THE KING'S CANDLESTICKS: Family Trees
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Robert LIVEING [436]
(1684-1745)
Martha VINYARD [143]
(1670-1748)
William HEARN [9851]
(1696-1763)
Sarah SIMKIN [6257]
(1702-1774)
Robert LIVEING [427]
(1714-1785)
Sarah HEARN [428]
(Cir 1723-1772)

Commander Thomas LIVEING R N [230]
(1760-1836)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Harriet HARROLD [231]

Commander Thomas LIVEING R N [230]

  • Born: 16 Mar 1760
  • Baptised: 23 Apr 1760, Harwich ESS
  • Marriage: Harriet HARROLD [231] on 7 Sep 1786 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS
  • Died: 30 Aug 1836 at age 76
  • Buried: Harwich Churchyard
picture

bullet  General Notes:


Thomas was a successful mariner and businessman, continuing the family's maritime history.

Essex Record Office File D/DU 206/9 contains various business letters addressed to Thomas.

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/10
DEED DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Scope and Content:
Papers and accounts of Captain Thomas Liveing, son in law and executor of Thomas Liveing's will, 1791-1809; release of legacy under the will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent. for L1000 invested in 3% consolidated bank annuities by Edward Bettes Harrold of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, surgeon and apothecary, 15 August 1809;

2 DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
6 November 1807
Bill of Sale: I Bridget Rachael Deane widow of Harwich and Elizabeth Rachael Deane spinster of Harwich, executors of the will of Philip Deane of Harwich, deceased, commander of the packet ship the 'King George' do in consideration of a sum of two thousand one hundred pounds in the hand by William Liveing of Harwich mariner do sell assign . . . . . that good Packet Boat Cutter or Vessel called the 'Lady Nepean' of Harwich, built at Bridport, Dorset in 1803 with one deck and one mast, length of 57 feet, breadth of 19 feet 2 inches, hold 10 feet 2 inches deep, 77 tons, a square sterned cutter with no galley and no figurehead together with all masts sails sails yards anchors cables ropes cords guns gunpowder amunition small arms tackle apparel boats oars . . . . . to Thomas Liveing of Harwich, mariner, 6 November 1807.
Signed: B R Deane E R Deane and other witnesses.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/11

26 December 1831
Bill of Sale: I Thomas Liveing of Harwich Gentleman in consideration of a sum of one thousand three hundred pounds in the hand by William Liveing of Harwich mariner do sell assign . . . . . that good Packet Boat Cutter or Vessel called the Lady Neapean of Harwich (description of the vessel) together with all masts sails . . . . . to William Liveing of Harwich mariner who now is and for ten years last past has been the Commander and John Barns the Master (of the Lady Nepean). . . . .
26 December 1831.
Signed Thos Liveing and other witnesses.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/11
This would appear to be a sale to William Liveing [6266]

The Packets.
Passage from Harwich was the main and shortest route to Holland and Europe until larger paddle steamers started to ply between Dover and Calais in the early 19th century. Packets Commissioned by the Post Master General would carry mails in addition to cargo and passengers. The crossing to Holland took about 48hrs always dependant on the weather. Coastal trade was also important. They were armed at times of war. A successful Packet Commander could make more than a L1000 a year, it was a lucrative industry.
Thomas's boat was typical for size at 77 tons.

Morning Chronicle 20 Oct 1809
Harwich the Lady Nepean Capt. Liveing for Gottenburg.

Morning Post, 23 Aug 1810.
This afternoon arrived the Lady Nepean packet, Captain Liveing, from Gothenberg, with mail and passengers, after a tedious passage of 14 days.

The London & County Directory 1811
H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean' from Mistley & Manningtree to Harwich daily.

The London & County Directory of 1811:
Packet Boat
Dover - Lady Nepean - Liveing.

Harwich. (transport options in 1811!)
Coaches - William Collen and Co proprietors of the Harwich coaches to and from the Spread Eagle Inn Gracechurch Street London morning and evening to the Three-Cups and White Heart Inn Harwich
A Waggon - To the Bull and Kings Arms Inn Leadenhall Street London
Water Conveyance - Sundry vessels constantly trading to and from Harwich taking goods etc at Bear-Quay and Harrison's-Wharf London.
Packet Boats
Auckland 1st - Bridge. Auckland 2nd - Line
Lady Nepean - Liveing. Earl of Leicester - Hammond
Lord Nelson - Deane. Lord Duncan - Hamilton
Diana - Macdonough. Lark - Wye
Prince of Wales - Mason. Lady Frances - Rutter
Beaufoy - Norris. King George - King
Days of sailing - Wednesdays and Saturdays now to hear Hellgoland and Isle of Anhalt, in time of peace to Helvoetsluys (sic).

