The Kings Candlesticks - Family Trees
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William JULIUS [685]
(1726-1780)
Jane Smith EDWARDS [686]
(1734-1823)
Rev Jonathan GILDER [1260]
(1735-1779)
Mary BRAZIER [1261]
(Abt 1743-1823)
Dr George Charles JULIUS [51]
(1775-1866)
Isabella Maria GILDER [52]
(1774-1867)

Rev Henry Richard JULIUS M.A. [776]
(1816-1891)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Mary Ann BUTTERWORTH [1031]

Rev Henry Richard JULIUS M.A. [776]

  • Born: 30 Jun 1816, Richmond SRY
  • Christened: 14 Apr 1818, St Mary Magdalen Richmond SRY
  • Marriage (1): Mary Ann BUTTERWORTH [1031] on 2 Sep 1840 in Clifton, GLS
  • Died: 27 Mar 1891, Woodcroft Red Hill SRY aged 74
  • Buried: 2 Apr 1891, St John Church Yard Redhill SRY
picture

bullet  General Notes:


Henry was baptised by his brother-in-law George Quilter.

Henry was educated at Charterhouse, Shewsbury 1832-35. St Johns College Cambridge. Curate Farnham 1839-46. Vicar of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. Henry retired in 1886 aged 70. Tilford was part of the parish of Farnham and did not have its own church in 1844.

Julius, Henry Richard. b.30 Jun 1816, 6th s. of Dr George Charles Julius of Richmond, Surrey. Day Boy, Jun 1824 - Sep 1826. At Shrewsbury, Feb 1832 - Sep 1835. St Johns, Camb.; B.A. 1839; M.A. 1842. D. 1839; P. 1840. C. of Farnham, Surrey 1839-46. V of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. m. 1840, Mary Ann, 1st. d. of J. H. Butterworth of Clapham.
d. Redhill 27 Mar 1891.
Ref: Charterhouse School Register.

Shrewsbury School Register - Entrance 1832.
Julius Henry Richard, left 1835; St Johns Coll. Cambridge, BA 1839; C of Farnham, 1839-46; V of Wrecclesham 1846; died 27 Mar. 1891.
NZSOG

Henry Richard Julius. College: ST JOHN'S Entered: Michs. 1835 Died: 27 Mar 1891 More Information: Adm. pens. at ST JOHN'S, Feb. 13, 1835. S. of George C., Esq., of Richmond, Surrey. Schools [Charterhouse and] Shrewsbury. Matric. Michs. 1835; B.A. 1839; M.A. 1842. Ord. deacon (Winchester) July 7, 1839; priest, July 12, 1840; C. of Farnham, 1839-46. V. of Wrecclesham, Surrey, 1846-86. Resided subsequently at Wrecclesham Grange, Farnham. Married, Sept. 2, 1840, Mary Ann, dau. of J. H. Butterworth, of Clapham Common. Died Mar. 27, 1891, aged 74, at Redhill. Brother of the above. (List of Carthusians; Shrewsbury Sch. Reg.; Crockford; The Guardian, Apr. 1, 1891.)
Alumni Cantabrigienses. Ancestry

Julius Henry Richard Wrecclesham, Parsonage, Farnham, Surrey. St John's College, Cambridge BA 1839, MA 1842; Deacon 1839, Priest 1840. P.C. of Wrecclesham, Dio. Win. 1846. (Patron Bishop of Winchester; P.C.'s Inc 350L and Ho; Pop 1271) Formerly C. of St Andrews, Farnham, 1839-46.
Ref Page 380 Crockfords 1868

JULIUS. Henry Richard.
Alum Cantab. Adm pens St.Johns 13 Feb 1835.
Son of George C. Esq. Richmond Surrey.
Schools [Charterhouse] & Shrewsbury.
Matric Michs 1835 B.A. 1839. M.A. 1842.
Ord. Deac [Winchester] 6 July 1839 pr 12 July 1840.
Curate of Farnham 1839-46.
Vicar of Wrecclesham, Surrey 1846-86. Resided subsequently at Wrecclesham, Grange, Farnham.
M. 2 Sept. 1840 Mary Ann d of J.H.Butterworth of Clapham Common. D. 27 Mar 1891 Aged 74 at Redhill. Bro. of A.A.Julius.
FROM : List of Carthusians, Shrewsbury Sch Reg, Crockford, The Guardian 1 Apr 1891.

