damaged by seal in places



17. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 14 Nov 1826.
Liveing Archive 60 a-d LT6
My dear Julia
I lose no time in letting you know that this mornings post bought us a letter from Dr Miller which that you may perfectly understand I shall transcribe "I desir'd on Saturday Round and Co of Colches on a stamp receipt being presented to them to pay Capt W Liveing Mrs Fenn and Mrs Ambrose L40 each - and which sum until further notice, will in future be paid in the middle of Jany and July - notwithstanding the coverture of the ladies the receipt must be signed by them. I have not written to the latter as I considered that you were in frequent communication, and that you would undertake to give the information" after adding a little more he goes on to say "the receipts should run somewhat in this form - Received of the executors of the late Edwd Betts Esq forty pounds, being the amount of interest due to me last July on L2000 stock four percent" of course you must date it and leave it with Mr Round when you receive the money - you must write it on a shilling stamp - of course you will go yourself - I hope you recd the parcel safe that I sent by Mr Cooper last Saturday to be left at the Horse and Groom - it contained the child's spencer and your lace ruff and tippet
Page 2
I half repented sending it fearing that it might be lost Uncle Harold sent me some medlars (apples) and Edwd filled up the cask with pears and by the same I heard of your general good health Edwd had been at your house on the day before writing - Harriet returned yesterday from Ipswich and left Aunt as well as she has seen her for years just as she has recovered her appetite and if she goes on as she does now she must I think soon be quite fat - Edwd has invited Father and Harriet to go and see them - and as H - has not been there so long a time perhaps she may go and take her money, and then pay you the first visit but perhaps she may go to Nayland first - you will hear her plans another time - I don't know at present when she will go - she will I suppose carry Wills receipt also he takes the mail tomorrow from Holland Father's say's this wind has made such a sea that he does not know when he can get out - poor Mr Sept Clark, Harriet tells us, has had a dreadful fit - paralectic - he has very much recovered and can walk about the room, can move his arm pretty well, but his hand is not right. Mr Bartlet when he first saw him did not think he would live an hour - I am very sorry for him. I think him worthy of respect he has three children - he is a good Father and husband - see the necessity of living in a prepared state to meet God he was engaged in the shop when he was taken - he never goes
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out to spend a shilling wantonly - to be sure he can have none to spare but every body does not regard that - ever have it in remembrance that God is present at all times - take care of your children they are a vast charge - they have immortal souls - "with early virtue plant their hearts" strive to set them a good example it goes before precept - you and I shall in some measure be accountable for our children's misconduct and awful consideration this - let it rest on your mind - pray I beseech you check what tends to wrong in your children do not overlook anything that may lead them to take the wrong path - children know what is right and wrong sooner than you may expect - and they also make remarks before you are aware on other peoples ills or good conduct but surely evil is observed, and followed - if not the good - remember the end - it will restrain you from doing amiss - for although we have a merciful God - yet he is severely just - which is not enough considered - or it would very often prevail miss doing - I pray God enabled you to do your duty and to bless your endeavours - remember that prayer - is not prayer except we are governed by the law of God - if our lives are not formed by his word - that unerring rule we are not in a safe state to pray to God to lead us and then to wilfully go wrong will not avail to any good purpose - accept and present our love - believe your ever afft Mother
H Liveing
Addressed
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Nov 14, 1826
Postmark Harwich 18 NO 1826 72
Notes: Nov 14, 1826 Uncle Betts legacies
L2000 Julia Ambrose
L2000 William Liveing
L2000 Harriet Liveing
they now receive dividends on above

Written on 3 half sheets both sides of one piece of paper sealed with black sealing wax


18. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Cir 1827. Liveing Archive 142a-c LT12

19. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 31 Mar 1827. Liveing Archive 145a-d LT12

20. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 16 Jul 1827. Liveing Archive 146a-d LT12

21. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 29 Jul 1827. Liveing Archive 147a-c LT12

22. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 8 Aug 1827. Liveing Archive 132a-d LT12

23. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, Dec 1827.
My dear Catherine
We all unite in thanking God for his great mercies to you in which mercies we all participate. We have anxiously desired to hear from you hoping and trusting soon to be relieved from fear on your account I bless God that the welcome news of your safety arrived this morning Edwd writes that you have been very uneasy for the last month but altho you were very uncomfortable yet I have no doubt the troubled you endured was preparing you by degrees for a quick and happy conclusion of the trial - and I am persuaded that you were more unable to go through a gradual process then to undergo such severe conflicts for many hours that I have so often experienced - you are feeling alive to God's goodness I know but still I feel it right to enlarge on the subject and to bring to mind former deliverance is of the kind and of many very many other causes of thankfulness that our hearts make exalt in praise and thanksgiving - the dear child was born on a highly rejoicing day may he ever be a joy to you - you have I know a strong sense of the necessity there is of a watchful eye to check the first tendency to evil habits or they will take deep roots which alas with all our care are not easily if ever eradicated - somewhere I read that the great causes why parents so often fail in their endeavours to lead their children in a right way is as a want of firmness in keeping up general good conduct by relaxing at times, the child soon takes the advantage
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when the parents lose their authority and their powers at the same time of doing their children's good - and above all those who neglect to water their endeavours by prayer to him who alone can pour down blessings upon them and make them succeed - can have no room to hope for the dew of His heavenly Grace. I trust my dear you will excuse these observations I am convinced you are a good and kind mother and I trust that your tenderness to your little (great I may be allowed to say) charges won't let you neglect their everlasting concerns - nevertheless when I write to any of my family if I do not bring Eternal things to their minds before I conclude I feel a pang for neglecting what I think my great duty and now I am so far advanced on my journey of life I am struck with the thought that I may not again have opportunity whether I do them good or not I feel a satisfaction in thus far delivering my own soul.
Tell your good mother we heartily congratulate her on this joyful event - it must be very great relief to her mind I am sure, I heard that she was so anxious that her health was hurt from it and Edwards feelings no doubt have been excited on your account and he now enjoys the happy termination of anxiety.
I will not lengthen my letter any more than by saying accept our united love - may the God of Heaven be with you and all of you even more prays your affectionate mother
H. Liveing
I hope Edwd or Tom will let us hear how you do very soon Father says give my love to her poor thing, and say I am glad that she is safe in bed. I forgot to say I hope the child will be named Thomas Harrold Thomas is a name that ought to be dear to us as very many of those who are most dear to us have and still bear that name - my stomach has been better the last two days - my face is sadly red and eruption is thrown out it may have relieved me.
Letter two sides of one page, dated December 1827 at a later date, no envelope.
Original in Fenn archive Ref L1


24. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 15 Jul 1828.
To
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Dear Catherine
It's a long time since I have had the pleasure of addressing you but be assured that you are often in our minds eye Father says bless her heart she shall come and see us, my reply is, she will, when she can, but she is a person of consequence and has many family concerns to correct and see in order - surely I need not say that we shall all be very glad to see you when you can leave home so as not to be very uncomfortable while you are absent. We are sorry for Mrs Downing's rheumatism but when we come so near to the bottom of the hill of life God in mercy warns us by pain and trouble of the descent that we may not forget that the end draws nigh. This lesson I endeavour to apply to myself and often preach to my husband for alass little pains of one kind and another we are but to apt to pass over without regarding them as admonitions whereas there is not a pain not trouble that comes without a message from our best friend to prepare for the end they every one speak and not only to those who have passed the flower of their age but they proclaim loudly to all those (however young) who have reached the day of reason and have discovered what it is to do right or wrong how ungracious then must it be to slight these messages of loving kindness. I often lament that I do not love God more and serve him better and I often reflect on the pious example of your late Aunt set to us all those of us who had the happiness of knowing her excellent characters show us the way to heaven they walk in the direct path that leads to it, then why do we not follow? What can I say in excuse nothing
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what is this but saying I am guilty: and of course deserving punishment alass that it is true but confession is not enough if we stop here we are lost - then what can we do? Have we strength to help ourselves alass no, must we then sit down without taking any steps without using any endeavours to bring us nearer to God? This plan cannot be right then let us humbly lay and our case before God and heartily entreat his assisting grace: for "of ourselves we cannot help ourselves". I cant forebear writing one or two verses of a hymn my poor Aunt was fond of, and which was brought to her remembrance now, and then as she could hear it in her last sickness.
Let not conscience make you linger; nor of fitness fondly dream; all the fitness he requireth, is to feel your need of him; this he gives you tis the spirits rising beam. Lo the incarnate God ascended pleads the merit of his blood; Venture on him venture wholly; Let no other trust intrude; None but Jesus can do helpless sinners good.
Perhaps if Edward reads this he may think I have taken and given unnecessary trouble but most surely we cannot have these momentous truths brought to our remembrance too often when our life - our ALL depends on a consistent Christian life and in particular as the world is ever bringing before us something to draw us off from God and our true interest. Therefore I shall make no apology as I consider when I am thus drawn out that I am but doing a part of my duty - and at the same time manifesting my regard for my family's best interest.
I have the scripture history you miss and Julia has the sermons one or perhaps both volumes, it's a shame to keep people's books so long that the borrower is quite forgotten
I am sorry that your domestic peace is disturbed and I earnestly hope you will be able to bring each to a right mind the world needs new
Page 4
modeling I may say with the strictest truth - few know their proper place all would be at the top not considering that the top must have a bottom or the fabric could not stand - without due order nothing can be right.
We are very glad that the dear children are so well and you I trust the same as you said nothing to the contrary - I don't wonder that Edward did not feel well in London as he really worked hard as he was always going from place to place and the weather so exceedingly hot he was fatigued till he could take no sleep or but very little, I trust that he is better now - I am sorry to hear that Mrs Harrold is again indisposed no means I am sure will be neglected that may facilitate her recovery - pray you remember us very kindly to her, and to my brother and say we shall be happy to hear from them and I hope they will be shortly able to say they are in good health.
I don't think I should have written just yet - but I wish to know as soon as you can tell me whether there is enough of a carpet to be had like that in your dining room - as I can't happen of one here to my mind and it is inconvenient to go to Ipswich now I have lost my poor Aunt. I shall like one like yours very well - our carpet requires to be finished 5yds qtr long and six breadths wide the room is not regularly of the above size because although it measures 5yds qtr at all parts yet the carpet lays up at one corner and wants more at the opposite cross corner, then there is the chance of matching the pattern so this I think 3 4yds is the least that like can allow. Will you be so good as to give me a line directly as I have a part of our carpet from Mr Leveret's (sic) at Ipswich and want to give some answer about it I should have written last evening but I took a walk and was too late to do so - you did not mention Mrs Hinchcliffe I suppose you have heard how she is going on - hers is rather an uncommon case I think if I have heard the truth of it - poor thing I hope she will do well Poor Mrs Sansum (sic) lays by with her ninth living child she has been in bed nearly a week and continues very ill she complained of pain from her back to her knee some time before her confinement and it still continues she is unable to turn herself and so when she is turned she screams violently poor thing she is suffering grievously - I am sorry your gig is not easy Charles I know took pains to have it right I hope it will be easier when more worn I expect it may be made too strong but I ought not to give an opinion as I don't understand these things - remember us kindly to your good mother and to Miss Alston who I hope is better in health
Our love to Edward and the children
Accept the same affection
Regards yours ever
H Liveing
Top page 2
William we expect may be on his way from Cuxhaven Elizabeth is at Cornard Lousia is very busy superintending carpet making at their new house Harriet is but poorly having caught and cold and continues to live almost without victuals she will be happy to hear from you whenever you find opportunity to write. When the Harrold's pay you a visit I may expect I may expect (sic) the remaining part to see me they really appear very amicable and so I think you will say one and all the family did all they could to make us comfortable pray give our love to Henry O that God made direct him in the right way I pray God to bless you all for ever.
Page 1
I grow a worse scribe than ever, if you can but read what I have written it as much as I may expect
Harwich July 15, 1828
St Swithern entered on a rainy morning - but I have known him mistaken and so I hope he is now
Letter on one sheet folded to four pages and sealed with an unreadable seal. Stamped "Colchester By Post" partly obscured stamp showing
(Har)wich, 15, year clearly 1828, underlined with the number 72

Original in Fenn archive Ref L2

25. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 4 Dec 1828.
My dear Catherine
Thank you few your kind letter and invitation and one day we hope (if it pleases God) to accept it but at present cannot say when. I am very sorry to hear that Edwd is so poorly, I think he imposes on his constitution by going too long without taking refreshment, Charles suffers from the same cause often. I am sure it is a wrong plan - when faintness comes on, does not nature cry in strong terms for refreshment? If he had only a piece of bread, it would be better than nothing, but I would persuade him to take a few biscuits in his pocket, he used to like gingerbread cakes I don't know how they would agree with his stomach of that he is the best judge, but something I would persuade him to have with him, fasting so long does not agree with him - altho his Uncle bears it so well, our constitutions are not all alike.
I am really very pleased that you were not disturbed by the thieves - what they took or had it been 10 times as much in value (as they did it quietly) would be nothing when compared with the terror of hearing them breaking in not knowing what the event might be. I think with you that it was likely to be somebody distressed for victuals. I wish for their own sakes that they had endeavoured to obtain it in an honest way, it will put you on the alert to secure your house better against depradators. I should think you had better have a shutter made within side to guard your staircase window, which might be easily put up, and have a bar to go across it. I think with you it's a window easy of access - besides as this event has taken place you will be more afraid and more watchfull - a shutter would
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I doubt not make your mind more easy.
I had occasion to write to Horksley to return thanks for medlass (sic) and also respecting jars, which I did on Monday last and the letter was sent with a jar by the carriers on Tuesday but I suppose Mrs Harold did not receive till Wednesday. I have often told Harriet she must write - but she would not as she said I did thanks her before I left her so at loss I wrote as above and acknowledged in Harriet's name a sense of the kind attention she had received from Uncle and Aunt, it is very kind of you my dear to remind her of not looking ungrateful and wanting decorum.
If your cousin George considers his situation, I think he can't be very happy - as to the lady she knows very little of housekeeping - nor how little way out pound will go to keep a handsome table - when I first heard of the intended union I thought it a hazardous step to take all things considered.
William has been very ill indeed all last voyage, he had a great deal of fever and many shaking fits - he was so very ill that he could not believe it was ague for some time - Mr Barns (the Mate) told us he was quite frightened, he never saw anybody so bad with a ague and could hardly think it could be ague and when he arrived at Cuxhaven (sic) the medical man there said it was useless to try to cure it till he had had seven fits so he had seven fits, he however missed the fit before he reached England - the Packet sailed yesterday without him he stays to nurse himself he looks most sadly and is glad to lay down in the afternoon as he feels by that time fatigued - they are going to Cornard on Saturday morning I don't like he
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should leave off medicine yet, so I have had a dozen and half of quinine powders up for him at the chemists. I thank God I have caught very little this week - I think, I may put by the last bottle of medicine that Edwd kindly sent me, for the present. I have not used a great deal of it - I have only taken it morning and night, as I understood Edward, to spare it as much as I could. Harriet thinks I am wrong - there is quite a change in me for I was never used to cough much in my life - now when I lose it a little while it returns again I think I must have had it nearly a twelvemonth I mean with short intermissions - my dear husband is pretty well for an old man he says. I often tell him he is a complete old man - he really gets infirm he is very well in health thank God he complains of rheumatism about him and his old complaint is often troublesome but these troubles must be looked for. I bless God that we are so well - I have this day obtained to my 66 year "Goodness and mercy" (I may say) has followed me thro life" pray for us dear Catherine that we may be prepared to enter a happy Eternity - you and yours are in any debt in this way we need each other's prayers: but our own much more - the grand business of our lives is sadly forgotten frequently, we are apt not to keep in mind that we are accountable creatures to the Great God and there every word will be brought into judgement as well as our actions and all our misspent time - these are wonderful considerations when it is brought to our mind how pure and holy God is and then we are led to look into our hearts - we may well shrink from even the thoughts of standing before the judge of quick and dead clothed in our non-righteousness - these solemn thoughts will make us cry out O Saviour clothe me in thy righteousness - and I shall be safe O Good God grant me and all mine this Divine clothing and our happiness is secure
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without it we are lost - let us my dear look to our ways but no(t) he says importunate like the widow that would not be refused, let us wrestle with God night and day for divine assistance for it is for our ALL.
I am persuaded you will let no opportunity of bringing your children to God slip but will as their minds enlarge lead them by degrees to God and by so doing you will be laying a good foundation to build on here after. I pray God to help you.
Pray it when you write to your Aunt Knottisford remember me to her very kindly and say I am very glad to hear they are in good health and that I am much to obliged by her remembrance of me.
Pray give my kind regards to your good mother and say I am very sorry that her mittens has not been sent sooner, indeed to say the truth they have been forgotten or they might have been sent with Mr Harold's jar without expense -- I have brought a yard of the based nankin we could find, I have had it scalded to shrink it, I have cut out and runned together three pairs ready for finish if they fit Mrs D Had better try them on first. I have finished one to show my way of doing them if it is approved - when the band is put on the fullness of the mitten should be all put to the knuckles - as you wish to know the price I paid 15d (sic)
This is a sad blundering composition but you must take it as it is for I am a poor scribe - your letter is dated Monday evening I see and it on Wednesday but now I think of it it could not come sooner.
Father and Harriet unite with me in love to you Edwd and the little ones - kind regards to Miss Alston
May God bless you all
believe me your affectionate mother
H Liveing
Harwich December 4th 1828
have you heard of Henry lately how he is going on
Original in Fenn archive Ref L3



26. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 6 Mar 1829. Liveing Archive 135a-c LT12

27. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 17 Mar 1829. Liveing Archive 136a-d LT12

28. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 24 Mar 1829. Liveing Archive 144a-d LT12

29. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 16 Jul 1829. Liveing Archive 137a-d LT12

30. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 11 Sep 1829-1 Jun 1830.
My dear Catherine
I have sent a jar of mushrooms and four bottles of catsup which I hope you will get without breakage
Altho you said nothing respecting Charles being in the country yet we were persuaded that he was in your neighbourhood as we understood that he was coming to shoot but not knowing that he had left Town and having occasion to write to him I addressed my letter as usual and have gotten his answer in return wherein he says "I had purposed coming down to shoot but that is now knocked on the head as far as the eye can see we are all working against time without intermission for the Chancellor of Exchequer so much so that I am forced to employ Mary Anne and Mr Beaumont - if there is a
Page 2
possibility of getting job done perhaps I may take a week about the 10th of October" so he may be expected if he is alive and well enough you may be sure those terrible guns I have so often warned against will not be laid aside after all my fears strongly expressed - my sons are like Gay's Cock in their own opinions but not in mine or why this great desire I so often feel to prevail on them to avoid spiritual and temporal dangers? and now dear Catherine I have my fears that I have some cause to scold you for by what I gather I doubt whether you even gave Edward the letter I wrote and tyed to the stools if you did not you certainly were wrong and have prevented a step - I thought it an imperative duty to take my dear you know it was for your sake I write and not only for your sake but for his also indeed it's a case in which your children are concerned
Page 3
as well - for to enjoy the comforts of this life - and to have an appearance of the blessings of that to come - we must live in piety and spiritual concordance for to have a well grounded hope we must be consistent Christians - to be a Christian when in good humour and forget all religion went temper is owned, can we be in a fit temper to meet God and who can say that God will have patience to wait till we come to ourselves before he calls us into eternity to give an account of thoughts words and actions - nominal Christianity will not stand any of us instead - almost will not do we must be altogether - or we shall be deemed as sounding brass - these are solemn truths - who is sufficient for these things we may indeed say - it is not so easy a thing to be a Christian as too many suppose. O may All my dear family earnestly consider these solemn truths - and not suffer this world to blind their eyes - and harden their hearts - it will be at the peril
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of their never dying souls
I hope you have not destroyed the letter and that you will give it to him - you may believe that I have the true interests of you all at heart - may God send a blessing on my endeavours to serve you all.
Tell Edward the boat is done and that his father will send it when the weather is more favourable I am in expectation of a man to call for the hamper so can only add the affectionate regards of us all.
I remain yours ever
H. Liveing
Harwich
September 11, 1829
Give my love to my brother remember us kindly to Mrs Harrold and your kind mother also to Miss Allston tell her I enjoy reading her book - I hope when I return is that you and E will send it if I might keep it so long I would send it to Henry to read.
Original in Fenn archive. Ref L4

Mrs Liveing
Nayland
My dear Catherine
we are all much surprised and truly thankful for the next to a miraculous escape from the perilous situation poor little George has gone through it is wonderful! that death - or worse than death had not been the event of such a frightful fall - let us bless God for his mercies - this event alone will show the necessity of daily nay hourly commending ourselves and all who belong to us to him who alone can keep us from dangers, we cannot foresee as well as from those we can.
I write to request you to give us a line, as we wish to know how the child is, whether he appears as well as he did yesterday, and also how you all do after such a fright, you must be almost petrified.
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Of course I need not say have the bars put thicker or rather nearer together adding as many as will fill up the sash for we think perhaps he gone over the top bar.
I pray God to bless and keep you all.
Believe me affectionately yours
H. Liveing
June 1, 1830
Note: My grandmother Liveing to my mother on my fall from the nursery window 1830 (GDL)
Original in Fenn archive Ref L6


31. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 4 Dec 1829. Liveing Archive 133a-d LT12

32. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 24 Dec 1829. Liveing Archive 134a-c LT12

33. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing & son Henry, 2 Mar 1830. Liveing Archive 35a-e LT4
My dear Julia
Mr Ambrose had left us about an hour before your letter came Father thought I had better write that you might go on with your business in the way that you think best - I don't know when he will return but you may be sure he won't stay longer than he can get through the business he went about half way to Ipsh in a boat as the Wherry did not go in time to take a coach at Ipsh (ie Ipswich) I would not have had him gone as I found it would have been a rainy day - but I am glad he did go now as he was so loth to lose a day. I observed to him if he thought of anything he wished to say to you he of course could write from one place as well as another. Father has now s een seen (written twice in error) the man who carried A who says he set him on shore at Mr Barnefses Park about 10 o'clock I suppose he had about four miles to walk. Poor Mary Ann I hope earnestly that she will get well - she and indeed they have had a long and weary trial, after being brought so low it must take a long time to recruit. (archaic definition to recover strength etc) I have had not heard my Brother's opinion of her . I must not forg e t to tell you that A brought all the money. When he returns he will pay Mr Logan - Father would have stockings bought for Tom that he might be ready to go to school and lose no more time - he has new shoes and his old ones soled and heel'd - which are enough for the present we have done nothing to the pin clothes as we suppose they will not let him wear them - do as you please about sending them all - I would mention them when you go with him to school - if they will let them wear them you can send those that fit best about the sleeves and new sleeve the others and send them soon after him - if they won't allow them in general I would request he might wear one with his new clothes - his long tail - I think he must wear in commons and his old ones will do to wear at home in the holidays - he wants a shiny belt and buckle
Above crosshatching
to wear with their dress suits so unfinished without one - this of course I leave to you - his hairbrush does not answer the purpose I expect it has been washed with hot water which spoils them - should you buy a better I would regard that it might be washed with only cold soap and water - his com b had better not be used any more so I fear it will stick into his head - I bought 2 pairs of glasses one pair has only been worn a few times - God bless you evermore your affectionate mother H Liveing.
Written on 2 sides of one sheet and sealed in red sealing wax, mark illegible
Page 1
Crosshatched
look if you can find a puse silk for a gown I have but one any thing like other peoples and th is is no t very like either Harriet says - I will put a scrap of Harriet s under the . . . . I admire the colour but I should like one of a good quality I don't like a stiff thready looking thing I would rather give more money and have a good one - if I can't have a puse colour - I should have no objection to have a green yours is a good colour I think all greens are so pretty wh atever I have I should wish a good one - I would say that the child is not forward as I wished - and would add he requires care and attention lest they should think you did not think him backward.
Page 2
My dear Henry
I am really very sorry to hear that you are in such a nervous state I hope and trust you will employ every means prescribed in the hope that it may please God you may receive benefit by persevering in the plan laid down. I suffered much myself some years since with a nervous affection. My Bror? gave me medicine and insisted on my walking out a great deal and in particular when I felt worse - then I was to go out at once, and I have gone many times when my legs would hardly carry me I told my Brr "I felt as if my legs would stay behind me his reply was, never mind that - don't give way make yourself go - and so I did although I did it with great reluctance very often for months and months. I bless God after much perseverance it wore off by degrees sometimes better and I had a return many times, this I tell you to encourage you, to bear up, and strive against the complaint, or it will get the better of you - if you don't resist it with your utmost power, walk a good deal - it will help you I have no doubt every way, and when you come in - you can read and rest at the same, time proper books will amuse and improve your mind. Julia tells me a voyage with William is recommended by Uncle and Edward and I hope you will embrace the next opportunity and go with him we are expecting him home from Heligoland or Cuxhaven - he was not certain which, he should go to, your brother has patients who from giving way to nervous sensations have brought themselves to believe in most strange ideas - pray I beg you
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and entreat you take courage and when you feel a bout coming on, get out and run away from it if you possibly can - although even so much against your inclination - I think Capt Herrage will take a walk with you sometimes I much wish he did not swear so sadly - he puts me in pain to hear him - I hope and trust, you won't catch that dreadful habit, so offensive to the Almighty - and to the ears of those who fear to offend him - when Ambrose goes about his business you might sometimes walk with him - if I could but prevail with you to rise when A does, which is not too soon for young people, go with him if you don't like to go by yourself always, you love to go to Colchester - you might walk there take something in your pocket to eat, rest awhile and then walk back - pray do all you can to drive these miserable feelings from you, medicine I hope will help you but I am persuaded medicine will not do without your own exertions, which will do more than medicine can do - but the one with the other - with attention paid to avoiding things prohibited I trust, in God's good time will restore you - now I pray be persuaded - cease not to pray for divine help God is the great physician - he cures the souls and bodies of those who live in his love and fear - he sees fit to try us all in one shape or another, he knows what is best for us and when, he knows we need the cross no longer, and the design of sending it is answered he takes it from us - O learn and learn to look to God more - to lean on him more - and less on the arm of flesh - it's for want of considering God more for want of bearing in mind that all the evils, and troubles, we are called on to endure are permitted of God for wise ends, did we I say but duly consider that nothing happens to us but by his will - we should submit and bear up under them the better our Lord says the hairs of your head are all numbered - and not a sparrow falls to the ground without your heavenly Father be of good cheer you are of more worth than many sparrows.
Address Page
Below
if Julia did not mention you when she writes - we should scarcely know whether you are alive - I tr y to put your neglect out of my mind - as it is a recollection far from pleasing - tell Julia not to keep Tom at home - tis b est not every way - let John keep gloves on - Mrs Bailey is still very low, has not left her bedroom.
Top
I hope you will pay attention to what I have said I have your interest at heart whether you believe it or not. God bless you your Father and sister unite in love with your afft Mother
H Liveing
Addressed as
To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester Efsex
post paid
Postmark Harwich MA 2 1830 Sealed with red sealing wax
Noted:
March 2 1830
Letter to Julia re Tom going to school. Mary Anne Liveing ill. Letter to Henry also Ambrose at Harwich boats and Wherry on River to Ipswich etc Mrs Bailey ill


34. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 24 Jun 1830. Liveing Archive 40a-d LT4
My dear Julia
We ha ve been thinking you would be glad to get rid of one of your boys - therefore send John to us, we think we shall agree pretty well together and I suppose he will have no objection to coming. I should think Ambrose when he goes to market may hear of somebody that would take charge of him at any rate he would come safely with Lambert the carrier if he was given in charge to him. I much want to know if Mr Turner has sent the money for the panel of bricks you sent? - I fear Ambrose has suffered him to take him in, how many did you send? If the first is not paid for shure ? (sic) A - won't send any more - if he does, he falls into the trap with his eyes open - in the full light of the sun, when a man has no, property, how, can he pay his debts?
I shall be glad to know what Mr Patterson says (perhaps I have not given him his right name - but I mean the attorney who knows something of the business of the Chapel Farm) - I hope the business will not run on to far - before some steps are taken to stop the mischief.
We are watching the weather - and thinking about your hay in particular, no doubt A will lose no time to get it in as soon as it is dry enough and he had need, for the sun does not bear a better appearance, and I am persuaded this fine weather will not last long. We came home on Monday and we were happy in having
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so fine a day, had we stayed till Tuesday it would have made travelling disagreeable in so much rain - we had the Stoke Chaise to Mistley, and waited there nearly two hours, if not quite, for the Wherry, when to our great surprise had only a little lobster boat to go in - a miserable stinking - and every way disagreeable and inconvenient conveyance - the wind was high enough to make some of the passengers cascade I was not sick, but we tossed a good deal from the wind being contrary, it was so cold that I was glad to creep down into a wretched place they termed a cabin - where we were perfumed by the distressing smell of stinking bundles of dried fish - I suppose we must be nearly four hours travelling in this way - Father thought we should not have reached the shore so soon as we did had it come on bad weather we should have been in a sad state, we repented heartily that we did not take a Chaise from Mistley - but I thank God we arrived at home in safety, how little God's mercy's are regarded - that Mighty God who keeps us by night and by day, who shields from thousands of evils - which we do not see - nor know, as well as from very many we might discover - and be humbly and heartily thankful for - if the love of God reigned in our hearts - and if that love does not dwell where - we are in a woeful state, and not at all fit for the Kingdom of God - which the Scripture directs as to seek first, alas alas that it is generally speaking - but a secondary consideration, so that by thus living and acting, we regard the body first the soul secondly - and God a far off - in comparison to the
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estimation we have for the world - and the things of the world, but, will this bring us peace at the last? surely not.
O my dear children remember that this - and every part of the Scriptures are written to guide us into the way of peace, and if we do not esteem them as the Voice of Almighty God speaking to us his poor blinded creatures, warning us not even to go near the borders of that path which surely leads to death and everlasting ruin, the fault rests on ourselves, and woe unutterable will be the consequence!!! not that in our own strength we can escape from the wrath to come - but God daily lengthens out our time of grace - wherein we may by fervent prayer seek the assistance of his divine help to carry us safely through the dangers and temptations - he may see fit to permit us to be tried with - but, if we earnestly, heartily commit ourselves to his keeping - we have his sure promise - that none ever shall seek him in vain, but observed the whole heart, must be concerned in this holy search - or we have no room to hope to find - remember it is for your life!! The life of your soul, the life of your eternal happiness, surely, in ought to be our first, our last - our pursuit at all times - and reason never to be forgotten interest, and however we may be engaged; eternity and the care of providing for it should ever hang on our minds if - we hope to obtain a happy one. I had purposed sending this with Henry's books, but the carrier does not go till tomorrow, and I thought if I sent this by the post perhaps Ambrose might contrive to send John on later perhaps Mr Pettrick will be at Colchester Market and would bring him if Ambrose asked him - I prefer sending the books by Lambert as he has always taken care of what ever I have committed to him and I think as it is such a rainy time the books may get wet if I send them by the post man - they will be directed to the Horse and Groom. I wish they had been sent sooner we were mistaken as to the carriers day - I am sorry any fault of mine has kept Henry from the use of them
Page 4
I shall write to Henry with them and should he not be with you when they arrive you need not send the letter after him I suppose Charles is with you - give our united love to him and to all your party - say we shall like to hear when we are likely to them (sic) - Father hopes he will bring his account book with him - that he may know how his account stands we shall be glad to hear how you are going on.
I pray God to bless and keep you all
believe me ever
your affte mother
H Liveing
Harwich June 24, 1830

To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Efsex
post paid Postmark Harwich 24 JU 1830
Note June 24, 1830 journey from Nayland by Chaise to Mistley lobster boat to Harwich.
Written on both sides of one sheet sealed with red sealing wax




35. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 16 Jul 1830. Liveing Archive 36a-c LT4
Harwich July 16, 1830.
My dear Julia
I am happy to say thank God, I am now pretty well but am afraid of leaving off my flannels as my neck often reminds me of the pains I have recently experienced. I went to Church last night for the first time - and I went out on the day before by the desire of poor Sally Stow to attend at the making of her Will - she has given me a double chest of drawers, and to Harriet all that is in them, and requested that she might be buried decently, and to have a good oak coffin - did not wish any finery but to have the grave bricked up with foot and headstone - she has divided her Chinese bowls among her mistresses two to Mrs Logan and two to Mrs Jansen - and two to me - or to Harriet I forget which - and a pair of table spoons to one of us - to Harriet I think - and one to each of her sons - a large tablecloth to me - and some Delft plates too little Master who called on her many times - and seemed to like the plates - she meant John - she ordered that they might be packed carefully that they might not be chipped and sent to him - poor thing I begged her to leave her effects to her friends she said she had none - for those who had some relation to her had used her cruelly - and had robbed her shamefully. Mr R Barns made the will - while Harriet and I were present - and as I several times pressed her to leave them to her friends - Mr B - said I am come to make Sally's Will and you must let it be as she directs
Page 2
or she won't be happy. I felt very uncomfortable and heartily wished she had not fixed on me to take anything her mother and herself had earned so very hardly I may say indeed by the sweat of their brows, but it was forced to be so - for indeed she had told Harriet while I was from home when talking about making her will - that indeed it would not be her will for her mother told her that what she might have the spare to give it to me - so then on her account she had a double desire, poor thing she died yesterday about three o'clock past noon - 15th - she was taken ill on the Friday before, and appeared to be struck with death at first. I feel quite vexed for her, and I heartily prayed she might recover - how I shall miss her - we had such dependence on her - I hope she is gone to a better place, she was not unwilling to die - said if she lived she should thank God and if she died she should go to God, and prayed him to receive her soul I hope her prayers were heard, she suffered much from pain in her body, and sickness, but retained her senses till the last perfectly - she told Mrs Logan lately that she was the same age as the King - it was rather remarkable that she should die on the day in which he was interred - this is also my age - all my old friends are dropping into the grave - within the last few years how many have left me - my departure must be near o god fit me for that solemn awful period, may the thought of the continual presence of God pervade all our minds, which will keep us many times from doing amiss - it will keep the end - in view - again I say o that
Page 3
God may grant us his holy Spirit to fit us for His Salvation pray God amen - amen -
we are very glad to hear that Ambrose is better - we have a bed for him if he can manage to come and take the air - we are also glad to hear that you are well, and that your clover has not suffered considerably. I think we may have had drier weather than you - Mr Cox has all his in - and Mr Powling says there were three in which the hay made quicker than ever he remembered it to do before - so I hope you were forwarder than you appear to be - by having grass to cut at this time - this is the fourth fine day we have had successively.
Charles bids me say that he left his watch at the head of the bed he slept in - he is rather worried that it has never been mentioned when ever you have written - he is sure that he left it there so trusts that it is safe - if you have not taken care of it - you had better do so now - we are very glad John's eye is better - and hope you will not keep him from school - and that you have sent Tom off - it's a false kindness to detain him when he might be profiting - such long holidays makes them idle and they lose much of that they have acquired.
My dear Henry - you have my hearty prayers - and these frequently put up to the Almighty that he would order all events for you spiritually as well as temporal interest - God Almighty prepare your Soul by his Holy Spirit for the vast change which appears to lay before you - remember, it is not an easy thing, to be a real Christian, and that God has promised to give his Holy Spirit to those who ardently and constantly desire it - O beseech him with your whole heart to help you, pray night and day to him - as Isaiah say's give Him no rest - be exceedingly importunate - wrestle with Him till you prevail with Him for Christ's sake to give you His blessing then you must do well. O do not lightly regard your Mothers fervent desires - and request - remember tis for your life - the life of your Soul. I wish you had Bridges on the Ministry - I am sending his comments on the 119 Psalm - my Brr T .. sent it to me to read - it is indeed excellent - we are very glad to hear that you are well - and one and all write in love and best
Page 1 (address face)
wishes for your well doing - let us hear as soon as you know anything further - but you will come perhaps - I hope you won't go that long expensive journey if you can avoid it - pray consider every expense - and avoid as much as you can - we are only Stewards for all God gives to us - and must remember him and account how we laid out - for the eye of God is ever on you and on me - bear this in mind - your time also must be accounted for also - do not forget - but make the most of it - or the mistake of it will sting by and by like a serpent - when it cannot be recalled
give our kind regards to Mr Ambrose and love to the boys how does how does poor Mrs Ambrose?, remember us to her - Charles with his Wife and Miss Beaumont and with us and one all will
Harriet is but so, so, she is worried having been with poor Sally so often - she can get no rest - I can only say pray God bless you all for ever
your aff mother
H Liveing

To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester Efsex
post paid
Postmark Harwich 1830

Written on both sides of one sheet of paper noted on the address panel " 16 July 1830 will and death of Sally Stow"


36. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 23 Nov 1830. Liveing Archive 42a-d LT4
Harwich November 23, 1830
My dear Julia
we are glad you are returned to your husband and home safety I think I may venture to say he was very glad to have you again filling your place - he must have missed you very much, I heartily wish that the purpose you went for have answered your expectations. I did not know that you had left home till I heard from Charles, and I wondered you had not written I had determined to write when his letter came and we shall be glad to hear again from you very soon - Har't (Harriet?)and I am afraid you have not gotten your money off Mr Turner - if you have not, and have reason to fear you shall not, when you write make a mark at the corner of your letter // for I don't like your F should vext about it - how does your little Captain, pray say that we enquire after him and present our compliments - you did not mention anything about the fan I returned, I should much like to know where I get it, don't forget to say when you write - you was also to have told us whether your great horse has recovered from his indisposition - I suppose you got the money I sent to pay any debts - you did not mention whether Henry's flannel waistcoats were to be made like William's the width of the flannel makes the length of the waistcoat - I have now sent a shirt I have made which I hope he will like I have not had any more made till I hear how he approves of this - Harriet has taken the trouble to plait the frill small - but Mr Beamont's was only laid in single folds - this irons very well with the Italian iron, of course it is quicker done - I did not know where the button holes were to be made in the bosom so they are left undone
Page 2
I have also sent him and another pair of drawers - I purposed asking you to come and stay a little with us but as you have been so long from home I suppose I must not now mentioned such a thing - it was a sad thing to be so unwell while you are away - it is particularly disagreeable when you are visiting - but it must be when it pleases God it was Bishop Ken (Bishop of Bath & Wells) - or Barnard Gilpin - who used to carry his shroud with him - when he went from home - saying " it was as likely to be wanted as any other part of his dress " they were both good men - and lived in readiness for their shroud always - O what a blessed state. God enable you and I and all who are dear to us - so to improve our time - that we to may be ready when the God of mercies see fit to call us out of this world. O may He grant us his holy Spirit to prepare us for a better, amen - you said that Charles could buy me a piece more of the green silk you was (sic) so good to buy me - I should like enough for another pair of sleeves - I had occasion to write to him and sent a small piece and requested him to get me a piece I said a yard and quarter but I wish I had said two yards - I don't know whether he knows where you bought - but I told him I was going to write to you and would ask you - if you should write to him before you write to me tell him how much and where to go - if you don't write to him soon - I shall have occasion - so tell me - we are thinking about Robert - our members are out of the way of helping him we are afraid (sic) have been writing to Charles respecting the business have you gotten the money on your mortgage - or have you no prospect of it? don't forget to mention it - I hope your health has been better since your return home - William had a long windy passage from Cuxhaven of 12 days blown I can't tell where
Page 3
he get in last Thursday in safety without other damage than much wear to rigging etc thank God - I felt very uneasy about him - Freshfeelos dinner was on Friday and W is sailed for Holland on Saturday - he get home in good time - and order on Friday evening, I thanks God for that - I wish Ambrose was well rid of his threshing machine - for fear of it bringing mischief on him, sad accounts of burnings - I pray God to keep you in safety - we may well say " the watchman waketh but in vain if God does not keep you" how necessary to put ourselves under the protection of the Almighty - or how can we expect to dwell in safety? Uncle H - has sent me a book to read chiefly on prayer - it speaks of wandering thoughts while in prayer - says could they be all written down - mixed up with our prayers as they occur - and we could read them afterwards - should we not be ashamed to present the composition even to our fellow creature"? how then can we expect they should be pleasing to the Almighty God and how can we expect then our petitions for safety - for comforts of this life - for pardon for peace and blessedness in the next life will be heard, and granted to such ungracious vile creatures? O Lord help us - and by thy great power enable us to love thee more - and serve thee better may such thoughts as these pervade our minds when we draw near to address the all seeing God in prayer - that we may strive to put away all thoughts, but those, that will be acceptable to the God whom we address - that we may not be worshipping that things of time and sense - those idols that obtrude on our minds - instead of the God of Heaven, which will make our prayers an offence, instead of a Christian sacrifice - Harriet went at noon to Ipswich as we had several little matters which wanted seeing after I expect she will stay two or three days with Mrs Elston
Page 4
I expect her back again this week - she would have liked to have stayed with you a little while but as neither she nor I knew when you were likely to return - I thought - and told her she had better come home I missed her very much - I also wanted her to go to Ipswich also I wish you lived nearer to us - but it's a vain wish for you can't come - and your Father don't like to remove - we are I thank God as well as old people must expect to be - aches and pain we must have I bless God they are no worse - I should get your Father to Ipswich more and then if our old friend was there - the change does him and me good I always think - we hear that Mr Cox has an order to have the Packet arms got in readiness to be taken on board when wanted - it does not look well - but I am afraid like war - things bear so bad an aspect - that F says he don't know what will be the end - nor no one die ? - God protect us - let us hear from you very soon and how you manage about money on the mortgages - accept and distribute our love - O that God may bless and keep you all for ever and ever
believe me your affte Mother
H Liveing
Then follows upside down
when I send by the carrier I mean to send your brushes etc ?
Top of page 1
Wednesday morning I have now a letter from Charles who says he has sent the shawl to you and shall send the silk I ordered to you also if he get it. Poor Mary I fear is in a bad way - he is very unhappy about her - and by his writing feared the worst - poor Robert is not established - and our
. . . . . . are gone out - but Charles still hopes, wither on good grounds I don't know.
Centre panel page 4
when I mentioned prayer I ought to have gone on with his remarks as follows, that we may take hope altho our prayers are imperfect yet through the intercession of our divine mediator so much of them as really come from the heart with humility and reverence we may trust will be heard for Christ's sake - and an answer sent, in God's good time - in the way that His wisdom knows will be best for us - for it would not always be best to have what we pray for granted, eventually - he trusts then what he has said, will not give encouragement to wandering thoughts or inattention to the great business of prayer, as formality in prayer - is always to be lamented - and heartily deplored - and when we rise from our knees, each one should ask himself, how have I performed my devotions? how have I thanked God for his mercies, and blessing? how have I entreated forgiveness and asked for strength to resist evil? in short has my heart been so concerned in my petitions that I may hope they will be heard - for the sake of Him who intercedes for me at the right hand of the all Holy - All Mighty God -
Entered later in the column: Nov 23 1830
Written on a note glued to the letter: Julia in London, Harriet to Ipswich, Mrs Elston , fears of Burnings , Cox has orders for arms on Packet


37. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 20 Dec 1830.
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Page 2
Harwich
December 20, 1830
My dear Catherine
We are sorry to learn that the wretched creatures who burn up the very bread which they stand in so much need of have visited your neighbourhood, what a strange inconsistency, it appears to me that they are determined if they cannot live as they would wish that nobody else shall live better than themselves and that by destroying all the property they can they shall in time bring all on a level.#
I read Judge Taunton's speech to the jurors and I remarked that I thought the clergy could not do better than to preach it with a little addition instead of a sermon - it's a good plan to have it put up in all places of resort as well but all cannot read it it would therefore be a good plan to let people hear it from the pulpit it is high time to use every means to warn them as well as to detect the wretches -- it's become a National concern as well as individual suffering they are using the means to bring famine I pray the good God to have mercy on us - a passage in the psalms frequently comes into my mind and more especially when human means (however right) are anged "If the Lord keeps not the city the watchman waketh but in vain" no doubt my dear this is a visitation for our manifold sins (as you have observed) God spake once and twice but man will not hearken - so destruction suddenly comes and what can we expect less? "when God is provoked every day".
Page 3
Harriet don't like the idea of Edwd being a constable she is afraid it should bring him among the rioters. I tell her if there was a riot near him he would be there and his having authority I hope would lessen his danger but she replies now he is a constable he must go from home if he is called upon but I hope that is not the case. Troubles surround us - everyone as far as they can must make the best of themselves looking up to him who alone can shield from dangers. These sad events shows the great necessity of self-examination, it points to the heart of every one to consider their ways and to discover as far as possible in what way they offend the Almighty. To take shame - pray for help and repentance and the blessing of a new heart. God grant it to us. I thank God we have had not disturbance here - we have had a special Visiting to consult on some plan to employ those who were out of work and to raise a fund for their benefit by way of adding to their small earnings for its difficult to find anything for them to do.
We are glad to learn that you were when writing pretty well. I thank God that I am able to report the same of ourselves mercies daily mercies O that we had but a due sense of them then we should learn to be more thankful -- William came in on S(a)turday (sic) we were glad to see him after such windy weather. God's goodness kept him I expect he will take the mail on Wednesday and there are a family come to go with him, of seven. I wonder they should travel at this season and in these disturbed times.
Page 4
I hope the weather will be better for I am always in pain for him in bad weather - father sent his compliments to Mr Dutton (Datton?) (the agent at Cuxhaven) and requested the favour of a couple of hams if they could spare them they were so kind to spare them although they had but three - they are seldom to be had at this time of the year. They are partial to a father and like to oblige him I don't know what the price is, when William go shall commission him to pay for them.
Your French woman behaved very unlike a lady, Harriet tells me however that you have all benefited from her tuition. I am glad your money has not been thrown away for you will be better able to instruct the children give Grandpapa's and Grand M's love and a kiss to them all (and you must not leave Aunt out) we have sent them some figs which I know they all like.
Willm generally stays at home one voyage in the winter he talks of asking leave to do so now W says if you were to smoke your own hands with tars (sic) they would be as good if not better than these, we had a letter from Charles on Sunday he says that Mary Ann is better than she has been this year - what a mercy!! We expect Tom on Wednesday or Thursday pray remember us very kindly to my brother and Mrs Harrold pray tell my brother I am much obliged for the medlars (sic) I enjoyed them, and to your good mother and also to Miss Alston and present my thanks for the loan of her book I sent it in a basket to Julia with a request to take care of it and send it to Miss Alston very soon and hoped she would find time to read it as it is very worth reading we take care of your books. Oberlin* was an extraordinary good man - practised great self-denial - give our united best loved to Edwd and accept
Page 1
the same may God Almighties protecting arms defend and save you all and all those who are dear to us Believe me ever your affectionate mother
H. Liveing
I have sent you a brown silk hand/kt Liveing has made use of it it - has been washed twice - I sent this instead of one which has not been used because it is so much better looking - Father says the boat ought to be washed clean and put into the house for the winter.
# The compiler has taken this to be the "Swing Riots"
Ref's - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_Riots
http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/terrace/adw03/peel/ruralife/swing.htm
* Pastor of Walbach?
Written on a single page on four sides and sealed.
Orginal in Fenn archive Ref L5


38. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 1831. Liveing Archive 103 a-d LT9

39. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 20 Jan 1831. Liveing Archive 37a-e LT4
Harwich Jan 20 1831
My dear Julia
I have been talking of writing ever since I received your last letter, I don't know whether you have seen Henry, he left us last Saturday was a week for Ipswich, and from thence to Hadlegh (sic), and he also purposed going to Nayland next - I have not heard of or from him, since he left us - I begged of him to return here - and not to go to trouble you - but he determined on the above route - he was so unlucky to promise Capt Deane to send him Mr Plumes terms for pupils - and all etc which he has not done, of course he has forgotten to do so, or he has not been at your home. Capt Deane has just now come to complain of his breach of promise, I have made the best of it and promised to write to you by this night's post - and to request you will write directly and let me bear the whole expense you have been charged and also whether he has a vacancy - and Capt Deane requested me to add if you could inform him of some convenient mode of conveying him from hence to Mr Plumes should other matters be concluded on - I replied that I did not know that you could do that - for of course you carried your son - however I promise d to ask whether you knew of any mode as being nearer that part you were more likely to know of a conveyance (if there is one) than Capt Deane he says. I hope as Henry has delayed that you will give me the wished for intimations directly say also when the school open 'd or opens - are your boys gone? what have you done with Tom?
Page 2
I pray God direct you for the best, he wants great subordination I know from experience, and if you, and Ambrose have real affection for him in the true acceptation (sic) of the term & you will both be determined that he shall - be made to behave well at home or if he is ever so well governed at school, if he is allowed to undo all as soon as he gets under his parents roof - he will never be a comfort to you - nor be happy himself - without he is happy in ill doing - the Scripture admonishes you to restrain your child betimes - to train him in the way he should go - that when he grows up he may not depart from the right way - at least then you may not have to accuse yourselves - for want of duty to him - pray don't split on that rock , or you will bitterly lament it when it will be too late. O ! do your uttermost to save your child indulgences alone won't lead him right - if you don't govern him now, you never never will - do all you can - they may not be by any means what you could wish them - alas I feel and lament it - but - if you don't do your utmost - much very much blame must and will fall on you - for which you must account to the Mighty God - O! do not suffer him to go with the people when he comes home nor with the boys - if he won't play in the garden don't let him go out at all - when you see fit to desire him to do anything - be firm - and make him - do it - I speak to his Father as well as to you - for if you are not both agreed - you will do nothing with your children - remember that the salvation of their immortal souls depends very much on the way they have been trained in their early days - a mistake in their first years is almost sure to lead to ruin - it's a momentous concern be more desirous (much more) to promote their everlasting well doing, than there temporal - the term of their natural life will soon terminate - but their eternal state can never end think - O think what everlasting pains must be, where no intermission can be found - no end can even be hoped for
Face 3
remember - children that won't obey parents - (I mean those who have their real interest at heart) will never obey God - you may see that this will bar them out of heaven - without a timely repentance. God of his infinite mercy help you - strengthen you and give you both courage - to be your children's real friends shall I add another passage of Scripture which strikes me - in this case terribly "let not thy soul spare for his crying" in other words - be their governess - and let them not get the better of you - they may be managed without many blows - be determined to be obeyed - and they will soon be sensible that they must - when they cannot be managed without stripes - they must have them - or your own souls are at stake as well as theirs - "if the rod is spared, when it ought to be used, you will spoil the children" but as I before observed there won't be occasion to use it often if you manage - being fully determined to govern - whatever you desire to be done - make a point of having it done - don't give way in this or you lose your authority at once - although it may be but a trifle - it's of much consequence - much more than you may imagine, advantage will be taken - on the next opportunity, depend on it you will lose ground directly as your children have governed you both - it will cost you much labour and much trouble - to bring them into good order - but don't let your courage fail - look up to God for help - and think you here him say, bring these children that I have given you up for me - strain every nerve to keep them from idleness and vice - I know it's a great work - but would you think much of any trouble you could take, to save them from being drowned or to save their lives in any other way Would you think your time lost or slighting some temporal concern of like consequence to their lives thus then think of their eternal all - and rule them if possible - or you will never bring them to God. The very thought is dreadful - I beg - I beseech you delay no longer - every day is precious - you know not how long you have to live how soon they may want a parent's hand to guide and to restrain them may God Almighty give you to see the great necessity of bringing them into subjection.
Address face
be not discouraged it's a great work but it is the very best you can be imployed (sic) in - but I must again repeat you must go hand in hand together - if you are not agreed to make them mind you both - you will fail most asssuredly - your countenance also must support your commands for if you smile when you ought to be serious - your authority is gone - once more I pray God to be with you, and guide you in this best of works - (in great measure ) saving of your children. O ! be their best friends
poor Nancy Cope is gone I hope to heaven she has been a great sufferer in mind more than body - John Clifton hanged himself last Sunday was a week - oh dreadful - he had no friend and I fear did not lead a good life - God keeps us all - and save our souls from death amen - is old Bateman able to go about your work. What a mercy that you have been saved from flames - poor old Mrs Osborne? hopes you will sell your corn before it is burned she thinks about you she tells me -except and present our United love yours ever affectionately
H Liveing
Upside down at the top of first page.
I hope you did not keep Miss Alston's book - for Harriet promised to send it soon for she has not read it when she sent it to me - say when you sent it - I am in pain fearing that you kept it.

To
Mrs John Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Efsex
post paid postmark Harwich 20 J a 1831
Written on both sides of one sheet sealed with red sealing wax
Written in the address panel Jan 20 1831 management of unruly children. Capt Deane wants particulars of Mr Plums school. Nancy Cope's death. John Clifton hangs himself fears of Rick burning. Also a column of figures with meaningless notations totalling L188 2s 2d

40. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 7 Feb 1831.
To
Mrs Liveing
Page 2
My dear Catherine,
This morning before I was up as I was reading and admiring the 103 Psalm it came into my mind that I made John Ambrose get it by heart (the prayer book version) And why should I not with that my other grandchildren should do the same now. I know that your children have abundant lessons to learn but I think they may get one verse on a Sunday and repeat on the following Sunday the former verse with the second and so on till they repeat the whole - it is a most beautiful composition, showing the unbounded goodness and mercy of God and mans perishable state. I don't expect that the children can now, fully comprehend, the scope of this divine hymn - but if it is now and then repeated, it will be kept up in their mind, and here after they will be benefitted. They will learn to extol God's goodness and a bend their heart with their knee.
You will say but we must ask God's blessing upon the means used all we shall not glorify God - or benefit our own souls - this is most true. Ti's an imperative duty on parents to water their instructions by fervent prayer for the dew of God's heavenly Grace - accept this hint, though I hardly think you need it but we ought to bring to each other's minds
Page 3
the one great concern which ought to be ever going forward, ever building up till we mount to the highest heaven. I pray the good God to be ever with you may He bless your endeavours may He be your guide thro the world -- this troublesome vain world to a better amen.
We are pretty well God be praised for all his mercies and right in affectionate regard to our dear children with their Father and Mother give my love to my Brother, Mrs Harrold, your good mother and aunt present our kind regards
believe me ever Affectionately yours
H. Liveing
Harwich
February 7, 1831
we happened of these pigeons in our market and knowing you are fond of them have sent them with the ducks - we have had to brace of pheasants sent us - 1 of them we sent to Dr Miller and the other to Mr Highum which I was very glad to be able to do.
Written on two sides of one piece of paper
Original in Fenn archive Ref L7


41. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 22 Feb 1831. Liveing Archive 105 a-d LT9

42. Harriet's Letters: To Her Son Edward, 28 Mar 1831 ?.
Mr Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Page 2
Harwich Monday afternoon (28 March?)
My dear Edward
The captain of the ship came here on Saturday (we suppose by land) but the ship has not arrived - yesterday your father heard that a large party were come to the White Heart in wagons and after church he went to speak to the Capt but he was much engaged with the overseer's (we suppose) that he did not notice him as he learnt from Mrs Blitzend that the Nayland people were not come - and then the Capt said he should send a man and horse to give you information of the vessel's arrival. They also said the Capt is uneasy about the ship the wind was fair on Saturday and Sunday, it is bad for them today.
With respect to canvass Father bids me say he has some but thinks that new, will answer better than old if you have to buy it. He went to look at some today - brown canvas is commonly used for tar paulings it is 2 feet wide at 11p per yard if you will say how long and how wide it is to be we had better get it made here as you have no sailmakers near you.
I thank God I have lost the violence of the cough - what remains has shifted its seat from my chest, to my throat the old place - I don't know how it is, every trifle gives me cold and adds to the cough. I never used to be so susceptible of cold, but I may say to myself, as I say to your Father when he complains of pains which he never had before "you never was so old before" he is I bless God pretty well he completed his 71st year on the 16 day of this month how near Eternity we must be pray for us, that we may be made fit for a happy one. I covert the prayers
Page 3
of all my family, they are much in my debt in that way, but I hope they will remain so no longer.
I am ashamed that I have kept your books so long, I purpose sending them shortly. I have not gotten through Wilberforce he requires to be read with great attention his work is a fine sieve he suffers no defects to pass unnoticed he clearly shows you that it's no easy thing to be a Christian indeed and to be almost, and not altogether, is ruin this consideration will make us cry mightily to God for help - or nothing will. Want of consideration was the complaint God made against the Israelites "my people do not consider" I heartily pray that you and I and all my dear family with their Father at their head may love God more - and serve him better as it is our bounden duty. Pray let this great concern ever rest on your mind it will stimulate you to govern your temper you will see things in a different light - it will make you a happier man and will enable you to do more good. Suavity of manner is very desirable especially among the sick it will sometimes do as much good as medicine I pray God to help you, and help me - and help us all for we have all great need and can do nothing as we ought without divine assistance let us not fail them to intreat God for it by night and by day the constant impression of the Eye of God being ever on us will act as a strong incentive to keep us from doing evil and to lead us to do that that is right.
Your father has now been to look for the ship - and learns that a vessel passed her about halfway from London - should be moderate weather your father thinks it probable they may be here tomorrow.
Page 4
I earnestly hope your patiens who has lost his leg will do well say when you write whether he is getting on as you wish - God guide you in all your undertakings.
Julia has been to see us she stayed a week, Ambrose came for her on Saturday night, and they set off on last Tuesday morning for Copford and took Harriet with them we sent their packages by the carrier. Ambrose said the horse would carry them very well a good deal of persuasion was used to make Harriet go, Julia was half angry that she had not been to see her of so long a time.
Harriet is very poorly she is so pale she vexes me when I look at her - she will fret fearing that Robert will lose the situation - should the reform Bill pass we . . . . . we can to make her hope for the best and to leave the event to God - I have observed to her that even if . . . . . he had it it might not eventually be best. I want her to lean more on God and less on man - Charles writes that he is much liked and he has no doubt but he will do well and if Clerks are appointed it is most likely he will be established.
Julia looks very delicate is much thinner she was never for so long from her paternal roof 16 months since she was at Harwich - what can be done with or for Henry? He is a great trouble to me - and to us all he is a trial if ever I prayed with my whole heart it is for him that God would make him fit for the great work he has been brought up for or never suffer him to go into a pulpit - O pray to him - pray for God's guidance. We are very glad to hear that you are all pretty well give our kind love to dear Katy and children - and remember us kindly to my brother and Mrs Harrold also to Mrs Downing and Miss Alston - I pray God to bless you and be with you all
believe me ever your Affectionate Mother
H. Liveing
Written on three sides of a page, folded inserted and sealed, faint postmark Harwich ?8 MA 1831. Damaged with words missing in places.
Note by G. D. Liveing my grandmother L to my father 1831 as postmark shows feebly she says my grandfather completed his 71st year on the 16th of this month but does(nt sic) name the month"
Note by Alston A Fenn "references to Julia Ambrose also to Harriet and Robert Fenn"
Original in Fenn archive Ref L8


43. Harriet's Letters: To Grandaughter Mary Kate Liveing, 19 Apr 1831. Liveing Archive 38a-d LT4
My dear Mary
I am much obliged to you for taking the pains to draw me such a very pretty flower, and another picture of horses and men - really you have performed much better than I could have expected such a little girl could have done - you will I have no doubt go on to improve, and by and by draw as well as dear papa.
What a good thing it is my dear Mary to have such kind parents - and friends to take care of you, and to teach you all that is right. God my dear child gives you all - your kind friends, then you must attend to all they say, and you must learn to thank God for them, and to pray to Him with your whole heart that He may preserve
Page 2
them to you in health, and that He may bless them, and also pray for a blessing on yourself - as well as for your sisters and brother.
Grand papa and Aunt desire their love to you - and to all my dear Grandchildren.
Think of me as your
affectionate Grand Mama
H Liveing

Harwich
April 19, 1831
remember me very kindly To Grand Mama Downing - and to Aunt Sally
To
Miss Liveing
Nayland
Noted on the address panel: Grandmother Liveing; Mrs Liveing of Harwich to Aunt Mary 1831 (Mary Kate Liveing)
Written on two half sides of one piece of paper.


44. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 22 Jun 1831. Liveing Archive 104 a-d LT9

45. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 22 Jul 1831. Liveing Archive 102 a-d LT9


46. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Aug 1831. Liveing Archive 106 a-d LT9

47. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 24 Sep 1831. Liveing Archive 107 a-d LT9

48. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 7 Dec 1831. Liveing Archive 108 a-d LT9

49. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, 18 Dec 1831.
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Suffolk
Page 2
December 18, 1831
Sunday after Church
My dear Catherine
Knowing that you take a kind concern in any thing that meteriable affects us, induces me to write, not doubting that you are aware of Henry's being at London for Ordination and, supposing that you may not have heard from thence we thought it would afford you and Edwd (at least) pleasing satisfaction to hear, thro Charles, that Henry has had four days examination, and has passed very satisfactorily indeed, the Bishop personally commended him for his good Latin, (and there is not a better critic in England) and also, said that he was well read in the Scriptures, indeed he appears to have done very well. Mr Scott has engaged that Henry should have Surplice Fees - which he says are L16 per annum. The Bishop talk to him much about the parish of Wix, and gave him his advice thereon. Henry dines with him tomorrow (Saturday) with the Bishop - and will be ordained on Sunday morning with 20 others - thus far all in Charles words. O he is and has been much on my mind may the Spirit of God be ever on him that he may not do the work of God by halves. God Almighty grant that he may stand up in his name and do the work of the Ministry faithfully heartily and acceptably to God that when he has preached to others he may not be a castaway - O do him the kindness to pray heartily
Page 3
for him its a duty we all owe each other and you are all much in my debt that way - I pray pay me that thou owest me.
I understand that the people at Wix are quarrelsome and that there are many Desenters there. I propose advising him to live as quietly among them as he can and by soft and persuasive manners and methods to win them over when occasion offers - a quarrelling clergyman can never do any good to the souls of the people around him - perhaps you will advise him on the subject. God prosper His work in his hands.
Charles sent a note he recently recd from Mr Scott Mrs Scott died lately his son and his wife (he writes) will be in London next week when our mortgage business will in all probability be settled which will be some relief to your Father's mind, you have heard no doubt of the great loss we are likely to have respecting Packets - and as it is not brought on by our own misconduct we bear it much better than if otherwise - as all the good things are only lent to us, He who gave them to us for a while has a right to take them again when He thinks fit - thus I look at it and I bless the God of all mercies that he has still allowed us to hold a part - that he has not taken all from us this is the doctrine I often set forth - it's a great comfort to bear in mind Gods care over us our Saviour says "even the hairs of your head are all numbered" and "are not two sparrows sold for a farthing and not one of them falls to the ground without your heavenly Father"
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then be of good courage - Ye of more value than many sparrows we are also directed "to cast our burden on the Lord and he will sustain us" We have had no official account of the intention of the port master General perhaps he has not come to a conclusion on the business - should go forward as it has been reported I don't know what William will do it appears that he is in danger of being turned adrift as one of the juniors but as I have said we don't know how it may turn out God orders all things best for us - our Lord says "man ought always to pray and not to faint" Charles letter came in a parcel by a neighbour last night but we did not get it till just as we were going to Church - Father would not open it till we came from Church fearing there might be something to make us anxious. God be praised all was well as far as it goes. Charles says there will another dividend . . . . . Jackamans paid only the 3rd January - I sh. . . . . 3d in the pound - they have been no little time settli. . . . . this pretty business. I continue sadly deaf how thankful I should be to hear only as well as I usually do - I cant hear half the sermon - not enough to edify from it at all - I am a sad trouble to those who talk to me - I have had oil of almonds dropped in my ear - and I have had both ears syringed with warm soap and water but I dont find benefit at all. Mrs Graham tells meet Mr Graham has found benefit from warm rum being put in I have only had it once - for I have had a most violent stiff neck - I have been in agonies. Harriet ironed it nearly from morning till night which relieved me very much - it is not yet quite right - I propose in a day or two to try the rum again
Accept and present our best love to Edward and to all our friends
God be with you all prays your aff Mother
H. Liveing
Page 1
Harriet is very poorly - looks about the colour of a turnip I think she much want some pills like those Edwd ordered for Miss Beaumont - she puts me in pain to see her - our new troubles have not made her better
I don't know whether Julia has heard from London so if you please direct this to her and put it in your post.
Charles adds we hope you are all better should be glad to hear how you get on - one of us will write when Henrys affair is over.

Let me dear Julia have this letter again when you have an opportunity because I like to keep them when I'm not ordered to burn them - I wish I had many more for there is always something good in them - we are all well and unite in kind love
Your affectionate Sister
C. M. Liveing
This letter is written on all sides of one sheet folded inserted and sealed. Postmarked "Harwi De 18 1831" it is damaged where the seal has been fixed, it is readdressed to:
Mr & Mrs J Ambrose
Copford
near Colchester
Essex
A note in George Downing Liveing's hand reads "My grandmother Liveing to my mother relates to my Uncle Henry's ordination & expected losses owing to changes in the Post Office service"
Original in Fenn archive Ref L9



50. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 22 Dec 1831. Liveing Archive 41a-c LT4
Harwich December 22, 1831
Inserted at the top of page1
how our time runs - another year nearer to eternity - are we better prepared for it - than we were last year.
My dear Julia
I don't know whether you have heard any further of or from Henry, since you saw my letter to Catharine, which I suppose she directed to you - we had a letter from Charles last Tuesday - which I shall transcribe as (if you have not heard from Harry) it will give you pleasure - Charles says as Henry is gone to Bromley to Mr Scott I have promised to write - but I am so ill today although I am better that I have not been to the office today, I have had a very painful and inflamed nose I have been compelled to have advice - it is now better and will do very well, but it made my throat and head very bad - Henry has passed a very capital examination - the Bishops took much notice of him - and when he gave them the chance after the examination was over he said publicly that this year's examination altogether was the best he had ever known and that all the men had done well, very well, but that 5 of them were very superior - and he named them - and I am happy to say that Henry was one of them - which was very creditable - there were 36 men examined - although I was very ill yet I and Robert went to see him ordained - which took place yesterday (Sunday last) at St James Church Piccadilly - by the Bishops of London after a most impressive sermon to them. Henry is going to Cambridge I think - before his return to take his Masters Degree - providing Mr Barminster will officiate for him on Christmas Day, you will soon see him, and then he will tell you how kindly the Bishop was in giving him private advice about his parish etc" - you will I am sure partake of the same feelings with us on Henry's passing through so well - but O dear Julia unite your prayers with mine that he may be ordained
Page 2
of God - to stand up in His name to proclaim the glad tidings of the Gospel.
We have heard nothing more from the Post Office Capt Deane being out of the service makes the duty come more heavily on those who remain - I am really sorry for them all - for they are nearly prisoners in their vessels they are obliged to perform quarantine at Holland now the Dutch have learned that we have Cholera so they will not allow them to come onshore - William we learn had a good and quick passage to Cuxhaven, he sailed on Friday morning and arrived at Cuxhaven on Sunday and took the mail on the Thursday following - I fear he will not have a good passage back - God preserve him - God order all things best - for him - and for us all - for we know not what is best in this world for ourselves - we hope you are all pretty well we are much as usual - thank God not worse - I am still deaf - I am thankful that Charles could tell us that he was better - for I think the nose is a very serious part to be so inflamed - as I don't know where Henry may be I have added my letter to him to yours and I wrote to Charles yesterday - and said several things then that I wished Henry to know - thinking then he may yet be with him - perhaps you may know whether Edw has heard from Charles or Henry since his ordination if not they would like to hear about it you can cut this off from the other side and add half a sheet to it and send it to Nayland.
accept our united love and present it to Ambrose and your sons - hoping that they have learnt to behave well to everybody - but more particularly to their parents if not they cannot go to heaven when they die - what a dreadful thing that will be - tell them I say so - God bless you all
H Liveing

No envelope written on both sides of one sheet, a note glued to the letter reads
22 December 1831 Capt Deane out of PO service heavy work for rest Quarantine in Holland owing to Cholera here Uncle Henry ordained at St James Picc Uncle Charles bad nose



51. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 3 Feb 1832. Liveing Archive 110 a-d LT9

52. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter Harriet, 10 Feb 1832.
My dear Harriet
I am thankful I ought to have said we are thankful that it has please God to bring dear Catherine thus far thro - Father unites his love with mine to her and say we join our praises to God with her as for His great mercies vouchsafed and trust Him for a continuance of them to her let us hear from you soon we hope you'll be able to give a good account another Liveing come into the world!! if he lives may he be a blessing to his parents - to his relatives, and to all about him, I pray that God may give him a right mind then he will be a blessing to himself - then God will crown him with blessings everlasting - O may these blessings rest on every branch of my dear family may the end be always kept in view, then how differently we should all act - in many things, how many words we should leave unsaid - how many evils, and follies would be avoided - how much more our lives would benefit others and eventually ourselves it has been strongly recommended to let three words ever hang on the mind "God is present" was the mind early imbibed with the sense that God is so near (always) it would be a means of leading them to Him. God direct and keep us all, may he never - never leave us. Talk to Tom - endeavour to impress his mind that the eye of the Almighty God is ever on him - and
Page 2
that if he hopes to do well in this world and to obtain the blessed of the next (thro atoneing blood) he must ever remember that not only the omniscient God sees him here but he must stand one day to be judged before that Mighty God - this impression will be a means to prevent his falling into many evils, and follies, and will leave him frequently to mentally address the Almighty on very many occasions in life knowing that He alone can lead him right - and can alone give grace and power to practice right - to Him may he look - to Him may we all look for help and comfort.
I sat up in my bed and wrote thus far - Mrs Logan led us to think we might get Mrs Whalebone to do for Henry but she is much engaged at home as her youngest daughter is in delicate health has been brought up a dress make (as it is termed) and cannot do hard work her son wants her assistance also, so she has enough to do - Mrs Logan told me she had set her brains to work to find somebody that would take care and do for him but can't think of anybody - I have written to Julia to exert herself for him and now request you to ask Catherine to turn over in her mind who are fit and likely to be willing to serve him - she ought not to be very young for the sake of character and if she is not careful - she will half ruin him - she need be careful clean and able to cook in a common plain way the boy he is to have is a quiet handy boy - remarkably to Julia he is as good as half the maidservants - which would accommodate the woman very much - I can't help feeling
Page 3
very anxious respecting him and should feel it a mercy should a proper person be found - a new servant is a formidable event to me - I dread having to do with one - or I should not always keep one so long - should you find one write to Julia at once.
Pray remember us to Mrs Harrold and Uncle - I shall be glad to hear that her good health is confirmed - I told Mr Logan yesterday of her arm - O a slight touch of palsy don't say I said so to Uncle - have you taken care of his letter?
I should have written yesterday, but as Tom's shirts are so bad I was willing to send the two Ive had made - we have had a wash, this rainy foggy weather and all the things I have bought for Henry in it - I have measured all the parts of the shirt and when you have seen them on and enquired how they are for length I purpose cutting more out as they can make the now at school - but you must let me hear from you first and say how many he wants - I would only have a convenient number as this is his growing time.
Willm came in on Tuesday noon and was liberated yesterday morning - he takes the Mail for Holland (as he has been four times to Cuxhaven and does not come on turn with bridge) he is pretty well - Father has been sadly anxious about his being so long behind - I feel he may be called to account for laying so long in Yarmouth roads but I endeavour to hope that the best he could not lay there for pleasure - for nobody could go to him nor he go onshore - dont say anything about when you write.
At last I have sent Ms Alstons book which I hope you will get safely
pray remember me very kindly to her and thank her for the loan of it so long I hope she is in better health.
Page 4
It's a fine morning I mean to take a walk I have given up figs although they do not appear (to me) to disagree with me but much to the contrary - as I cut them in thin pieces before I eat them. I suppose I may eat an apple as I cannot do so without scraping - I seem to want something but I will forbear if necessary - I seldom take any other vegetable than potatoes - not them without they boil well - or they would give me pain directly - I thank God I have not had any other pains (or but seldom) than those I complain of in my head except rheumatic pains which fly about me in various parts.
Father bids me say if you want any money you must let us know and he will send you some.
Give our love to all the dear little children - I suppose they are all pleased with their new brother, except Anne - remember us kindly to Mrs Downing tell her we congratulate her on Catherine's affair - my love to Edd and tell him I beg he will use every means to be rid of the cough he has - the damp weather is against him
God bless you all forever
prays your Afft Mother
H. Liveing
Friday February 10, 1832
Written on four sides of one page, sent in an envelope it appears.
Separate note by G D Liveing "my grandmother to my Aunt Fenn 1832 on birth of my brother Edward - various family matters"

Original in Fenn archive Ref L10


53. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 20 Mar 1832. Liveing Archive 120a-d LT11

54. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 27 Mar 1832. Liveing Archive 109 a-d LT9

55. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 9 Apr 1832. Liveing Archive 121a-d LT11

56. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 19 Apr 1832. Liveing Archive 122 a-d LT11

57. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 14 Aug 1832. Liveing Archive 123a-d LT11

58. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 18 Nov 1832. Liveing Archive 124a-d LT11

59. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 19 Nov 1832. Liveing Archive 125a-d LT11

60. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 18 Dec 1832. Liveing Archive 126a-d LT11

61. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 28 May 1833. Liveing Archive 128a-d LT11

62. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 14 Jun 1833. Liveing Archive 127a-d LT11

63. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 19 Jul 1833. Liveing Archive 129a-c LT11

64. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 5 Sep 1833. Liveing Archive 131a-d LT11

65. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 30 Dec 1833. Liveing Archive 130a-c LT11

66. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 30 Sep 1834. Liveing Archive 111a-e LT10

67. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 31 Dec 1834. Liveing Archive 112 a-d LT10

68. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Cir 1835. Liveing Archive 119 a-d LT10

69. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Cir 1835. Liveing Archive 117 a-d LT10

70. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, 3 Jan 1835. Liveing Archive 113 a-d LT10

71. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Jun 1835. Liveing Archive 114 a-d LT10

72. Harriet's Letters: To her son Rev Henry T Liveing, 25 Mar 1836. Liveing Archive 26a-b HL
My dear Henry,
You promised to write when you were last here to say truth I have thought it long in coming, however when it did come it was dictated in kindness, I heartily wish I could say that your dear Father is better, O, no, I cannot - I think that his infirmities and indisposition increases, we can scarcely get anything to suit, his appetite is so indifferent - eggs are his main support, I hope that he won't take a dislike to them, or I know not what we shall do - he has very often restless nights - and when he can't rest - he can't let me - so that we are generally in bed late in a morning, as I am glad to get sleep at one time if I can't at another, as I am neither well, nor strong. I am ever taking fresh cold, which always produces cough - and ever indisposes me very much - I am also much troubled with shortness of breath and am still hysterical altho not in so alarming a degree as when I last saw you - no one can tell the suffering I endured then it amounted at times to horrible despair. God almighty preserve you - and I - and all that are near, and dear to us (in particular) from so dreadful a state amen - God hear my prayer - poor dear F complains much of difficulty of breathing - I often think (not only from our length of years but from so much weakness, and from so many infirmities) that our own thread of life must be nearly spent - O pray for us - pray for yourself that you with us, and all of us may be gathered into one fold under the Great Shepherd. Oh may your father say, in the great day, here am I, with my wife and all the children thou has given me. Oh God for Christ's sake hear and grant this great request - amen - amen - yesterday morning I was reading God's command to Ezekiel (the third chapter) to warn the people - you have well considered the chapt I trust - you are an appointed watchman - O be careful to be a diligent one pray - and look up to God for help - that you may rightly divide the word of truth - that
Page 2.
you may warn the guilty, (and who are not guilty? altho we are strangely apt to overlook our own faults, while the faults of others glare in our eyes) and encourage the weak hearted who are bound down under the sense of weight of sins - by lifting up weak hands and strengthening the feeble knees - as the Scripture directs - O be careful to represent sin as so hateful to God that he cannot not in endure it in his sight - set forth his exceedingly great love for man - that He sent His beloved only Son to endure such suffering on the cross represent the excessive weight of sin - of such poor unworthy creatures oppressed His Holy Soul so heavily that he swet drops of blood running down to the ground from His body - exclaiming was ever sorrow like unto my sorrow - all this and much more the blessed Saviour endured to save us from everlasting sufferings - think what a mighty mercy - what great kindness it would be thus to suffer for friends - but He suffered for his enemies, O wonderful!! Enlarge on the subject - be preparing a sermon for Good Friday - find the way to the heart if you possibly can - exalt Christ to the utmost of your power - and O dear Henry what speaks louder - or so loud as a pious life, let your sermons live in you - O humble self under the mighty hand of God put down pride make a point of it, or it will surely keep you out of heaven - no pride lives there it lives more - or less - in all hearts - let it be regarded by you as a great energy that will minder your everlasting happiness - when I am gone you will have no one to remind you of easily besetting sins - and I am not very likely to write many more letters welcome or unwelcome to you- we all need a touch stone to enliven our sluggish hearts who are dreadfully apt to sleep - and rest quietly in the sin although death is in the slumber - death eternal -perhaps you'll say I have drawn a sad picture - but surely it is a faithful one - may the God of heaven make you a faithful Minister - O entreat Him that He may give you his holy spirit without his aid you can do nothing as you ought - consider your holy calling, O may you honour God - O may you
Page 3.
have the great blessing of winning souls to Him - and after all may you be converted - that your soul may be healed and saved with a mighty Salvation - be careful to be well prepared with proper portions of Scripture when you visit the Sick - may you be a blessing to them in leading them to God - by showing them what sin is - for many are insensible of very many sins - and draw them by kind persuasion to confess them to God - and to humble themselves under his Mighty hand - for all pain and sickness - no doubt is the fruit of sin and sickness is to reprove us for it - sometimes it is sent as a trial of faith - may God be ever with you - and send these truths home to your own soul - O pray for me - for I with truth acknowledge that I am vile and full of sin - O God wash me in the atoning blood of Christ - "O wash me Saviour or I die" - O wash us all dear Father dear Sons and daughters amen amen
I have not time add much more - we have had a great mortality among the aged in particular within the last month - amongst them old Mrs Stevens is gone. Should Edw come to see us have anything you have that wants repairing put together and send them - or bring them when you come - I am glad that you give satisfaction you must look over little things - so that great things go on well - for none of us can have everything right or rather to our wishes "the sun shines no where blessed? but in heaven" so that we shall be miserably disappointed if we expect it.
Once more God bless you - accept our united love
believe me your
affct mother
H Liveing
remember us to Uncle and Aunt and to Mr and Miss Whitmore

Harwich
March 25, 1836 Friday

Addressed:
The Rev HT Liveing
Nayland

Written on two sides of one sheet sealed with red sealing wax, endorsed, Mrs L March 26, 1836.



73. Notes on Harriets Wedding: Author Unknown, Undated.
Notes on Harriet Harrold and the Liveing's by an unidentified Liveing
Mr Crowden came to Harwich to enter as being MP (was appointed Collector of Customs) and went a great deal to Gt Grandf Harrold - she got him an old servant (a widow Read) for his servant. She put her daughter to board at a Fisher? Mr Crowden's saw the daughter and thought it a pity her and said to Mrs L if you will clothe me I'll send her to school. So she went to school with Grandmama Liveing at Emsted Market. Mr Crowden also ye called Grandmama Liveing (Miss Harold) his daughter Little Polly Elizth Reid spent holidays at Harolds. Mr Crowden made her his ward when about 20. She died in her confinement, child lived 10 months lie in Harwich. Mr Crowden then left and went to Hull. Mr Harold was Mr Crowden's chief clerk ("Blaze" (John) Batten nicknamed for light in ? sent on a wild goose chase to Mr Crowden dying bed at Hull.)
Miss Harold's marriage. While Mr Crowden was at Harwich this took place. She was aged 24. The wedding was to be very grand and Mr Crowden gave the feast and was very liberal and kind on the occasion. He had always made a great pet of her. The Post Chaises were at Harwich to take them off to Michael Stow Hall, Ramsay where Mr Crowdens country house was, all the clergy in the County invited and were there.
Our Grandfather dearly loved to have his head combed, used to say Julia come and comb my head for a penny sometimes it was 6d. He had a six inch pigtail tied up with ribbons a little bit of leather at top where it fixed in
Page 2
These pigtails were the natural hair a little piece of leather tied round at the base and a piece of ribbon half inch wound up and down bows at top the end turned up like a drakes tail the used to call coft sic (cue) liveing the A ? ?
He also had a house in Harwich invitd to all people in neighbourhood and a large assembly. He gave her a silver teapot and other things never was such a wedding seen there bells rang at 3 churches en route poor Captain Liveing was so abashed by the display he would have sunk into an egg shell. Mr Crowden was court dressed in blue satin Swale clothes, waistcoat. Why Aunt Ambrose was This wedding of course took place before Mr Crowden own The young lady ? he had brought up did not ? marrying him.
Miss Harold (ye bride) was dressed in dove colour silk dress, open in skirt over a blue satin petticoat. The body to a ? and little straps of trimming round. Long white lace aprons High-heeled narrow shoes 2 and three-quarter inches ? And coming down to 1 inch ? red ? on every ?
She also wore bell hoops made of brown holld and ? (sketch of a bell) sleaves to elbow with 3 deep lace ruffles just below elbow such sleeves and single ruffle were commonly worn
She was only half a yard and half a quarter of a yard round the waist. She was a very fine figure, and falling shoulders, beautiful hair curling naturally, dark brown. The said to Mr Crowden "I can't walk through the streets he said oh my dear you must it is quite right to let the people see you and know you are married".
The Deave paid Mr Crowden sums of money for, getting them command of packet boats. At that time Captain Liveing would willingly have paid L200 a year to him to get him command as
Page 3
the command used to make thousands a year. He did get Captain Liveing office of mate in Cutter Captain Liveing got this command of Packet much later.
Mr Crowden was godfather to Aunt Ambrose and Uncle William and Uncle Thomas. He sent Aunt a 5 note when 14 old. This she thought was only introducion to what she was expecting, it however never came. She was named Julia after his mother. Mr Crowden lived after his first wife's death at Hull he was worth L40,000 himself and then he married an old maid worth 60,000. He left his property to Thomas Crowden his nephew. Mr Crowden used to ask if his friends and knew the Yorkshire ? Coat of arms - a flea a fly and a magpie. A flea bites every mans back, a fly dips into every mans dirt, a magpie chats about every mans business.

He gave Mrs Liveing when he left all his first wife's beautiful baby linen Aunt Ambrose has one cuff now. In Michaelstow Hall they danced there was an organ the pipes of which went up to the roof. Our Great grandmother Liveing always had a white satin dress to sit up in and receive company with tea after her confinements. Such dresses were kept laid up after use. It was afterwards died pink for our Great aunt Saunders and trimmed with foxes fur.
Page 4
The best chintz prints at that time were 4 shillings and 5 shillings a yard the ladies embroidered skirts used to be cut up and shared for gents waistcoats; beer very strong; 3 combs of malt cost 27 shillings and was made into a hogshead of ale (now,1870, malt 32 shillings per comb) half a pint of beer need to make you queer.
The money made by Packets was by passengers, that being almost the only commission in the contract. My Grandfather made L600 in 7 weeks; the most he ever made.
Once a dead man lodged on boat as they pulled in once they had at Harwich a cargo of fish worth L100 instead of going to Gravesend they went into Harwich harbour which was then all covered with ice most severe cold bout Grandfather xposed and got facial palsey & ? up he never ?
Great grandmother Liveing died when our grandfather was very young. His mother was 43 and he the Benjamin1 when she died. His sister Sarah died of smallpox. He had 3 brothers Phillips who all died. When his mother died his aunt Saunders kept house and an old woman. His father lived later - he used to go to bed at 10 o'clock every night after a hot supper. Grandfather was once out 14 days for gales of wind off Dogger Bank without changing his clothes. He was once washed off deck by a wave and washed on again by the next. When he got to his fathers and knocked he looked down and said oh boy I never expected to see you again. They used to get codfish and killed by knocking on head. Once he went in a rowing boat to London to catch the market, probably from below Gravesend. Smacks never went ?

1. The last born see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin

The transcriber has not identified the author of these notes, the writing is very like that of Capt William Liveing, Harriet's son ?, possibly part of the notes are by Julia Ambrose nee Liveing. There are two sets of the notes, which vary, in different hands.
Crowden has not been traced and does not appear to have been the owner of Michaelstow Hall Ramsey ESS at that time. Little has been verified, the tone and interest in the garments suggest it was written by a woman, but the hand suggests a man, the description of relationships confuses.
E L Fenn 2014.






74. Further Notes on Harriets Family: Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Undated.
These notes largely mirror those above.