Harwich Dec 29
The Lady Nepean Capt. Liveing for Cuxhaven
Ref: Morning Chronicle 31 Dec 1813

Harwich September 22
Sailed - Wednesday the Lady Nepean, Capt Liveing, for Helvoetsluys.
Ref: Ipswich Journal 2 September 1820.

Harwich and Dovercourt Association.
For the protection of Property, and prosecution of Felons, Thieves, and Depredators.
Whereas, a violent attempt was made in the night of Friday the 9th, or early in the morning of Saturday the 10th instant, to break into the banking house of Messrs Cox and Knocker at Harwich; the Committee of this Association hereby offer a reward of twenty pounds, to whoever shall discover the offender or offenders . . . . .
Members: . . . . Thomas Liveing . . . . .
Ref: The Suffolk Chronicle Saturday, 24 January 1824.

Essex Record Office
Reference Code D/DU 206/14 Dates of Creation 1822-1838
Mortgage account book of Thomas Liveing, with receipts for 1824-1836; at end reversed, note that Thomas Liveing delivered his commission as the commander of H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean', 1822; executors' accounts, bills (including bills for funeral), receipts etc. estate of Thomas Liveing, 1836-1838; sale catalogue of furniture of Captain Thomas Liveing, deceased, sold on the premises at King's Head Street, Harwich, 14-15 September 1837 (marked copy); insurance policy with Suffolk and General Country Amicable Insurance Office for the insurance of house of Thomas Liveing (L380), storehouse (L60), house (L180) with kitchen (L30), all in Kings Head Street, Harwich, 14 February 1838.

Memorandum
Feb 2nd 1822
Delivered my Commifsion as Commander of H M Packet Lady Nepean to Mr Anthony Cox the Agent for Packets at this Port to be by him delivered to their Lordships the Postmaster General.
Thos Liveing
T L Fisher
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

October 20 1834
Received of Mfs Dinah Frances and others the sum of six pounds five shillings being half a years interest due the 27th June last past 6-5-0
Thos Liveing
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

April 25 1835
Received of Mfs Dinah Frances and others the sum of six pounds five shillings being half a years interest due the 27th December 1834 last past 6-5-0
Thos Liveing
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14
33 DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Dates of Creation 1822-1838
Scope and Content:
Mortgage account book of Thomas Liveing, with receipts for 1824-1836, with details of a large number of loans made by Thomas to various parties. (At end reversed)
Note that Thomas Liveing delivered his commission as the commander of H.M. Packet 'Lady Nepean', 1822; Executors' accounts, bills (including bills for funeral), receipts etc. estate of Thomas Liveing, 1836-1838;
Insurance policy with Suffolk and General Country Amicable Insurance Office for the insurance of a timber, plaster, and tile house of Thomas Liveing (L380), storehouse (L60), brick and tile house (L180) with kitchen (L30), all in Kings Head Street, Harwich, 14 February 1838. Premium L1 17 0.

Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14 - a fascinating file of receipts insurance policys accounts and notes etc including:
Sale catalogue of furniture of Captain Thomas Liveing, deceased, sold on the premises at King's Head Street, Harwich, 14-15 September 1837 (marked copy).
A summary of receipts on page 16 shows the proceeds from the sale at L249-16-11 from some 370 lots, less expenses L27-9-9 and sales to family totaling L104-5-8 nett L145-11-3 plus the sale of a bed L5-5-0 total realised L150-16-3 approx.

Ipswich.
Deaths.
30th ult., much respected, in the 77th year of his age, Capt Thomas Liveing, many years Commander of the Lady Nepean Post Office packet, on the Harwich station.
Ref: Ipswich Journal Saturday Sept 3, 1836.

PRECIS OF THE WILL OF THOMAS LIVEING OF HARWICH.
Dated 5 October 1833
First after my debts funeral and probate expenses, and legacies be satisfied, all ready money and cash at my bankers to my dear wife Harriet, also all my household goods and chattles for the term of her natural life.

To my sons Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing all my messuages, tenements, lands, etc in Harwich and elsewhere in trust permitting my wife Harriet to have hold and enjoy the same taking rents and profits for the term of her natural life.

Upon the decease of the said Harriet my wife the Trustees to sell and dispose of same and all other of my personal estate and effects and I give and bequeath the proceeds to Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing and all and every other of my child or children who shall be living at the time of the demise of my said wife equally to be divided between them share and share alike.