The Times, Friday, Sep 20, 1844; pg. 0; Issue 18720; col A
Marriages - Henry Julius MA officiating at St Marylebone church
The Times, Friday, Apr 28, 1848; pg. 0; Issue 19849; col A
Marriages - Rev H R Julius at Wreclesham Surrey, officiated

1855 July 16; Henry was issued a British Passport No. 24787
Ref: Findmypast 2011.

THE CURATE OF FARNHAM, the Rev*A.B. Julius, obviously knew some Tilfordians as he shewed in a letter to Mr Ware on 21st June 1844. He made some very forceful points and wrote on the subject of a school for Tilford.
As a resident Curate of Farnham for nearly five years, I have become acquainted accidentally with some of the inhabitants of this hamlet in our parish and I deeply regret that neither piety nor morality is at all increasing in the district. On the contrary there are many youths from twelve to twenty years of age with little or no employment who are likely to infect with their evil principles, the younger children, themselves to become serious plagues to the neighbourhood unless they can be brought into contact with the civilisation and correcting influence of Christianity.
I have been making enquiries respecting the practicability of establishing such a school and there seems to be little doubt that from twelve to thirty boys might easily be brought together. This arrangement need not interfere with the school now conducted by Miss Eade as air equal number of girls ought to be under instruction to which she might attend.
The main difficulty seems to be in procuring the rental for a suitable house, and ground attached. Upon this point in particular I should apply now to you, and should feel very obliged of you could either alleviate the difficulty or suggest any other quarter in which to apply. I feel sure that I could guarantee a fair rent for two or three years through the aid of some of the inhabitants, after which time I hope the school may support itself.
I deeply deplore that circumstances should have arisen that led to the closing of the chapel but at the same time I feel that this very deprivation of spiritual privileges is an increased reason why efforts should be made to supply the sad deficiency."
The idea of the school was not acted upon with any haste.- - - The new church was consecrated on 10th July 1867 and the Rev. H.R.Julius read one of the lessons at the first evening service.
* The initials A.B. are undoubtedly an error, for the writer of the letter could only have been Rev H.J.Julius.
Ref: Tilford Through the Ages.

England Return of Owners of Land 1873. Surrey.
Rev Henry R Julius Wreclesham. 2a 2r 34p gross estimated rental value. L86/10s/0d

From Old Julius by John Birch and Roy Waight.
Henry Julius's success is part a reflection of his relationship, over 40 years, with his Bishop the grand prelate Charles Sumner, he regarded Henry as a protege.
Henry had been ordained by Sumner in the chapel of Farnham Castle, and was then placed in a curacy at St Andrews Farnham, St Andrews was the largest parish in Surrey and Henry worked with a fellow curate Joseph Butterworth. It was Joseph's sister Mary and who married Henry in 1840.
Sumner was planning a new parish for Wrecclesham, SW of Farnham, a rather bleak and squalid village in a hop growing area, subject annually to the tough behaviour of London East Enders who visited to pick the hops.
St Peter's Wrecclesham was consecrated 15 July 1840 by Bishop Sumner creating a perpetual curacy which was filled by a Rev Buttemer. Buttemer did not occupy the living for long, and on 17 July 1845 Henry was licensed to the perpetual curacy of Wrecclesham, on a stipend of 400.
Henry is recorded as accepting the challenge gladly but his daughter Florence reports "my mother did not at all relish the prospect. She thought it a dreary and rather savage place, with no gentry . . . . ." However the vicarage was a pleasant commodious home set in 2 acres of park.
An interesting extract from Florence's book "To the Vicarage Born" records. "It must have been about the year 1851 that the railway was extended from Farnham to Alton. It was a great interest to us as it passed in front of our nursery windows and actually through part of our field . . . . . As a bridge had to be built very near our house the interest in the Railway occupied many months until all the tracks were decorated with little warning flags and we were told the railway was opened. Later our daily paper was brought down by an early train and thrown into our field by the guard. We sat in a row by the railing and as soon as the train had passed made a rush to secure it."
Henry's life at this time was busy with a demanding parish and a growing family, church attendances were increasing, a Sunday School increased the influence of good across all social classes.
Henry, himself well educated had a passion for the education of the village children beyond the Sunday School. In 1859 land was donated and funds raised for a school for 250 pupils and a schoolhouse. However school was not free and cost 1d a week when it opened, the school records show Henry often making good for those families unable to afford even that.
Thinking not only of the children but of the men in the village, Henry promoted the building of the Wrecclesham Institute which opened in 1881, dedicated to improving skills and knowledge.
About 1865 Bishop Sumner and Henry had discussed establishing a new parish in the growing hamlet of Rowledge at the junction of three parishes, Binsted, Frensham and Wrecclesham about 2 miles SW of Wrecclesham. A unique opportunity for Henry to create a parish from the word go.
Not only did this involve raising the funds and building St James, Rowledge and Parsonage, but much time was taken in negotiating with surrounding clergy whose parishes were impinged upon. One, a Rev Richard Stevens had been non-resident in his parish for years, he was finally traced for his consent, to a hotel in Paris where he had been living.
St James was consecrated in 1871 and quickly followed by a school in 1872.
For his efforts and a 1000 contribution Henry was granted the patronage of St James for the term of his incumbency. Thereupon he named his son-in-law the Rev A W Parker to the living of St James Rowledge, on a stipend of 300 pa.
During his incumbency, Henry attracted parishioners from outside Wrecclesham and the church became too small. In 1861 21 years after its consecration St Peter's was almost totally rebuilt, adding 100 seats.
Henry's daughter Florence Stevens describes a visit of the Bishop in her writing To the Vicarage Born "I well remember the excitement caused in Wrecclesham church on many a Sunday by a carriage rolling up just before the service and the Bishop coming in . . . . . The Bishop was very big and dignified and it was an awesome event. He loved taking his neighbouring country parsons by surprise, and preach for them . . . . . After the service the carriage and pair arrived at the gate and the Bishop insisted on driving my mother home"