75. Harriet's Letters: To Her Daughter-in-Law Catherine Mary Downing, Apr 1836.
Mrs Liveing
Nayland
Page 2
Harwich friday afternoon
My dear Katy
I received a letter from Henry on Wednesday wherein he says that you would be all glad to hear how we do, I heartily wish that I could report better but that is not the case - poor dear Father is very sadly he says he gets daily weaker - I don't know that he is exactly so, but certainly he is very weak - he talks sometimes of laying in bed, not being able to get up - however I thank God that has not at present been the case - he gets up very late and so we all do as we have very frequently restless nights - I am glad to get sleep also as I can for I cannot do very well without, as I am very far from well, or strong. I tell my poor husband except that he is paralysed he is as strong as I otherwise, we have seen all our best days and are fast going into Eternity. I cannot neglect to say how often his Father says I wish I could see Edwd once more - I ever reply that I would write and tell him what he says but at the same time I remark, that I cannot see how he can leave home, as so much depends on him - however as he has poor thing so repeatedly expressed his desire I could but tell him - whether he can comply or not.
His appetite is bad we can rarely get anything that he likes if it was not for eggs I don't know how he would be supported, he has liked pigeons now and then when we could get one, now because we have at several times gotten three he dont wish for any more - knowing that you and Edward are fond of them Harriet bespoke half a dozen when they could be obtained, these I have now sent were brought this morning, they are
Page 3
wood birds as you will see, Harriet thinks the flavour of them is higher than the tame pigeons. I hope they will prove acceptable
I had a letter from Charles on Wednesday written in haste he is so full of business and says Mary is a good clerk to him and but for her services he knows not whether he should be able to get through - to use his own words "Mary has become a useful and diligent clerk to me, she is much better than half the clerks in our office and better than nine tenths of government clerks in general, she is both quick and correct and comprehends directly what is explained to her, she spares me much labour - I don't think I could get through without her help" - he adds that if it please God he proposes going to Mrs Freeman's on the night before good friday and return on Saturday (or I think on Monday) he has business of importance to settle of Mrs Freemans - he means to leave Mary behind for a week - it's a good thing that she can help him - and it is a good thing for a woman to stand high in her husband's eyes is it not?
I am glad to learn that you are all pretty well - and hope that your children will improve in health at Copford your kind and good Mothers health is a mercy to you I know - as well as to herself at this stage of life we can hardly look for such a blessing - and your poor Aunt Sally - I am very glad to learn that she is at all able to get out - she has had a solitary life - so lonely - having no near friend to be always with her - I think she has a better situation now - only see a few different faces relieves dullness sometimes and you now and then call on her for a few minutes oftener then you did when she lived further from you - remember me
Page 4
and tell her when ever I think of her I enjoy her little change of life for her account. Yesterday Harriet recd a letter from Tom wherein he says (after speaking of his medical employments etc) "I hope you will make no objection to my accepting my Uncle Henry's invitation to stay with him the holidays which will be after the 14th of April till the first of May" (he must be back on the first of May) "I have set my heart on it and it will cost as much for my board in London as my expenses in getting backward and forward" I am thinking that Edwd may be glad of his services to put up medicine for the time that he may have a little leisure. Harriet also had a letter from Robert who says he believes that Tom is very diligent and careful as far as he can respecting expenses to avoid them as much as may be - Charles also says that he has no doubt of his doing well - as he is fully determined to study and learn and to comprehend what is taught him as far as he is able. I pray God that he may eventually do well for his poor mother's sake as well as his own - poor Robert is much attached to him he appears to have a fatherly regard for him - he looks (as far as he can) to his spiritual concerns as well as his temporal - he is indeed a brother and a real friend. I believe that he strives to be a Christian - I can but feel a great regard for him - he is strictly honest in every sense of the word I really think - what a comfort to parents to see and know that their children are well disposed to be near God oneself is the first of course - next to that our near - and dear friends - God of His great goodness grant that you and I dear Catherine and all who are near and dear to us may be at the great day gathered into one fold under the great and Good Shepherd. God for Christ's sake hear our prayers I say our prayers because I am sure that you will unite with me in a hearty amen - so be it -I have only time to add love to all friends I don't forget Mrs Downing
believe me your affectionate mother
H. Liveing
This letter is undated with three notes:
"no date but evidently April 1836 see letter to Julia Ambrose of 7 Ap 1836" (In the hand of EHL)
"the date is evidently Ap 1836 - see letter to Julie Ambrose Ap 1836" - EHL. (Edward Henry T Liveing ?)
My grandmother Liveing to my mother no date, she writes of my grandfather as paralysed and Tom Fenn studying medicine in London. GDL (George Downing Liveing)
Written on three sides of one page folded, tucked into itself, and sealed with a crosshatched seal. Scanned. The letter to Julia Ambrose referred to has not been traced. 2007
Original in Fenn archive Ref L11


76. Harriet's Letters: To Her Son Edward, 10 Jun 1836.
Mr Liveing
Surgeon
Nayland
Suffolk
Page 2
Harwich June 10, 1836
My dear Edwd
We are all heartily glad that it has pleased God to deal so favourably with dear Catherine and we all unite with you in returning the Almighty thanks and praise for his great mercy shown her - I pray God to take her and her baby under his divine care then O'time to eternity also the same earnest desire we have for you and all those who are near and dear to us. Pray give our love to her and say that her safety is much relief and comfort to our minds - I wrote to Henry a few days since, and requested him to answer my letter very soon so I expect to hear from him every post if he does write soon request him to say how poor Katy does, if not, I hope you all one of your family will write, for we shall be very glad to hear of her well doing - I thought by what you said yesterday that the event was nearer than you expected, the feelings that she generally experience told her so and me to - I was thankful but not surprised by this morning's account - poor Mrs Downing I suppose did not hear of the affair till all was over - remember us to her, and said that we congratulate her on this happy occasion - may the child prove a blessing to you and all of yours I think I should like her name should be Harriet if no one has chosen another name, whom it is right that you should pay attention to. I think the name may bring your Mother to your mind sometimes, when I am gone - putting aside palsy - I think I am as feeble as your father - and I am very much annoyd by difficulty of breathing pains of body and back and rheumatism in my limbs
Page 3
all these and many more ailings are the consequences of years - I often tell your poor Father - and that God is leading us both into Eternity by gentle steps which is His mercy and goodness He sends, that we may be warned to prepare for the great change - O may He grant us the grace of His Holy Spirit - for without His guidance we can do nothing as we ought no - although it is for our everlasting interest - for without divine aid and defence, the God of this world, will blind our eyes and harden our hearts - unite your prayers with ours, that it may please God to carry us safely through this world, to the world of rest, God Almighty give us repentance unto life - and firm faith in the merits of the Saviour, with the blessings of Pardon and peace Amen Amen
we were much struck to hear of the death of poor Hent. . . . . for Henry said she had been very ill, but she was recovering and that you hoped she might have her general health better in future - poor Henry we are very much sorry for him as well - for it must have made him very uncomfortable if not ill as I know that he is a very nervous subject - Harriet heard of the solemn event at market by accident I wrote to him on the subject and observed to him that perhaps Mrs Harrold or Katy might have recommended a proper person and requested him to let me hear from him as soon as he could for if neither of the above had thought of someone - then we would endeavour to seek for one, and at the same time observed that it was indeed a very difficult thing to find a person in every way fit - I observed at his first going to housekeeping that he must be sure not to take a young person - for altho the parties were ever so innocent, in the eye of the world they would not be esteemed as such - and that a good name was much sooner lost then
Page 4
regain'd - nay perhaps it never would be recovered and in particular what a blemish to a man in his situation it would be, even to be thought criminal - my dear Katy I hope will impress the like thoughts on his mind, I know he values her, if she can think of a proper person I shall feel indebted to her to do her best for him for I really don't know of one - without Mrs Dick Westhorp would undertake it but I don't know that she would be willing to go out but she has only her wits to live by - she has a little house and furniture but nothing else - she is of good age and is a very respectable person above the common sort - remarkably clean and a good manager and caretaker to do the best as they were much reduced by long and severe illnesses. I don't know that her health is the best but she has held out wonderfully in nursing her husband for several years and after his death she nursed her mother for a year and half.
We have gotten the tincture - but have forborne to press the taking it as he has taken opening pills today which generally disposes him to sickness - indeed he often complains of being sickish when he has taken nothing to make him so. Harriet and I are frequently grieved at meal times to see him as we are much afraid that he wont take enough food to support his weak frame - we will get the medicine down if possibly we can - I pray God to send his blessing with it - Harriet bids me ask whether you have heard anything of Tom since he left Nayland - she has not - she has always her fears that he may cut himself remembering the danger you were in at the hospital.
I had a letter from Amelia and a few days since - she says her poor father has been alarmingly ill with inflamed windpipe - and again by spasms in his stomach and bowel obstruction -- and her brother Edwd has had a sharp attack of influenza and Louise such a violent termination of blood to the brain that they almost despaired of her life -- they all soon recovered - thank God - Mrs Harrold is poorly by the tenor of her letter I am led to hope that she may have become as
Page 1
pious as her truly Christian sister was - I told Henry that I should take opportunity of sending it that you may all see it.
that God may bless you and all of you is the prayer of your Affectionate Mother
H. Liveing
remember us kindly to Mrs Harrold and love to my brother - to be the father of eight children what an important trust!!! Oh think much - and pray more for divine help that you may set them a good example and bring them up in the fear of God, and to the love and honour of His name may God be with you and all of you for ever more Amen
Written on four sides of one sheet, folded inserted and sealed, endorsed post paid, showing a postmark Harwich 10 JU 1836.
Note in George Downing Liveing's hand "from my grandmother living to my father on the birth of my sister Harriet June 1836"
Original in Fenn archive Ref L12



77. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Date uncertain. Liveing Archive 140a-d LT12

78. Harriet's Letters: To daughter Julia Ambrose nee Liveing, Undated. Liveing Archive 141a-d LT12

79. Memories of Harriet's death: From Anna Marie Howard & Edward Liveing, 1 Jul 1898.
Liveing Archive

In 1836 died at Harwich old Capt Liveing, my grandfather, whom I can remember.

January 1837 my grandmother, nee Harold, his widow, died of influenza (bronchitis) epidemic, at my father's house at Nayland. My sister Fanny (at 13) escaped influenza and waited on her grandmother.
Mrs Liveing was taken ill quite unexpectedly while staying at Nayland and she and her daughter Mrs Fenn were still in occupation of the house at Harwich and she was on the lookout for a house in Colchester to be under the ministrations of an excellent evangelical Divine Mr Carr of St Peter's Colchester also to be near Copford (her daughter Mrs Ambrose) and Nayland her son Edward.
I well remember when she was dying my father getting . . . . . inhaling apparatus for her, and we small children (I was five) being sent over the way to my grandmother Downing's to be out of the way.
Uncle Henry T Liveing MA was curate at Hadley Suffolk when his father died (1836). He was born in 1805: died 1884.
E. L.
Memories by Anna Maria Howard my sister, July 1, 1898.

Harriet married Commander Thomas LIVEING R N [230] on 7 Sep 1786 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS. Thomas was born on 16 Mar 1760, was baptised on 23 Apr 1760 in Harwich ESS, died on 30 Aug 1836 at age 76, and was buried in Harwich Churchyard.


20. Samuel ALSTON [85], son of Samuel ALSTON [640] and Sarah [122], was born in 1721 in Edwardstone SFK, was baptised on 21 Oct 1722 in Edwardstone SFK, died on 3 Jun 1796 at age 75, and was buried on 11 Jun 1796 in Family Vault Nayland Church.

General Notes:
Samuel Alston was admitted an Attorney in the Court of Common Pleas on 26th June 1746 and later viz on 20 May 1760 before Judge Sir Thomas Alay? he was admitted and enrolled as a solicitor of the Court of Chancery.
Samuel commenced practising as an attorney-at-law in Nayland in 1746, when he succeeded his father-in-law Jacobus Vanderzee.
There are extensive records from Samuel's practice etc on deposit at Bury St Edmonds PRO ref HA541.
Samuel was retained as Steward of various Manors, some records of his profession life are included below, he also practised with his sons James and George, further records of some of their work are recorded under George's research notes.

Samuel married 2nd August 1758 at St James, Westminster, Mary, daughter of Jacobus Vanderzee, Attorney of Nayland, to whom Samuel had been articled. Ref: Alstoniana

A portrait of Samuel by Beeston Coyte is inscribed on the back " Sam Alston Attorney at Nayland aged 31 Beeston Coyte 1752" sighted E L Fenn 2001. This was gifted to Christchurch Mansion Ipswich SFK by Nancy Hadwen 2003. An unsigned miniature is in possession of E L Fenn N.Z. 1999. An oval miniature of Samuel aged 51 and one of Mary his wife both by George Roth and dated 1773, in possession of Mrs Angela Wilson (RIN 501 Fenn), Sudeley Lodge, Winchcombe 2000.

Samuel purchased (copyhold?) his Nayland house (Groom) after his married, it was formerly owned by J Vanderzee, Nayland Manor Rentals 1755 - 62 Ips RO HA108/1/4/11 show John Williams as owner of Groom, Sam Alston occupier. Dr E L Fenn renamed the house Alston Court after its restoration early in the 20th cent. The Alston's had a messuage in Edwardstone named Groomes mentioned in Samuel Alston of Rogers Will 1631, in occupation of Thomas Martin.

An inventory of sundry household goods at the dwelling house of Mr Samuel Alston attorney at law at Nayland in Suffolk which were seen and appraised August 27, 1762.
By Heny Lodge.
In the Hall and on Staircase.
One eight-day clock three oval tables five old cane arm chairs and six others a couch and squab in old India pattern seven pictures eighteen prints and three old maps. L5 10s 0d.
In Parlour and Closet.
One looking glass one oval table three stone jars and a footman. L2 10s 0d.
In Kitchen and Closet.
One old cupboard 2 old oval tables 5 chairs a cloaths brusher to formes coal grates with col irons fender poker pewter tongs and crane in chimney and hooks dripping pan stand 2 split racks and one split and Jack pulleys and weight and a tin candle box. L2 0s 0d.
In the Cellar.
Four ale stalls two half hogs heads a 16 gallon vessel and a wood funnell. L1 11s 6d.
In the Backhouse and Laundry.
One old ? Browning copp a marsh tub and cooler 3 tubs and 2 ? a work line? and one pail two boylors 2 saucepans 2 skillets a store pan five Earth pots a safe a tin oven stone cistern and coal racks L5 7s 6d
In the Two Butterys.
A washing Engine useless till repair by Mr Alston three old Firkins a kneading trough one vessel and stall? and wood steps. L0 12s 6d
In the Best Parlour
A moving stove with brass moulding and fender 6 rush bolton chairs a corner cupboard a looking glass a small table 2 china bowls one of them broke 3 Delft bowls one of them broke 1 Delft dish and 9 plates 12 China plates 3 of them broke 40? Glasses of different sorts as jelly glasses wine glass and a two quart glass decanter and one pint. L5 5s 0d.
In the Laundry and Closet
An old 4 leaf screen one old ? iron one ? and 2 ? A stricking board and Deal Dresser an old napkin press and old chairs light pewter dishes 23 plates one water glass 2 pewter salvers 2 tin covers 2 iron dogs and 2 linen horses one copper chocolate pot and one ditto drinking pot. L2 15s 0d
In the Dining Room
A looking glass with glass arms a jappaned side? table 2 white cups a glass canister an old hearth brush 16 prints glazed in black frames an old piece of tapestry and a mahogany side? board. L3 3s 0d
In the Room Over the Cellar.
An old turn up bedstead with old flock bed mixed with feathers a bedstead with red handing? a feather bed 2 old blankets and quilt a bolster and 2 pillows a Deal hanging ? and old table and 3 old chairs. L2 12s 6d
In the Yellow Room.
A bedstead with old yellow hanging one old featherbed a bolster and one pillow an old under bed 2 blankets and old quilt a small old glass and old chest of drawers a small table 2 old cane chairs a childs chair old window curtains and rod and old trunk. L2 0s 0d.
In the Green Room.
A chest of drawers a dressing glass old dressing table an old skrowtore? and 4 chairs stove and fender old window curtains and rod. L1 11s 6d.
In the Dressing Room and Closet.
A swing glass one cane chair 6 small pictures and a trunk. L0 5s 0d.
In the Best? Chamber.
A bedstead with a featherbed a bolster one pillow 2 blankets green hanging and a gilt hanging of the room and window curtains 2 old stools an old easy chair 3 cane chairs a picture 7 blue & white china cups broke and whole. L3 7s 6d
In the Red Room
A bedstead a featherbed a bolster 3 pillows a mattress and old white quilt a looking glass a square table a chest of drawers and three old chairs. L5 0s 0d.
In the Blew Room Green Room and Closet and Stair Case.
Old looking glass and tinned night table a palla? and bedstead broke a feather bed and bolster an old clock case 10 old portraits? and three maps. L1 10s 0d
p?Patar?
One pint mug a cream pot 2 salts and shovels one scop spoon 5 tablespoons 8 tea spoons a strainer and a pepper crusher
L11 0s 0d
All the goods mentioned in this infantry were appraised at the sum of L56.10s 6d
per Heny Lodge.
Inventory in Other Records file, it uses many abbreviations.

Entry in the Alston Law Practice Diary
"My son William went to Mr Alefounders School - My daur Anna Maria went there to learn to write & my daur Harriot went to Mrs Bachlors? School all of them on the 22nd day of June 1778"
Manor of Weeley ESS Court Records 1696-1793.
Both Thomas Alefounder & Samuel Alston were involved with the Manor of Weeley ESS.
8 Aug 1764: Thomas Alefounder of Nayland Suffolk schoolmaster; Samuel Alston; Sarah Savill; John Hockford. 31 Dec 1763 TA surr to his will; SA in place of Lords Bailiff; SS and JH copyholders wits All land held by copy of court roll. Ref: ERO. D/DU6/3 fo 41v
30 Jly 1772: Thomas Alefounder of Nayland Suffolk schoolmaster; Samuel Alston gent.; Danl. Partridge; John Barnby; Susannah Cole widow; Richard Hayward; Bennett Foster of East Donyland Essex 1 Jun 1772; surr TA to BF; SA in place of Lords Bailiff; DP and JB copyholders wits; BF did not attend court to take adm; 1st proc made Barn with land and appts 30 A more or less formerly in occ SC, then RH & his assigns
Ref: ERO. D/DU6/3 fo 63r
Peter Alefounder writes 2013 "Thomas Alefounder (died 1789), was schoolmaster there (Nayland) for 50 years, he was a tenant of the market cross in 1764-5 and possibly later. He may very well have used it or "the Chamber over the same" as a schoolroom.
Ref: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~alefounder/index.html

Samuel paid Quit Rent to Samuel Gibbs of the Manor of Nayland in 1781.
Alston Samuel: Freeholder
For a house called the Groom 6d.
For the brick wall on the left hand of the door 4d.
For the garden behind the house called the Groom 1s 0d.
For Chamberlains 4d.
For a tenement pulled down inclosed with a brick wall 9d.
For another late Doomsdales in the said yard 4d.
For ground where a tenant stood formerly John Robertson's 4d.
For ground where a house lately stood now called Harlins 4d.
For a tenement behind the church called Whitebread Hall 1s 0d.
For a house near the Court Meadow Gate late Thos Alsops 2d.
For ground in Town Street where a tenant lately stood forml
Mary Franas (sic) Gusterson widow late Edward Gusterson 2d.
For ground in Town Street where a tenant lately stood late
Edw Gusterson late in the occupation of Mr Lingwood Smith 2d.
For a yard in town Street where a house forml stood forml Smiths
& late Edw Gusterson late in occupation Mr Lingwood Smith 2d.
5s 7d
As Copy holder of ground called Kemballs 3s and where Bretts
Barn stood 1s 4d both laid into meadow the bottom of the garden. 4s 4d
Total as at Michaelas Day (29 Sept) 1781 9s 11d
Ref: HA541/2/1/13 (ii)
Also assesed in 1795.

The following are personal extracts from his 1757 diary:
14/2 Paid Mr Todd my subscription for relieving the poor. 10/6d.
19/2 Taken ill with asthma.
26/2 Taken with the gout.
30/3 Paid Mr Church for a ticket in the Guin. . . . . lottery.
21/5 Set first crop of kidney beans and cauliflowers.
27/5 Brewed 6 bush of malt. 2lb1/2 of good hops.
30/5 Mon Mr Samuel Gledhill came to my house in the morn th stayd till Wed 2nd after breakfast at parting he borrowed 5 shills of me.
1/6 Phamplet Club at it.
2/6 Book Club at it.
3/6 Musick Club paid my forfoits 4p.
13/6 Paid Hannah my servant half a guinea.
28/6 Phamplet Club absent, but sent my pamps.
30/6 Book club at it.
1/7 Music Club at it.
27/9 Pam - Club - day afesembly.
22/11 Phamplet Club pd Mr Sheldon my years subs 6 shillings.
23/11 Paid Mr Darby 20s subscription for the Book Club for a year ensuing.
24/11 Music Club.
28/11 Began to cut my vines.
1/12 Pd Mr Rigby for 4 days work 6 shills.

1776 - An Americus Backers grand piano of that date appears to have been bought for the house, as recorded in the National Trust Magazine of Autumn 1976 No 26. Pg10:
Benton Fletcher Collection of Musical Instruments by Augustine Ford. The Benton Fletcher Collection, now at Fenton House, Hampstead, London was formed by Major George Benton Fletcher . . . . . Sometimes instruments would be given to him as was the the grand piano of 1776 by Americus Backers. One of the earliest English grand pianos extant, it came from Dr and Mrs Fenn of Alston Court Nayland Suffolk, where it had stood ever since it was made.

Samuel was a Church Warden at Nayland Church from time to time between 1756 and 1795.

MINUTES OF NAYLAND COURT BARON.
Elizabeth Gibbs widow was Lady of the Manor, then from 1739 Samuel & Elizabeth Gibbs, with Jacobus Vanderzee appointed Steward of the Manor. Samuel Alston sat as Deputy Steward in 1745, then Steward in 1746.

Dated 1754 to 1767 (Latin to 1727, gap to 1754)
9 Aug 1756 - Samuel sold a Tenement to J N Sadler.
12 Nov 1758 - Richard Williams sold to John Williams, Grooms & other lands held at an annual rent of 6d of the Manor of Nayland.
12 Nov 1758 - Mary Vanderzee widow sold a messuage to John Boor (?) another to Hugh Green.
1758 - William Greenwood sold a messuage named White Bread Hall and another in Court St to Samuel Alston.
Ref: Bury RO HA108/1/4/8

Dated 1729 - 1775. (searched from 1734 in English)
1752 - mentions death of John Fenn Customary Tenant, his son Joseph and wife of 3 years Sarah, all family of George Fenn.
1754 - Samuel Alston acquired a Tenement in Bear St from Thomas Lyme.
1767 - Admission of Samuel Alston to the use of his Will.
1768 - Alienation of Grooms from John Williams Snr. & Jnr. to Samuel Alston
Ref: Bury RO HA108/1/4/2

1780 Nov 1 - Thomas Alsop the elder hath since the last General Court Baron alienated to Samuel Alston and his heirs a certain Messuage and tenement with the lands yards and appurtenances situated in Court Street Nayland near the gate leading into the Court Meadows now in the occupation of Daniel King clog maker and pattern maker.
Ref: Dr Edward L Fenns book of notes pg 29

Samuel Alston attorney of Nayland Master, Apprentice James Vanderzee, date of Indenture 16 Sep 1785, date of Duty 14 Oct 1785, Term 1yr 3 mths. Fee L10.0.0 Ref:The Genealogist IR 1/32

Suffolk Record Office, Ipswich Branch:
RINGSHALL PARISH RECORDS
Catalogue Ref. FB4/N1
FILE - Office copy decree in the Court of Chancery, in the case between Samuel Alston, executor of the last will of Rev. Stephen White, clerk, deceased and John Males and others - ref. FB4/N1/52 - date: 6 Dec. 1785

FILE - Attested copy of Chancery report of the auction of two lots lands, belonging to Rev. Stephen White, rector of Holton, and purchased by Samuel Alston of Stoke-by-Nayland, in the case between Samuel Alston plt. and John Males and others def. - ref. FB4/N1/53 - date: 17 Nov. 1786

FILE - Certificate of transfer of L1027.5s.9d - ref. FB4/N1/57 - date: 8 May 1787. Joint Stock of Bank, 3 per cent annuities to the Accountant General, by Samuel Alston on the order of the Court of Chancery, in the above mentioned case (FB4/N1/53)

General Evening Post London 16 Feb 1788
Sale by Kings College Cambridge:
. . . . . Also about Eight Acres and a Half of Free Hold Land in Edwardftone now in the occupation of Mr Samuel Alston under a leafe which will expire at Michaelmas 1795 at the rent of 4L per annum.

1788 March 24 - the Lord of the Manor by his Deputy Steward with the consent of all the homage, granted licence to Samuel Alston to enclose half a rod and 14 feet of ground by measurement lying next the Meadow of him the said Samuel Alston from the corner of the messuages of him the said Samuel Alston situate in Court Street in Nayland now in the occupation of Daniel King pattern maker to the post or stile for a foot passage into certain meadows called the Court Meadows in Nayland.
Vide 1802 April 19 - George Alston alienated above to Mary Baker.
Ref: Dr Edward L Fenns book of notes pg 32

FILE - Copy will of Samuel Alston of Nayland - ref. FB4/N1/64 - date: 1795,1796
FILE - Copy admission - ref. FB4/N1/65 - date: 25 Jul. 1796 Mrs. Mary Alston, widow, admitted to copyhold lands in Ringshall (8a.) by virtue of the last will of Samuel Alston
FILE - Lease and release - ref. FB4/N1/66-67 - date: 19-20 Sep. 1796
1. Mrs. Mary Alston of Nayland, widow
2. James Alston of Bocking (Ess.)
George Alston of Nayland
Samuel Alston of Leicester
Charlotte Alston of Nayland
Anna Maria Alston of Nayland
Harriett Alston of Nayland

FILE - Copy absolute surrender: manor of Ringshall Charles Rockells and Rawlings - ref. FB4/N1/68 - date: 30 Sep. 1796
1. Mrs. Mary Alston

FILE - Copy admission: manor of Ringshall Charles Rockells and Rawlings - ref. FB4/N1/69 - date: 21 Oct. 1796
2. Mrs. Mary Alston

FILE - Copy acknowledgement of the receipt of L500, by Sarah Alston, from her mother, Mary Alston, widow, given to her under the will of her late father Samuel Alston - ref. FB4/N1/76 - date: 25 Jun. 1805
Ref A2A (This is an extract of the complete catalogue)

Essex Record Office D/DC/23/19
MISCELLANEOUS ESSEX DOCUMENTS
Series D/DC 18/48-57 Manor of Greenstead: copyhold property called Freemans
Dates of Creation 5 & 6 July 1791
Scope and Content Lease & Release to make a tenant to the precipe for suffering a Recovery. (i)Wm. Dawson [as in D/DC 23/17], and w. Eliz.; (ii)Rev. Hen. Dawson of Great Waldingfield (co. Suff.), clerk (s. of said W.D.); (iii) Samuel Alston senior of Nayland (co. Suff.), gent., to (iv) Jn. Whishaw of Castle street, Holborn, London, gentleman Property as in D/DC 23/13.]

Essex Record Office D/DC/23/18
MISCELLANEOUS ESSEX DOCUMENTS
Series D/DC 18/48-57 Manor of Greenstead: copyhold property called Freemans
Dates of Creation 5 & 6 July 1791
Scope and Content Lease & Release to make a tenant to the precipe for suffering a Recovery. (i)Wm. Dawson [as in D/DC 23/17], and w. Eliz.; (ii)Rev. Hen. Dawson of Great Waldingfield (co. Suff.), clerk (s. of said W.D.); (iii) Samuel Alston senior of Nayland (co. Suff.), gent., to (iv) Jn. Whishaw of Castle street, Holborn, London, gentleman Property as in D/DC 23/13.]

Essex Record Office D/DU 133/6
DEEDS AND RECORDS OF LANGHAM AREA.
Dates of Creation 1,2 April 1778
Scope and Content Conveyance (Lease and Release) for L1200; with bond to indemnify against dower (i) Henry Nunn, as in 133/3; (ii) Thomas Blyth, as in 133/3; (iii) Samuel Alston of Nayland (co. Suff.), gentleman (trustee of Thomas Blyth) (a) Field (formerly 5 fields) (7a.) called Lynches, abutting E. on the highway, N. and W. on lands sometime of Robert Potter, now of Richard Foster and formerly in the occupation of Samuel Blyth and now of James Blyth, sen., and S. on lands sometime of Robert Coleman, afterwards of Richard Houlding and now of Mary Blyth, called Crane Grove; which field is situate in Langham and was sometime in the occupation of Samuel Debition, late of Samuel Young, decd., and now of Samuel Young, his s. And all other freehold lands of Henry Nunn in Langham

Essex Record Office D/DYz/36
DEEDS OF VARIOUS PARISHES
Dates of Creation 21 AUg. 1775
Execx W. Elizabeth
Wtn: Sam., James & Jacob Alston [996]

Suffolk Poll Book 1790 Nayland: records Samuel as a voter but not his vote.
NZSOG.

He died on 3rd June 1796, "Tuesday last, died at advanced age, Mr Alston, of Nayland Attorney at Law" so says the Ipswich Journal June 11th 1796.

THE WILL OF SAMUEL ALSTON OF NAYLAND, CO. SUFFOLK, GENT.
DATED 7 FEBRUARY 1795
I give to my wife Mary Alston my real estates and all my goods and personal estate, chargeable with the payment of 100 pounds a piece to my daughter Mary, wife of George Downing Esq. and to my son William Alston.
I forgive my son James Alston his note of hand for 100 pounds with interest thereon due to me.
I also charge my estates with the sum of 100 pounds in favour of my grandson Charles Alston, to be paid to his father James Alston and used for said Charles's education.
Also with the sum of 500 pounds a piece to my sons George and Samuel and my daughters Charlotte, Anna Maria, Harriet and Sarah.
I appoint my wife sole executrix.
Signed Samuel Alston.
Witnesses T.C.Harrold, Isaac Nicholson, Thomas Marshall.
Proved 25th August 1796 by Mary Alston widow relict of deceased and sole executrix named in will.

Samuel is presumed buried in the Alston family vault he built under the tower of St James Church Nayland.