Provided always that with respect to the share of my daughter Harriet the wife of Robert Fenn I order and direct that the same shall be placed out at interest in the names of the said Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing and the prooceeds thereof be paid into the hands of my said daughter Harriet Fenn for her own sole or separate use for the term of her natural life. . . . . . "that those same or any part thereof may not be at the disposal of or subject or liable to the control debts or engagements of her present or any after taken husband but only at her own sole and separate disposal" . . . . .

Thereafter I give and bequeath the principle monies aforesaid to be divided between the children of my daughter Harriet, at age twenty one, equally share and share alike.

I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Gill and William the son and daughter of my late brother William Liveing L15 each for mourning.

I appoint my dear wife Harriet my executrix and my sons Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing executors of this my will

Signed: Thomas Liveing
Witnesses: Thomas Stevens, Robert Lake, John Sansum all of Harwich.

Memorandum: No2 Harwich 4 April 1818 L500.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Harriet Fenn wife of Robert Fenn of Coddenham SFK at different times and in different sums the sum of L500 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No3 Harwich 24 March 1819 L300.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Julia Ambrose wife of John Ambrose farmer of Copford ESS on her marriage the sum of L300 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No? Harwich 8 Nov 1820 L500.
Whereas I have given to my daughter Julia Ambrose wife of John Ambrose farmer of Copford ESS the further sum of L500 for her own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of her share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.
It is my desire and request that when you get the remainder of your share of my property that you should pay of the money borrowed of Mr Logan and also the sum or sums borrowed of your brother Edward.
Signed: Thomas Liveing

Memorandum: No4 Harwich 16 Nov 1821 L200.
Whereas I have given to my son Edward Liveing of Nayland surgeon the sum of L200 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Witness my hand.

Memorandum: No5 Harwich 23 Aug 1830 L100.
Whereas I have given to my son Charles Liveing of National Debt Office London on his marriage the sum of L100 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Memorandum: No6 Harwich 23 Aug 1830 L200.
Whereas I have given to my son William Liveing of Harwich mariner at various times and on various occasions the sum of L200 for his own use and benefit which sum it is my will shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.
In addition to the above L200 I have let him have the sum of L400 more for his own use in all L600.

Memorandum: No7 Harwich 5 Oct 1833 L300.
Whereas I have given to my son Henry Thomas Liveing L200 to purchase furniture with and L100 more when he took the degree of Master of Arts in all L300 it is my will it shall be considered a part of his share of my estate at my decease and the decease of my wife Harriet Liveing
Signed: Thomas Liveing. Written in my own hand.