Suffering increasingly poor health Henry, in 1886, after 40 active years in the parish and aged 69, decided to retire.
This was reported as:
Resignation of the Vicar.
We regret to have to record the resignation through failing health of the vicar, the Rev H R Julius. The news will doubtless be received with regret as Mr Julius and his family are most highly regarded by all classes of society in the district.
Mr Julius graduated from St John's College, Cambridge and took his degree in 1839. He was for sometime curate of Farnham and was appointed vicar of Wrecclesham in 1846 and it was mainly through his exertion and munificence that the church was considerably enlarged and improved in 1876.
There was no good work ever started in the parish that did not receive his warm and enthusiastic support and he was always ready to assist in any really deserving case of need that might be brought to his notice. The living is in the gift of the Bishop of the diocese and is of annual value of 400 and there is a good vicarage house.
The Surrey Advertiser 6 Mar 1886.

Presentation
The parish was to recognise the contribution made by Henry Julius with a testimonial the Surrey Advertiser reports:
Perhaps one of the most interesting ceremonies that has ever taken place in the village of Wrecclesham was performed on Wednesday afternoon when the testimonial to the late respected vicar the Rev H R Julius which has been on the tapis1 for some time was presented owing to the failing health of the Rev HR Julius the affair was made as private as possible. As might be expected funds were readily forthcoming, as the parishioners were only too glad to be able to show in some tangible form the love and respect which they held for a pastor who had worked in their midst for forty long years and whose name had been a household word in the village. The following gentlemen were appointed to act as a committee in carrying out the scheme: Col Wyndham and Messrs R D Mason, G F Roumieu, T Smith, G R Waterson, H J Snelling, A Harris, W Mould, J Hughes, J Parrott, E Marley, S Bunyan, H Catt and H Shrubb.
It was decided that the testimonial should take the form of a chest of plate and Messrs Roumieu and Smith were deputed to make the purchase, which they did in London. On Wednesday, at noon, the chest was on view in one of the rooms in the Institute and it was seen by a number of parishioners who expressed admiration of the splendid article. The chest was of polished oak and bore upon the top of a small silver plate on which was engraved the following:
"Presented by the past and present members of the congregation to the Rev H R Julius MA on his resigning the vicarage of St Peters Wrecclesham after forty years administration. August 1886."
The chest contained the following massive silver pieces. One and a half dozen table forks, one dozen desert spoons, one dozen desert forks, one dozen teaspoons, one dozen table spoons, half a dozen egg spoons, two gravy spoons, four salt cellars, four salt spoons, four sauce ladles, one soup ladle. In all 87 pieces. Nicely inscribed on a card with the words "list of subscribers" and underneath the names of 155 persons who had contributed to the testimonial.
Leaving the Institute the company repaired to the Grange where in the drawing room, they found the Rev H R Julius surrounded by his family and a few friends. There were present: the Rev L H Burrows, and the Rev A W Parker (Rowledge), Col Wyndham, Mr R D Mason, Mr G F Roumieu, Mr Sneling, Mr Waterson, Mr Mould, Mr Harris, Mr Hughes, Mr Parratt, Mr Catt, and the following ladies Mr and Mrs Julius, Mrs Parker, Mrs Wyndham, Mrs Roumieu, Mrs Catt and Mrs Langhurst.
Col Wyndham made the presentation and said they, as representatives of the Rev H R Julius's parishioners and congregation, had met there that afternoon with his (the late Vicars) permission, to express to him, not only in words, but in the shape of a testimonial, the high esteem and regard and affection of those whose name were inscribed on the illumination. As the spokesman of the party, he felt sure that many of those who accompanied him had known the Rev H R Julius much longer than he had and also, having been longer with the parish, knew more and perhaps, if possible, appreciated more, the good work, whether spiritual or temporal, of what their guest, as their vicar and their friend, had been the promoter and the guide (Hear hear).