Research Notes:
HISTORY of ALSTON COURT (Formerly GROOM/S)
Record of the pictures known to have been hung at Alston Court (Grooms) as described in "Portraits in Suffolk Houses" by Rev E Farrar.
John Alston - Farmer and Inn Keeper at Nayland born at Edwardstone 1680 portrait painted 1754.
Samuel Alston - Maltster of Boxford born at Edwardstone 1690 died 1754, Date of portrait 1752.
Thomas Alston - Maltster at Kirby in Essex born 1693 died 1774, date of portrait 1754.
The above were sons of John Alston farmer of Edwardstone Suffolk. Samuel and Thomas were children of his second marriage with Martha Stock of Wethersfield Essex.
The children of Samuel Alston, Maltster at Boxford :
Samuel Alston - Attorney at Nayland born 172, died 1796, Date of portrait 1752.
Mary Alston - m. John Smith of Groton Suffolk schoolmaster, date of portrait 1752.
Sarah Alston - m. William Sudell of Wytiahe? painted 1753
Ann Alston - m. (1) Jacob Alston of Boxford and
m.(2) John East of Hadleigh. date of portrait 1753.
Rachel Brown - Housekeeper to Samuel Alston Snr.
All these portraits are in pastels painted by Beeston Coyte. Ref also pg 359 Alstoniana.
Note: this is not an exact transcription from the back of the portraits, the exact wording transcribed by Edward L Fenn in 2001 is recorded in the individual notes to each person. The relationships with John Alston remain unproven 2001.
A family myth has survived the years to the effect that Beeston Coyte, who appears to be an unknown artist, completed the above set of pastels in settlement of a debt to Samuel Alston Jnr, for legal services.
E L Fenn 1999

COYTE, BEESTON - Adm.sizar (aged 16) at Peterhouse Feb 17th 1726/7. Of Suffolk. School Ipswich. Matric 1727; Scholar 1727; BA 1730-1. Artist. Died at Kingston, Jamaica.
Alumni Cantabriensis
("Admitted sizar" - In the 19th century, a sizar was one of a body of students who, having passed a certain examination, were exempted from paying college fees and charges. They were probably so called from being thus employed in distributing the size, or provisions)

Also see ? http://www.pastellists.com/Articles/Coyte.pdf

In 1968 Allison Redman & Angela Wilson lodged a number of Alston and associated documents with PRO Bury St Edmunds ref HA541/11253 uncatalogued 2001, (ref 1995 Letter from D Halliday to A Redman)

D J Halliday, Historian of Nayland records in a lecture given 11 June 1991 (on file E L Fenn 1991), that the 4 plaques set into the garden wall at Alston Court reading "Here stood a fenn house 1708" etc date from Thomas Parris, Attorney, ownership of the house.
HA541/2/1/11 Bury PRO SFK - Is an interesting record of Court Bills for the Manor of Nayland starting 5 Oct 1739 with Jacobus Vanderzee as Steward, then Samuel Alston, George Alston, then George Downing, ending 25 Sept 1804.
It records that at his death Sam's estate paid reliefs of L.1-18-6d (relief was paid on the transfer of a deceased's property)

NOTES ON ALSTON COURT - Nayland & Wissington Conservation Society.
Album lent by Mrs Nancy Hadwen
East Anglian Times (around 1900?)
Dr Fenn's great-great-grandfather was Jacob Vanderzee, a solicitor, and he came into the occupation of the house about 1734, succeeding a Mr Thomas Paris, also a solicitor, who had been in practice there since the days of William III. Mr Samuel Alston married a daughter of Mr Vanderzee and succeeded to his practice in this old house, which is still in the occupation of his granddaughter Miss Alston.

Death of Miss Alston, Saturday lst March 1902.
Her grandfather Samuel Alston commenced practising as an attorney-at-law in Nayland in 1746, when he succeeded his father-in-law Mr Jacobus Vanderzee, who appears to have settled in Nayland in 1728. Mr Alston was succeeded by his son George and his grandson Samuel (d.1887).

Country Life c.1920. Article by Christopher Hussey entitled 'Alston Court in Nayland, Suffolk; the residence of Mrs E.L.Fenn'.
[Looking down the village street] to the right was Mr Holmes Family Drapery and Grocery Shop [now Church Mews], said by tradition to be an old bay and say factory backing upon the churchyard. To the left was the baker's, formerly the guildhall . . . . . and beyond it the White Hart Inn . . . . . The Queen's Head, built 500 years ago as a weaving mill, with the master's house adjoining, on the banks of the millstream. . . . .
The older part [of Alston Court] . . . . . has been attributed to the reign of Edward IV. There is evidence to support this view, and to date the building about 1472. The hall . . . . . seems somewhat later, about 1510, and the wings forming the south and west sides of the court are later still in the sixteenth century . . . . . In the space between the west wing and the brick wall bordering the street, which at present is a strip of garden, where a house called Chamberlayne's seems to have stood: At the end of the eighteenth century, when it (Alston Court] had been for fifty years the home of a branch of the Alstons, it was known as Groom's. A clothier of the name of Grome is found to have worked in Lavenham.

East Anglian Times February 1922. In the East Anglian Miscellany of 1912, Mr Farrer described the appearance of Alston Court in 1900 . . . . . On Miss Alston's death, it passed to her nephew, Dr Fenn of Colchester. He had it repaired, made it his home and christened it Alston Court The heraldic glass is evidence that it was built for the Payne family. The Will of John Payne of Nayland was proved in 1526.
Other references : Articles by K.Morrison in Ideal Home Dec 1926, 450-452, Woman's Journal 1927, 169-171, and Town. & Country Homes 1927?, 12-13.

Presumed Succession of Occupiers/Owners of Grooms, re-named. Alston Court about 1905, up to shortly after World-War II, by D.J.Halliday 18.11.92

16th Century
[John PAYNE?]. Listed in the 1522 Muster Roll of Nayland as a clothmaker taxed on lands there worth L.1-6s-8d per year and on movables valued at L.50, his traditional association with Alston Court is based solely on the evidence of the armorial stained glass including a supposed Payn/Parker marriage, which would have taken place at some date around 1500. This evidence is discounted, however, by the suspicion that the stained glass may have been introduced from elsewhere at a later date. (See Note on Alston Court Armorial Stained Glass)
Andrew PARISH (or PARIS), clothier. Born around 1550s? Son of Thomas Paris whose Will was dated 1583. Acquired (Groom's probably after that date. (See Note on the Paris Family of Nayland also John Payne [19275])

17th, Century
John WALTER, clothier. Tenant of Andrew Parish, clothier, of Nayland, 1606. The house was then called Groomes.
Thomas PARISH, clothier. Born around 1580s? As the eldest son of Andrew Parish, he inherited Groomes from his father. [In 1640, Thomas Parrish (sic) was one of the four largest Suffolk Ship Money payers in Nayland, paying L.1-2s-0d out of a total of L.19-6s-8d. The other three were Christopher Scarlet, L.1-10s-0d; Edmund Goodwin, L.1-5s-0d: and Edward Garrard, gent., L.1-2s-0d.]

Probably Thomas PARIS (or PARISH) senior, gent. Born around 1620s? or Thomas PARIS (or PARISH) junior, gent. Born around 1650s? is believed to have demolished a number of nearby houses in order to enlarge garden. One of these was named Domesdales (mentioned in Will of Samuel Alston 1722-1796, as quoted in Nayland-with-Downings Manorial Minutes 1797). Sites are marked by stones inset into interior side of walls fronting Court Street (four labelled "Here stood a Fenn House 1708") and Church Lane (two labelled "Here stood a Fenn House 1714").

18th Century.
Thomas PARIS, attorney. Born in late 1680s or 1690s? Brother of Sarah, who married the Rev. John White, 'Vicar' of Nayland, in 1721. According to Mrs Nancy Hadwen (10 July 1991), a grand-daughter of Dr Edward Liveing Fenn, one of the bedrooms is haunted by a Mrs Paris.
(Nayland Rentals 1735 - 40. Ips RO HA108 /1/4/10 entry No. 62, Town St. Mr Paris for his home called Groom, tax 6d.)
Jacobus VANDERZEE, attorney. Acquired house about 1734. Died 17 Aug 1746. Mary VANDERZEE, his widow, died 17 Feb 1762, aged 38.
Samuel ALSTON (1722-1796), attorney. Baptised at Edwardstone 21 Oct 1722, only son of Samuel and Sarah Alston. Was articled to Jacobus Vanderzee, whose daughter Mary Vanderzee he married 2 Aug 1758 at St James, Westminster. Started practising at Nayland in 1746. His name appeared on the Rate Assessment list 4 Jan 1748.
Lionel Cresswell's book, 'Stemmata Alstoniana', indicates (in Table A) that he did not buy the house until after his marriage. Table A2 on page 80 of the same book states that it formerly belonged to the Parker family, now of Long Melford. Samuel died 3 June 1796.
Mary ALSTON, his widow, inherited the house after his death, together
with various other properties. She died in 1800.

19th. Century
1800-1831: George ALSTON (1763 -1831), second son of Samuel (1722 -1796) and Mary nee Vanderzee. The transfer into his name was recorded in the Nayland-with-Downings Manorial Minute Book 19 Apr 1802.
1831- ? : Ann ALSTON (1795/96 -1856), born Billericay, Essex, daughter of James Vanderzee and granddaughter of Jacobus Vanderzee, widow of George Alston (1763-1831).
? -1887: Samuel ALSTON (1809-1887), eldest son of George (1763-1831) by his second wife (first cousin Ann nee Vanderzee, daughter of James and grand-daughter of Jacobus). Died unmarried. Buried 23 Apr 1887.

1887-1902: Occupied until her death by Margaret ALSTON (1813-1902), sister of the above, daughter of George (1763-1831) and Ann. Died unmarried 1 Mar 1902.

20th-Century
1902-1907: (Dr) Edward Liveing FENN (1843-1907), Inherited from Samuel Alston his uncle, he extensively restored the house and changed the name from Groom's or The Groom to Alston Court.

1907-1930: Edith FENN, nee Todd, widow (second wife) of Dr Edward Liveing Fenn. Died 22 Dec 1938.

1930-1947: (Dr) Charles Edward FENN (1873-1947), son of Dr Edward Liveing Fenn by his first wife Katharine Pauline, nee Julius.
1947 - 1968 : (Col) A Alston FENN, cousin of Dr Charles Edward Fenn, son of Edward Liveing Fenn's brother Ernest Harrold Fenn.
1968 -1978: STONOR, later LORD CAMOYS, son-in-law of the Hyde Parkers of Long Melford.

Notes from Index to Nayland Manor Court Rolls 1623 - 1728. (SRO Bury ref.
HA 541/2/1/4). All these items are believed to relate to what are now parts of Alston Court garden.
No.40a: 16 Apr 1677. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Robert Kemball and his wife to Thomas Paris, clerk; also, on same date, transfer of copyhold tenancy of property from Anna Brett to Thomas Paris, clerk.
No.45a: 8 Apr 1686. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Thomas Paris, clerk, to Mary Paris, spinster; also, on same date, agreement with Thomas Paris, gent.
Nos.51b & 52a: 25 May 1691. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Roger Walsh and his wife to Thomas Paris, gent.
No.53a: 5 May 1696. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Sarah,
wife, to Thomas Paris, gent.
In Libr. Curial: 6 Apr 1730. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Thomas Paris, gent, to Thomas Paris, gent.
Ditto: 7 Oct 1782. Copyhold tenancy of property transferred from Thomas
Paris, gent, to Jane Paris, widow.

Manuscript Note in Alston Family Papers (SRO Bury ref.HA 541/2/6/19)
Extracts from Nayland Court Minute Book:
8 Dec 1767 Samuel Alston admitted in fee on the surrender of John Williams the elder and John Williams the younger to . . . . . 3 rods of land called Kemballs with the garden thereto belonging and also that piece whereon formerly stood a cottage called Bretts Barn with the yard thereto belonging.
[In relation to Samuel Alston who died 7 Feb 1795 leaving everything to his wife Mary]. Samuel Alston, gent, who held while he lived . . . . . the capital messe called The Groom . . . . . also a piece of garden behind The Groom . . . . . also . . . . . the Wall garden . . . . . also another piece of garden whereon a house formerly stood called Harlin . . . . .

From Summary of Wendy Sparrow's Notes Nayland-with-Downings Manorial Court Minutes:
17 Apr 1797 Samuel Alston's Will left all freehold, copyhold, leasehold messuages etc to Mary Alston, living at The Groom: sites of 7 former houses incorporated into the walled garden; also messuage near Court Meadow gate and small area next to the gate ; also Whitebread Hall behind Church.
19 Apr 1802 All from Samuel Alston's Will to Mary Alston now altered to George Alston, including The groom, except cottage by Court Meadow gate to May Baker.
7 Apr 1806 G.Alston to Jas Potter Whitebread Hall in Newland Street.
25 May 1875 Town St. = Crown St.
5 Oct 1908 Land called Chamberlains, part of the Crown, and another formerly Doomsdale; also ground opposite church land into yard, piece of ground called Hawkins. Edith Fenn pays relief.
Deeds : 1693 Agreement re The Cock.

Extract from Will of Andrew Parish, clothier, of Nayland,1606.
To my son Thomas, my eldest son, my chief messuage called Groomes in which one John Walter, clothier, now lives, with all the houses, edifices, buildings, yards, gardens and orchards, plus 3 acres in the common meadow called Lewes Meadow. Also two other tenements to the said messuage adjoyning and belonging, with the yards and gardens appertayning, wherein John Oentne & Henry Turner now dwell . . . . .

Court Knoll.
Court Knoll, at the bottom of Alston Court Garden, is a circular field of five acres surrounded by a deep ditch with the remains of a wall on the inner side. The ditch contains the remains of earth works, early 20th century excavations found Roman flint, pottery and tile. Although the Archaeological survey of 2002 has revealed that the structures here are Norman, reusing much Roman material.The original site of the Lord of the Manor's house and seat of the Manorial Court is likely have been here, Court Knoll land now belongs to the Tendring Hall Estate.
A significant excavation took place in 2016, see http://www.naylandconservation.org.uk/LatestNews.html

From D J Halliday's letter to Mrs V. Cook of South Petherton Somerset.
We recently had a speaker on heraldry at the Nayland - with - Wissington Conservation Society who came to the same conclusion about the Alston Court armorial stained glass as others have done, that it is not original and has been introduced later; also that the purported Payn arms are not the arms of a Payn or Payne. He did, however, come up with some new information - a reference to the arms of a Payne of "Stokeneyland", which I think is described as "Sable a fess chequy or and gules between three leopards' faces or".
Rosemary Knox and I have been looking at the later history of Grooms/Alston Court after the death in 1735 of Thomas Parish 1696-1735. It now appears that Jacobus Vanderzee may not have himself been either the owner or occupier. According to the Manorial Rent Rolls, ownership passed to Mrs Williams in (or soon after) 1736 and remained in the hands of the Williams family until 1768 when Samuel Alston, who had been the tenant/occupier since 1755 or earlier (probably since 1746). The Williams were the Lords of the Manor, living at Stoke-by-Nayland, and we are wondering if there can have been any relationship between the Williams and the Parishes which might have resulted in the house passing by inheritance instead of by sale to the Williams, without any need for the transfer to have been recorded in the Manorial records (which are in any case incomplete).
The Stewardship of the Manor of Nayland, incidentally, passed from Vanderzee to Samuel Alston in 1746.

Undated manuscript note on the history of Alston Court - A. Alston Fenn (from Alston Family Papers) SRO Bury ref. HA 541/2/6/19
"Alston Court originally belonged to John Payne (to which a pencilled query has been added : 'John Abel ?), for account of whom see Country Life. We have never been able to trace the full history of the house.
"We know it belonged to Thomas Paris, attorney. And that the people who had it before the Alstons were called Williams. When the Alstons bought the house, a Miss Williams went to live at Tendring, Stoke.
"The Samuel Alston to whom these papers refer is the one who was born in 1722, his father another Samuel Alston from Edwardstone. Samuel (b1722) was the first to own the house, then known by the name of Groom. He was an attorney, also Steward of the Manor. He married Mary Vanderzee, daughter of Jacobus Vanderzee, attorney, to whom Sam Alston was articled. We have pastels of Sam Alston and his father in the drawing room and a small picture of J.Vanderzee.
"Samuel's son George Attorney, inherited the house and business and became Steward to Nayland Manor. He left the house to his wife Anne Vanderzee who left it to their son Samuel, Attorney. Samuel died 1887, unmarried; his sister Margaret lived in the house for the remainder of her life, their nephew Edward Fenn then inherited the place.
"This last Samuel built Nayland Vicarage and cemetery, being the first person to be buried in the cemetery.
"Our meadow with 3 big chestnuts is still called Kemballs. The Wall Garden referred to in the Manor Book is evidently our present bowling green and the houses must have stood where the lines 'Here stood a fen house' are engraved into the wall.
"I daresay Whitebread Hall stood on the site of the present Brewery House (or should it be The Butts !). Miss Cuddon might know this.
"An uncle of mine went recently to the British Museum and read a lot up about Nayland there. He said Mr Alston told the British Museum people that Alston Court was once a Roman Catholic chapel. This has puzzled us very much as the house is obviously built as a dwelling house. The explanation may be that there was an RC private chapel in the house and the owner allowed the villagers to attend services there. Fr Gerrharty could not tell me anything because after the Reformation for many years priests were allowed to keep no records, not even marriage certificates as they were not supposed to hold services in England."

Alston Court has a particularly fine solar or upper chamber, the heavily carved ceiling is of Spanish chestnut, which repels spiders and their cobwebs.

Extract from Alston & Vanderzee Family Tree (from Alston Family Papers, SRO Bury ref. HA 541/1)
Henry Gusterson (d.31 Nov 1729) married Constance Holton at Stoke-by-Nayland 1699;
Their daughter Mary Gusterson (bapt 21 Apr 1706 at Nayland, bur. 22 Feb 1766) married Jacobus Vanderzee (b, about 1688, settled Nayland c.1728?, bur. 23 Aug 1746 at Nayland);
Whose daughter Mary Vanderzee (bapt 3 Apr 1740, died aged 63, bur. 11 May 1803) married Samuel Alston (b, about 1722, died aged 75, bur. 11 Jun 1796, son of Samuel of Edwardstone) at St James, Westminster, 2 Aug 1758;
Whose son George Alston (b. 11 Sep, bapt 8 Oct 1763, died aged 69, bur. 5 Feb 1815) married first Mary Creek (who died 1802-08?) and second Ann Vanderzee [his cousin, daughter of his mother's brother James Vanderzee of Billericay];
Whose son Samuel Alston (bapt 17 Nov 1809), solicitor, died unmarried in 1887; and whose surviving daughters were Margaret Alston (bapt 27 Oct 1813) who lived at Alston Court all her life until her death in March 1902, and Maria Alston (bapt 18 Sep 1815) who married Thomas Harrold Fenn at Nayland 19 May 1840;
Whose eldest son was Edward Liveing Fenn [b. 1843, d. 1907].

Alston Court Armorial Stained Glass
The references are to : Rev.E.Farrar, East-Anglian Daily Times 1912, 18th & 25th May and 1st June ; Dr J.Blatchly, private communication with R.Knox.
North Window of Hall (left to right)
Jermy Hopton (quarterly:Swillington/Wyssett/Pert/Hopton) [Farrar I]
Narburgh/Clere (Farrar III)
Parker (of Honing,Norf.)/Wichingham [Farrar III]
Boys (of Hoston - Honing?)/Wichingham [Farrar IV]
Payne/Spelman (of Narburgh,Norf.) [Farrar V]
Payne/ "X"? [Farrar VI]
Spelman/Narburgh [Farrar VII]
Parker (of Honing)/Jermy [Farrar VIII)
Payne/Rookwood [Farrar IX)

South Window of Hall (left to right).
Jermy/Hemenhall (Farrar X]
Wingfield/Parker [Farrar XI]
Haultoft (of Outwell,Norf.) [Farrar 2nd ser.I]
Hotoft/ "Y"? [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.II]

Willoughby (quarterly: Ufford/Haultoft/Haultoft/Beke) [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser III]
Hotoft [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.VI)
"Y"? [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.V)
Willoughby/Hotoft [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser IV]

First Floor Landing (left to right)
Jermy Wroth (of Enfield,Middx.) (Farrar XII]
Wingfield/Parker [Farrar XIII)

Oak Room
Upper Row (left to right):
Payne/Parker (Farrar XXIII]
Payne/Rookwood
Jermy/Wroth (of Enfield) [Farrar XV]
Pakenham/Parker [Farrar XX]
Jermy/Hopton (quarterly: Swillington/Wyssett/Pert/Hopton) (Farrar XIX)
Everard/Parker (Farrar XXII]

Lower Row (left to right):
Jenney/Boys (reversed) [Farrar XIV)
Appleyard/Parker [Farrar XVI]
Payne/Thwaites (reversed) [Farrar XVIII]
Parker/Jermy
Appleyard/Parker (Farrar XVII]

Pakenham/Parker (Farrar XXI]
Farrar suggested that "X" might be Thwaites but, although all colour
has gone from Farrar VI in the North Window of the Hall, the 5 or 6 pointed star which can still be seen top right (sinister chief) indicates that the coat-of-arms is not the same as in Farrar XVIII in the Oak Room.
"Y" not yet identified, is "Azure a cross crosslet (botonny ?) argent, three lions' (or leopards'?) heads erased or tongued argent on a chief sable". The reputed Payne (Payn) arms - argent three boars' heads couped gules - are listed in Papworth as belonging to two Suffolk families, Cudlow and Playstead. According to Dr John Blatchly the Nayland Paynes, clothiers,
were not armigerous; there was no mention of such a coat in early records.
If Alston Court stained glass is genuinely original to the house, it
would seemingly relate to a Payne/Parker marriage around 1500.
Andrew Paris/Parish, clothier, who owned Grooms (i.e. Alston Court) in
1606 married Jareth or Zareth (=Sarah) Wilson at Nayland in 1577 and is thought to have been born in about the 1550s, son of Thomas Paris of Nayland whose (second) wife was named Emma (his first wife is believed to have been Joane, who died in 1564). This Emma (1526/27-1588) who married Thomas Paris as a widow (her first husband being named Scarlet) might conceivably be a daughter of John Payne (1495?-1526), son of a Payne/Parker marriage, and his wife Agnes.
Andrew's father, Thomas Paris/Parish of Nayland, was the son of another Thomas of Nayland and his wife Margaret, whom he had married as a widow (of Robert Harvie); and this Thomas was the son of yet another Thomas, who married Eleanor Radcliffe of Nayland, and a first cousin of Emma Paris who married Robert Spring of Lavenham.

Alston Court Armorial Families
JermyArgent: a lion rampant gules.
HoptonArgent: on 2 bars sable 6 mullets of as many points, 3 and 3 or.
Narburgh: A chief ermine.
Clere: Argent, on a fess azure, 3 eagles displayed or. [Fees=broad horizontal band, displayed= wings extended]
Parker: Argent,a chevron between 3 mascles sable.
Wichingham: Ermine, on a chief sable 3 crosses pattee argent.
Boys: Argent, 2 bars gules on a bend sable an annulet or; a canton of the second. [Canton= a diminutive of thequarter]
Payn (?): Argent, 3 boars' heads couped gules.
Spelman: Sable, 11 plates between 2 flaunches argent.
Thwaites: Argent, on a fess sable between 2 fleurs-de-lys gules, as many bezants. [Bezant = round flat piece of gold]
Rookwood: Argent, 3 chess-rooks sable.
Hemenhall: Or, an a fess between 2 chevrons gules 3 escallops argent.
Wingfield: Argent, on a bend sinister gules, voided sable 3 pairs of wings in lure of the field. [Voided- with centre removed, pair of wings in lure= 2 wings joined together with their tips pointing downward]
Wroth: Argent, on a bend sable 3 lions' heads erased of the field, crowned or.
JenneyErmine, a bend gules, cotissed or.
Appleyard: Azure, a chevron or between3 owls argent, a crescent for difference.
Pakenham: Gules, a garb argent. [Garb= sheaf]
Everard: Gules, on a fess between 3 estoiles argent, as many mullets sable.
Ufford: Sable, a cross engrailed or.
Haultoft: Sable, 3 lozenges ermine, a bordure engrailed of the second.
Beke: Gules, a cross moline argent.
Swillington: Argent, a chevron azure, a label of 3 ermine.
Wyssett: Gules, a griffin segreant argent. [Segreant= erect with wings extended]
Pert: Argent, on a bend gules, 3 mascles or.

English Heritage - National Monuments Ref. ALB 84 - Pictures of Alston Court Ref A2A
Bury PRO - Sale particulars Alston Court, Nayland. (illus.) - ref. HD 1180/59 - date: Undated. Ref A2A
Bury PRO - Photographs and lantern slides of Nayland, Suffolk.
Catalogue Ref. HD 1391
FILE - Composite postcard showing winter snow and following floods - ref. HD 1391/1/1 - date: pre 1920 Views include: Anchor Bridge, views west and south from church tower, Alston Court, Church Street, Fen Street and Gravel Hill
FILE - Alston Court, Court Street - ref. HD 1391/1/30 - date: 1926
FILE - Nayland War Memorial unveiling ceremony, by Alston Court - ref. HD 1391/1/32 - date: 6 Mar. 1921
FILE - Lantern slides pre 1920 by Gowing, Nayland Church street towards Alston Court - ref. HD 1391/6/3 - date: nd
FILE - Copy of Hadleigh Weekly News with item on Alston Court, Nayland - ref. HD 1391/8/20 - date: Feb. 1968
FILE - Photograph of stone in the wall of Alston Court on site of a Fenn House - ref. HD 1391/8/23 - date: n.d.
Ref A2A
Bury PRO - Papers of the Reverend Edmund Farrer of Hinderclay, Suffolk
Catalogue Ref. HD526
NAYLAND
FILE - Copy of letter, Ed. L. Fenn to E. Farrer about the restoration of Alston Court - ref. HD526/101/1 - date: 7 Feb 1903
FILE - East Anglian Miscellany No. 3678, Alston Court - ref. HD526/101/2 - date: 7 Feb 1906
FILE - Article, by Charles J. Blomfield, "Some notes on Alston Court and its Reparation" (from The Architectural Review?) - ref. HD526/101/4 - date: Undated 1906?
FILE - Plates from Farrer's Portraits in Suffolk Houses (West) of Mr and Mrs. Samuel Alston - ref. HD526/101/6 - date: 1908
Bury PRO - Slides of West Suffolk Towns and villages
Catalogue Ref. K 963
Nayland
FILE - Alston Court - ref. K 963/143 - date: 1973
FILE - Alston Court - ref. K 963/156 - date: 1973
Ref A2A

The 1552 Military Survey shows two Awstens living in Nayland;
John Awsten clothmaker assessed for tax on land & moveables.
Robert Awsten assessed for tax on moveables.

9th January 1786
. . . . . order to Saml Alston
Whereas two several injunctions at the visitations of the Archdeacon of Sudbury have been made for new pewing ye South and North sides of the middle ayle in the Parish Church of Nayland in Suffolk and wear as these several meetings have been duly called and held when the churchwarden's were ordered and directed to carry the said instructions into . . . . . for the doing whereof materials are moved and proposed and it has since been . . . . . that the expense thereoff will fall heavily on such persons who occupy cottages and tenants in the said Parish now in order to assist such . . . . . persons and for other purposes . . . . . after maintained we are a major part of the . . . . . lands and tenements in Nayland Stoke next Nayland and Wiston in the Suffolkand and in Gt Horksley in Essex do hereby order and direct Samuel Alston of Nayland aforsaid . . . . .
Incomplete letter of untraced source 2011

Map of Nayland: http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/print.cfm#zoom=14&lat=51.9784&lon=0.8822&layers=1

NEYLAND is seated on the north bank of the Stour, over which' is a large brick bridge of one arch, leading into Essex. This place is subject to inundations from the lowness of its situation. Here is a weekly market on Fridays, and an annual fair on the 2nd of October. Neyland contains 223 houses, and 1242 inhabitants. The church, standing in the middle of the town, with its spire steeple, is its principal ornament. The ancient monuments here are chiefly to the memory of persons formerly eminent in the clothiery line, for which this town was once famous. One Abel, a cloth-worker, is said to have built the handsome porch of this church, in the wall of which he has a monument, and to signify his name, and also to make up his coat armour, the letter A. and the picture of a bell are cast upon the monument.