Appeared Personally: Charles Liveing of Danmark Hill Camberwell Esq, Robert Liveing Fenn of the National Debt Office in the city of London Gentlemen & William Jennings of the same place Gentlemen and jointly and severally made Oath and the first the said Charles Liveing for himself saith that he is the son and one of the executors named in the last Will and Testament as containing in paper writings marked Nos 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 of Thomas Liveing late of Harwich in the County of Essex a Captain in his Majesty's Post Office Service deceased who died on the 30th day of August last past and he further saith have few days subsequent to the death and prior to the funeral of the said deceased but the day he more particularly he is unable to set forth on search being made for the deceased's Will his the deponents sister Harriet Fenn wife of Robert Fenn proceeded to the room or bedchamber called the great front room where stood a chest of drawers wherein the deceased was in the habit of keeping his papers of moment and in one of the drawers thereof found a paper parcel which she thereupon brought to the deponent who was then in the adjoining room who immediately proceeded to open the same and then therein found the last Will and Testament of the said deceased together with certain paper writings or memoranda in the handwriting of the deceased and having now carefully viewed and perused the paper writings hereto annexed marked as aforesaid that marked No1 beginning thus this is the last Will and Testament of me Thomas Liveing of Harwich in the Co of Essex Esq aducing? thus this 11th day of Oct one thousand eight hundred and thirty five and thus subscribed Thomas Liveing that marked No 3 beginning thus L300 herewith Mar 24 1819 ending thus and also the sum or sums borrowed of your brother Edward and having the name Thoms Liveing set and subscribed to the first and
second sides thereof that marked No 2 beginning thus Harwich April 4th 1818 ending thus witness my hand this 4th day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen and thus inscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 6 beginning thus Harwich August 23rd 1830 ending thus witness my hand Thoms Liveing that marked No 4 beginning thus Harwich November 16th 1821 ending thus . . . . . written with my own hand the day and year above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 5 in continuing this memorandum Harwich August 23 1830 ending thus . . . . . written with my own hand the day and year above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing that marked No 7 beginning this memorandum Harwich Oct 5 1833 ending thus written with my own hand the year and day above mentioned and thus subscribed Thoms Liveing further saith the same are the papers by him predeposed of and are the only papers which were aforesaid found by him or contained in the said paper parcel and he lastly saith careful search hath sure been made among the papers of the said deceased but no paper or papers in the handwriting or otherwise of the said deceased whereby any sum or sums of money are specified as having been advanced by him the said deceased in his lifetime to his children save as by him predeposed have been found or discovered And the said Robert Liveing Fenn for himself saith that he knew and was well acquainted with the said deceased for some years prior and to the time of his death and during such his knowledge of and acquaintance with the said deceased often saw him right and subscribe his name to paper writings and thereby became well acquainted with his manner and character of handwriting and subscription and the said William Fennings for himself saith he knew and was well acquainted with the said deceased for some years prior and to the time of his death and during such his knowledge of and acquaintance with him has been in the habit of corresponding with and receiving letters in reply which he knows and believes were written addressed and forwarded to him the deponent by the said deceased and thereby became well acquainted with his manner and character of handwriting and subscription and they the said Robert Liveing Fenn and William Fennings having now carefully reviewed and perused the said paper writings now hereto annexed marked respectively 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 beginning ending and subscribed as aforesaid lastly say they verily and in the constructure? believe the whole body series and contents of the said paper writing beginning ending and subscribed as aforesaid save and except the words "turn over" appearing written at the foot of the first side of that marked No 3 as also the words "it is my desire and request that when you get the remainder of your share of my property that you should pay off the money borrowed off Mr Logan as also the sum or sums borrowed off your brother Edward" appearing written at the bottom of the second side of the said paper writing marked No 3 together with the names Thomas Liveing thereto set and subscribed to be all of the proper character handwriting and subscription of the said deceased
Chas Liveing - same day the said Charles Liveing was duly sworn to the truth of hereof Before me W. C. Curtis Surv . . . . . Pt Montague J Fatham Ser . . . . . Pub. R Liveing Fenn W. Fennings same day that said Robert Liveing Fenn and William Fennings were duly sworn to the truth hereof before me John Laubeny Sivir . . . . . Pt Montague I Faltham Not . . . . . Pub

Will as contained in paper in paper writings marked Nos 1,2,3,4,5,6 was proved in London 1st March 1837 before the worshipful William Calverley Curtis Doctor of Laws and Surrogates on the Oaths of Edward Liveing and Charles Liveing the sons and surviving executives to whom Admon was granted having been first sworn duly to administer

The Executors.
For the Funeral of the late Captn Thos Liveing
5 Sep 1836
Drs to Philip Hast.
Inside Coffin lined with matrafs and pillow - L2 12 6d
Outside coffin half inch oak covered with cloth best black furniture & etc - L6 10s 0d
6 feet of oak used at the grave - 6s 0d
Paid eight bearers - L2 2s 0d
Paid Beadles 4/- Constables 2/- . 6s 0d
Paid stones to cover grave - L1 4s 6d
Paid brick'd grave - L3 10s 6d
Clerk & Sextons fees - 13s 6d
Ministers Fees - L2 16s 6d
L19 18s 6d
With Mr Hast's grateful thanks
9 Sep 1836
Ref: D/DU 206/14 ESS RO