Among the substantial benefits accruing to Wrecclesham during the vicar's long residence and administration in the village, he (the speaker) would first mention the parish church which had been enlarged, and he might say almost totally rebuilt. Then there were the schools, the water supply and last, and by no means least the Institute. In all of these improvements and good works we understand that the Rev H R Julius had taken most prominent action, not only by sound advice and fixed purpose for a worthy hand, but also he believed substantively, with substantial funds. He could say no more than a liberal hand and self-sacrifice. He felt that while mentioning this fact they momentarily were only saying that the past and present, and perhaps the future generations, had an might have to be grateful to the Rev gentlemen for the many good works that had been performed by him (Hear hear)
But what they felt would be to him, the Rev H R Julius, much more valuable than all, was the belief in a reward far more endurable for the spiritual words breezed to the sick, the troubled, the penitent and the dying. For such services as these, the God whom the late vicar had so faithfully served, was alone able to give an adequate reward. The speaker went on to refer to the kindly and active part taken by Mrs, and the Misses Julius in the work of the parish, in conjunction with the vicar. These ladies had made many a service bright by their music and singing. (Applause). They (the ladies) had born with the vicar the burden and heat of the day and the gratitude of the parishioners was due to them for their willing services.
In conclusion he said that the committee had some difficulty in deciding what form the testimonial might take and what would be most suitable. He might add that Mrs Julius had been taken into their confidence. (A laugh and hear hear). They hoped that the testimonial, to be presented, would be what was intended, a testimony of the love and esteem which the subscribers to it felt for the recipient after forty years of administration and residence amongst them, and that when in God's time he should be called to his well earned rest it would be a memorial to his family of the feelings then expressed in the gift (Applause).
In handing the gift to the Rev HR Julius, Col Windham said he thought all the subscribers had seen it. Mr Roumieu read the inscription to the recipient who in replying began by addressing those present as follows:
My dear friends and dear old parishioners. He must offer them his sincere thanks which he heartily did. He must also thank those kind parishioners and friends who were not present that day, but would be made acquainted with the proceedings. The testimonial he must add came at a very opportune time because, and they would believe what he said, there was a great trial to leave a living. It was a trial to give up the dear old vicarage in which he had many pleasant associations. Some of the children were born there, brought up and trained within its walls. It was a great wrench but he knew it was his duty to resign. He had many pleasant memories of the time when he was engaged in the ministry but that was passed away. He had resigned that part because he was too feeble and weak to any longer act. It was his duty that he felt that he owed to his parishioners to resign when he was not able to carry out the work as efficiently as he had done in former years.
At this point the Rev gentlemen stopped for a few minutes and, upon Col Windham offering him a chair, that a week clergy could never sit down. He went on to say that there was recompense for him leaving in the testimonial presented to him that day. It told him that he had their affection and love. It was a very pleasant thing for him to say. I am not going away. When he first looked over the matter with Mrs Julius, upon his leaving the vicarage, it was a sad thought to him that he would have to leave Wrecclesham. But Gods kind Providence had given him leave to take this present house.
He was glad to see their new vicar present who he was sure would do the work of the parish just as well as he did and perhaps a great deal more. He could not do better he said in conclusion than repeat the words of St Paul: "I commend you to God and to the word of his Grace which is able to build you up and give you an inheritance among all they that we sanctified"
He concluded by saying - God bless you
The Surrey Advertiser 2 Oct 1886.
1. On the tapis, a Victorian phrase meaning 'on the table' or 'under consideration"