STOKE JUXTA NEYLAND, or STOKE NEYLAND:. Here was a monastery of considerable celebrity before the conquest. The church, with its majestic steeple, is a noble structure. This may be seen as far off as Harwich, a distance of twenty miles. Neyland, though containing a much greater number of houses, is only a chapel of ease to the church of Stoke. The church at Neyland contains several handsome monuments for the Howards. In the south part, between the high altar and choir, is interred Catherine, first wife of John Howard, Duke of Norfolk, slain at the battle of Bosworth, in support of Richard III., with this inscription : " Under this stone is buried the body of the right honourable woman and ladie, sometime wife unto the right high and mighty prince Lord John Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and mother unto the right noble and puissant prince Lord Thomas Howard, Duke also of Norfolke, who departed this present life, Ann. Dom. 1452." Giffard's Hall, in this parish, with the estate, has been in possession of the Mannock family since the time of Henry VI., being then purchased by Philip Mannock, who had previously resided at the neighbouring village of Stoke. This house surrounds a quadrangular court ; the entrance by a tower gateway, said to have been built in the beginning of the reign of Henry VIII. by Peter Gifford, a distant relative to Anne Bullen: however, the whole is of brick, and the mouldings of the windows, doors, and other ornaments, are of the same material. Opposite to this entrance are some remains of an old chapel. A little to the left of Neyland, between that place and Stoke, is situated TENDRING HALL : this anciently belonged to a family of that name. William de Tendring had a grant of a market and fair at Stoke by Neyland, in the thirty-first of the reign of Edward I. Sir John Williams, knight, and Lord Mayor of London, one of its possessors, in the year 1736, built a fine seat here, which by purchase became the property of Sir William Rowley, one of the lords of the admiralty. Joshua, his son, gave several proofs of courage and conduct in the naval service, for which he was created a baronet in 1785. On his death, in 1700, Tendring Hall became the property of his son and successor, and is now in the possession of Sir William Rowley, bart. M. P. for Suffolk.
Ref Excursions in the county of Suffolk.

Other Records

1. Alston Vault: Family Burial Vault, Nayland Suffolk.

2. Samuel Alston: Attorney Duties paid on Apprenticeship Indentures, 1763, 1765, 1774, 1781. 1763 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures Peregrine D'Olyly
1765 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures, Sam Meddows
1774 Duties Paid Apprentice Indentures Jacob Alston
1781 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures George Downing


3. Billing Book: Samuel Alston Attorney, 1740 1745.

4. Samuel Alston: Attorney Duties paid on Apprenticeship Indentures, 1758. 1758 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures Will Smithies

5. Household Inventory: Samuel Alston, 1762, Alston Court Nayland.

6. Alston Law Practice: Day Book Sundry Charges, 1771, Nayland Suffolk.

7. Portraits: Samuel Alston, 1773, Nayland Suffolk.

8. Alston Law Practice: Bill Book Extracts, 1774 1777, Nayland Suffolk. Details of bills rendered to customers of the practice, several of them Alston family

9. Alston Law Practice: Bill Book Extracts, 1774 1775, Nayland Suffolk. Details of bills rendered to customers of the practice, several of them Alston family

10. Alston Law Practice: Bill Book Extracts, 1775 1777, Nayland Suffolk. Details of bills rendered to customers of the practice, several of them Alston family

11. Alston Law Practice: Diary Extracts, 1777 1784, Nayland Suffolk. Diary of document service and other activities and includes notes and signatures of the various members of the practice.

12. Alston Law Practice: Diary Extracts, 1786 1794, Nayland Suffolk. Diary of document service and other activities and includes notes and signatures of the various members of the practice.

13. Signatures and Notes Vanderzee/Alston law practice: Nayland Suffolk. Signatures of Jacobus Vanderzee and Sam Alston snr notes re Nayland Church fabric and the education of Sam's family.

14. Alston Court: Nayland Suffolk.

15. Samuel Alston: Attorney Duties paid on Apprenticeship Indentures, 1787 1790. 1787 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures Charles Fowle
1790 Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures Joseph Hoare



16. Nayland surrounding Villages & River Stour: 1885 1900.
Courtesy National Library of Scotland.

Samuel married Mary VANDERZEE [86] on 1 Aug 1758 in St James (Piccadilly) Westminister. Mary was born in 1740, was baptised on 3 Apr 1740 in Nayland Register., and was buried on 11 May 1803 in Vault With Husband Nayland SFK.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  James ALSTON of Bocking [88] (born on 20 May 1759, baptised Nayland SFK - buried on 18 Dec 1806 in Bocking ESS)

         ii.  Mary ALSTON [91] (born on 6 Jun 1761, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 5 Mar 1842)

        iii.  Charlotte ALSTON [95] (born on 23 May 1762, baptised Nayland SFK - died in 1797, buried in Nayland SFK)

10       iv.  George ALSTON [61] (born on 11 Sep 1763, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 4 Feb 1831 in Nayland SFK)

          v.  Samuel ALSTON [90] (born on 17 Sep 1764, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 28 Jul 1835, buried in St Martins Church Leicester)

         vi.  Anna Maria ALSTON [93] (born in 1769 in Nayland SFK - died on 26 Jul 1815, buried in Edwardstone SFK)

        vii.  Rev William ALSTON [89] (born in 1772, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 6 Feb 1839, buried in St Giles Cripplegate London)

       viii.  Harriott ALSTON [94] (born in 1773 in Nayland SFK)

         ix.  Sarah ALSTON [92] (born in 1778, baptised Nayland SFK - died on 28 Apr 1837, buried in St James Nayland In Family Vault.)




21. Mary VANDERZEE [86], daughter of Jacobus VANDERZEE [120] and Mary GUSTERSON [2071], was born in 1740, was baptised on 3 Apr 1740 in Nayland Register., and was buried on 11 May 1803 in Vault With Husband Nayland SFK.

General Notes:
St James Piccadilly Westminster.
Marriages 1758
Number 280
Samuel Alston of the parish of Nayland in the County of Suffolk and Mary Vanderzee a minor of this parish were married in this Church by Licence from the Bishop of London by and with the consent of Mary Vanderzee the lawful mother of the said minor, this 1st day of August in the year 1758 by me John Justamond curate.
This marriage was solemnised between us
Sam Alston
Mary Vanderzee
In the presence of Simon Cooper, Ja Vanderzee.
Ref: Findmypast

In 1797 Mary was assesed for Quit Rent by the Manor of Nayland.

Notes on reference to The Groom in Nayland-with-Downings Manorial Minutes 1797 as summarised by Rosemary Knox - SRO Bury ref.FB/64/A4/1
Mary Alston was admitted to land called Tremballs (3 rods) and also a piece on which formerly stood a cottage called Brett's farm which Samuel had been admitted to in 1767 by surrender of John Williams
Mary Alston takes by her late husband Samuel's Will "that Capital messuage held by deed called the Groom, also a piece of garden ground behind the messuage; also a piece of ground on which a house formerly stood now laid out into a garden called the Wall garden; also a piece of ground on which a house formerly stood and now in the same garden; and also another piece where a house known as Domesdales stood now in the said garden; also a piece with a house called Harlins. Also a piece of land formerly of Robinson laid into the yard opposite the church; also two pieces of land near the Court Meadow gate; also that messuage behind the church called Whitebread Hall late in the occupation of Thomas Glover". Earlier Mary Alston had been "admitted to land called Tremballs (3 rods) and also a piece on which formerly stood a cottage called Bretts Barn which Samuel had been admitted to in 1767 by surrender of John Williams".

Mary's portrait by George Roth 1773 is endorsed "Mary daughter of Jacobus Vanderzee and wife of Samuel Alston of Nayland. Born 1740, married 1758, died 1800. Geo Roth finxit 1773. This is in the possession of Mrs Angela Wilson 2001.
A copy done by Charlotte Alston is in the possession of Mrs Mary Burn of Little Bealings Woodbridge SFK.

Mary was aged 63 at her death.

THE WILL of MARY ALSTON of MELFORD, Widow.
Dated 19 December 1800
Hereby revoking all former wills so make and publish my last Will and Testament in manner following and so appoint John Mathew GRIMWOOD of Lincolns Inn Esq. and my son George ALSTON Executors hereof.
I direct all my just debts to be duly paid.
Next I give and bequeath all my real and personal estate unto and to the use of the said John Mather GRIMWOOD and George ALSTON their heirs executors and administrators in Trust to sell dispose of and convert the same into ready money with all speed after my death into money upon the Trusts hereafter expressed and I declare that the receipts of the said John Mather GRIMWOOD and George ALSTON on the receipt of the Survivor of them his heirs or assigns shall be an effectual discharge to the purchaser or purchases of my said estates respectively and that he or they shall not after payment of his or their purchase money to my said Trustees or Trustee to be liable to see to the application thereof and as to the clear monies rising from my said real and personal estates respectively and from rents and profits of my real estates until sold.
I dispose there of as follows, that is to say I direct that my said trustees or trustee shall in the first place invest in some of the public funds or on good real security which they shall be at liberty to vary at discretion such a sum of money as shall be sufficient to produce a yearly income of Seventy pounds for the support of my son William ALSTON and I direct them to apply such annual income for his clothing custody and maintenance during his present infirmity and in case of his recovery my will is that the said annual provision shall cease and in lieu thereof I give him the sum of six hundred pounds sterling and as to the residue of the monies to be invested for securing my said son Williams annuity after his recovery or the whole thereof after his death in case of his disorder not being removed in his lifetime I direct that the same shall sink into the residue of my property and be divided and applied as after mentioned.
Next I direct that my said Trustee or Trustees shall out of the produce of my said real and personal estates advance so much of the sum of three hundred and fifty pounds which I have agreed to contribute for the exigencies of my son James as shall not be advanced in my lifetime
And all the residue of my property I direct to be divided between my three unmarried daughters, Anna Maria, Harriet and Sarah in equal chare and proportions except the sum of fifty guineas which I give to my son Samuel ALSTON
And I direct that the rents and profits of my real estate until sale shall be applied as the interest of the purchase money would go if the same were sold.
Lastly I declare that my Trustees shall not be answerable for any loss that may arise to my property without their wilful defaults and that they shall be at liberty to retain their expenses and that neither of them shall be accountable for monies received by the other of them.
In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand and eight hundred.
Mary Alston.
Signed sealed published and declared by the above Testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in her presence and at her request have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses - Mary Downing - Mary Alston - Priscilla Stranger.
Probate granted 18th August 1803 to John Mather GRIMWOOD and George ALSTON.
Suffolk Record Office, HA/541/11253 19th Dec. 1800
PROB 11/1397 Q682
Copy on this file

Details of funds from Marys estate to be transcribed from images: Alston-Alston Origionals-Alston 1- Picture 1 135.

Mary married Samuel ALSTON [85] on 1 Aug 1758 in St James (Piccadilly) Westminister. Samuel was born in 1721 in Edwardstone SFK, was baptised on 21 Oct 1722 in Edwardstone SFK, died on 3 Jun 1796 at age 75, and was buried on 11 Jun 1796 in Family Vault Nayland Church.


22. James VANDERZEE [126], son of Jacobus VANDERZEE [120] and Mary GUSTERSON [2071], was born in 1737, was baptised on 19 Jan 1736/37 in Nayland Register., died on 13 Aug 1785 in Billericay ESS at age 48, and was buried in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard. The cause of his death was inflammation of the bowels.

General Notes:
England Law Lists.
Admitted 14 Feb 1758 - James Vanderzee of Nayland Gent - Before Judges S Burroughs & Thos Law - Enrolled 13 Feb 1759.
James is recorded on the Chancery List
Ref: Dr Edward L Fenns book of notes pg 10

James practised as an attorney at Billericay & Rochford ESS, where in the late 18thC he had a large practice demonstrated by his advertising in the London papers of estate disposals, auctions etc.
Ref British Newpapers 1600 on, Burney Collection Gale digital collections - 2008

Essex Record Office D/DS 474/1
QUY FAMILY OF ROCHFORD
Dates of Creation11 June 1784
Scope and ContentArticles of agreement and partition Golden Prentice of Paglesham, gent., to James Vanderzee of Billericay, gent. Brewhouse, malting office, land (40a.) and Marlborough Head inn in Rochford, warehouse, woolchamber and land (12a.) in Lt. Stambridge, messuage called Bull and land (2a.) in Hockley Recites will of John Wright of Rochford, malster, died Nov.1783 Signatures of both parties Witnesses: Samuel Alston and J. Vaughton Cope

Essex Record OfficeMISCELLANEOUS ESSEX
Level: SeriesD/DC 18/48-57 Manor of Greenstead: copyhold property called Freemans
Reference Code D/DC/20/6
Dates of Creation12 June 1755
Scope and ContentAdmission of Richard Alston [5266] (as in 20/5), on surrender, out of court , 21 November 1753, of Jn. Quilter, by hands of James Vanderzee, gent., instead of the lord's bailiff in presence of Edward Fox & Ste. Hobart Two cottages in Fordham, in occupation of Richard Lewis, and Tho. Tomlinson, in the manor of Great Fordham. [Court of Samuel Savill, esq. Steward: Charles Grey. esq.]

James Vanderzee attorney of Billericay Master, Apprentice Thomas Clubbe, date of Indenture 31 Aug 1768, date of Duty 27 Sep 1768, Term 5 years, Fee L105.0.0 Ref:The Genealogist IR 1/25

James Vanderzee attorney of Billericay Master, Apprentice Edward Benson, date of Indenture 17 Oct 1776, date of Duty 18 Nov 1776, Term 5 years, Fee L145.0.0 Ref:The Genealogist IR 1/29

James Vanderzee attorney of Billericay Master, Apprentice Harry Grover, date of Indenture 24 Feb 1780, date of Duty 1 Apr 1780, Term 5 years, Fee L105.0.0 Ref:The Genealogist IR 1/30

Essex Game Duty - Certificates Issued 25 Mar to 1 Oct 1785 - Vanderzee James of Billericay, gent.
Chelmsford Chronicle 27 Jan 1786

Chelmsford August 19.
Sunday morning died, universally regretted, Mr Vanderzee, attorney at law, Billericay.
Chelmsford Chronicle 19 August 1785.

Court Proceedings.
C 12/158/24 Vanderzee v. Willis 1788
C 12/1702/19 Greenwood v. Vanderzee 1788*
C 12/2427/42 Clarke v. Vanderzee 1788
Ref PRO
http://catalogue.pro.gov.uk
It is uncertain to which Vanderzee's all these matters pertain

London.
To be fold, purfuant to the decree of the High Court of Chancery, dated the 18th day of April 1788, made 1 Greenwood* againft Vanderzee, before Peter Holford Efq., one of the Mafters of the said Court, at his chambers in Symonds-inn, Chancery lane, London. Various houfes in the town of Rochford, in the County of Effex, viz. A houfe late in the refidence of Mr John Wright, deceafed; a houfe at joining occupied by Mr John Gallock, watchmaker; the Marlbro Head Inn, and a large range of wool warehofses adjoining; alfo 2 fields about 10 acres at Little Slambridge, near Rochford, and a cottage and two fields about five acres at Downham; and a Moiety of a cottage and two fields about two acres and an half at Ramfden Bellhoufe, in the faid County; the whole late the eftate of James Vanderzee deceafed.
For a particular thereof in choir at the faid Mafters Chambers, and of Mr Benifon, No 19, Lincoln's Inn.
Ref: News London Gazette 24 June 1788.

To be fold, purfuant to a decree of the High Court of Chancery, before Peter Holford, Efq; one of the Mafters of the faid Court, at his chambers in Symons-inn, Chancery lane, London; in divers lots, three several freehold houfes and a large range of buildings, in the town of Rochford in the County of Effex, in the occupation of Mrs Cope, Mr Gullock, and Mr Newman; and two fields of land at Little Stembridge, near Rochford, in the occupation of Mr John Harriot; and a cottage and garden, and two fields of land, at Downham about 5 miles from Billericay, in the occupation of William Rivers; and a moiety of a cottage, with a garden and two fields, at Ramfden Bell House, about a mile from Downham, in the occupation of . . . . . Bundock, owner of the other moiety. The whole the estate of James Vanderzee, late of Billericay, in the faid County of Effex, Gentleman, deceafed. For a particular of the faid premifes enquire at the faid Mafters Chambers; and of Meffrs Wildman and Smith, Lincoln's Inn.
London Gazette March 14 1789 Issue 13077.

Purfuant to a Decree of the High Court of Chancery dated the 18th April inftant, made in the Caufe Greenwood againft Vanderzee, the Creditors of James Vanderzee late of Billerica, in the County of Effex, Attorney, deceafed, are forthwith to come in and prove their refpective Debts before Peter Holford, Esq., one of the Mafters of the faid Court, at his Chambers in Symonds-inne, London, or in Default thereof they will be excluded the Benefit of the faid Decree.
London Gazette Sat April 19 1788 Issue 12983

The Will of James Vanderzee of Billericay Gent.
Dated 29 Mar 1780
This is the last Will and Testament of me James Vanderzee of Billercay in the County of Essex Gentleman.
I give devise divest and declare all and every my customary and copyhold messuages, farms, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever and wheresoever unto and to the use of my loving wife Philadelphia her heirs and assigns for ever to whom I give and bequeath all my goods chattles moneys effects whatsoever and wheresoever and appoint her sole executrix of this my will which I declare to be my last In Witness hereof I hereunto sett my hand and seal this 29th day of March 1780
James Alston
4 Nov 1785
Appeared personally Thomas Emmanuel Mayott, . . . . . and George Hatton . . . . . who were acquainted with the manner and character of James Vanderzee's handwriting testified to the authenticity of the Will

Proved London PCC 7 Nov 1785 on the oath of Philadelphia Vanderzee widow and relict of the deceased
Ref ESS Nov 579 PROB 11/1136.

It appears the Will was inadequately witnessed.

Chelmsford Chronicle. Page 1.
February 7, 1786.
All perfons who ftand indebted to the Eftate and Effects of James Vanderzee, late of Billericay, in Effex, gent, deceafed, are defired forthwith to pay their refpective debts to Mrs Vanderzee, of Billericay, aforefaid, his executrix: and It all perfons who have any claims on the faid eftate and effects, are requefted immediately to fend an account of their refpective demands to the faid Mrs Vanderzee.
Chelmsford Chronicle Friday, 17 February 1786.

Frances Brennan writes in 2012 that James cause of death is recorded in the Death Register of Gt Burstead.

James married Philadelphia MEAD [1041] on 22 Jul 1765 in Gt Burstead ESS. Philadelphia was baptised on 29 Dec 1737 in Gt Burstead ESS, died on 28 Oct 1802 in Billericay ESS at age 64, and was buried on 3 Nov 1802 in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  James VANDERZEE [1258] (born on 1 Apr 1766, baptised Gt Burstead ESS - died on 16 Dec 1821 in Southend ESS)

         ii.  George VANDERZEE Esq [1377] (born about 1767 - died on 29 Mar 1837 in 3 Francis Tce Kentish Town MDX)

        iii.  Daniel VANDERZEE [6243] (baptised on 23 Jul 1770 in Gt Burstead ESS)

         iv.  Philadelphia VANDERZEE [1434] (baptised on 9 Sep 1771 in Gt Burstead ESS - buried on 22 Jan 1825 in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard)

          v.  Mary VANDERZEE [353] (baptised on 19 Apr 1773 in St Mary Magdaline Gt Burstead ESS - died in 1829, buried in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard)

         vi.  Felton VANDERZEE [6244] (baptised on 2 Jan 1775 in Gt Burstead ESS - died on 31 Dec 1802 in Essex)

11      vii.  Anne Margaret VANDERZEE [60] (baptised on 29 Mar 1776 in Gt Burstead ESS - died in Feb 1856 in Nayland SFK)

       viii.  Charles VANDERZEE [1437] (baptised on 4 Oct 1781 in Gt Burstead ESS - died on 21 Mar 1821 in St Giles Cripplegate City)

         ix.  John VANDERZEE [1378] (born on 30 Apr 1820 in Billericay ESS - buried on 8 May 1820 in St George Camden LND)




23. Philadelphia MEAD [1041], daughter of George MEAD [12739] and Margaret [12740], was baptised on 29 Dec 1737 in Gt Burstead ESS, died on 28 Oct 1802 in Billericay ESS at age 64, and was buried on 3 Nov 1802 in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard.

General Notes:
James Vanderzee of Gt Burstead gent aged 26 to Philadelphia Mead aged 25 of the same, dated 1765.
Colchester Public Library ; ESS Mar Lic E 929.3 u-y Pg c12.

James Vanderzee batchelor & Philadelphia Mead spinster both of this parish . . . . . the church by Banns this 22nd day of July was by me Rev . . . . . this marriage was solemnised between us J Vanderzee P Mead
Extracted from a partly illegible print of film of the Gt Burstead Register ref D?P 139/16
Ref: Rosie Flower 2008

Marriages
Monday Mr Vanderzee, Attorney at Law, of Billericay in Essex, to Mifs Mead of the fame place.
Ref: London Evening Post 23 Jul 1765, also the Public Ledger 25 July 1765 & Ipswich Journal 27 Jul 1765.

BOND
Dated 8 Apr 1788.
Between Philadelphia Vanderzee and James Vanderzee her son involving James Vanderzee her husband deceased
PRO C12/1702/19
Search and photograph with C12/158/24 11 Jun 1788

Country House and Land at Billerica, Essex.
To be sold by private contract, in complete repair, and may be entered on immediately, a capital house, containing two large and one fmall parlour, kitchen, wafh house, dairy, five chambers, light clofets, and three garrets, with coach houfe, ftabling, barn, and other outbuildings, and a garden three quarters of an acre, walled and well cropped.
Alfo a handfome building adjoining, confifting of two fpacious rooms: also two fields of rich paft Done byure-ground near adjoining, containing between five and fix acres, well fenced with quick, and planted.
Alfo to be fold, a neat cottage, and three fields of arable land, containing eight acres, about half a mile diftant, now on lease for 21 years, at 10/- per annum, clear of every defection, and the tenant to keep all repairs.
For further particulars enquire of Mrs Vanderzee, at Billerica; or of Mr Benifon, Number 19, Lincoln's Inn.
Gazette & New Daily Advertiser June 3 1788 Issue 18558

Chelmsford November 5.
On Thursday the 28th ult. died, in the 65th year of her age, Mrs Philadelphia Vanderzee, of Billericay, widow, and relict of the late Mr James Vanderzee of the same place.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday 6 November 1802.

1802 Nov 3. Philadelphia Widow of Mr James Vanderzee Attorney at Law, buried in a vault in the church yard 3rd day aged 64 yrs. Fee paid - the vault being not a Faculty one. D?P 139/1/4
Ref: Gt Burstead Burial Register.

Will Philadelphia Vanderzee
16 June 1802
This is the last Will and Testament of the Philadelphia Vanderzee of Billericay in the County of Essex widow I direct that all my just debts funeral expenses and the expense of providing this my Will shall be paid and discharged by my executor hereinafter appointed as soon as conveniently can be after my decease out of my personal estate and whereas by an Indenture made subsequently to my marriage with late husband James Vanderzee deceased bearing date on or about the eighth day of November in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy six (1776) and made or expressed to be made between Peter Harvey Clark and Margaret his wife and said James Vanderzee and the said Philadelphia Vanderzee of the one part and George Ward gentlemen of the other part and by a fine duly levied in turn in the year of the reign of his present Majesty King George III and by declaration of the uses of that fine contained in the said Indenture certain freehold feoffments, messuage, land's grounds meadows pastures tenements hereditaments and promises situate in the several parish is of Lavor Magdalen otherwise Magdalen Lavor High Lavor North Weald otherwise North Weald Bassett and Moreton in the County of Essex and then in an tenure or occupation of John Shipman his under tenants or assigns and in the said Indenture particularly described and hereinafter appointed and devised were settled limited and assured as to one undivided moiety or full half part thereof (the whole into two equal parts to be divided) to certain uses therein intentioned and as to the other undivided moiety or full half part thereof the whole into two equal parts to be divided To such uses as the said James Vanderzee and the said Philadelphia then his wife should during our joint lives appoint in manner therein mentioned and in default thereof and subject thereto to the use of the said James Vanderzee and his assigns for his life with the remainder to the use of me the said Philadelphia Vanderzee and my assigns for my life with remainder to such uses as the said James Vanderzee should appoint by Will in manner therein intentioned and in default thereof and subject thereto the use of all and every the child and children as well daughters and sons of me the said Philadelphia Vanderzee by the said James Vanderzee then lawfully begotten or to be begotten for such estate and estates and in such shares or proportions and in such sort manner and form as I the said Philadephhia Vanderzee in case I should survive the said James Vanderzee by my last Will and Testament to be by me duly executed in the presence of three or more credible witnesses should give devise order or dispose of the same and for default thereof to other uses therein instituted and whereas in pursuance of the covenant and agreement contained in the same indenture and under or by virtue or medus(?) of a survivor or survivors thereof made in due form of Law certain customary or copyhold lands tenements and hereditaments holden of a Manor of North Weald otherwise North Weald Bassett in the said Indenture particularly described and herein after appointed were settled limited and assured in equal undivided moieties or half parts to for and upon the same uses and for the same estate and estates and upon the same person or persons and in such manner or form as one therein before by the said Indenture limited appointed expressed and declared of and concerning the said freehold messuage lands grounds meadows pastures hereditaments and promises and to and for no other use or uses intents or purposes whatsoever and whereas the said James Vanderzee hath departed this life without having joined with me in exercising the power of appointment given or reserved to us jointly as aforesaid and without having exercised the power of appointment by Will given or reserved to him solely as aforesaid and whereas there are nine children of my marriage with the said James Vanderzee namely James, George, John, Daniel, Philadelphia, Mary, Felton, Ann and Charles and they are all now living and whereas I have already made some provision for all my said sons except the said Felton and Charles and the said Charles is a minor now I the said Philadelphia Vanderzee by virtue of and in exercise and execution of the power or authority powers or authorities given limited or reserved to me in or by virtue or means of the said herein before in part writed Indenture and fine surrender and other appurtenances and also by virtue as in exercise and execution of all and every other power and powers authority and authorities enabling me in this behalf do by this my last Will and Testament executed by me in the presence of three credible witnesses and to be attested by the same witnesses by their severally subscribing there names at the foot of the memorandum of attestation written on the last sheet of this my Will give devise order and dispose of direct limit and appoint the said moiety of the said freehold messuages lands grounds meadows pastures and hereditaments and the said moiety of the said customary or copyhold lands tenements hereditaments and premises over which I have any such power of appointment as aforesaid unto all the children of my marriage with the said James Vanderzee their heirs and assigns for ever to be equally divided between them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants I authorise and appoint my said two sons George and John or the survivor of them or the executors or administrators of such survivor and to give to him or them full power and authority to sell my said copyhold house in which I now reside situate in the hamlet of Billericay in the County of Essex and fined of the Manor of Gt Burstead with Gurnards (?) and Clewsdon (?) and which hath been duly surrended to the use of my Will at such time or times due in such manner as he or they in his or there discretion shall think proper to any person or persons who shall be willing to become the purchaser or purchasers of the same and for the most money and best price or prices that can be reasonably had or gotten for the same and to take and receive the intermediate rents and profits of the same copyhold hereditaments and I direct that he or they shall stand possessed of interested in and entitled to the money which shall arise or be produced by or from such sale or sales and the intermediate rents thereof in trust for my said daughters or such one or more of them as shall be living at the time of my decease to be equally divided between them if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and my Will is and I do hereby direct that the person or persons respectively who shall become the purchaser or purchasers of the said copyhold messuage and hereditaments his her or their heirs executors or administrators shall not be obliged or required to see the application of the money to be advanced or paid by him her or them respectively as the consideration of such purchase or purchasers or be answerable or accountable for the misapplication or non-application of the same money or any part thereof after the same shall have been paid to or to the orders of my said sons George and John or the survivors of them or the executors or administrators of such survivor and that every receipt which shall be given by my said sons George and John or the survivor of them his executors or administrators for such purchase money or any part thereof shall be a good valid and sufficient acquittance and discharge for the sum or sums of money which therein or thereby respectively shall be acknowledged or expressed to be or to have been received I give and bequeath unto my son Felton the sum of two hundred and fifty pounds of lawful money of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland current in Great Britain to be paid to him at the end of eighteen months after my death in case and upon condition that my said son Felton his heirs and assigns shall at the cost and Charles (sic) of my said daughters their heirs and assigns within eighteen months after my death and before the receipt of the same legacy release convey surrender and assure his share of the said freehold and copyhold hereditaments and premises hereinbefore appointed as aforesaid and do all such acts and make and execute all such deeds conveyancers and assurances in the law whatsoever as shall be adduced requisite by my said daughters their Heirs Assigns or their council in Law for conveying settling and assuring the same share to the use of them my said daughters their heirs or assigns for ever to be equally divided between them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants I give and bequeath to my son Charles the sum of four hundred pounds of lawful money of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland current in great Britain to be paid to him when and as soon as he shall attain his age of 21 years and in case he should attain his age of 21 years before my decease then to be paid at the end of 12 months after my decease or sooner if my executors shall think proper incase and upon condition that said son Charles his heirs assigns shall at the costs and charges of my said daughters before the receipts of the same legacy or in case he shall die under his age of 21 years then his heirs shall within three calendar months after my death release convey surrender and assure his share of the said moiety of the said freehold and copyhold hereditaments and premises which is hereinbefore appointed as aforesaid and so all such acts and make and execute all such deeds conveyancers and assurances in the law whatsoever as shall be deemed requisite his said sisters and their heirs and assigns or their council in the Law for conveying settling and assuring the same share to the use of them their heirs and assigns for ever to be equally divided between them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and I give and forgive unto each and every of my said sons James George John and Daniel all and every sum and sums of money which shall be to and owing from them respectively to me at the time of my decease incase and upon condition as to each of my said sons respectively that he or his heirs do and shall at the costs and charges of my said daughters there heirs and assigns within six months after my decease and before the same legacy release shall be delivered or considered as released forgiven or discharged covey surrender and assure his share of the said freehold and copyhold hereditaments and premises hereinto for appointed as aforesaid and do all such acts and make and execute all such deeds conveyances and assurances in the Law whatsoever as shall be deemed requisite by my said daughters their heirs and assigns or their council in Law for conveyancing settling and assuring the same share to the use of them my said daughters their heirs and assigns for ever to be equally divided between them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and subject to the payment of my legacy just debts funeral expenses and the expenses of proving this my Will I give and bequeath all the rest residue and remainder of my real estate and all my money's and securities for money and estates vested in me as mortgage goods and chattels and personal estate whatsoever and wheresoever and of what nature kind or quality so ever unto my said three daughters their heirs executors administrators and assigns or such one or more of them as shall be living at my death to be equally divided between them if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and I nominate and appoint my said three daughters to be executors of this my last Will and Testament and I give and commit to the said George and John my son's and the survivor of them the guardianship custody care tuition and management of my said son Charles and the management of his estates real and personal until he shall attain his age of 21 years and I direct that from and after my death and thenceforth during the minority of the said Charles my son interest not exceeding five pounds per cent per annum shall be allowed to him on his said legacy of 400 pounds in full and final satisfaction of his share of the rents of the said hereby appointed moiety of the said freehold and copyhold hereditaments and that the same interest may be paid to the said George and John my son's and the survivor of them all the executors or assigns of such survivor and applied by him or them in for or towards the maintenance and education of my said son Charles in such manner as he or they shall think fit and I revoke and make void all and every Will and Wills Testaments and Testaments by me at any time heretofore made and declare that this present writing contains the whole of my last Will and Testament
In witness whereof I the said Philadelphia Vanderzee the testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in six sheets of paper set by hand and seal in manner following did direct to the first five sheets my hand and to the sixth and last sheet by hand and seal this Sixteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two
P Vanderzee
Signed sealed published and declared by the said testator as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunder subscribed our names as witnesses The words "Manor of " between the fourth and fifth lines in the second sheet and the word shall "be respectively" his heirs or assigns between the 6th and 7th, 12th and 13th and 14th and 17th and to lines in the 4 sheet and what in the 5 sheet being interlined previous to
the execution
Barnabas Flacke Prittlewell, H William Whale Southend Daniel Marsfield South End Essex

This Will was proved at London the 11th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and three (1803) before the worshipful William Terret Doctor of Laws and Surrogate of the Right Hon Sir William Wynne Knight Doctor of Laws Master Keeper or Commissary of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by the Oaths of Philadelphia Vanderzee spinster Mary Hand formally Vanderzee wife of the Rev John Staples Hand Clerk and Anne Vanderzee spinster the daughters and executrix named in the said Will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods chattels and credits of the said deceased having been first sworn duly to administer.
PROB 11/1389
Copy of Will on this file
Miniature of Philadelphia in the possession of E L Fenn Auckland NZ 1998.