Harwich
Most Excellent Sale Of
Household Furniture
Fine feather beds equal to Down, with Superior Blankets. Marseille quilts, and other Counter . . . . . Horse hair, Cotton, and Wool Mattresses and Four Post, Tent, and other Bedsteads and Furniture . . . . . Properties etc.
To Be Sold by Auction
By Messrs Hast & Squirrel
At the residence of Captain Liveing, deceased, in
Kings Head Street, Harwich.
On Tuesday the 14th of September, 1837 and the following day,
. . . . . punctually each day at 10 o'clock, on account of the number and quality of the lots,
Without Any Reserve
. . . . . genuine, an excellent household furniture in the best possible preservation: comprising seven excellent down and feather beds, with bolsters and horse hair, wool and cotton mattresses, prime blankets, rich Marseille and British counterpane quilts, various four-post and tent bedsteads . . . . . chintz, moreen, and dimity furnitures, and win. . . . . en suite: mahogany commodes on various . . . . . chairs, cushions and covers, set of fine wood ma- . . . . . tables, on telescope slides; also in mahogany, tea, card, loo, dining, and Pembroke tables; . . . . . fancy painted and Japanned toilet and washing . . . . . excellent mahogany sofa, with mahogany seats of . . . . . and nailed chairs en suite; excellent pier, . . . . . and swinging glasses and mirrors, in rich frames, . . . . . dimensions; gentlemen's portable writing desks, boxes, caddies, etc; most excellent mahogany and . . . . . double and single chests of drawers etc: two . . . . . bureau desks . . . . . or rosewood and other stained . . . . . chairs; handsome Brussels, Kidderminster, and . . . . . carpets and stair carpeting and hearthrugs, pas- . . . . . floor cloths, variety of brass and steel fenders, irons, capital 8 day clock, sundry valuable foreign . . . . . canvass and boards by the old masters; framed . . finished engravings. Sets of table cutlery, . . . . . cruets, spirit bottles, etc, candlesticks and . . . . . dinner and desert sets very neat, sundry lots . . . . . china, in bowls, plates, dishes, cups and saucers, and ornaments. About 100 volumes of books, . . . . . biography divinity history etc. Also a variety of stone and glass bottles, kitchen, washing, and utensils, in copper, tin, and iron ware; casks, tubs, and the usual appendages in housekeeping.
. . . . . be viewed the day previous to the sale and catalogue . . . . . of the Journal Office, Ipswich, and Auctioneers.
Ref Ipswich Journal 9 Sept 1837 (A poor image)

From a copy of the above catalogue, showing the sale prices, we see:
Scotts Bible in 4 Vols L5-10-0
Burkitt's Testament 18/0
Village Sermons 4 Vols 8/6
West's Letters to a Young Lady 8 Vols 3/6
Clark's Life of Christ 2/-
Navigation 5 Vols 1/8
Atlas 5 Vols 2/3 etc.
4 Windsor Chairs L1
Handsome Mahogany Bureau L2-6-0
A Gout Stool 3/6
Good Feather Bed L5-5-0
The sale raised L249-16-11 but after commission's and other sale costs including refreshments the net amount was L145-11-3
Ref: Essex R.O. D/DU 206/14

The following is an brief account of the personal estate of Thomas Liveing at 1st Mar 1837.
Cash - L218. Household effects - L272. Leasehold interests - L1375. Mortgages Bonds Annuities Interest Dividends etc - L10940. Probate & funeral expenses etc were L328, stamp duty of L125 was paid on the estate.
Ref: ESS RO D/DU 206/14

Declaration form by his son Charles Liveing that Thomas Liveing's estate was valued at L12477-10-6
Note by Charles Liveing of the main distribution of the funds of the Estate to the beneficiaries as- Julia L.2329, Harriet L.2329, William L.2329, Edward L.2329, Charles L.2329, Henry L.2329.
Essex Record Office D/DU 206/14

Thomas's tombstone in Harwich Churchyard reads: In memory of Thomas Liveing gent some time commander of one of HM packets on this station who died Aug 30th 1836 aged 76 (also see Harriet's notes). They were natives of this town where they spent their days endeavouring to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with their God.
Transcribed by Edward Liveing May 1874, not traced in 1999.

bullet  Research Notes:


Colchester Record Office.
Kalendar Harwich Munuments.
Item 157.
1807/08
Five printed receipts for payments of 6d per month for each of the 16 members of the crew of the Lady Nepean, paid to Runnacles of Harwich, receiver for the Port of London, towards the maintainance of the Greenwich Royal Hospital for seamen, as required by law.
Various accounts from Anna Maria Cope for sailmaking, canvass, ironmongery, ropes, tarpaulins etc. Bills from Adam Gavin of Gottenberg for sundry items including spirits, meat, salt, potatoes, pilotage, repairs and varnish.
E L Fenn, 15 June 2004.

Liveing (T-). of Harwich. Letter to W. Huskisson 1812.
Ref British Library 2007.