Henry at his retirement in 1886 had moved to a large modern manor house, The Grange, which happened to be right alongside the Wrecclesham Church.
However in 1890 Henry and his family moved to settle in Redhill leaving behind family and 12 grandchildren in Wrecclesham. They settled in a house called Woodcraft alongside Earlswood Common. It is here that he died 27th of Mar 1891, and at the wish of the family was buried at St John Redhill, not the family vault in the churchyard of St Peter's Wrecclesham

Deaths.
Julius. On Good Friday at Woodcroft, Redhill, the Rev Henry Richard Julius, for 40 years vicar of Wrecclesham, aged 74.
Ref: Sussex Agricultural Express 3 April 1891.

"On St James Day, July 25 of 1894, the east window (at Rowledge) was dedicated. The window is a (fine) triplet in the style of early English architecture designed and executed by Clayton and Bell. It was given by the Rev A W and Mrs Parker in memory of the latter's parents, the Rev H R Julius founder of the church, and his wife. The sermon at the dedication was preached by the Rev Canon Humbert, vicar of Hyde, Winchester. The subject of the window generally is "The Resurrection", nearly all the Scripture records of the dead raised to life being represented in the several parts."
Ref: A Rowledge History by Florence Parker and others researched and published by Roy Waight

In 1895, St Peter's Church Wrecclesham dedicated two stained-glass windows to their late vicar. The windows were created by Clayton and Bell, one of the most prolific and proficient workshops of English stained-glass during the latter half of the 19th century. They depicted the presentation of our Lord at the Temple. The two windows originally located on the wall of the north aisle, were moved to form the centrepiece of the east wall of the Chapel of St Michael when it was built in 1917.
The two windows bear the following inscription:
The East Window of St Peter's Church Wrecclesham.
To the glory of God and to the beloved memory of Henry Richard
Julius for 40 years vicar of this Parish
who died 27 Mar 1891.
Also of Mary Ann, his wife,
who died 27th of Mar 1893.
Heirs together of the Grace of Life.

There was a surplus of funds collected by the family for the above windows and this was spent on a brass lecturn, in use in the church to today (2015).

bullet  Research Notes:


Old Julius.
Published in 2015 by the Farnham and District Museum Society, "Old Julius", by John Birch and Roy Waight is a comprehensive record of Henry Richard Julius, his life, family and contribution to the parishes of Wrecclesham and Rowledge.
ISBN 978-0-901638-21-2.

Image Courtesy St Peters Wrecclesham SRY Archive.

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bullet  Other Records

1. Census: England, 30 Mar 1851, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 34 Curate of Wrecclesham born Richmond. Also in the house were a governess, cook, 3 maids.

2. Census: England, 2 Apr 1871, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is recorded as head of house married aged 54 Vicar of Wrecclesham born Richmond SRY

3. Census: England, 3 Apr 1881, Rectory Wrecclesham Farnham. Henry is described as head of house married aged 64 Vicar born Richmond SRY. Also in the house were three servants