Research Notes:
Baptism IGI Film No1471966 Batch No102544/8.

Philadelphia married James VANDERZEE [126] on 22 Jul 1765 in Gt Burstead ESS. James was born in 1737, was baptised on 19 Jan 1736/37 in Nayland Register., died on 13 Aug 1785 in Billericay ESS at age 48, and was buried in Gt Burstead ESS Churchyard. The cause of his death was inflammation of the bowels.


24. William JULIUS [685], son of William JULIUS of Basseterre [687] and Frances (Anne) Mary CHARLES [688], was born on 12 Nov 1726 in St Kitts (Reg In London), died on 18 Feb 1780 in London. at age 53, and was buried on 22 Feb 1780 in St Paul Covent Garden. Another name for William was William John.

General Notes:
Florence Stevens nee Julius, an early researcher of the family history wrote:
William first managed then inherited the family sugar estate "Killiekrankie" on St Kitts, (however his wife's death notice describes William as "of Mansion Estate St Christopher's") where he lived until about 1779, then at Cavendish Sq London. He was considered one of the proudest and most extravagant men in England, who never rode out without his coach and four with out-riders, and fully living up to his income of L7,000 per annum.
A close personal friend of British Foreign Secretary Charles James Fox (d1806), and Godfather to his infamous second son, he was one time secretary to the Marquis of Rockingham, then Prime Minister.
Much of the above is family lore, and incorrect.

Ref: Image of Mansion Estate Yard courtesy Dr. Grant H. Cornwell, of the College of Wooster

Ownership of Mansion Estate,
Christ Church Nichola Town St Kitts.
Estate Owners
William Julius ( estate) 1780 - ?
In his will of 1813, John Julius (q.v.), the brother of William Julius, said the he had purchased Mansion, which had belonged to William, subject to an annuity of 300 p.a. to Jane Smith Julius [nee Edwards], William's widow.
John Julius ? - 1813
John Julius junior 1813 - 1815
John Julius (above) 1817 - 1826
John Swindell 1 Feb 1826 - 1834

William left in his Will considerable property to his widow for her life; marriage portions to his three daughters, directions for the apprenticeship of his son. JOHN JAMES, also for the purchase of part of a ship for his son ROBERT EDWARDS, and the remainder in the hands of Trustees for his son GEORGE CHARLES, then only 5 years who he desired should be educated at Eton and afterwards Kings College, Cambridge.

Trial of John Barbot of St Kitts; for the murder of Mat Mills Esq. William Julius witness for the defence. John Barbot shot Mat Mills on 19th Nov. 1752. He was tried on 5th June 1753 and found guilty. William Julius "one of the coroner's inquest".
Full account in the London Magazine Vol. 6 page 34 August 1753 and Caribbeana Vol 7 Pg 34
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075409/00007/35j?search=julius

London
On Wednefday as the chariot of William Julius, Esq; of Downing-ftreet, was coming to London from Feverfham, the Axle-tree broke at Stroud, by which Accident Mr Julius and his Lady were overturned, and tho' every Glafs was broke, and Mrs Julius big with child, they yet reciev'd not the leaft Hurt, but the Coachman was bruised in a very violent Manner
Public Advertifer Sat 9 Apr 1757

Monday, as William Julius, Esq; and his Lady, with two Children, were coming to Town in the Poft Chaife with four Horfes, they were met between the two Pack-horfes at Turnham Green, by a wagon driving furioufly with out any man attending the Horfes, which run foul of the Chaife and tore it all to Pieces, cut Mrs Julius, and a child about four years old, in a moft terrible Manner: but as they were conveyed immediately to London, and attended by two eminent Surgeons, it is expected they will do well. The Wagoner came up after the Accident, and in the confufion was fuffered to make his escape.
St James's Chronicle or the British Evening Post 31 December 1761

Monday as William Julius, Esq; and his Lady, with two children, were coming to town in their post chaife with four horfes, they were met between the two Pack Horfes at Turnham-Green by a wagon driving furioufly without any man attending the horfes, which ran foul of the chaife and tore it to pieces, and cut Mrs Julius and a child very much.
General Evening Poft Dec 31 to 2 Jan 1762

To Be Sold by Auction.
By Mr Affleck and Son
On Thurfday the 25th day of October
The entire genuine houfehold Furniture, &c. belonging to William Julius, Esq; at his late Seat called a Holt Houfe near Woakingham Berkshire: consifting of Four poft Bedfteads with neat and elegant Furnitures, Bedding, large Pier and other Glaffes, Cheft of Drawers, Tables and Chairs; the Kitchen and Brewhouse Furniture compleat; a Stack of exceeding good old Hay, Gardening Utenfils and Dung; likewife the Live Stock, consifting of fome high-bred Colts and Fillies, a Cart, horfes, &c.
To be viewed on Monday the 22nd until the Time of Sale which will begin precifely at 11 o'clock, the Whole being to be fold in one day.
Catalogues to be had the Days of Viewing at the Place of Sale; at the Inns at Staines, Egham, Sunning Hill, Windfor, Maidenhead, Reading, and Woakingham: and at Mr Affleck's in Parliment Street, Weftminster.
The London Chronicle Sep 27 - 29, Oct 18 - 20, Oct 20 - 23 1764.

Yefterday fet out for Scarborough, for the recovery of his health, William Julius Esq and his Lady and family, from their houfe in Wimple-ftreet, Cavendish-fquare.
Gazette and New Daily Advertifer 12 May 1767

To be Sold by Auction,
By Mr Christie,
On the Premifes,
On Wednefday the 3rd of October,
And the following Days,
All the genuine net Houfehold Furniture, China, Wines, Liquors, a Crane neck, Town Chariot, and other valuable Effects of William Julius, Esq; retiring to the Country, at his House No 18 Wimple-ftreet, Cavendish-fquare; confifting of rich Crimfon Damafk and Cotton, in Drapery Bud, and Window Curtains, Sofas, French Elbow Chairs, elegant Pier Glaffes, Variety of neat Cabinet Work, Screens, &c. At the fame Time will be fold by Auction the unexpired Term of 42 Years of his fpacious Dwelling-houfes, with all convenient Officers, fitted up in the prefent Tafte, and completed with every requifite Fixture, and may be entered on immediately after the Sale.
To be viewed on Monday the 1ft and till the sale.
Printed particulars of the Premifes, and Catalogues of the Furniture are preparing, and will be ready to deliver in a few Days.
Public Advertifer 26 September 1770

The Leeward Islands suffered a hurricane on the 31 Aug 1772, in the Parish Christ Church Nicola Town William Julius Esq. (Estate?) reports 'Both works, and all the out-houfes down; two cows, two mules, and a negro killed. The crop fupposed to fuffer between thirty and forty hhds. One boiling houfe has been fince built from the ruins of the former two".
Ref: Government report (on computer file) St Kitts Hurricane 2008

Saturday died in Bond-ftreet, William Julius, Esq; of St Kitts.
The London Chronicle 19 - 22 Feb 1780

Died. The fame day (Sat) in Bond Street, William Julius, Esq; of St Kitts.
The London Evening Poft 19 - 22 February 1780

Saturday, in Bond-Street, William Julius, Esq.of St Kit's, fome time one of the Members of the Affembly for the Leeward Iflands.
The St James Chronicle Sat 19 - Tues 22 February 1780

At The birth of William's twins, Jane and William 1757 his address is shown in a newspaper report (copy on file) as "at his seat at Holthouse nr Oakingham Berkshire".
Note: Oakingham was changed to Wokingham in the early 20thC.

Burial Register St Paul Covent Garden.
22 February 1780 William Julius Esq from St George Hanover Square.
Ref: Harleian Series.

THE WILL of WILLIAM JULIUS Esq.
Dated June 5th 1779.
In the Name of God Amen. I, William Julius of the Island of St Christopher Esquire, being of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding do think fit to make my last Will and Testament as follows that is to say
Imprimis I Will that all my just Debts Legacies and Funeral charges be fully paid and satisfied and I charge all my Estate. Real as well as Personal with the payment thereof.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my Wife her Executors Administrators and Assigns for ever all my household furniture and Plate Coach and Chaise Horses Chaises and other carriages except such are used upon and for the business of my Plantation and it is my Will that my said Wife if she shall choose so to do be permitted to live and remain in the Dwelling House on my Plantation during her Widowhood only but no longer.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter CATHERINE CHARLES JULIUS, the sum of one thousand Pounds Sterling to be paid to her on her Day of Marriage with lawful Yearly Interest to be raised and paid for the same in the mean time at the rate of eight percent per annum in lieu of maintenance but it is my Will that if my said Daughter shall die before Marriage the said sum of one thousand Pounds shall not be raised and paid to her Executors Administrators or Assigns.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter JANE SMITH JULIUS, the sum of one thousand Pounds Sterling to be paid to her on her Day of Marriage with lawful Yearly Interest to be raised and paid for the same in the mean time at the rate of eight percent per annum in lieu of maintenance but it is my Will that if my said Daughter shall die before Marriage the said sum shall not be raised and paid to her Executors Administrators or Assigns.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter LOUISA CAROLINE JULIUS now in England the sum of one thousand Pounds Sterling to be paid to her upon her Day of Marriage with lawful Yearly Interest to be raised and paid for the same in the mean time at the rate of eight percent per annum in lieu of maintenance. But it is my Will that if my said Daughter shall die before her said Marriage that the said sum of one thousand pounds shall not be raised and paid to her Executors Administrators or Assigns.
Item. I give to my son ROBERT EDWARDS JULIUS the sum of five hundred Pounds Sterling, to be paid to him within six Calendar Months next after my "Wm Julius" decease to be laid out in the Purchase of part of a ship.
Item. I give to my son JOHN JULIUS the sum of five hundred Pounds Sterling to be paid to him upon his attaining his age of twenty one years but without any interest for the same in the mean time and it is my Will that my said son shall be maintained at the expense of my estate during his minority according to the discretion of my Executors hereinafter named And also that when of a proper age, he will be bound Apprentice of some Tradesman being a Freeman of the City of London and that reasonable Apprentice fee be paid with him upon his being bound Apprentice and that such apprentice fee be paid out of my estate over and above the sum of five hundred Pounds Sterling hereby given and bequeathed unto him but it is my Will that if my said Son shall break his Indentures and shall not duly and regularly serve out his Apprenticeship that the said sum of five hundred Pounds shall not be raised and paid to him.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my good Friend William Wharton my stop Watch by Mudge as a token of my Friendship and Regard for him.
Item. I give to John Wood of Old Burlington Street a mourning Ring and fifteen Guineas for a suit of mourning if he shall choose to wear it
Item. I give to the said William Wharton Mr Nicholas Richards and Mr James Akers a mourning Ring apiece.
Item. All the rest and residue of my Estate both real and Personnel whatsoever and wheresoever Charged and Chargeable as aforesaid I give devise and bequeath unto my son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns respectably forever. But in case of my said son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS shall die before he attains his age of twenty one Years then I give and bequeath my said Estate real and Personnel unto the said William Wharton, Nicholas Richards and James Akiers and the survivors and survivor of them and the Heirs Administrators Executors and Assigns of such survivor upon this special Trust and Confidence that "William Julius" they or the survivors or survivor of them or the Heirs, Administrators Executors or Assigns of such survivor do and shall sell and dispose of the same at publick or private Sale with all Convenient speed after the Death of my said son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS and pay apply and divide the monies arising from such Sale unto and amongst my said Daughters CATHERINE CHARLES JULIUS, JANE SMITH JULIUS and LOUISA CAROLINE JULIUS equally share and share alike if they shall be living at the time of the death of my said son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS but if there shall be only two of my said Daughters then living then to pay apply and divide the said monies unto and amongst such two surviving Daughters equally Share and Share alike but if there shall be but one of my said Daughters then living then it is my Will that my said Estate shall not be Sold but that my said Trustees or the Survivor or Survivors of them or the Heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns do and shall Convey my said Estate real and Personal unto such only and surviving daughter her Heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns for ever to whom I accordingly give the same
And it is my Will that my said son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS be educated at Eton School and afterwards sent to Kings College Cambridge and it is my further Will that my said son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS shall not come into the possession of my said Estate until all my Debts be fully paid and satisfied but that the same do and shall remain in the possession Management and direction of the said William Wharton Nicholas Richards and James Akers or the survivors or survivor of them or their Heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns of such survivors until such Debts shall be fully paid and satisfied.
Lastly I do hereby Nominate Constitute and Appoint the said William Wharton, Nicholas Richards and James Akiers Executors of this my Last Will and Testament and also Guardians of the Bodies and Estates of such of my said Children as are Minors during their respective Minorities.
In witness whereof I the said WILLIAM JULIUS have to this my last Will and Testament contained and written upon four sides of a sheet of Paper to the first three my hand and to the fourth and last side thereof my hand and seal set this fifth day of June in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and Seventy nine.
Wm Julius
SIGNED sealed published and declared by the said Testator WILLIAM JULIUS as and for his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witness to the execution thereof, the word "Sterling" between the twenty sixth and twenty seventh lines of the first sides having been first interlined
SIGNED: Thomas Bridgewater, William Butler Pemberton, Jn Mabzac, St Christophers.

Before the Honourable Lewis Brotherson Esquire President of his Majestys Council and deputed Ordinary of the Island aforesaid
PERSONALLY Appeared Thomas Bridgewaterone of the subscribing witnesses to the execution of the above and within written Will of the above and within named William Julius and made Oath on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God that he was personally present and did se the said William Julius duly Sign Seal publish and declare the same Will as and for his Last Will and Testament in the presence of this Deponent and William Butler Pemberton and John Mabzac who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other severally subscribed their names as Witnesses to the Execution thereof and that the said William Julius at the time of his Executing his said Will was of sound and disposing mind memory and Understanding
Thos Bridgewater
SWORN before me this 2 Day of June 1780
Lewis Brotherson

WHEREAS upon my leaving St. Christophers I made a Will disposing of all my Worldly Effects but to the best of my recollection I forgot to mention my Plate of which I have between three and four hundred ounces I Will and desire that my Dear Wife JANE JULIUS shall have the use of the said Plate during her natural Life at her death it shall go equally to my three Daughters or as many of them as may be living at my Wife's Death if neither of my Daughters are living at the Death of my Wife I then in that case Will and bequeath this said plate to my son GEORGE CHARLES JULIUS and his Heirs for Ever
This is meant as a Codicil to the Will I made at St Christophers and not intended to militate or Operate against any part of my said Will
SIGNED in London September 1st 1779
Wm Julius
SIGNED and sealed in the presence of James Blair, John Calfe.
Saint Christophers Before the Honourable Lewis Brotherson Esquire President of his Majestys Council and deputed Ordinary of the Island aforesaid
PERSONALLY Appeared James Blair one of the subscribing witnesses to the within written Instrument of Writing purporting to be a Codicil to the last Will and Testament of the within named William Julius who made Oath on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God that he was personally present and did see the within named William Julius duly Sign Seal publish and declare the same Codicil as and for his codicil in the presence of this Deponent and and of John Calfe who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other severally subscribed their names as Witnesses to the Execution thereof and that the said William Julius at the time of his Executing his said Codicil was of sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding
James Blair
SWORN this 2 Day of June 1780 before me
Lewis Brotherson

Ref: St Kitts Archives Will 10110 Folio 15 copy document on file - C Macpherson 2013.

Family copy of the above Will: "My Fathers Will received from my mother Feb 1802. - In G.C.Julius's handwriting it came to me after the death in 1876 of Emily Julius, dau of Dr G C Julius" [Florence Stevens]. Not accurately transcribed.
Copy on file.

Issue 103 - Deaths of Considerable Persons -
No.19 Wm. Julius esq. of St Kitts.
Ref: Gentlemans Magazine 19 Feb 1780 Issue 103.

Julius William died in Feb. 81 (Buried 22 Feb 1780 at St Paul Covent Garden)
Cayon Diary St Kitts

Research Notes:
Some ambiguity exists around the dates and details of Williams life, Florence Stevens considers that he did not have a second name John. She notes his brother is John. She also writes (incorrectly) that he finally settled in Cavendish Sq London in 1779, but died in Jan 1780. Musgraves Obituary puts him at 19 Feb 1780. However William is referred to as William John in some notices about him, particularly on the IGI at the birth of his daughter Catherine Charles

The Victorian Julius's adopted a Family Crest, as published on Julius Jottings, its provenance is uncertain.

West Indian Deeds On the Close Rolls at the Public Record Office. (Not Searched at 2015)
Relating to bargains in land 1768.
William Julius and Henry Willmot - St Christophers B. 4.
Henry Wilmot by William Julius - St Kitts 1768 4-20-21
Ref: Caribbeana Pages 171 & 352.

This item below of family lore appeared in the family magazine Julius Jottings No 4 Jan 1901 and has been taken as read since. It was submitted by Mrs Stevens but attributed to Ella Julius who gave her the story about the year 1865.
However the researcher has not been able to establish it as fact, beyond Michael Billett & Gillian Spraggs writing, (see below), that Rann worked as a coachman, and for several wealthy gentlemen in London. It seems a bit unlikely William Julius was gay, see Gillian Spraggs below, but who knows! ELF.

SIXTEEN STRING JACK. (John Rann)
Once upon a time, that is to say, about the middle of last century, there lived in Cavendish Sq a certain Mr Julius. He had a comfortable income of L.7000 a year derived from estates in the Island of St. Kitts. He was secretary to the Marquis, of Rockingham, then Prime Minister, a friend of the Prince Regent's, and lived what was then the life of fashionable man about, town. He was well known as the fortunate possessor of four very celebrated grey horses.
At this time the environs of London were greatly infested by highwaymen, and among these knights of the road there, was one, afterwards known as Sixteen-Stringed Jack, who was specially famous.
Now, it happened, on a clear moonlight night, that the Duke of Argyle was riding alone across Hounslow Heath, then a bare, desolate common, when he was stopped by an armed highwayman, who, threatening to shoot him, demanded his purse.
The Duke, by way of reply, drew his pistol and fired at the man, but missed his aim ; whereupon the: robber put spurs to his horse and galloped off in the direction of London. The Duke, who had recognised him as the renowned highwayman, immediately gave chase, but the robber soon distanced him, and on entering London turned suddenly down a dark ally, and gave him the slip.
During the chase the Duke had been particularly struck with the robber's horse, a fine grey, so like Mr. Julius', that the Duke proceeded at once to Cavendish Square to make inquiries. He was out; "gone to the play," his Grace was informed. Thither he followed him. The performance was drawing to a close, but Mr. Julius still in his box.
The Duke hastily related his adventure, his pursuit of the robber, and his firm conviction that the highwayman was mounted on one of the well-known greys. Mr. Julius assured the Duke: he must be mistaken, as he had driven to the theatre with the four greys, and
had ordered them to be put up at the mews close by. The Duke
was not satisfied and persuaded Mr. Julius to accompany him to the stable, and there they found them. Three were cool and quiet, but the, fourth panting and covered with foam.
The Duke turned to make inquiries of the coachman, and in a moment recognised him as the man who had stopped him an hour before, at whom he had fired and chased to London, in a word, the celebrated and dreaded highwayman.
It is hardly necessary to add that the coachman was
immediately arrested, and shortly afterwards tried, found guilty,
and condemned to be hung, which sentence was duly carried out.
at Tyburn ; and thus ended the career of Sixteen-Stringed Jack,
a who in the red-book of the knights of the road ranks second only
to Dick Turpin.
L'Envoi.
Shortly before his execution Sixteen-Stringed Jack made a
full confession of all his guilt, whereby it appeared that he had
been in the constant habit, after driving his master to the
theatre, of mounting one of the greys, galloping off to Hounslow
Heath, committing a robbery, and returning in time to drive
his master home.
Ref: Julius Jottings, Jan 1901, No.4, Pg 105

OUTLAWS & HIGHWAYMEN - The Cult of the Robber.
by Gillian Spraggs.
"In 1774 . . . . . the last of the truly colourful Highwaymen ended his life at Tyburn. This was John Rann commonly known as Sixteen String Jack. Rann a former coachman received his nick'name from the ribbons he tied below the knees of his breeches. He affected a gorgeous style of dress altogether, frequently boasted in public that he was a Highwayman and protested if anyone treated him in a manner that he thought was unsuited to his dignity as a Gentleman."
Published by Pimlico, Random Hse, London.

15 November 2003
Dear Edward Fenn,
Thank you for your letter. I am sorry not to have replied to it before, but it arrived when I was under a lot of pressure of work.
My information on John Rann comes from the following sources:
a) An Account of John Rann, Commonly called Sixteen String Jack. Being a circumstantial Narrative of his Principal Transactions, and His Amours to the Celebrated Miss La Roache. London, T Sabine, 1774?
b) The Life of John Rann, otherwise Sixteen Strings (sic) Jack . . . . . Together with anecdotes of Miss Roche. London, Frederick Wheeler, 1884 (reprinted from eighteenth-century original published in about 1774)
Both of these are in the British Library. They are fairly short, more
pamphlets than books. Either one of them is plagiarising parts of the other (in which case it seems most likely that a is plagiarising b) or both are borrowing from a third biography that I haven't seen.
They contradict each other; b) says that Rann had been 'coachman to a man of fortune', a) that he had been 'a common Hackney Coachman' and not a coachman to a nobleman, 'as has been reported'.
I don't know how you are going to feel about this but b) as much as says that Rann's unnamed master was homosexual and that Rann was his lover. It says that Rann was a particular favourite with his master, that his master allowed him to dress in a way that was 'far above his rank', that his master gave him 'silk breeches with eight strings at each knee, from which he acquired the name of SIXTEEN-STRINGS JACK'. It continues 'It is irksome to say what might be said on this occasion; but a Miss Smith, with whom this
unhappy wretch has since lived, has been heard to say that he was not a Woman's Lover.'
This may not any of it be true; hack writers writing the lives of notorious criminals were perfectly capable of making up sensational stuff by the yard.
On the other hand, it might be true, or there might be some truth in it.
There was certainly rather a camp quality to some of Rann's behaviour it seems to me. Though that doesn't mean he wasn't heterosexual, of course.
On the Duke of Argyle: I don't know anything about his being robbed on Hounslow Heath, but he may well have been at some point. I have checked in Gordon S. Maxwell's Highwaymen's Heath (1935), which has many highwaymen stories, but all it tells me about the Duke is that he had an estate at Whitton, one of the villages on the Heath. The London press, including the Gentleman's Magazine, would certainly have reported such a robbery. I have dipped into the Gentleman's Magazine but to go through all the many news items related to highway robberies is a labour I have never undertaken. You might like to see if the public library in Hounslow has a local history librarian who might help you. Or they may be able to put you in touch with a local history group.
However, as you know, the story about Argyle being involved in Rann's arrest and trial is untrue.
On ranking Rann second to Dick Turpin: I am not at all sure about that. I don't think I would. Claude Du Val had a huge reputation right into the Victorian age, and still isn't completely forgotten now. Rann certainly was remembered a long time after his death. Robert Louis Stevenson talks about having read stories about him as a boy. I think I'd stick at what I said about Rann in my book: 'the last of the truly colourful highwaymen'.
I have no problem at all with your including a short quotation from my book in a dossier of family history material for consumption within your family.
You may like to know that the book itself is still in print, and is distributed in New Zealand.
I hope this material is useful to you. Best of luck with your researches. It sounds as if you are having a lot of fun.
Best wishes,
Gillian Spraggs
<http://www.outlawsandhighwaymen.com>

SIXTEEN-STRING JACK
Extract from Highwaymen & Outlaws by Michael Billett
During the final decades of the eighteenth century, the formation of John Fielding's Bow Street Runners made life extremely hazardous for English highwaymen. A good example was John Rann, one of the last extrovert highwaymen to gain fame and notoriety before he was caught by the Runners. He was born in a village near Bath in 1750 the son of an itinerant tinker who placed him in service at the age of twelve. Rann later worked as a footman, before becoming a coach man to several wealthy gentlemen in London. He admired their life-style and began stealing to finance his own high living. He became an extravagant dresser and wore breeches with eight silk
strings or tassels attached to each knee. The strings were threaded into the eyelet holes, where the breeches were gathered at the knee. This fashion earned Rann the nickname of 'Sixteen
string Jack'.
His entry into crime was as a pickpocket, working in a team with several other men. The booty he acquired was 'fenced' fox, him by his mistress, Eleanor Roche. In due course. Rann decided there was more money to be made as a highwayman and took to the road. On one occasion, he was captured after being accused of robbing a coach on the Hounslow Road and stealing a watch and money. He was brought to court in leg-irons, making a flamboyant appearance before John Fielding with blue ribbons tied to his irons and a buttonhole of flowers in his new suit. Eleanor Roche appeared alongside him accused of receiving. Both pleaded their innocence and lack of real evidence secured them their freedom. However, Fielding remained suspicious and detailed one of his best Bow Street Runners to take an interest in their future activities.
Rann continued his highwayman's life and even openly boasted about it to his friends in the many taverns he visited. He dressed extravagantly on social occasions, one of his favourite outfits comprising a scarletjacket, tambour waistcoat, white silk stockings and a hat trimmed with lace. Once he wore this garb when attending the execution of a fellow highwayman at Tyburn; craving attention, he pushed himself to the front of the crowd in order to be more conspicuous, and it was rumoured that he forecast to all and sundry that one day he would not be just a spectator at Tyburn but the main participant in the proceedings, His outrageous style of dressing made him easily recognisable, too, at the races, when he wore a sporty waistcoat of blue satin, trimmed with silver threads.
When Rann was at work, however. he deliberately dressed shabbily. This confused his many victims and witnesses because they could not vouch it to be the same man who appeared court extravagantly dressed. He gained several acquittals on this account but the Bow Runners were not so easily deceived. They continued to watch Rann carefully, until he made a final mistake.
This occurred on 26 September 1774 when he robbed, with an accomplice. Dr William Bell chaplain, as he travelled along the Uxbridge Rd by Gunnersbury Lane in Middlesex. They stole just eighteen pence from him and a watch in a tortoiseshell case.
The latter was to prove fatal as it was later traced to his mistress Eleanor Roche by the Bow Street Runners. In court Dr Bell positively identified Rann as the highway and this evidence was corroborated by his servant who saw the accused riding in the area before the robbery took place. Rann was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged, but mercy was recommended for his accomplice, and Eleanor Roche earned fourteen years transportation for her part as the fence.
"Sixteenstring Jack" remained cheerful to the end and entertained seven girls among his guests at a party - apparently with much drink and merriment - in the condemned cell, on the Sunday before his execution. Aged twenty four, he was allowed to go to his execution at Tyburn, an 30 November 1774, dressed in a suit of his best gaudy clothes.