Marriage date was perhaps 1787

Essex Record Office
MISCELLANEOUS DEEDS ETC.
DEEDS DEPOSITED BY GUILDHALL LIBRARY
Reference Code D/DU 206/10
Dates of Creation1767-1830
Extent15 items
Scope and Content Release of legacies under the will of Thomas Hearn of Harwich by Thomas Hearn of Harwich, mariner, eldest son, 8 August 1767, by William Hearn of Harwich, draper, 15 October 1770 and by Richard White, baize maker of Coggeshall and Anne his wife (formerly Hearn), 26 August 1774; release of legacies under the will of Robert LIVEING of Harwich, gent. by Robert LIVEING of Harwich, gent., 19 July 1785, by Thomas LIVEING of Harwich, gent., 24 August 1785, by Joseph Threadgill of Harwich, fisherman and Martha his wife, 25 August 1785 and by Richard White of Coggeshall, esq., his wife Anne, Thomas Hearn of Harwich and William Hearn of Coggeshall, 9 March 1786; probate, 21 January 1792 and copy of will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent., appoints wife Deborah Harrold and son-in-law Thomas LIVEING of Harwich executors, bequeaths to wife Deborah all money in public stocks at his death for life, on her death to be divided equally between children Thomas Churchman Harrold, Edward Betts Harrold and Harriet LIVEING, with the condition that a sum not to exceed L.300 can be advanced to any of the children by the executors during his wife's lifetime, 11 August 1791 [proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1792, reference January 25]; papers and accounts of Captain Thomas LIVEING, son in law and executor of Thomas LIVEING's will, 1791-1809; release of legacy under the will of Thomas Harrold of Harwich, gent. for L.1000 invested in 3% consolidated bank annuities by Edward Bettes Harrold of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, surgeon and apothecary, 15 August 1809; attested copy of will [for registered copy see D/ABR 33/372] of Sarah Stow of Harwich bequeaths L.5 and wood and coal in cellar to Ann wife of Jeremiah Durrant of Dovercourt, gardener, to Mrs LIVEING wife of Thomas LIVEING of Harwich, gent., her double chest of drawers, two large china bowls and the residue of her estate, to Elizabeth Thorogood LIVEING, daughter of Captain William LIVEING silver milk pot, locket and beads, to Robert LIVEING Fenn and Thomas Harrold Fenn, sons of Mrs Harriett Fenn a silver table spoon each, to Harriett Fenn two silver table spoons, to Elizabeth Mary Logan, wife of Thomas Logan of Harwich, surgeon two large china bowls, to Mrs Mary Sansum, wife of John Sansum of Harwich, gent. two china bowls, to Isabell Ann Kelly, daughter of Thomas Kelly of Harwich, mariner, six china cups and saucers, to her lodger Mrs Mann six silver teaspoons, 14 July 1830; account of executor of will of Sarah Stow, 1830.

bullet  Medical Notes:

Notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP.
Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion ( . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ) he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye check" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Bradstreet one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)

picture

bullet  Other Records



1. Capt Thomas Liveing: A Cutter Harwich, Notes on the Battle of Camperdown, 1797.
Cutter Princes Royal leaving Harwich c1810

Notes on Thomas Liveing serving at the Battle of Camperdown1 11 Oct 1797.
The Cutter Argus in Coastguard Service at Harwich Cmdr, Capt Saunders, Chief Mate Thomas Liveing. 17.
The cutter sailed very fast and before the Battle of Camperdown when we were at war with the Dutch this and others of H.M. Cutters were in attendance on the British Fleet (Friday) to carry dispatches Capt Saunders being often drunk his brother in law Mr Liveing had frequently the command.
This was the case when the Dutch colours were taken at ye battle of Camperdown and they were sent home to England Mr Liveing commanding who stood at ye helm all night, there being a gale of wind. There was probably some office in charge but drunk.
Mr Liveing did not like being in attendance on the Fleet and under command of the Admiral.
There was also a Wivenhoe Cutter (Capt Mannings?), The Viper cutter of Harwich Capt Morgan engaged in similar service
Another occurred in which the Argus Cutter was in attendance under Lord Nelson or Sir Sydney Smith in the Fleet (or Squadron) off Deal or Dover, Mr Liveing and some others were sent off in boats to fetch off our sailors (Wounded ones?)
They were going to cut out French gun boats but found it impossible as they were chained together, and the expedition was a failure, as they advanced under fire of Batteries and lost many sailors
Who came home to ye Cutters? when . . . . . service and was discharged
Who piloted the fleet in the North Sea and received thanks of Trinity Board.
The compiler has been unable to validate this story but much of it is entirely possible

1. 11 October, 1797,was one of the Royal Navy's greatest victorys, but became overshadowed by Trafalgar 1805. Batavian (Dutch) losses: 11 ships of the line, 540 dead, 620 wounded; British losses: 203 dead, 622 wounded



2. Thomas Liveing letter to his Wife (copy): Family Life, 24 Jul 1797, Aldeburgh SFK.
Liveing Archive Image IMG3850 & 39a LT4