4. Henry Richard Julius: Will & Probate, 24 Apr 1891.
This Is the last Will of me Henry Richard Julius of the Grange in the County of Surrey Clerk in Holy Orders
I hereby revoke all Wills and testamentary dispositions made by me
I appoint my nephew Alexander K Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth (hereinafter called my trustees) to be the Executors and Trustees of this my will
I give all my plate linen china glass books pictures prints wines furniture and other household effects and my carriage and pony to my dear wife Mary Ann absolutely in case she shall survive me but in case my said wife shall die in my lifetime then I give the testimonial presented to me by my late parishioners and the silver teapot coffee pot cream jug sugar basin and silver given to my father together with the piano pony and carriage to my dear daughters Edith Catherine and Constance Marion jointly and my plate and ornaments other than the articles aforesaid together with the jewelry and trinkets worn and used by my wife
I give to my trustees (to whom I have signified in writing wishes as to the distribution thereof) to be by them divided between my children and grandchildren all some of them according to the uncontrolled judgement and discretion of my trustees And all my other household effects I give to my said daughter Edith Catherine and Constance Marion jointly I give my leasehold dwellinghouse the Grange situate at Wrecclesham aforesaid to my dear wife absolutely if she shall survive me but in case she shall die in my lifetime then I declare that the said dwellinghouse shall fall into and form part of my residuary estate
To my dear daughter Mary Isabel inasmuch as I consider that she will find the money she will receive under her parents marriage settlement amply sufficient for her wants as a Clewer Sister and to my dear daughter Harriet Emily wife of the Rev Arthur Parker who has already received 2 cottages at Boundstone and to my dear son Henry John to whom I have advanced in my lifetime a sum of money which I had intended to leave him at my death I make no bequest
I give and desire that the cottage situated opposite the Vicarage at Wrecclesham shall with the garden and appurtenances unto my trustees to the use of my wife during her life and after her death to the use of such of my children or grandchildren as she shall by any deed or deeds or by her will or any codicil thereto appoint and in default of such appointment and so far as any such appointment shall not extend to the use of my dear daughter Florence the wife of James Stevens
I give to my dear wife the sum of 300 to be paid within one calendar month after my death
I devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate not here by otherwise disposed of unto my trustees upon trust that my trustees shall sell and call in and convert into money the same or such part thereof as shall not consist of money and shall with and out of the money used by such sale calling in and conversion and with and out of my ready money pay my funeral and testamentary expenses and debts and the legacies bequeathed by this my will or any codicil hereto and shall with the consent in writing of my said wife during her life and after her decease at the discretion of my trustees invest the residue of the said monies with power my trustees from time to time with such consent or at such discretion as aforesaid to vary such investments and shall stand possessed of the said residuary trust monies and the investments for the time being representing the same (hereinafter called the residuary trust funds) upon the trusts following (that is to say) in trust to pay the income thereof to my said wife Mary Ann for her life and after her decease in trust for my children or any of them or any of their issue as my said wife shall by any deed or deeds or by her will or any codicil thereto appoint and in default of such appointment and so far as any such appointment shall not extend upon trust to sell and convert into money the said residuary trust funds and out of the monies produced by such sale and conversion to pay the following legacies that is to pay to my dear daughter Ellen Georgina the wife of the Rev Ambrose Morris the sum of 800 To my dear daughter Mary Louisa the wife of Arthur Brewin the sum of 200 and to my dear daughter Octavia the sum of 300 and to pay the residue of the said residuary trust funds and monies to my said daughters Edith Catherine and Constance Marion in equal portions and if any of my 5 last named children shall die in my lifetime leaving children then such children shall take in equal shares the share or legacy of their respective parents Provided always that no child or grandchild of mine who shall take any part of the residuary trust funds under any such appointment as aforesaid shall be entitled to any share of the and appointed part of such residuary trust funds or to any such legacy as aforesaid without bringing the share or shares appointed to him or her into hotchpot and accounting for the same accordingly And I declare that my trustees may postpone the sale and conversion of the residue of my real and personal estate as any part thereof for so long as they shall think fit and that the rents profits and income to accrue from and after my decease of and from such part of my estate as shall for the time being remain unsold and unconverted shall after payment their out of all incidental expenses and outgoings be paid and applied to the person or persons and in the manner to whom and in which the income of the monies produced by such sale and conversion would for the time being be payable applicable under this my will if such sale and conversion had been actually made And I also declare that all monies liable to be invested under this my will may be invested in or upon any stocks funds or securities of or guaranteed by the Government of the United Kingdom or any British Colony or Dependency or any foreign state or the debentures securities stocks or shares of any Railway or other company in the United Kingdom or India or upon any real or leasehold securities And in lending money on any mortgage security my trustees may accept whatsoever title or evidence of title shall appear to them sufficient without being answerable for any loss arising therefrom And my trustees may release any part of the property comprising any mortgage security if satisfied that the remaining property is a sufficient security for the money owing thereon And I also declare that the power of appointing new trustees conferred by the statute shall for the purpose of this my will be vested in my said wife during her life And I also declare that my trustees and any future trustee of this my will may be a solicitor shall be entitled to charge my estate for all business done by them in relation to my estate the trusts of this my will in the same manner as they would have been entitled to charge my Executors or Trustees for the same if they had not been themselves Executors or Trustees but had been employed by my Executors or Trustees to do such business as their solicitor
In Witness whereof I the said Henry Richard Julius have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of August 1888
Henry R Julius
Signed by the said Henry Richard Julius as and for his last will in the presence of us present at the same time who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have here unto subscribed our names as witnesses
George Robert Waterson Schoolmaster Wrecclesham Schools
George Hoare Gardner Wrecclesham