EXTRACT FROM THE TRIAL OF JOHN RANN.
October 1774.
John Rann late of the Parish of Ealing MDX labourer, and William Collier late of same labourer on the 26th Day of September 1774 with force and arms at the Parish aforesaid in the Kings Highway therein did make and assault the said William Bell in corporal fear and danger of his life in the Kings Highway then there feloniously did . . . . . one watch with the inside case made of silver and the outside case made of tortoise shell of the value of L.3 and one stone seal set in gold of the value of 5/- one gilt key of the value of 6d and 18d in moneys, goods chattels and moneys of the said William Bell in the Kings Highway aforesaid then and there feloniously and violently did steal take up and carry away against the said Peace of Our Lord the King,
AND the Jury say Guilty. (No goods)
To be hanged by the neck until he be dead.
Ref London Metropolitan Archive Parchment OB/SR 151 (2003)

THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE OLD BAILEY.
Ref: t17741019-50
Homepage - http://www.oldbaileyonline.org

JOHN RANN, WILLIAM COLLIER, ELEANOR ROACHE, CHRISTIAN STEWART,
Theft: receiving stolen goods, theft with violence: highway robbery, 19 Oct 1774.
Original Text:
735, 736, 737, 738. (M.) JOHN RANN, WILLIAM COLLIER, ELEANOR ROACHE, and CHRISTIAN STEWART, were indicted; the two first for that they in the king's highway, in and upon the Reverend William Bell, doctor in divinity, did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a watch with the inside case made of silver, and the outside case of tortoiseshell, value L.3 a stone seal set in gold, value 5/-, a gilt key, value 6d. and eighteen pence in money, numbered, the property of the said William, Sept. 26th. And the other two for receiving the above goods well knowing them to have been stolen. *
Dr. William Bell. In my way home to Gunnersbury, on the 26th of September, at rather more than a quarter past three o'clock, I came through a part of the town of Ealing, that part that is next Brentford; when I was a little way in the town, my attention was attracted by two men on horse-back, who were before me; they rode one immediately behind the other; they walked their horses. Something appearing singular about the head of the first man. I took my glass out of my pocket to see what it was; I found it was the flap of his hat let down all round, probably without strings, and a red handkerchief upon it; they walked their horses; I trotted, and by that means came up to them before they had quitted the houses at the end of the town, and their dress and appearance being something singular, attracted my notice to see what they were; the thought of their being highwaymen never entered my head, but that my pace might not be hindered by them, I passed them close by the hedge, and then I put my horse into the track immediately before the foremost man; as I passed them I took particular notice, though as I said before I had no thoughts of a highwayman, that the hindermost man was clothed in a lightish coat, a hat flapped round, a great deal of black hair hanging loosely about his head, and his horse was something of a kind of brown, though I took no particular notice. The first man I observed to be in a frock mourning coat, buttoned; I likewise observed, as I passed by him, that his horse was black and very low in flesh; it struck me that his boot was shorter than boots commonly are, and there appeared over it something of a light coloured stocking; I took notice likewise that his boots were very dirty, and his hair was loose about his head, but not in so large a quantity as the man I first came up to; the man that I first came up to I observed to be of a very sallow countenance and of a sickly look +; the other was not sallow or sickly; they each kept their heads steadily forwards, but both looked at me, my way lay perhaps about a quarter of a mile straight forwards; I went that quarter of a mile, and then turned, as my way led me off to the left, in the road that leads to Gunnersbury; I soon heard the sound of, I thought, two horses in the road, and thought I heard the sound of wheels, and from a curiosity I cannot account for, I turned about to see what carriage might be coming behind; I looked, and could see neither horses nor carriages, nor at that time could hear any thing; therefore I concluded they were at that time down in that part of the road which forms a hollow, and which going low, it was impossible for me to see; I turned forward again, and rode off; in a little time, on a sudden, I heard two horses coming up briskly after me; I heard there were no carriages; I had nothing to get out of the way of, and having no apprehension I did not turn my head to get out of the way, but when I found by the sound of the horses feet, that they were just coming a-breast of me, turning my head to the left to see who might be passing me, upon that instant a black horse's head and neck came up directly to my bridle, and turning to see who might ride upon me in that manner, having then no thoughts of a highwayman, when I immediately perceived the man I passed first at Ealing Town; he at that instant said either so sir, or stop sir; as soon as he had said this, and partly by his riding upon me, and my checking my horse, I was stopped; he immediately said your money; I said, my money? he immediately answered yes, or I will blow your brains out; he upon that instant put his hand into the sore part of his coat, as if he would open his coat, in order to take out a pistol, but did not open his coat, nor take out any pistol; upon his saying that, I believe I answered I will give it you; I drew my glove off my right hand, knowing my silver was always in my right hand pocket, and I had no purse in the other; taking up the flap of my coat, he saw the key of my watch, and said, and your watch too, sir, in a minute, and take no notice (as I was at that time looking him in the face); I put my hand into my pocket; I had only eighteen pence there; I held it to him in the palm of my hand; he took it up; I held my watch in my hand; he took it greedily and bid me ride on; I did, and they galloped off instantly. My lord, I omitted one circumstance, that all the business was transacted with the man who set himself before me; but I was sensible that in half a minute after he was up with me, there came another horse close on my right hand, but kept behind me, and staid there during the time I was robbed, and then they rode off together.
+ Note, Collier answered that description.
Q. Do you believe the prisoners to be the men?
Bell. I was robbed on Monday; I was called to see these prisoners in Bow-street, on Wednesday; having been robbed in open day light, and they having no disguise upon their faces, I was in hopes before I saw them that the first sight of them would sufficiently convince me whether they were the men or not; therefore when I was at the upper end of the Court, and they came into the lower part, I kept my eyes off them, that I might not see them till I was ordered to go into the Court to look at them; at the very first view of them, I could not have sworn to them, there was so much difference, though at the same time so much likeness, that I could not positively swear to them; I took a considerable time to look at them; after having done that I went into the yard to relieve them and myself, and came back to look at them again, and I do declare upon my oath, though at first sight I could not undertake to swear to them, yet I did in the progress of my survey see such looks and marks that I do declare that I firmly believe that John Rann is the identical man that robbed me, and I do believe that if I had had the same conviction upon the very first sight of them, as I had after I had attentively surveyed them, that I should at first sight have positively swore to them, and I do also believe that William Collier is the other man that I saw pass riding with John Rann. My attention was wholly taken up with the man that actually robbed me, and I neither saw the other man, nor horse, though I am confident there was a horse there close up to me.
Q. Which of the men did you see at the time of the robbery?
Bell. John Rann.
Q. You saw him after that at Sir John Fielding's?
Bell. Yes.
Q. Was your opinion confirmed or staggered by that?
Bell. Confirmed.
Q. Upon the result of the survey and deliberation, are you of opinion or not of opinion John Rann is the man that robbed you?
Bell. Clearly of opinion.
Q. Is your opinion equally clear with regard to Collier being with that other man at the end of Ealing Town, or less clear?
Bell. I would hardly from the nature of things say it can be so equally clear, but the remarkableness of the person of William Collier is so very great, that I think myself very clear.
John Cordy. I am a pawnbroker in Berwick-street. On the 26th of September, the day Mr. Bell was robbed, the two women prisoners, Roache and Stewart, came to my house, and offered a watch to pawn; I was not in the shop; my lad came for me; I went; I asked them if it was their watch; they said a gentleman left it with them; this was between eight and nine o'clock; I asked them who the man was, and said the man must come or I cannot lend you money upon it; why, said Roache, it is a very singular circumstance that you should object to this, you took a watch of me at such a time; I said I knew I did, but that was no rule she should be entitled to bring more; she said it was a very singular circumstance, and why should I stop it? I said I must till the man comes. I knew well where they both lived, so I made as light of it as I could, and said they must bring the man: the short one, Stewart, said, well, it is a matter of indifference, we can bring the man to-morrow; I said if so it will do; I let them go; I went directly up to Sir John Fielding's; I got two of his men; we went down to their house, and took the two women; I left my two servants with one of the constables to wait for the two men, and on ransacking the house, the constable and I found two pair of boots quite wet and dirty; I took the watch to the watchmaker; he told me it was Mr. Bell's; I found the women at their lodgings; I was at Sir John Fielding's when the two men prisoners were brought there by the constable; this is the watch (producing it.)
Dr. Bell. The watch seal and chain are mine.
William Hill. I am a postilion to her Royal Highness the Princess Amelia; I saw Rann go through Acton the same day, the 26th of September; it was about ten minutes after three.
Q. How far is Acton from Ealing?
Hill. About a mile; there was another young man with Rann at that time.
Q. Was that the other prisoner?
Hill. I cannot tell, I did not take much notice of him; I am sure as to Rann.
Q. Did you know Rann before?
Hill. Yes; they were going towards Ealing.
Q. What coloured clothes had they on?
Hill. I did not take particular notice of their clothes: I know Rann by sight very well.
Q. Did you take notice whether they were clean or dirty?
Hill. Dirty; their boots were very dirty; one of their boots was rather shorter than the other.
Blanchville Clarke. I am a constable belonging to Sir John Fielding; upon Mr. Cordy, the pawnbroker, coming to the office, Mr. Halliburton and I went up to Miss Roache's lodgings; Mr. Cordy shewed us the lodgings; on searching in her apartments, in the left hand closet, I found two pair of boots, quite wet and dirty, as if they had been wore that day.
Q. What time in the evening was this?
Clarke. It was after ten o'clock; I cannot be particular to the time; I took Miss Roache and Christian Stewart, and brought them down to Bow street; I went back and took Peter Senhouse with me; I was then informed that the two prisoners had come in, and Halliburton had taken them into custody; when I went back to Bow-street I found them there.
William Halliburton. I went to Roache's lodgings with Mr. Cordy and Mr. Clarke; when we came there we found these two girls, and these boots; Mr. Cordy and Mr. Clarke, and the two women went away together to Bow-street; I with Mr. Cordy's two young men staid behind; about a quarter after ten o'clock, or it might be more, I heard a knock at the door; I went and opened it; the first person that came in was Rann, who I knew perfectly before; I desired him to walk in and was going to shut the door; I found a person against the door; I let it open again, and then came in Collier; I got them into the parlour and made them fast, and carried them to Bow street; I believe they did not speak a word till I tied their hands; then Rann spoke out, what have I done now, and got in his old way of swearing.
Hannah Craggs. I live in Berners-street: Roache and Stewart lodged in the same house. On the morning of the day they were taken in the evening, I let in Collier between ten and eleven o'clock; he came to Miss Roache; between eleven and twelve two horses came up to the door; I saw Rann (I did not know his name then) go into the necessary house in the morning; I imagine he was there all night, but he was not to my knowledge; there were two horses walked about the door some time; soon after somebody opened the parlour door and paid for the horses.
Q. What colour were the horses?
Craggs. They were so low in flesh I could hardly tell; one seemed of a blackish colour, the other rather brown; somebody opened the door and paid them for the horses; then I heard the door open, and Rann and another man went away after the horses; it must be the two prisoners; I do not suppose there were any others in the house; I saw the same men again in the evening when Sir John Fielding's men took them; I did not see them before, nor did I know who they were till then: I am sure to Collier; Rann was dressed in reddish coloured clothes.
Q. from Rann. Why you say I was in the house in the morning?
Craggs. I saw him go into the yard; there was a woman with him; she said who he was; I had heard great talk of him but did not know who he was.
Rann's Defence.
I knows no more of it than a child does unborn, nor I never seed Mr. Bell before he came to Sir John's, which Mr. Bell must be certain of, for to think for me, for to come to him in the middle of the day, for to rob him, which I was never guilty of; I know no more of the affair what these gentlemen, that belongs to Sir John, that wants to do things to swear my life away, for I don't know what. They have said false things to you; I know no more of it if I was to suffer death to-morrow. This woman wants to swear my life away for an affair I know nothing of, no more than this candle, and I am innocent of the fact if I was to suffer for it to-morrow; if I had been guilty I would not have trusted her with the affair.
Collier's Defence.
On the 26th of September last I called at Miss Roache's lodgings; when I came in I asked if she was within; there was a stranger, who was Halliburton; he opened the door; he said, no, and desired I would walk in; I walked in; he took hold of my hand and the other prisoner's, and bound us together, and said you must go with us, and took us to Sir John Fielding's.
Roache's Defence.
These are not the men that gave me the watch; there were two gentlemen went by my parlour window that afternoon; they were dirty and wet; they said they were just come to town; they asked me if they might come in; I said they might; they sat a little while, and asked me to give them leave to change themselves; they had just come to town; they had clean shoes and shirts, &c. the maid helped off the boots; one of the gentlemen was dressed in mourning; he asked me to go into the bed room with him; I did; he said he had no money; he had nothing but notes about him, and his watch, and he would leave his watch; and if I wanted money, I might pawn it, and he would dine with me next day, and give me ten or twenty pounds if I wanted it; I went to the pawnbroker that I have dealt with two years to pawn the watch; he stopped me; indeed he did not stop me because he knew where I lived, and I believe does not know of my pawning any thing but my own property; I said a gentleman was to come for it; I came home to my lodgings; I was going to bed when the pawnbroker and Sir John Fielding's men came in; in the morning a gentleman of my acquaintance called upon me, and said he was going out of town for three weeks; a little after he was gone away two horses came to the door; the maid was gone out for some beer; I said the horses were come to the gentleman in the parlour; the men went and ordered the horses from the door; I know no further of them; my life has been threatened a great while about Mr. Du Wall's watch, that they would not mind what they did to bring me into a snare; some of his acquaintance might lay the snare to bring me into it; he is not the man; if I had known the watch was stolen I should not have offered it to a pawnbroker I had dealt with a great while.
Stewart's Defence.
I was servant to this lady; I went with her to the pawnbroker; I told this lady I was surprised to have the horses coming at this time of day; she said she was surprised at it, and wondered who they came to; I said they came to some young man that used to call upon my mistress, who I supposed had ordered them to come here instead of elsewhere; I went and ordered them from the door; when the horses came up two gentlemen came past the window and asked how she did; she said, very well; they asked if they might come in; I said yes; I opened the door; one was dressed in second mourning; he came in and saluted my mistress, the other sat down in the parlour; I went down into the kitchen; I did not come till I was called again; my mistress went into the back-chamber with this gentleman; she came out again, she had the watch in her hand; the gentleman said you may pawn the watch for four or five guineas, or whatever you may get for it; I will come tomorrow and dine with you, and get the watch.

RANN and COLLIER, Guilty. Death.
ROACH, Guilty. Transportation for 14 years.
STEWART, Acquitted.
Collier was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy.
Note. The defence of Rann is printed verbatim et literatim.

Supplementary material: John Rann
Original Text:
John Coleby, Charles Jones, William Lewis, John Rann, William Lane, and Samuel Trotman, who were capital convicts last sessions were executed at Tyburn; on Wednesday, the 30th of November. The rest of the capital convicts were respited during His Majesty's pleasure.

Other Records

1. Mansion Estate Buildings: Sugar Plantation, Nichola Town St Kitts WI.
View over Mansion Estate Lands, Overseers House, Yard, Sugar Mill, late 20thC.
Images courtesy Dr. Grant H. Cornwell, of the College of Wooster

William married Jane Smith EDWARDS [686] about 1753 in Recorded In London. Jane was born on 15 Feb 1733/34 in Antigua, was baptised on 17 Mar 1733/34 in St Peters Basseterre St Kitts WI, died on 27 Jun 1823 at age 89, and was buried on 3 Jul 1823 in Bunhill Fields Burial Grounds Bristol GLS.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Catherine Charles JULIUS [763] (born on 3 Jan 1753-1754 in Reg In London - died on 7 Nov 1836)

         ii.  Rev William John JULIUS of St Kitts [765] (born on 17 Jul 1755, baptised Christ Church Nicola Town St Kitts - died on 4 Jul 1810 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean)

        iii.  Anne Mary JULIUS [4510] (born on 4 Sep 1756, baptised St Margaret Westminster - died in 1768, buried in St Paul Covent Garden)

         iv.  Jane Smith JULIUS [766] (born on 12 Aug 1757 in Holthouse nr Wokingham BRK - died in 1832 in Bristol WIL)

          v.  William JULIUS [4509] (born on 12 Aug 1757 in Holthouse nr Wokingham BRK - died on 26 Sep 1771 in Harrow School Eng.)

         vi.  Robert Edwards JULIUS [24164] (baptised on 15 Aug 1757 in Wokingham BRK - buried on 8 Jan 1759 in St Paul Covent Garden)

        vii.  Capt Robert Edwards JULIUS [773] (born in 1759 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean - buried on 10 Mar 1785 in St Paul Covent Garden)

       viii.  JULIUS [24407] (born on 14 Aug 1761 in Wokingham BRK)

         ix.  John James JULIUS J P [767] (born on 25 Jan 1763, baptised St James Westminster London - died on 9 Jul 1837)

          x.  Louisa Caroline JULIUS [771] (born on 21 Mar 1763-1764 in Nicola Town St Kitts - died on 22 Sep 1845 in Camberwell LND)

         xi.  Charles Smith JULIUS [4508] (born on 17 Jun 1765 in Wimpole St Cavendish Sq London)

        xii.  Nancy JULIUS [774] (born about 1768 in St Kitts Leward Is Carribean - died in 1768 in Wimpole St Cavendish Sq London)

12     xiii.  Dr George Charles JULIUS [51] (born on 6 Jun 1775 in Nicola Town St Kitts - died on 6 Nov 1866 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng.)




25. Jane Smith EDWARDS [686], daughter of Dr Robert EDWARDS of Antigua [4804] and Catherine JULIUS [4805], was born on 15 Feb 1733/34 in Antigua, was baptised on 17 Mar 1733/34 in St Peters Basseterre St Kitts WI, died on 27 Jun 1823 at age 89, and was buried on 3 Jul 1823 in Bunhill Fields Burial Grounds Bristol GLS.

General Notes:
Baptisms St Peter Basseterre St Kits
1734 Mar 17 Jane Smith dau of Catherine and Robert Edwards aged 6 weeks.
C Vol 1 pg 158

Laft Friday the wife of William Julius Efq., was fafely delivered of Twins, a Son (sic) and a Daughter, at his Seat at Holthoufe, near Oakingham in Berkfhire, and all are extremely well.
London Chronicle 16-18 Aug 1757 pg 2.

12 August the Lady of William Julius Esq of a son and a daughter.
Gentleman's Magazine 1757 vol. XXVII p 386.

On Friday laft the Lady of William Julius, Esq. was fafely delivered of a fon at his seat near Reading in Berkfhire
The Daily Register of Commerce and Intelligence 19 Aug 1761

Yefterday morning the Lady of William Julius, Esq. was fafely delivered of a fon, at his houfe in Wimpole-ftreet, Cavendish-fquare.
Gazette and New Daily Advertifer Tuesday 18 Jun 1765

Jane was an Executor of the Will of John Calfe probated 13 April 1805

At Bristol, June 27 aged 100, Mrs Jane Smyth (sic) Julius, relict of the late William Julius, Esq. of Mansion Estate St Christopher's.
Jacksons Oxford Journal 12 Jul 1823 also Gentlemans Mag. Vol 2 Pg 93.

WILL of JANE SMITH JULIUS
Probate July 1823
Last will and testament of Jane Smith Julius widow at present living in Pritchard Street parish of St. Paul Bristol to be buried in the churchyard of the parish in which I may happen to die with as little expense as may be.
No 15 Pritchard Street to my dau Jane Smith Julius and her assigns for life and after her death to my Grandaughter Emily Julius dau of my son George Charles Julius and her heirs assigns etc.
To my said son George Charles Julius a ring to the value of 5 guineas as a token of affection he is well provided for, my dau Jane Smith Julius's income is considerably reduced in consequence of a change in public affairs, therefore all my residue to said dau who is made sole executor.
Signed Jane Smith Julius 1 March 1822. Witness Caroline Ford and a Bristol Solicitor and his Clerk.
Prob 11 1673 fol. 416; IR26 - 959 fol. 752. Duty 1% of Three hundred & fifty three pounds eight shillings and five pence. Equals three pounds ten shillings and eight pence.
Copy on file.

Bunhill Fields Burial Grounds
Jane Smith Julius age 89 of Pritchard St St Pauls July 3rd 1823 No FG27, 3 Feet, Cost L3/3/0
I hereby certify that the above is a true extract or copy of the Register Book of Burial belonging to Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, in Redcross Street, in the Parish of St Philip & Jacob, in the City of Bristol, as examined and compared therewith, this 19th Day of August 1926.
H.S. Allen
Secretary

Picture courtesy Caroline Macpherson 2013

Research Notes:
Jane wasthought a Welsh heiress, first cousin of Sir Charles Morgan of Tredegar Park. (Family lore unsubstantiated)

John Hill writes 2009
I am as sure as I can be that Jane Smith Julius (nee Edwards) was the daughter of a Dr. Robert Edwards and his wife Catherine JULIUS (nee Smith). Dr Robert Edwards was a medical practiitioner in Antigua where Jane was born, and maybe also in St Kitts where he died on 3 Sept 1762 in Basseterre; on his gravestone is engraved "chirurgeon" and the records confirm this. I have not yet been able to find out his parentage, and the nearest I got was a certain Rev. William Edwards , a clergyman in Shropshire who had a son named Robert who was born in 1700 and went to Wadham College, Oxford in 1717. I am trying to find out where he studied medicine.

1848 Bunhill Fields, Redcross Street
Burials discontinued except to members of the tabernacle congregation and only one body in each grave and no burials with five yards of a building.
Ref: http://www.bafhs.org.uk/burial-data

Jane married William JULIUS [685] about 1753 in Recorded In London. William was born on 12 Nov 1726 in St Kitts (Reg In London), died on 18 Feb 1780 in London. at age 53, and was buried on 22 Feb 1780 in St Paul Covent Garden. Another name for William was William John.

26. Rev Jonathan GILDER [1260], son of Jonathan GELDER of Burton Westmorland [1262] and Elizabeth SANDER [10050], was baptised on 19 May 1735 in St Columba Warcop WES, died in Jul 1779 at age 44, and was buried on 3 Jul 1779 in St Mary Aspenden HRT.

General Notes:
Jonathon won scholarships to the prestigious Appleton Grammer School, and Queens College Oxford; breaking from his yeoman heritage. He completed an MA some 17 yrs later at Christs College Cambridge. He had a family of 14 (only 12 identified in this Tree) and not large means. The family were bright, lively and capable, and several later made their mark.

Gelder Jonathon, s Jonathon of Burton WES, pleb. Queens Coll., matric 10 Apr 1753, aged 17; BA 1756
Oxford University Alumni, 1500-1886

Gilder, Jonathan or Gelder Entered: Apr. 10, 1753 B.A., incorp. from Oxford, 1770; M.A. from CHRIST'S, 1770. S. of Jonathan, of Burton [near Warcop], Westmorland. Matric. from Queen's College, Oxford, Apr. 10, 1753, age 17, as Gelder, J.; B.A. (Oxford) 1756. V. of Layston, Herts., 1762-79. R. of Aspenden, 1770-9. Chaplain to Lord Bellenden. Died 1779. (Peile, II. 277; Al. Oxon.; Cussans, I., Pt II., 87, 105.)
Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900

Jonathon was known as Gelder at Oxford but his Cambridge record lists him as Gilder with a reference back to Gelder.

At his marriage he is recorded as a clergyman and schoolmaster.

Jonathon was aged 44 at his death

Research Notes:
Layston HRT has been absorbed into the town of Buntingford HRT - 2010

Jonathan married Mary BRAZIER [1261] on 9 Aug 1859 in Layston HRT. Mary was born circa 1743 and died in 1823 in Bromley College Bromley KEN aged about 80.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Nancy GILDER [1321]

         ii.  Mary GILDER [1263] (baptised on 1 Aug 1760 in Layston HRT)

        iii.  Sarah GILDER [1268] (born in 1762, baptised Layston HRT - died on 5 Jul 1809 in Fateghurr India)

         iv.  James GILDER [1265] (baptised on 7 Mar 1762 in Layston HRT)

          v.  Elizabeth GILDER [1266] (baptised on 3 Dec 1763 in Layston HRT)

         vi.  William GILDER [1322] (baptised on 22 Oct 1765 in Layston HRT)

        vii.  Ann GILDER [10059] (baptised on 15 Dec 1769 in Layston HRT)

       viii.  Juliana Ann GILDER [1301] (baptised on 29 Jul 1772 in St Mary Aspenden HRT)

         ix.  Johnathon GILDER [1319] (born in 1773, baptised Layston HRT)

13        x.  Isabella Maria GILDER [52] (baptised on 8 May 1774 in Aspenden Herts. - died on 4 Jan 1867 in Maze Hill Hse. St Leonards On Sea Eng.)

         xi.  John GILDER [1303] (born in 1776, baptised St Mary Aspenden HRT - died in 1830)

        xii.  Charlotte GILDER [1320] (baptised on 27 Feb 1776 in St Mary Aspenden HRT)


27. Mary BRAZIER [1261] was born circa 1743 and died in 1823 in Bromley College Bromley KEN aged about 80.

General Notes:
Mary at her marriage, was described as a spinster of St Peter in the East, Oxford.

Bromley College was an Anglican institution to provide a residence for widows of the Clergy.

Mary married Rev Jonathan GILDER [1260] on 9 Aug 1859 in Layston HRT. Jonathan was baptised on 19 May 1735 in St Columba Warcop WES, died in Jul 1779 at age 44, and was buried on 3 Jul 1779 in St Mary Aspenden HRT.

28. William SMITH [12757] was born about 1738 and died on 23 Aug 1817 aged about 79.

General Notes:
Details of this Smith family are from entries in the front of the book, "Burkitt on the New Testament" by William Burkitt M.A. late vicar and lecturer of Dedham Essex, printed in London MDCCLX.

William was aged 79 at his death 23 Aug 1817.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

William married Hannah [12758]. Hannah was born about 1739 and died on 17 Jul 1796 aged about 57.

Children from this marriage were:

14        i.  William SMITH of Nottingham [2423] (born on 23 Jun 1769 - died on 3 May 1818)

         ii.  Joseph SMITH [12759] (born on 19 Jun 1763 - died on 14 Jun 1772)

        iii.  Charlotte SMITH [12760] (born on 29 Jun 1764 - died on 17 May 1802)

         iv.  William SMITH [12761] (born on 30 Dec 1765 - died on 31 Dec 1765)

          v.  Mary SMITH [12762] (born on 19 Dec 1766 - died on 30 Jul 1790)

         vi.  Dorothy SMITH [12763] (born on 10 Mar 1768 - died on 26 Jan 1786)

        vii.  Hannah SMITH [12765] (born on 1 Aug 1770 - died on 25 Jul 1772)

       viii.  Elizabeth SMITH [12766] (born on 28 May 1772 - died on 8 Feb 1819)

         ix.  Lucy SMITH [12767] (born on 13 Nov 1776 - died on 18 Mar 1792)


29. Hannah [12758] was born about 1739 and died on 17 Jul 1796 aged about 57.

General Notes:
Hannah was aged 57 at her death on July 17 1796.
From the entries in Burkitt on the New Testament.

Hannah married William SMITH [12757]. William was born about 1738 and died on 23 Aug 1817 aged about 79. picture

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