Letter from Thomas Liveing to his wife Harriet.
Aldbro July 24 1797
What return can I make to my dearest best of wives for her letter only to assure her how much I respect and love her above all other creatures in the world. I humbly hope the good and gracious disposition of all events will soon bring me to her I hold dear in this life, that of seeing my family again
I am many times attempted to read your letter before I could accomplish it, indeed I don't know whether I have read it all now for as soon as I began my eyes were as soon filled with the tears and I was obliged to put it up again.
You do not say anything of your mother how she did I hope she is well how is my little Edward and the rest of them I would gladly give a guinea for a kiss of them.
Our affair is still in suspense but hope to hear from London tomorrow Mr Saunders will be in the harbour today and I think will call upon you he is in good heart about her, I wish I could say so to. I would have you send a direction to Mr Saunders and beg the favour of him to enclose a note of L20 to your brother the remainder can be sent to you - I should have sent to you by the cutter but had not the opportunity of writing soon enough, if anything should occur favourable tomorrow I shall not fail to let you know. If the cutter comes down tomorrow send me a pair of shoes. I have had a little inflammation and swelling of my right ankle from the fatigue and being so long out of bed, but by the friendly assistance of an old lady a Mrs Beddon the boat setters wife of this port it is much better.
Adieu my dearest best of girls and be assured that I would not wish to live were I dispossessed of her, unless for the sake of the little ones, remember me to your mother and let me hear from you soon.
God bless and comfort you don't drive off going to Mr Club if you're breast is not better.
T Liveing

Grandfather dearly loved to have his head combed, used to say Julia come and comb my head for a penny sometimes it was 6d. He had a six inch pigtail tied up with ribbons a little bit of leather at top where it fixed in. These pigtails were the natural hair a little piece of leather tied round at the base and a piece of ribbon half inch wound up and down bows at top the end turned up like a drakes tail used to call coft sic (cue or queue).
Ref: Notes on Harriet Harrolds Wedding.



3. Thomas Liveing: House Insurance & Receipt, Sale Catalogue and Prices, 1838 To 1839.



4. Capt Thomas Liveing.
His resignation as Commander of the Lady Nepean, 1822

His funeral bill 1836



5. 01 Thomas Liveing & others: Family memories.
Liveing Archive

Notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP.
Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing (his brother-in-law) piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion whether on the Argos or the Isis not known, he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye cheque" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Bradstreet one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)



6. 02 Thomas Liveing & others: Family memories transcription copy of 01.
Liveing Archive

Copy of the notes made July 1870 by Edward Liveing FRCP, by E H T Liveing (c1920's).

Capt Liveing (Snr) died October 1836 at his house at Harwich; his wife in January 1837 at her son Edward at Nayland. She was well when she went there and was taken with the epidemic of influenza then prevailing and died of bronchitis.
Capt William Liveing went to Weymouth about 1833 - 34. He had a house previously in Harwich (not the one he first occupied, in King Street next to his father's) belonging to Mr Thorogood bought by him for Capt Liveing's benefit. He was at Weymouth about seven years. The Lady Nepean was sold, at Harwich, the Govt giving Capt William Liveing 1700 (they sold it after for 400). All the captains of packet service at Harwich were ranked as Masters and Commanders so to secure half pay as naval commanders viz 150 or 120. Capt Liveing senior son was given a commission and the price of packet instead of he himself receiving a retiring Presentation.
Capt William Liveing's vessel at Weymouth was The Flavier a lady's name changed to the Firefly. He was paid 1000 a year in service perhaps seven years. The naval officers were jealous that he should hold a birth of this good kind and they persuaded him to retire on pension of hundred 120 this was done under cover of a medical exam and certificate that his eyesight was bad. There were disputes about the ranks of these commanders ye Harwich packets in Harwich. E.g. on one occasional sprig of nobility in a man of war went on Board Capt G Drum's packet and asked for the master, Capt Drum sent for the mate, saying this is the master. Are you not the master then? No, I am commander. Uncle Henry says they held an admiralty commission in post office services. Another dispute was that Capt Bridge was so elated by his intimacy to the Hope family and the Prince of Orange (whom he carried over) that on one occasion on his return, he indirectly hoisted a Commodores flag and a naval officer came and hauled it down.
Capt Liveing Snr began sea life with Capt Saunders who commanded the Revenue Cutter Argus. (He it was who picked up Major Money1, the celebrated Aeronaut when he fell into the sea) it was while Capt Liveing was mate of the Argus (his uncle Saunders being drunk in bed) that Capt Liveing (his brother-in-law) piloted the Baltic fleet into the Texel. (Lord Nelson in command) on another occasion whether on the Argos or the Isis not known, he did the same office into Copenhagen had to sound perpetually to ascertain if there was water enough for the men of war.
Page 2.
After serving in the Argos Capt Liveing Snr served in the Iris which he commanded (as Master). She was a rev [enue] Cutter and tender on the Adml in the Baltic fleet. He was at the siege of Boulogne, one of those unfortunate boating expeditions. Amongst other places of service he was specially commissioned, at one time to take Johnson a notorious smuggler who was supposed to convey tidings to the French, Capt Liveing was once in the same room to him without knowing it. At that time (the old war) too there was much privateering which gave the cutters plenty of work. Afterwards when the naval war was over his services were less in request and he joined the packet service; they were private vessels (that is the goodwill and vessels were bought by those commanding (or masters) but hired or chartered by Govt, for P.O. service. He had the Lady Nepean named after the admiral which afterwards went to his son Capt William Liveing. Capt T Liveing Snr twice conveyed the French Royal Family (except the King Louis XVIII) viz, afterwards? Charles X and his family to Holland.