On 24 April 1891 probate of this will was granted to Alexander K Butterworth and George Montagu but the Executors.

On the 24th April 1891 probate of this will was granted to Alexander Kaye Butterworth and George Montagu Butterworth the Executors.
Be it known that at the date hereunder written the last Will and Testament of The Reverend Henry Richard Julius formerly of the Grange, Wrecclesham but late of Woodcroft, The Common, Redhill within the County of Surrey, Clerk deceased who died at Woodcroft aforesaid was proved and registered in the Principal Registry of Her Majesty's High Court Of Justice, and that administration of the personal estate of the said deceased was granted by the aforesaid Court to:
Alexander Kaye Butterworth of the North Eastern Railway Station in the City of York, Solicitor to the North Eastern Railway Company and George Montagu Butterworth of No 5 Brunswick Terrace, Swindon in the County of Wilts. Solicitor the Nephews the Executors named in he said Will they having been first sworn well and faithfully to administer the same.
Gross Value of Personal Estate L3,851 7s. 0d.
Ref: Will Supplied & Transcribed by J Birch 2014

Julius the Rev Henry Richard 24th April 1891.
The Will of the Rev. Henry Richard Julius formerly of the Grange Wrecclesham but late of Woodcroft the Common Redhill both in the County of Surrey. Clerk who died 27th March 1891 at Woodcroft was proven at the Principal Registry by Alexander Kaye Butterworth of the North-Eastern Railway Station in the City of York Solicitor to the North-Eastern Railway Company and George Montagu Butterworth of 5 Brunswick Terrace Swindon late of the County of Wilts. Solicitor. The nephews the Executors.
Personal Estate L3,851 7s 0d
Ref: National Probate Calendar.



5. Henry Richard Julius: Memorials.
In 1895, St Peter's Church Wrecclesham dedicated two stained-glass windows to their late vicar. The windows were created by Clayton and Bell, one of the most prolific and proficient workshops of English stained-glass during the latter half of the 19th century. They depicted the presentation of our Lord at the Temple. The two windows originally located on the wall of the north aisle, were moved to form the centrepiece of the east wall of the Chapel of St Michael when it was built in 1917.
The two windows bear the following inscription:
The East Window of St Peter's Church Wrecclesham.
To the glory of God and to the beloved memory of Henry Richard
Julius for 40 years vicar of this Parish
who died 27 Mar 1891.
Also of Mary Ann, his wife,
who died 27th of Mar 1893.
Heirs together of the Grace of Life.

There was a surplus of funds collected by the family for the above windows and this was spent on a brass lecturn, in use in the church to today (2015).

"On St James Day, July 25 of 1894, the east window (at Rowledge) was dedicated. The window is a (fine) triplet in the style of early English architecture designed and executed by Clayton and Bell. It was given by the Rev A W and Mrs Parker in memory of the latter's parents, the Rev H R Julius founder of the church, and his wife. The sermon at the dedication was preached by the Rev Canon Humbert, vicar of Hyde, Winchester. The subject of the window generally is "The Resurrection", nearly all the Scripture records of the dead raised to life being represented in the several parts."
Ref: A Rowledge History by Florence Parker and others researched and published by Roy Waight

Henry & Mary's grave, St John, Redhill Surrey.


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Henry married Mary Ann BUTTERWORTH [1031] [MRIN: 329], daughter of Joseph Henry BUTTERWORTH of Clapham Common [2216] and Mary Ann STOCK [2217], on 2 Sep 1840 in Clifton, GLS. (Mary Ann BUTTERWORTH [1031] was born on 20 Feb 1816 in MDX London and died on 27 Mar 1893 in Woodcroft Red Hill SRY.)


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