Capt W Liveing Junior.
There were not packets enough for the service and the commanders of them agreed to fund four vessels themselves and Commanders or Masters for the Govt at certain contract. Captain Liveing Snr had a share in this and the appointment of his son Capt W Liveing as master of one of them the Thetis. (He had previously served as a sailor on his father's vessel the Lady Nepean) Capt W Liveing lost the Thetis on the rocks off Jutland, Court-Martial of captains acquitted him. After that his father resigned his command of the Nepean in his favour, which he secured to him through his friend . . . . . Lord Bexley (the Honourable Nicholas Vansittart Chancellor of Exchequer and MP for Harwich Lord High Steward of Harwich (see Portrait in Town Hall)
Page 3.
The same kind friend procured for his next son Mr Charles Liveing (who had been brought up as a farmer) the position of clerk In the National Debt Office, in which he rose to be Chief Clerk. (C Liveing was apprenticed to Mr Wallanger at Finborough, his father paid 100 per annum for his learning, wheat fell to 7 a load in 1822 and farming became a bad business).

Baileys of Harwich.
"Grandfather Bailey was a member of Corp: and a builder (the house he lived in and built was that in West Street where Mr George Deane lived) John Bailey his eldest son, apprenticed to Mr Hopkins, a surgeon (attended the livings &) he became surgeon and wrote a tr on Bella donna plant. So good that University of Paris conferred Doctor of M.D. on him. He married a Mrs Brooks (of Ipswich?) A first or second cousin of Capt Liveing Snr of Harwich. Another son was surgeon at Thetford successful and two daughters Mrs Sewell Oakley Mrs Sampson Harwich. John Bailey some, were 1 John Hopkins 2 . . . . . 3 Brooke 4 Alen 5 Edgar and two daughters Mrs Head of Ipswich and the other engaged to a army cadet, who used to be at Tendering, broken off. Brooke Bailey married his cousin Emily Sanson) was killed at siege of Leone Etan.)
Old Hopkins became "clerk of ye check" and repeatedly Mayor of Harwich. Very wealthy 70,000. He put Mr John Baileys son J H B to college 500 per annum at Trinity College (Camb). He was clergyman at or near Baddow Essex (about uncle Henry's age) Hebrew scholar at Cambridge, was here and at Westminster School. Hopkins left 10,000 to Mr Hales who married Miss Catherine Stevens (once a sweetheart out of many of Charles Liveing. Very good looking he is now Mayor of Harwich (1870).

Grandfather Fenn of Cobham had one son Robert, Capt in Yeomanry, who succeeded him in house and farm (Rectory farm belonged to Longe) and married Miss Harriet Liveing, and four daughters two married men in Brad Street one of whom was steward and managing agent of the grandfather of the present Sir N Brooke Middleton of Shrubland Hall by Ipswich and Coddenham one married Mr Goodwin of Stowmarket? a jack of all trades - sharp - like old Thorogood, children disliked him. Another married Mr Sherman farmer & miller.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Money_(aeronaut)



7. Harwich & surrounding Villages, 1885 1900.
Courtesy National Library of Scotland.


picture

Thomas married Harriet HARROLD [231] [MRIN: 77], daughter of Thomas HARROLD [131] and Deborah BETTS [21861], on 7 Sep 1786 in St Nicholas Harwich ESS. (Harriet HARROLD [231] was born on 4 Dec 1762, died on 24 Jan 1837 in Nayland SFK and was buried in 1837 in Harwich Churchyard.)


Copyright © and all rights reserved to Edward Liveing Fenn and all other contributors of personal data. No personal data to be used without attribution or for commercial purposes. Interested persons who wish to share this data are welcome to contact edward@thekingscandlesticks.com to arrange same and be given the details


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